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DIVERSITY IN FEMALE ART

TABLE of CONTENTS

DUBARRY Editor’s Letter

GREEN MILIEU Current art events

AMBER GLOW Historic artists and events

BLITHE About us

COSMIC SKY Featured artist

SILVER BULLET Culture


TABLE of CONTENTS

FEATURES

19 THE ANTI-MUSEUM

45

FRESH OFF THE BOAT

58

67

MANY MAKE ONE

SILENT SCREAM

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ACROSS THE AISLE


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EDITOR’S LETTER

DEPARTMENTS

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COSMIC SKY Art

1 23

AMBERGLOW

History

15

41

GREEN MILIEU

What’s happening now

SILVER BULLET

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Culture

BLITHE Us


TABLE of CONTENTS

19 EASTERN BLENDS

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FEATU

INDIAN AMERICAN

RES

58 THE EYE SEES ALL 45

FINDING THE WAY

65 LOOKING AHEAD


DEPARTMENTS

2 EDITOR’S LETTER

12

BLITHE Us

18

COSMIC SKY Art

15

GREEN MILIEU

What’s happening now

41

SILVER BULLET Culture

23

1

AMBERGLOW History


EDITOR’S LETTER

Queen B Y AUDIENCE ARE WOMEN who are interested in learning and being inspired by other female artists. Art and cultural lovers who want to learn about diverse audiences and visuals. I would like to convey that though they are not the headliners in most art magazines, these women have a powerful presence and voice. Their art belongs in the front but due to societal circumstance is not. These artists are the up and coming people in the field and this magazine gives you a pulse of the culture. It’s the art magazine for the people who are tired of art magazines. An outlet for these women to shout about their passions and frustrations with the art world they live in. They should believe it because I am going to be the person doing the field work, getting the real raw story and life.


“Good art makes people uncomfortable, forces you to question things you don’t want to question.”

I won’t hold back or be apologetic. I won’t just find these women from a google search and call for an interview. I will want to meet them and speak with them personally to get a feel for who they are and where they come from. I want them to go out and learn more about these artists and the world around them-specifically women’s minority issues through visually artistic mediums. I believe my current audience is unaware of these women, their voices and their talent. They want to learn more and are open to awareness of topics they are unfamiliar with. Women who are under represented and up in coming in the art field. The bleeding edge of art.

Deanna Clark Executive Editor

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Current Art Events

SILENT BUT DEADLY POST POST RACIAL ETERED NIGHT, an exhibition of work by Robert Mapplethorpe curated by Juergen Teller opened at London’s Alison Jacques gallery, gathering a throng so huge that it packed the gallery rooms and spilled out towards Berners Street. Cash-strapped (yet fashionable) kids sipping on free beers rubbed shoulders with collectors, dealers, and celebrities, including the actress Pamela Anderson, in a rare blend of modern bohemianism, wealth, and beauty that would have surely delighted the late American photographer and artists.

SARAH LONG

EVER A REASON and there are many others—including their shared penchant for revealing (self )portraits and their capacity to seamlessly mix the glamour of high society with the cool grit of the underground—having Teller curate a Mapplethorpe exhibition seemed to most, from the get-go, like a match made in heaven. The show, however, surpasses the already high expectations for them. Through careful research, but clearly guided by instinct, Teller has managed to create a new reading of Mapplethorpe’s work, one not centering on his flowers or his S&M and sex series (although there’s a number of explicit images in the show). Instead, Teller gives us a Mapplethorpe that is mellower, romantic even seen. With portraits of actresses Madeleine Stowe and Lisa Marie floating ethereal like Pre-Raphaelite beauties; a tiny little kitten wedged on the side a sofa; or a number of photos of children—including Susan Sarandon’s daughter, Eva Amurri—all revealing a softer, on the world. What really makes the selection stand out, however, is Teller’s exquisite hang. A ghostly nude of Carol Overby squinting in the sun.

JAMIE HILL THE ART HOUSE

Jessica Wessler uses make up to create living art.

This year they showed controversial


A TIME AND A PLACE

Rebecca Field self portrait, part of Field Gallery’s.

NTER THE SIMON LEE GALLERY is delighted to announce Mai-Thu Perret’s second solo exhibition and her first at the London gallery. Mai–Thu Perret creates interdisciplinary works that combine the languages of feminism, politics, theatre, nature, religion and art history and life. The exhibition Zone expands on Perret’s own fictional narrative The Crystal Frontier, which the artist has been writing since 1999, that follows a group of women who form a commune New Ponderosa Year Zero in the remote desert of South Western New Mexico, in an attempt to escape capitalism and patriarchal convention. Perret’s new body of work draws on French avant-garde writer and feminist theorist Monique Wittig’s novel Les Guérillères (first published in 1969) that imagines a society run by a tribe of warrior lesbian women, men and life.

