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Volume 1, Issue 4

Spring 2009 Library Matters The official newsletter of the Dearborn Public Library

Library Matters The official newsletter of the Dearborn Public Library

A T H I S M O N T H ’ S Q U O T E

How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book? — Henry David Thoreau

I N S I D E TH I S I S S U E :

Library Events

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Everyone’s Reading program

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March-April Children’s programming

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Music we love

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Movies we love

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Library news

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The most recent appointee to the Library Commission is Jihan Ajami Jawad. Library Matters asked the new commissioner some brief interview questions via e-mail to introduce herself to our readers. What motivated you to accept the Mayor's appointment to the library commission? As a Dearborn resident, I felt that it was my duty to accept. Secondly I believe that the library plays an important role in the community and I was honored to be a part of it. It is important to be involved in our community and this was one of many opportunities where I felt I could contribute. I realize you have only been on the Library Commission a short time, but what do you see as your role as a Library Commissioner? What do you believe are the goals and objectives of the Library Commission ? First and foremost I believe my role is to best serve the citizens of Dearborn. As the newest member of the Library Commission, I hope to be able to bring a new and

different perspective to m e e t i n g s a n d discussions. Emerging technologies have brought forth a multitude of changes in our information world and the methods of accessing it are changing. The Commission p lan s to h e lp o ur libraries meet these emerging needs of our community. What do you think is the most vital role the library plays in the community? I truly believe that the library plays a vital role in the community. Not only does it offer a meeting place for students and adults to conduct research, hold meetings and study, but it provides an outlet for our younger generation. Whether they visit the library to read or use the computer, we as parents know that our children have access to a quality educational environment. What are some of the most exciting improvements the library is pursuing? The library is making every effort to move into 21st century technology. The libraries have recently installed wireless internet access and soon games for

all the new gaming systems will be available. The new generation has different needs and different methods of accessing information and we hope to be able to meet those needs. What is your favorite book and why? This is the hardest question; it is very hard for me to choose because I love to read. But if I have to boil it down to one book, it will have to be The Story of Zahra by Hanan Al-Shayk. The story is about a young woman and how circumstances affect and change the path of her life. It is a haunting, sad story that brings forth some of the injustices in this world and how they affect peoples’ choices. Again, our sincere thanks to Commissioner Jawad for taking the time to answer our questions. We wish her the best of luck on the commission!


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Long lines of anxious book buyers awaited Friends of the Library volunteers at the March used book sale at Henry Ford Centennial Library. The Friends of the Library—Dearborn (FOLD) holds used book sales on the first Wednesday of each month (excluding January and September) in the HFCL rotunda. The books for sale are a combination of withdrawn material from the library’s collection and also

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Dates for upcoming book sales are as follows: Wednesday, April 1 Wednesday, May 6 Wednesday, June 3 Sales run from 9:30 AM— 6 PM. Lines are usually longest in the morning as book seekers prowl the aisles for deals.

The Dearborn Library Foundation continually seeks private contributions for library projects and improvements. In the past, donations to the Foundation have helped with major library enhancements such as the renovated Children’s area. Cash donations can be made in person at the Henry Ford Centennial Library administration office from 9:30—5, Monday through Friday. Credit card donations may be

Book shoppers on the prowl

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contributed online through the Foundation’s website, www.dearbornlibraryfoundation.org. Check or money order donations are also accepted, made out payable to “Dearborn Library Foundation.” There are two options for the type of funds you may contribute towards: the Capital Improvement Fund, whose goal is to refurbish and renovate the library system’s main and branch buildings, or the Endowment Fund, which provides

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The group meets on the first Wednesday of each month in the training room on the third floor (mezzanine) of the Henry Ford Centennial Library. Discussions will take place from 6-7:30 PM. The

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donations made from the general public.

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The Henry Ford Centennial Library is hosting “Classics Revisited,” a monthly reading group dedicated to the discussion of some of the greatest works ever written.

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d o n a t i o n s funds to maintain ongoing quality services provided by the library. Donors may also donate funds for specific items, which will be recognized accordingly. Please consider a contribution to your Dearborn Public Library Foundation. Any size donation is welcomed!

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sessions are free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Discussion will be moderated by a member of the library staff.

