Issuu on Google+

Volume 4 Issue 4

July-August 2011

Library Matters

The official newsletter of the Dearborn Public Library

THIS ISSUE’S QUOTE

F R O M B R A N C H

Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer's day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time. —John Lubbock

IN THIS ISSUE

Summer Reading

2

Author Luncheon

2

Food For Fines

2

Children’s Programs

3

Movies We Love

5

Summer Library Hours

7

T H E D I R E C T O R : S N O W L I B R A R Y S C H E D U L E D T O C L O S E

Dear Dearborn residents: I want to start by thanking all of you who have contacted the library voicing your concerns about the future of public library service in Dearborn. Let me assure you that the Dearborn Public Library staff will continue to offer the best possible library service to the community during these difficult days ahead. We are not alone as libraries across the state are facing difficult decisions. Some cities are closing their only public library, others are closing branches and curtailing hours. Dearborn has made the decision to close Snow Branch Library. The last day of public service at Snow Branch will be Friday, September 2, 2011. Those of us who have worked at the Dearborn Public library for many years see these as the most difficult and painful decisions that we have ever faced. Over the last ten years, even while reducing our full time staff by 45%, we have continued to offer service at four library locations. Unfortunately, the City of Dearborn faces a difficult financial situation and

the Library, along with other City departments, was asked to again reduce our expenditures. A branch library closure is our only method of achieving our budget target while continuing to offer library service at a sustainable model for the future. In making our decisions, we must look to the future and ensure that the library model we develop today is fiscally manageable for many years to come. You may contact Library Administration at 313.943.2037 if you have any questions or comments. Sincerely, Maryanne Bartles Library Director

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: SUMMER READING WRAP-UP PARTY DATE CHANGE

The date of this year’s Summer Reading Wrap-Up Party has been changed from August 11 to Thursday, August 18 from 6-8 PM. Please be sure to mark this new date on your calendar!


P a g e

2

Library matters

S U M M E R R E A D I N G T H R O U G H J U L Y This year’s summer reading program continues through August 5 with programs ongoing at the Henry Ford Centennial Library. The reading program is open to all ages with everyone who reads books having a chance to win weekly prize drawings.

P R O G R A M R U N S A N D A U G U S T All activities / programs take place at the Henry Ford Centennial Library. The summer reading program’s annual wrap-up party will take place on August 18 from 6-8 PM at the Henry Ford Centennial Library. Join us for refreshments, games and fun for the whole family!

There are individual programs for babies and toddlers under age 3 and for children ages 3-12. Teens and adults also have their own distinct programs. All participants (excluding the under-3s) are eligible for weekly prize drawings by filling out drawing slips for each book read. There will be a variety of activities conducted at HFCL as part of the summer reading program, including crafts, storytimes and other activities scheduled through July and into the month of August. (See page 3 for a detailed listing of programs.) Check out the library website www.dearbornlibrary.org or call the Youth Services Reference Desk for at 313-943-2345 for additional information.

F O O D

F O R F I N E S P R O G R A M A U G U S T 1 - 1 2

Do you have library fines? Do you wish you could reduce them or even erase them? If so, come to any Dearborn Public Library during Food for Fines weeks and donate food for families in need. For every non-perishable (canned or boxed), non-expired food item donated, you will receive a $1.00 reduction in overdue library fines. There is no limit on the number or amount of fines that can be cleared, but bills for lost or damaged library items are not eligible for this program, nor are accounts that have been placed in collection. All items donated will be given to the Dearborn Firefighters for distribution through the Burn Drive program The library reserves the right to refuse any item and items must be more than single-serving size.

C H I L D R E N ’ S A U T H O R L U N C H E O N I N S E P T E M B E R

The Dearborn Public Library Foundation will host the 2nd Annual Children’s Author Luncheon on Saturday, September 17, 2011 from Noon to 2 pm. Ruth Barshaw, author of the popular Ellie McDoodle series, will be the guest author. The event will be at Park Place Banquet Hall (23400 Park Street, Dearborn 48124). Tickets will be available at the Dearborn Public Library beginning about August 1st. The price for an adult ticket is $20 and children under 12 are $15.


Volume 4, issue 4

J u l y

Page 3

c h i l d r e n ’ s

All programming listed below will take place at the Henry Ford Centennial Library Participants arriving more than 5 minutes after the scheduled program time will not be admitted. Due to space limitations, strollers may not be allowed inside the program room or the auditorium. Children must be the required age on or before the first date of the program. Residents and cardholders are given preference. Individuals with disabilities who require special accommodations, auxiliary aids, or services to attend or participate in these programs should contact their local library or TDD 313-9432193. Reasonable advance notice is required.