to escape capitalism and patriarchal convention. Perret’s new body of work draws on French avantgarde writer and feminist theorist Monique Wittig’s novel Les Guérillères (first published in 1969) that imagines a society run by a tribe of warrior lesbian women, men and life. Wittig’s layered, interconnected style of writing and Dada collage techniques are referenced in the scale and range of works in this exhibition, reflecting Perret’s interest in formal strategies of disruption, combining incongruous elements and materials to explore different histories, political situations and how objects function within and influence the social systems they inhabit. The exhibition’s title Zone can simultaneously refer to a meditative, mindful space and a war zone. Visitors to the gallery are greeted by an armed, faceless, seated female figure Les guérillères XII, who seemingly acts as an idle guard over a series of new works, including a ceramic fountain, a wicker

“Art has a consciousness and voice. The people who make it do as well.”

Wittig’s layered, interconnected style of writing and Dada collage techniques are referenced in the scale and range of works in this exhibition, reflecting Perret’s interest in formal strategies of disruption,

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GRACE LAKE

Kevin, featured artist, explains his work to visitor, Chevanne.

Field Gallery

In January they showed a collection based on travel.


Feautured Artist

Anima/us Botanica II 2013. Anima/us Botanica.

DEAL WITH IT THE ART OF

BRIANA McCARTHY RIANNA McCARTHY is a mixed media visual communicator working and living in Trinidad + Tobago her whole life. She is a self-taught artist and aims to create a new discourse examining issues of beauty, stereotypes, representation as well as the documenting the process – particularly poignant in an ever smaller digitally connected world. Her form takes shape through masking and performance art, fabric collage, traditional media, and installation. I obviously knew his work quite well before, but during the research process I went several times to the Foundation in New York, where the whole thing is, so I discovered a huge amount of images that hadn’t been so widely seen or shown. At the same time, this is a commercial show, so for example I couldn’t focus on the Polaroids, which are one-offs. But I certainly knew I didn’t want to do yet another show about the sex photographs, or the flowers, first cause they’ve been widely seen.

What’s your favorite image in the show?

Keeping Company with Jaguars hand sewn fabric collage. 2013

From a very personal point of view, my favorite is the one of the frogs on the plate [Frogs (1984)] which is what we ended up using for the invite, because Teller means plate in German. And then here [he points to Shoes on Plates (1984)], there’s a man standing on a stack of plates! And downstairs there’s even more images with plates. So many “Tellers”! I also love the image of Lisa Lyon holding the bones.


PAPER QUEENS Cut paper collages 2010-2012.

Rosa cut paper collage. 2011.

Paper Queen Laurel cut paper collage. 2011.

Marli cut paper collage. 2011.

Chocolate Lady cut paper collage. 2011.

The personal journey I’ve been on is to positively impact the image of Women of Colour in art and the ways in which they seem themselves and accept themselves.

Colour(ed)s Series Composite from left: Jump Out Yourself, Sew/Stitch, Coloured II, Coloured I.hand sewn fabric collage. At Aftercolour exhibition. 2012

What was your relationship with Mapplethorpe’s body of work before undertaking this show? I am not a collector, at all, but about 12 years ago I bought Man in Polyester Suit. I don’t know what came over me, but I saw it and thought “That’s good!” I kept thinking about it, and I spoke to my wife at the time, and she said she knew the director of the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Michael Stout, and that we should ask him about it, so we did. It’s such an iconic picture, one of his most famous photographs. I was completely surprised that it was it still available, I was even more surprised about how cheap it was. I mean, it was cheap! My edition comes out of a portfolio, in

This is the first time you curated a show. How did the project come about? Alison approached me about nine months ago. She must have seen a shared sensibility or similarity in what we do. I was very honored and flattered when she asked me, and I didn’t have to think too much about it before accepting. I knew I wanted to do

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it would be a very interesting process from which I would learn something. I think that’s for other people to judge, but I guess there’s a certain directness in the work and a certain purpose which is similar. I have been working in self-portraits for many years, and he did too, and he was interested in life, in all its facets: children, men, women,

How would you say that your work and his relate? This is true. The art world is very interested in fashion, and the fashion world is definitely interested in the art world nowadays, they eat each other up. But at the same time, those labels don’t really matter. I think that’s another thing I might share with Mapplethorpe, and it’s the fact that it’s all about the work. He just wanted to make his work, whatever it might have been. Also, I think he really enjoyed the glamor of doing these portrait commissions of rich and beautiful ladies, and so do I. It’s funny! It’s gives you the chance of entering a world that otherwise would be completely closed off to you. You can have fun with it, you can SHARON HALL


fresh off the boat


ERE WE EXPLORE the artists whose lives are a blend of US and international.


HEN SEVERAL creative individuals gather, huge impacts are made in the commnunity.