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Copies of the selected books are available through the library, or simply bring your old dog-eared copy from home! Discussion handouts for each work will be available as well.

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

The following works selected for April—May:

are

The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton May 6

If you have any questions about the “Classics Revisited” program, please contact Henry at (313) 943-4091 or Jeff at (313) 943-2017.


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E v e r y o n e ’ s Everyone’s Reading is a community-wide reading program sponsored by public libraries in Oakland and Wayne counties. This is the second year the Dearborn Public Library has participated in this program. Similar to other One Book, One Community programs across the country, Everyone’s Read ing pro motes community dialogue through the shared experience of reading and discussing the same book. Additional programming, related to issues and topics in the selected book, is offered throughout the community to enhance the reading experience. The Everyone’s Reading 2009 selection is Finding My Voice by Diane Rehm, host of The Diane Rehm Show, which can be heard worldwide on National Public Radio stations as well as its home station of WAMU out of American University in Washington, D.C.. You can participate by checking out the book and joining us for the following programs:

Mondays, March 16, March 30 Library

Please join us for our series of movies featuring strong female characters who overcome various obstacles in pursuit of fulfilling their much longed-for dreams and aspirations. Scrapbooks: Images of the Past

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and ticket stubs from events enjoyed that are all small slices of family history. This presentation will help you identify miscellaneous items that you may have collecting dust in a drawer that could be placed with loving care in a scrapbook. Creative Memories Scrapbooking Wednesday, March 25 at 7 PM Henry Ford Centennial Library, Mezzanine Conference Room Registration is required and a nominal fee will be charged. Please call 313943-2330 for more information. Consultant Cherrie VerWoert will offer ideas, journaling tips and gentle encouragement to help you create your very own scrapbook page and get you started on preserving your family stories. Make a Memory Box Saturday, April 4 at 2 PM Henry Ford Centennial Library, Mezzanine Conference Room

If you could only place your very special memories into a box to keep with you always, what would you put inside? A representative from Close to My Heart will offer hands-on instruction in creating your own uniquely designed memory box using pictures and other small keepsakes. Book Club Book Discussion of Finding My Voice

Wednesday, March 18 at 7 PM Henry Ford Auditorium

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Registration is required and a nominal fee will be charged. Please call 313943-2330 for more information.

Monday Movie Nights

Henry Ford Centennial Auditorium, 7 PM

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Scrapbooks are a useful resource of family data. Genealogist Diane Oslund will show examples of things found in scrapbooks, such as greeting cards with notes in them, awards won

Thursday, April 9 at 7 PM Henry Ford Auditorium

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Please join in this group forum discussion of Diane Rehm’s memoir. Meet and share your thoughts with

members of other library book clubs who have read this captivating work. For information on programs being offered at other participating libraries and the dates and locations of the “Meet the Author” sessions please go to www.everyonesreading.info.

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EVENTS Decorate an Egg Contest All ages. All ages can decorate a real egg, or pick up a sheet from the desk to color/decorate. Small prizes for all who enter. Entry sheets will be available at the desk. All entries due by April 9th, and they will be on display. March 9 — April 4. Esper Branch Library Women’s History Bingo Ages 7 and up. Learn about famous women and win prizes playing bingo at the library. Registration required. Tuesday, March 10 6:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library “GOING GREEN” with Tropical Birds—All ages. Rainbow Feathers will bring their beautiful friends with “green wings” and a few others. Learn about the care and dedication it takes to care for these wonderful animals. (If the weather is too cold, the program will take place the following week on March 24th.) Tuesday, March 17 7:00pm Bryant Branch Library R.E.P.T.I.L.E., Inc. - All ages. Collector Michael Brophy will bring a variety of live reptiles to the library. Learn about snakes, lizards and tortoises in the wild and as pets. Tuesday, March 24 7:00pm Snow Branch Library

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Pocket Poem Challenge Ages 5-12. When you come to Snow Library during Poetry Month, pick up a Pocket Poem to take home and learn by heart. On your next visit (by April 30), recite your poem to the Librarian at the desk and receive a reward. April 1—30 Snow Branch Library Spring Fling - Ages 5-12. Enjoy light snacks, a craft, music and games to welcome Spring. Registration required. Thursday, April 9 4:005:00pm Esper Branch Library Book Swap - All ages. Bring in some of your “old” favorites (IN GOOD CONDITION) to swap for some “new” favorites. Paperbacks, hardcovers, board books, and magazines are welcome. Limit of 15, please. Saturday—Thursday, April 18—23 Snow Branch Library Family Magic Show - All ages. Come to this free family show filled with fun and magic. The door will close after the show starts and will not be re-opened. The show will last approx. one hour. Registration required. Tuesday, April 28th 6:00pm Esper Branch Library

