Page 1

AUGUST 18, 2021 | EMMY NOMINEES

MJ RODRIGUEZ MAKES EMMY HISTORY WITH A LANDMARK NOMINATION AND LEADS OUR 2021 GALLERY OF EMMY NOMINEES, INCLUDING: + Elizabeth Olsen + Anya Taylor-Joy + Ewan McGregor + Daveed Diggs + Hannah Einbinder PLUS:

Jean Smart - Uzo Aduba Josh O’Connor - Barry Jenkins Juno Temple - Brad Ingelsby Michael Douglas - Emma Corrin


18 E M M Y N O M I N AT I O N S ®

INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES LEAD ACTRESS ANYA TAYLOR-JOY

“THE

TV EVENT OF THE YEAR.

The series owes its powerhouse effect to the smashing, star performance of Anya Taylor-Joy. You can’t take your eyes off her. Add suspense, thrills and smarts and the combo is unbeatable.” ABC NEWS

FYC.NETFLIX.COM


D EAD L I NE .CO M

D EAD L I NE HOL LYWOOD I S OWNED AND P UB L I SHED BY P ENSKE MED I A CORP ORATI ON

Breaking News

CHAIRMAN & CEO

Follow Deadline.com 24/7 for the latest breaking news in entertainment.

Sign up for Alerts & Newsletters G E N ERA L MA NAG ER & CH IEF R EV ENU E OF F I C E R

Stacey Farish

CO - E D ITO RS - IN-CHIEF Nellie Andreeva (TEL EVISION) Mike Fleming Jr. (F ILM)

EX EC U T I V E AWA R DS ED ITO R

AWA R D S CO LUMNIST & CHIEF F ILM CRITIC

Joe Utichi

VI C E P R ES I DENT, C R EATIV E

Craig Edwards D E P U T Y EDI TOR

EXECUTIV E E DITOR

ASS I STA NT EDI TOR

EXECUTIV E M ANAGING EDITOR

SO C I A L M EDI A DI R ECTO R

D E PUTY M A NAGING EDITOR

Laureen O’Brien

SE N I OR EV ENTS M A N AGE R

Sophie Hertz

Anthony D’Alessandro Patrick Hipes Tom Tapp

S E NIO R M A NAGING EDITOR

Denise Petski

S E NIO R E D ITOR, L EGAL / TV CRITIC

Dominic Patten

VI D EO M A N AG ER

S E NIO R FILM REP ORTER

VI D EO P RODU C ERS

TE LEV IS IO N EDITOR

David Janove

Benjamin Bloom Andrew Merrill Shane Whitaker

E D I TOR I A L & M A R K ET I N G D ES IGNE R

Michael Luong

SE N I OR V I C E P R ES I DENT, ASS OC I AT E P U B L I S HER

Justin Kroll

Peter White

BUS INES S E D ITOR

Dade Hayes

CO - BUS INES S EDITOR

Jill Goldsmith LA BO R E D ITO R

David Robb

Kasey Champion

PO LITICA L E D ITOR

SE N I OR V I C E P R ES I DENT, G LO BA L B U S I N ES S DEV E LO PM E NT & ST RAT EG I C PA RT N ERS HIPS

INTE R NATIO NAL EDITOR

Céline Rotterman

VI C E P R ES I DENT, EN T ERTA INM E NT

Caren Gibbens

Ted Johnson

The Actor’s Side with Pete Hammond

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT & TECHNOLOGY

Meet some of the biggest and hardest working actors of today, who discuss life, upcoming projects, and their passion for film and television. deadline.com/vcategory/ the-actors-side/

Behind the Lens with Pete Hammond

Explore the art and craft of directors from firsttimers to veterans, and take a unique look into the world of filmmakers, from their own perspectives. deadline.com/vcategory/ behind-the-lens/

Production Value

Go behind the scenes with the talented craftsmen and women behind some of this year’s acclaimed films and television series. deadline.com/vcategory/ production-value/

Jenny Connelly

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL

Judith R. Margolin

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

Ken DelAlcazar

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Lauren Utecht

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CREATIVE

Nelson Anderson

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, LICENSING & BRAND DEVELOPMENT

Rachel Terrace

VICE PRESIDENT & ASSOCIATE GENERAL COUNSEL

Adrian White

VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Anne Doyle

VICE PRESIDENT, REVENUE OPERATIONS

Brian Levine

HEAD OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS & COMMUNICATIONS

Brooke Jaffe

VICE PRESIDENT, SEO

Constance Ejuma

VICE PRESIDENT & ASSOCIATE GENERAL COUNSEL

Dan Feinberg

VICE PRESIDENT, GLOBAL TAX

Frank McCallick

VICE PRESIDENT, TECHNOLOGY

Gabriel Koen

VICE PRESIDENT, PMC DIGITAL ACQUISITION

Gerard Brancato

VICE PRESIDENT, PORTFOLIO SALES

Jacie Brandes

VICE PRESIDENT, E-COMMERCE

Jamie Miles

Joni Antonacci

P O D CASTS

Crew Call

New Hollywood

Nancy Tartaglione Todd McCarthy Erik Pedersen Greg Evans Matt Grobar Bruce Haring