VOICE OF THE UNHEARD OU MAY NOT SEE these ladies work on the walls in museums but they are a force to reckoned with. Although Laly Mille has been creative since childhood, it took her many years to listen to her creative soul, and become an artist. In fact, she didn’t start calling herself an artist, or sharing her art with the world, until 2010. After reading Kelly Rae Robert’s book, Taking Flight, she began sharing her art with the world and has since been published in Cloth, Paper, Scissors Magazine, has a painting coming out in a North Lights book, and has received many local awards, including the “Incite: Dreams realized” mixed media award. Collage is very important in my work and I do use it a lot. My most elaborate paintings have lots and lots of layers of collage, and yet, when you first look at them, you won’t necessarily notice it at all. You’ll have to come closer. . . That’s because I tend to really blend it all toghether with paint, inks, pastels and even words.

Experimenting means trial and error! Working in layers with different materials means that sometimes they will react in unexpected ways. For instance, inks can be pretty tricky! Some inks will keep “coming back” no matter how much paint or gesso or modeling paste you put on top of them. Brown alcohol ink will leave surprisingly pink spots! Now I know that I have to remove the ink with alcohol instead of covering it up. When used on canvas, a non-porous surface, some inks will smear at the slightest brushstroke, no matter how dry you think they are, so you need to use a spray fixative before proceeding to the next layer. The same goes with gel pens and many others. All these “discoveries” can be frustrating, especially if you’ve just completed a painting and find out, upon applying a coat of varnish with a brush, that ink has been smearing and made the whole thing yellowish! But once you master these processes, you can start using them to your advantage. For instance, I have a black marker that smears really easily, but if I write with it and then quickly swipe a good amount of gel medium. over it with a credit card, I get the coolest blurry effect! I live in


68 Making sure change happens is difficult but through art those can see it plainly. It has an impact more than words or speaches could ever make.


EVER HAS LALY MILLE been this creative since childhood, it took her many years to listen to her creative soul, and become an artist. In fact, she didn’t start calling herself an artist, or sharing her art with the world, until 2010. After reading Kelly Rae Robert’s book, Taking Flight, she began sharing her art with the world and has since been published in Cloth, Paper, Scissors Magazine, has a painting coming out in a North Lights book, and has received many local awards, including the “Incite: Dreams realized” mixed media award.

But it can become a bit overwhelming too, especially at the beginning, and make it hard to find your own style or favorite techniques. To me the key is to keep experimenting at my own pace and to stick with a few techniques that I have truly made my own. But any time I get stuck, trying out something new is the best remedy. Alyice: What is the best part about creating art using various art supplies and found objects?

Laly: First, it is just so much fun! The other day I was working on a plaster gauze piece for an assemblage and inadvertently spilled some Alyice: There’s a lot of mixed media coffee on it. . . and it collage work on the market these looked great! The days, how do you differentiate yours Getting to work with such wonderful people effect was just from the rest? In other words, so cool that I what do you feel makes your work has helped me so much. I could never have started dipping unique and truly your own? makde it this far without the support of fellow my brush into my mug and Laly: Collage is very important Creatives around me. spilling more in my work and I do use it a lot. coffee all over the piece. I My most elaborate paintings have lots love this sense of freedom. and lots of layers of collage, and yet, when you first look at them, you won’t necessarily notice it at. You’ll have to come closer. . . That’s because I tend to really blend it all I have also always had a soft spot for found objects, little “treasures” like lost keys, childhood memories, old postcards, pebbles, sea glass. I toghether with paint, inks, pastels and even words. love to give them a new life, and I love that through art, others can see To me, what’s hidden is equally as important as what is visible. When how poetic they are. I paint a girl by her window, I paint the garden behind it, or collage a Alyice: What do you wish you knew about mixed media before you map of the city where I imagine her to be. It may be almost invisible got started? to the viewer, but it’s there and it affects the rest of the painting.

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All the collage elements I use in a painting are relevant to the story I am trying to tell. They act as clues, like a sort of visual lexical field. Storytelling is a very important aspect of my art.

Laly: Experimenting means trial and error! Working in layers with different materials means that sometimes they will react in unexpected ways and forever around.

Alyice: What is the most challenging part about being a mixed media artist and in life?

For instance, inks can be pretty tricky! Some inks will keep “coming back” no matter how much paint or gesso or modeling paste you put on top of them. Brown alcohol ink will leave surprisingly pink spots! Now I know that I have to remove the ink with alcohol instead of covering it up.

Laly: One of the greatest things about mixed media is this sense of endless possibility. Practically anything can become an art supply! And there are so many wonderful books, ecourses, magazines and blogs with friends. There has to be a way to make this line the same as the other side. I will just keep typing until that happens.

When used on canvas, a non-porous surface, some inks will smear at the slightest brushstroke, no matter how dry you think they are. ELLEN PORTER


SKZM magazine