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GG: I love working with Cassandra, but nothing compares to the time we spent making the Ghoultown music video. The Texas-based band was in town for two days, so we got down and dirty, slapping that video into existence. We shot fast and guerrilla style. Having Cassandra on set made the experience loads of fun. LDM: Here at Living Dead we believe that horror isn't a genre, it's a lifestyle—something that you and your wife seem to understand and embody as well with the music you listen to, your home decor, your work, etc. Have you always been drawn to horror beyond just watching horror films? What exactly does living a horror lifestyle mean to you personally?

GG: I've been drawn to monsters since I was 5, but living a horror lifestyle to me exists more in the heart than on the sleeve. I look up to Charles Addams in this regard. To this day, no mind has surpassed Chas with its macabre twist on normalcy. And yet on the outside he was a pleasant gentleman.

LDM: As a director and scriptwriter, your style is much darker and more messed up than what we are used to with your books. Can you talk a bit about the difference between doing film versus illustrations? GG: No matter what I work on, I skew it towards the audience it is intended for—maybe a little more twisted for children and a little more whimsical for adults. But no matter what story I try to tell, it tends to have some dark corners to it. LDM: Because this is the Female Horror Pioneers issue, featuring interviews with Elvira, Adrienne King, the Soska twins, Brinke Stevens, etc., we have to ask: who is your favorite female horror pioneer in film or beyond? GG: Barbara Steele!

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Issue 7 web  

Celebrate some of the most talented women in horror who have helped pave the way for females in horror today. Featuring interviews with Elvi...

Issue 7 web  

Celebrate some of the most talented women in horror who have helped pave the way for females in horror today. Featuring interviews with Elvi...