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ANNUAL BOOKMARK CONTEST The contest is open to all Dearborn residents and children attending Dearborn area schools. Drawings must be in BLACK INK. Use black ball point pens on white paper. Entrants must be in grades 1-5. Size of the bookmarks must be 8 1/2" by 2". Students' designs chosen for reproduction will be distributed through the Dearborn Public Libraries and the child's school. Each entry must have the student's name, school, and grade IN PENCIL on the back of the bookmark. (Please write legibly.) Bring your entries to your local Dearborn Public Library. Entry deadline is Tuesday, March 31, 2009.

STORYTIME *** Where noted, registration is required, beginning two weeks prior to the event. Ages 6-24 Months Mother Goose Storytime Rhymes, stories and playtime for the youngest ones. One adult per child is recommended for this hands-on fun. Registration required. Fridays, March 13—27 10:30am Henry Ford Centennial Library Fridays, April 24— May 15 10:30am Henry Ford Centennial Library

Ages 2-3 Tot Time Children with a caregiver are invited for stories, songs, and fun. Registration required. Wednesdays, March 18— April 8 10:35am Snow Branch Library Wednesdays, April 22— May 20 10:35am Snow Branch Library Ages 2-5 Storytime. Children with a caregiver can join us for fingerplays, stories, songs, and a simple craft. Tuesdays, March 3—April 28. 11:00am Henry Ford Centennial Library Storytime. PANCAKES, COOKIES, MUFFINS, and CUPCAKES? Piggy Pancakes, Moose Muffins, Mouse Cookies, and Cat Cupcakes. Have fun with this “if you give” class. We will have little treats, sing songs, and do activities that will take us all through the books created by Laura Numeroff. And chances are...when the fun is done, you’ll want to start all over again! Registration required. Wednesdays, March 4—25. 11:00am Esper Branch Library (cont’d)


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M a r c h Ages 3-5 Pre-School Storytime. This is an 8 week session showcasing the things we like about the season of “Spring”. Winds blow kites. Bunnies hop. Flowers start to grow. These items come as simple crafts, songs, and stories. Tuesdays, March 10—April 28 2:00pm Bryant Branch Library Wednesdays, March 11— April 29 10:45am Bryant Branch Library Pre-School Storytime. Children can join us for fingerplays, stories, songs, and a simple craft. Registration required. Wednesdays, April 1, 8, 22, 29. 11:00am Esper Branch Library (Note: There will not be a Storytime April 15th) Wednesdays, March 18, 25, April 1, 8 1:30pm Snow Branch Library Wednesdays, April 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20 1:30pm Snow Branch Library All Ages Fireside Stories. Families can come and enjoy a few stories by the fire, and roast marshmallows. Registration required. Tuesday, March 10 6:00pm Esper Branch Library Froggy Family Storytime. We’ll read books and do a simple craft with frog themes. Tuesday, April 14 6:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library

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CRAFTS Third Thursday Craft All Ages. Noodle Craft. March is National Noodle month. Use your noodle to make something creative out of noodles. Thursday, March 19 11:00am—7:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library Recycle Reuse Craft. Earth Day is April 22. Go green by turning clean recycled food containers into a cool craft. Thursday, April 16 11:00am—7:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library HOPPY ART All Ages. Spring season and rabbits make for a fun craft project. Supplies are limited. Saturdays, March 28 & April 4 1:00pm Bryant Branch Library

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Tween Kaleidoscope Craft Ages 8-12. Those gray winter days will be more colorful when looking through the kaleidoscope you make at the l i b r ar y. R e g i s t r a t io n required. Saturday, March 7 3:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library Tween Earth Day Craft Ages 8-12. Celebrate Earth Day by turning plastic food containers into Shrinky Dink type charms. Charms may be used to