S E NIO R TE LEVISION REP ORTER

Andrea Wynnyk

Debashish Ghosh

Jerry Ruiz

AS S O CIATE E DITORS

PRO DU CT I ON M A N AG ER

Mark Howard

MANAGING DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL MARKETS

D I GI TA L SA L ES P L A NNE RS

Michael Petre

CHIEF ADVERTISING AND PARTNERSHIPS OFFICER

Tom Finn

M A NAGING E DITOR

D I ST R I B U T I ON DI R ECTOR

Todd Greene

VI D EO SE R I ES

ACCOU N T MA NAG ER

Natalie Longman

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS AFFAIRS & CHIEF LEGAL OFFICER

VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCTION OPERATIONS

Diana Lodderhose

FILM CR ITIC & COLU MNIST

PRO DU CT I ON DI R ECTOR

Craig Perreault

INTE R NATIO NAL F EATU RES EDITOR

D I R ECTOR , ENT ERTA I N M E NT

Jessica Cole Brittany Bonner Yvonne Gray

CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER

Paul Rainey

Deadline’s editorial director Anthony D’Alessandro focuses on below-the-line nominees. deadline.com/tag/crewcall-podcast/

Lauren Pollock

Sarlina See

VICE PRESIDENT, ACQUISITIONS & OPERATIONS

SE N I OR DI R ECTOR , EN TE RTA INM E NT

London Sanders

CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER

Andreas Wiseman

INTE R NATIO NAL BOX OF F ICE EDITOR/ S E NIO R CO NTRIBU TOR

Brianna Corrado

George Grobar

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS & FINANCE

Peter Bart

E D ITO R IA L D IRECTOR/ BOX OFF ICE EDITOR

D I R ECTOR , B RA N D MA R K E TING

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

E D ITO R-AT- LARGE

D O C U M ENTA RY EDI TOR

Scott Shilstone

Gerry Byrne

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS & FINANCE

Michael Cieply

Ryan Fleming

VICE CHAIRMAN

Pete Hammond

Antonia Blyth

Matthew Carey

Sign up for breaking news alerts and other Deadline newsletters at: deadline.com/newsletters

Jay Penske

Rosy Cordero

TE LEV IS IO N REP ORTER

A platform for people of color, LGBTQ members, women, and other underrepresented voices in entertainment. deadline.com/tag/newhollywood-podcast/

Alexandra Del Rosario

VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Marissa O’Hare

CMO, HEAD OF PMC STUDIOS

Mike Monroe

VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC PLANNING & ACQUISITIONS

Mike Ye

VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT DELIVERY

Nici Catton

VICE PRESIDENT, CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE & MARKETING OPERATIONS

Noemi Lazo

VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

Young Ko

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, TALENT & RECRUITING

Andy Limpus

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Brian Garcia

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, ADVERTISING OPERATIONS

Eddie Ko

Gurjeet Chima

Tom Grater

Brandon Choe

Karen Reed

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, INTERNATIONAL MARKETS

INTE R NATIO NAL F ILM REP ORTER PHOTO E D ITO R

VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, CONTENT

Karl Walter

FOLLOW DEADLINE Facebook.com/Deadline Instagram.com/Deadline Twitter.com/Deadline YouTube.com/Deadline

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESCOURCES

Tonya Alexander

SENIOR DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT

Amit Sannad

DIRECTOR, PRODUCT MANAGEMENT

Derek Ramsay

DIRECTOR, LICENSING & BRAND PARTNERSHIPS

Laura Ongaro


24 EMMY NOMIN ®

INTERVIEWER

PRINCESS DIANA

PRINCE CHARLES

Episode 3 “Fairytale”

FYC.NETFLIX.COM


BEST DRAMA SERIES

BEST DRAMA SERIES

INCLUDING

ATIONS

OUT S TA NDING DRAMA SERIES

OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE IN A DRAMA SERIES

BEST DRAMA SERIES

BEST DRAMA SERIES


4

FIRST TAKE How Elizabeth Olsen carved a small screen surrealist gem from her longtime MCU character in WandaVision Choreographer Mandy Moore tells the Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist story through dance

12

ON THE COVER Mj Rodriguez’s path to Pose and shaking up the industry as the first ever trans person to be nominated in a leading category

22

THE DIALOGUE Barry Jenkins Jean Smart Hannah Einbinder Michael Douglas Juno Temple Daveed Diggs Josh O’Connor Emma Corrin Ewan McGregor Uzo Aduba Brad Ingelsby Anya Taylor-Joy

44

HANDICAPS

Pete Hammond takes a look at the runners and riders in an unusual year

ON THE COVER Mj Rodriguez photographed exclusively for Deadline by Andrew Zaeh ON THIS PAGE Hannah Einbinder photographed by Justin Bettman


16

EMMY NOMINATIONS ®

INCLUDING

O U T S TA N D I N G L I M I T E D S E R I E S


Universal Magic BY STEVIE WONG

6

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

D I S N E Y+

The WandaVision star takes her longtime MCU character to the small screen for a twisty, surreal spin-off


THROWBACK Elizabeth Olsen as Wanda Maximoff in WandaVision.