STORYTIMES Storytime Ages 2-6. Weather permitting we’ll meet by the fountain for storytime. Join us for stories and rhymes celebrating “One World, Many Stories”. All family members are welcome, but storytime is geared for children 2-6 years old. In the event of rain, storytime will be held indoors. Wednesdays, July 6-July 27 10:30am

p r o g r a m m i n g

CRAFTS All Ages Wednesdays, 11am-7pm July 6-August 3 No registration just drop in and have fun crafting with your family. Younger children will need adult assistance. While supplies last. July 6— African Trade Beads July 13— Chinese Fan July 20— Inuit Canoe July 27— Egyptian Scroll August 3— Odds & Ends Crafts Tween Crafts Ages 8-12 Wednesdays at 2 pm July 6-27 Register the Wednesday before each craft date. Call 943-2345 to register. July 6— Kente Cloth Pony Bead Weaving (Africa) July 13 — Didg eridoo (Australia) July 20— Inca Mask (South America) July 27— Celtic Potato Putty Medallion (Europe)

EVENTS Comix Crew. Ages 9-13. Interested in comics, manga, shonen, shojen, or even anime? Hang with us. We’ll talk. We’ll draw. We might even watch. Don’t think you can draw? We don’t expect you to be a master. You just need to be creative and want to have a little fun. Registration begins June 9th.  Registration must be made by phone or in person at any Dearborn Public Library. Thursdays, July 7—July 28 2:00-3:00pm Puppet Show. Ages 2-8. Come watch our friends at summer camp! Space is very limited. No Strollers. Tuesday, August 2 6:30pm


P a g e

4

Library matters

M A C Y ’ S

S H O P

F O R

A

C A U S E

I N

A U G U S T

Since 2006, Macy’s Shop For A Cause Event has partnered with non-profit organizations nationwide to raise more than $34 million for their ongoing charitable efforts. Shop For A Cause gives you the opportunity to give back to your community by helping the Friends of the LibraryDearborn. Purchase a $5 Shopping Pass* for exclusive savings in every Macy’s store and online at macys.com on Saturday, August 27, 2011. The Friends of the Library-Dearborn will keep 100% of the proceeds. Plus, you can enter to win a $500 Macy’s Gift Card. Find the magic of giving back, as Macy’s celebrates a national day of support for our community. Passes are available at all Dearborn Public Libraries with the proceeds going to Friends of the Library—Dearborn (FOLD). *Some exclusions and restrictions apply.

G E N E A O L O G Y For a long time, the Dearborn Genealogical Society’s library, the Yulon Smith Memorial Collection, has been housed at Henry Ford Centennial Library. Within the last year, it was moved from the third floor to the second floor. Now it is accessible at the end of the Reference section, on one side of shelf number 24. Items can be used within the library by any patron or visitor. They are reference only, not to be taken off the second floor, but users are welcome to make copies as needed. The collection is not organized by Dewey number like the rest of the

C O L L E C T I O N

A V A I L A B L E

library. The categories are: Periodicals (quarterlies, newsletters, and magazines), General Genealogy, How-To Books, Family Histories, International Genealogy, and State Genealogy. Periodicals are nearest the windows. All books are marked R DGS on the spine. An index will be out shortly, with one copy to be stored with the collection and one to be housed at the Reference Desk. Amateur genealogists may find several useful books on records in Canada and Great Britain, some locally-oriented books, and a local family history or two, as well as

A T

H F C L

newsletters for some of the local genealogical societies. Patrons can also access the Ancestry online research tool through the library website’s Online Resources. Happy hunting!


P a g e

5

Library matters

M O V I E S E S S A Y S

W E

B Y

L O V E

L I B R A R Y

The Thin Red Line 1998 / 170 min. / R Directed by: Terrence Malick Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line is a war film unlike any other. Yes, it has its share of suspenseful, wellstaged battle scenes that every war movie needs, but this is a film that pays just as much (if not more) attention to the thoughts and feelings of its characters as it does to the visceral impact of battle. The film is unusual in that it doesn’t exclusively follow one character throughout the course of its story; instead, it floats in and out of the interior monologues running through each character’s mind as they question the motivations of what they are doing and even the very nature of existence and their place within the natural world around them during a time of war. These interior thoughts are verbalized through the director’s trademark use of soft, whispered voiceovers that lend a poetic, dreamy quality to the entire film.