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make backpack clips, key chains, necklaces or bracelets. Registration required. Saturday, April 4 3:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library CRAFT! Ages 13-17. Don’t just sit around, CRAFT! Join us at the library and don’t forget to bring a t-shirt to cut up and re-purpose. Possible future CRAFT! and other teen programs will be discussed, so if you want to see more teen events at the library, make sure to sign up for this one. Call the Children’s Desk to register. 943-2345. Saturday, March 28 3:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library Teen Poetry Slam - Ages 13-17. Celebrate National Poetry Month by reading your original poetry or that of your favorite poet. Bring one or more poems to participate. This is a public event, so please make sure your poem is rated PG. (That means you won’t blush if Mom or Dad reads it.) Of course, no poetry event would be complete without goodies. Call the Children’s Desk to register. 943-2345 Saturday, April 25 3:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library

THE BIG READ Presented by the Arab American Museum in cooperation with the Dearborn Public Library Families Learn to Play B a c k g a m m o n (Bilingual: English/ Arabic) Families are invited to learn the basics of backgammon, a game that traces its history to ancient times. Backgammon is often played in Egyptian cafes, one of the settings in The Thief and the Dogs. The class is intended for beginners or those who desire a refresher. Instruction provided by the Plymouth Backgammon Club. Registration is required. Saturday, March 14 1:30—3:30pm Esper Branch Library Children Learn to Play Backgammon Children ages eight and up can learn the basics of backgammon, a game that traces its history to ancient times. Backgammon is often played in Egyptian cafes, one of the settings in The Thief and the Dogs. Instruction provided by the Plymouth Backgammon Club. Registration is required. Registration begins March 7. Saturday, March 21 2:00—4:00pm Henry Ford Centennial Library


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Born to Run opens with “Thunder Road,” which is, in my humble opinion and with due apologies to Dylan and Lennon / McCartney, the finest song ever written. Behold the imagery of its famous opening lyrics:

Born to Run (1975) Bruce Springsteen

The screen door slams Mary’s dress sways Like a vision she dances across the porch As the radio plays Roy Orbison singing for the lonely I almost hate to stop there (the rest of the song is just as vivid) but you get the idea; it’s a song about that romantic notion of grabbing your girl, getting in your car and driving off to an unknown—but hopeful— future:

Pet Sounds (1966) The Beach Boys I don’t know if there has ever been a better representation of what it means to be young, free and in love than the music captured on these two albums. Born to Run (ranked #18 on the most recent Rolling Stone list of the greatest albums ever made) and Pet Sounds (ranked #2) take me back to a time in life when the biggest responsibility you had was getting a car, chasing the perfect girl and figuring out who you were and what you wanted to do with your life. They are both full of energy, poignancy and longing. They are also absolutely timeless.

Hey what else can we do now Except roll down the window And let the wind blow back your hair Well the night's busting open These two lanes will take us anywhere The title track explores some of the same territory: Together Wendy we'll live with the sadness I'll love you with all the madness in my soul Someday girl I don't know when we're gonna get to that place Where we really want to go and we'll walk in the sun There isn’t a weak track on Born to Run but for me these two songs represent how resonant and full of poetry rock music has the potential to be.

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Pet Sounds, Brian Wilson’s response to the Beatles’ Rubber Soul, is a perfect compliment to Born to Run in that it deals primarily with the emotions of being young and in love, but it strikes me as more reflective and melancholy. The album’s opening track, “Wouldn’t It Be Nice,” presents a longing similar to that seen in Springsteen, although not nearly as aggressive: Wouldn’t it be nice if we were older Then we wouldn’t have to wait so long And wouldn’t it be nice to live together In the kind of world where we belong The closing track “Caroline, No” is a prime example of the album’s sadly nostalgic tone: Where did your long hair go Where is the girl I used to know How could you lose that happy glow Oh Caroline, no We haven’t even gotten to the deliriously romantic ballad “Don’t Talk” or the single “God Only Knows” (one of the great songs) or the artistry of the orchestrations throughout the album. It will suffice to say that Pet Sounds, along with its soul mate Born to Run, never fail to inspire and move me with their limitless youthful energy and sublime artistry. — Jeff Lelek


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characters about the nature of life, the disappointments, the ups and downs. On the return trip a parent becomes gravely ill, setting up as profound a conclusion as you’re likely to ever see in a film. Not that there are any last– minute revelations or big emotional moments (except perhaps one); it’s more important what is left barely spoken. All the characters understand it well: appreciate those around you as best you can while you can.