S T A F F

O N

T H E I R

F A V O R I T E

Taking place during the battle of Guadalcanal during World War II, the main conflicts of the film concern two pairs of characters: the thoughtful Captain Staros, who disobeys orders from his superior Lt. Col. Tall by refusing to send his men into a suicidal attack, and the philosophical differences between Private Witt, AWOL and living with natives at the beginning of the film, who believes he has “seen a better world” apart from this one, and his cynical superior Sgt. Welsh, who believes that “a man alone in this world, is nothing, and there ain’t no world but this one.” The thoughts and ultimate fates of these characters help to define the existential the mes that run throughout the film, and all of Malick’s work, for that matter. As is the case with all of Terrence Malick’s films, the combination of cinematography and music create an almost overwhelming power. From the opening image of a menacing crocodile slipping below the glassy surface of a pond to the final shot of a lone coconut palm

F I L M S

tree sprouting on a beach, accompanied by the ethereal sounds of Melanesian choirs, The Thin Red Line is a feast of images and sound that sticks with you long after the film is over. Not only are the battle scenes expertly staged and shot, but it is the juxtaposition of gorgeous images of nature with

the carnage of war that lend The Thin Red Line a distinction that places it beyond compare with most war films. This film profoundly moved me when I first saw it, and it continues to do so today. I can think of few other films that so artfully convey what it means to be alive and a part of the world around you, even under the extreme conditions of war. It’s a tremendous experience.

Pvt. Witt and Sgt. Welsh discuss madness and war

— Jeff Lelek


Volume 4, issue 4

Page 6

M O N D A Y N I G H T B L O C K B U S T E R F I L M S O N G O I N G

F O L D B O O K S A L E S S C H E D U L E

The Blockbusters Monday evening free movie program continues at Henry Ford Centennial Library. Classics and new favorites are shown every Monday night in the HFCL auditorium. Films begin at 7 PM. Schedules are available at the Reference Desk of any Dearborn public library.

B U S I N E S S R E S O U R C E C E N T E R N O W A V A I L A B L E H F C L

A T

Want to start or expand your own business? Wonder where to begin? Consider visiting our new Business Resource Center (BRC) at Henry Ford Centennial Library (HFCL). Thanks to a partnership with the Michigan Small Business & Technology Development Center of Southeast Michigan (misbtdc.org/ region9), we are able to provide you with this exciting new reference collection that features materials on several kinds of self-owned businesses, from day care, pet care and landscaping to wedding consulting, photography, retail and much, much more. So if you’re thinking about starting a business or expanding the one you already own, please stop by HFCL and ask about the BRC. Or visit our Small Business Resource Center database in the “Online Resources” section of our website. Like the BRC, this can help you learn how to start, finance or manage a small business. It includes sample business plans, how-to guides, articles and websites. We hope these resources will help you navigate the challenging economy and thrive in your entrepreneurial endeavors.

The regular monthly book sales sponsored by the Friends of the Library Dearborn (FOLD) will be held on the following upcoming dates: Wednesday, July 6 August and September—NO SALES The sales will continue to take place in the lobby of the Henry Ford Centennial Library from 9:30 AM to 6 PM. P A R K & R E A D P R O G R A M Spend a lazy day with a good book in the great outdoors compliments of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Library of Michigan. Back for a third summer, the DNR and the Library of Michigan are offering their Park & Read program at more than 400 participating libraries across the state, Dearborn public libraries. While checking out a book, Park & Read allows library cardholders to "check-out" a one-day pass that waives the Recreation Passport entry fee into any Michigan state park or recreation area. This $10 savings also provides a one-time, free access to more than 500 events taking place in state parks throughout the summer, and to make the day even more relaxing, some of the state parks are offering the loan of a hammock. Passes are valid for seven days from checkout and can be used for one day at any one of Michigan's 98 state parks. Passes are valid for day use only. The program runs through Oct. 1, 2011. For more information on the program and a complete list of participating libraries, hammock availability and park events taking place throughout the state, visit www.michigan.gov/stateparks.


Library matters

Page 7

L I B R A R Y A D M I N I S T R A T I O N A N D I N F O R M A T I O N

B U I L D I N G

H O U R S

DIRECTOR

The libraries are now open for summer hours through Labor Day weekend according to the schedule below .

Maryanne Bartles

SUMMER HOURS

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

Henry Ford Centennial Library

Julie Schaefer

16301 Michigan Ave. (313) 943-2330 Mon-Thurs Friday

Marcel Pultorak VICE-CHAIR Nancy Zakar SECRETARY-TREASURER

9:30-5:30

Saturday and Sunday

LIBRARY COMMISSION CHAIR

9:30-8:30 CLOSED

Branch Libraries Monday

12:30-8:30

Wednesday

10:30-5:30

Tuesday

12:30-8:30

Thursday 12:30-5:30

Friday 12:30-5:30 Saturday and Sunday

CLOSED

www.dearbornlibrary.org

Jihan Ajami Jawad Candyce Abbatt Rachel Fawaz David L. Schlaff Sally Smith Antonia Straley Robert Taub

VISION STATEMENT “The Dearborn Public Library fosters the spirit of exploration, the joy of reading, and the pursuit of knowledge for all ages and cultures starting with the very young.” MISSION STATEMENT “The Dearborn Public Library provides a broad range of effective, courteous, quality services and a balanced collection of materials for the educational, informational and recreational needs of the community.”

Library Matters July-August 2011 Layout, writing and editing by Jeff Lelek with staff contributions as credited


Library matters volume 4 issue 4