Tokyo Story (1953, 136 min) I’m a fairly good son when it comes to calling my parents on a regular (almost daily) basis, just to touch base, see what’s happening with them, the usual. There are times, however, when I see their number pop up on the caller ID after I had just settled into the couch to read, watch a game or a movie and I get annoyed, only halfway paying attention to what they’re saying in hopes of trying to cut the conversation short and return to what little time remains in my evenings for solitary relaxation. Whenever I hang up the phone after one of these exchanges I immediately feel guilty. The reason is that my thoughts almost immediately return to the lessons of Tokyo Story, Yasujiro Ozu’s 1953 masterpiece. Tokyo Story starts out as a relatively simple story: an aging couple travels to Tokyo to visit their busy professional children. The kids are busy and barely have time for the parents; they are pulled in a million different directions and really end up spending very little time with the parents at all. During the visit many conversations take place between each parent and various other

I’ve read accounts of audiences weeping openly during the film’s final scenes, and I can believe it: it creeps up on you as you realize that this family from a 1953 Japanese film is the same as yours, that its themes of life, death, disappointment and regret are universal. It is rare that a great film comes into your life with such emotional resonance that you see it once and it sticks with you forever; such is the case with myself and Tokyo Story, which is why whenever I get one of those inconvenient calls in the middle of the evening I take a breath and remind myself to be patient as I’m reminded of the old father’s heartbreaking words toward the end of the film: “...if I knew things would come to this, I’d have been kinder to her.” — Jeff Lelek

Manhattan (1979, 96 min) Manhattan has long been my favorite

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Woody Allen film (narrowly edging out Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters) and also one of my three or four favorite films of all time. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is the fact that it has probably the greatest opening and closing-scene bookends of any movie I’ve seen. The entire film is shot in lush widescreen black-and-white, but the opening montage featuring stunning images of New York (including fireworks over the Manhattan skyline) scored to Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” and accompanied by Allen’s voiceover is jus t jaw - d ro pping . S i mil ar ly astounding is the final scene between Allen’s character and his muchyounger love interest (played by a luminous Mariel Hemingway): he confronts her and begs her to not leave for London; she declines, telling him she’ll be back in six months and that he needs to have a little more faith in people; “Rhapsody in Blue” softly cues up on the soundtrack . Cut to black. This is not as much of a spoiler as it might sound; what truly sells the moment is the expression on Allen’s face in the final shot—is it acceptance, optimism, regret? I’ve never been able to quite place it but I have my suspicions; I’ll leave it to you to decide for yourself. It is this ambiguity that really makes it quite brilliant and moving. There are many other moments of genius in Manhattan, particularly a romantic scene set in a planetarium and another involving a well-placed skeleton. Plus, Meryl Streep is in it, too! Writing this makes me want to run home and watch it again right now; you’ll feel the same way after seeing Manhattan. — Jeff Lelek

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Written and edited by Jeff Lelek

RECENT DONATIONS TO THE DEARBORN PUBLIC LIBRARY

James and Janet Lesinski Kathleen Monahan Anthony and Margaret Wade Your generous donations are greatly appreciated !

Credit cards now accepted at circulation desk

New environmentally-friendly “green” book

All branches of the Dearborn libraries now accept credit card payment (Visa and MasterCard only) for library fines, missing item charges or purchase of non-resident library cards.

for toting around library books, school

bags are now available at the library! Perfect materials and just about anything else. Cost is only $5 and each time you use your bag at the library, you can enter a monthly drawing for a Borders’ gift card.

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Wireless internet access is now available at the Henry Ford Centennial Library and all branches! A valid library card and PIN number are required to log in and access the wireless signal. Temporary daily passes for those who do not have a library card can be purchased for $1 . A special thank you goes out to library patron Kathleen Monahan for her recent donation in support of the Dearborn Public Library. This donation was used to purchase an assortment of rhythm band instruments for Snow Branch Library. As you can see in the photo, children are already using the various instruments to enjoy lots of musical fun during library programs. Thank you again, Kathleen, for your generosity and for helping the library (and its patrons) keep the beat!

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