“I was really worried about launching a show like that,” admits Olsen. “The idea that Kevin had about trying to tell this story in a Twilight Zone-y way through sitcom is so twisted and bizarre to me that I could only be excited to see what they would come up with. Another issue was to bring these superhero characters that audiences are used to seeing on big screens onto a small television.”

But timing played a fateful hand with the WandaVision release. The pandemic allowed for people to stay indoors and wax nostalgic on entertainment that made them feel safe. And WandaVision’s creatively misleading retro storytelling not only brought a visual comfort, it also told an underlying story of one woman’s intense grief and how she needed to escape from reality. This zeitgeist-y scenario made the series an instant watercooler hit, not only kicking off an exciting new era of MCU on Disney+ but giving fans the chance to watch sidelined characters become the leading characters in their own major storylines. “If you’re in a choir,” explains Olsen, “you’re adding a tone to the group. So, in the [Avengers] films, I always felt like I was adding a sincerity tone while everyone was being sarcastic. Wanda has a lot of heart and a lot of pain, but with this, all of that went out the window. The core of this woman is

8

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

D I S N E Y+

WHEN ELIZABETH OLSEN WAS FIRST PITCHED THE IDEA OF TAKING HER CHARACTER WANDA MAXIMOFF INTO THE SUBURBS WITH HER LATE ANDROID HUSBAND VISION, PLAYED BY PAUL BETTANY, SHE WASN’T QUITE SURE HOW TO WRAP HER HEAD AROUND IT, LET ALONE UNDERSTAND THE COUPLE’S INEXPLICABLE REUNION. THE PRESIDENT OF MARVEL STUDIOS, KEVIN FEIGE, AND CREATOR JAC SCHAEFFER HAD TOLD HER THEIR PLANS FOR WANDAVISION TO KICK OFF THE MCU ON THE NEW DISNEY+ PLATFORM. THEY ALSO EXPLAINED THE CONCEPT THAT EACH EPISODE WOULD BE SET AGAINST CLASSIC SITCOM TROPES FROM THE ’50S TO MODERN DAY.


SUPERHUMANS Clockwise, from left: Olsen dons the Scarlet Witch outfit from Marvel comics; with Bettany as Vision; Wanda struggles to control her wild magic.

really her lack of having really under-

Matt Shakman who brought his years

of comedy sitcoms, with its specific

stood her own grief and trauma, and

of collaborating as the artistic director

sets of rhythm, less of a challenge and

mindset,” says Olsen. “It was also

she’s trying to move forward in the

for the Geffen Playhouse onto the set;

more of a celebratory collaborative

frustrating because [WandaVision]

world. Then there’s this strong desire

bringing a cohesive theater troupe feel

effort to work through.

hadn’t come out yet. I had just spent a

and need for creating a family nucleus

to the cast. “I’ve had some pretty great leaders

“I mean it was like a dream,” smiles

year breaking down what family meant

Olsen. “It already feels like such a gift

for Wanda. How our entire show is

world. And then everything else, the

on my films,” recalls Olsen, “but Matt

as an actor to get to play a genre or

about family sitcoms, because it gave

sitcoms, even her knowledge of what’s

is one of the greatest leaders I have

tone or period piece or have a playful

comfort though so many different

happening is just circumstance.”

ever had on a job. He had us come in

exploration of your voice. All those

time periods. And I knew that Dr.

The big themes hidden within

for two weeks to do rehearsals and to

things are already just so much fun

Strange was going to be different for

WandaVision’s deliberately forced

all get the same visual vocabulary for

and then to constantly have to change

this character, even though I was going

sugary facade made it a hit among

every single episode. Everyone came

and alter it, yet keep the same core of

into a film with a bunch of new people,

critics, too. Think pieces and fanatical

out to Atlanta, even for a couple of

these characters. It was a joy.”

to have this new huge group experi-

breakdowns of each episode brought

nights, or even if they weren’t working

a level of kudos never before seen for

until six months later. We literally felt

continues Olsen, “I got to have a lot

a Marvel character. So much so, that

like an acting troupe.”

of fun showcasing in a way of being a

finally give Wanda a break and take on

when the Emmy nominations were

ence, I was completely alone again.” Now back in the U.S., Olsen can

ham. I haven’t gotten to do that in a lot

characters outside the MCU, possibly

announced, WandaVision scored 23 of

Katheryn (Hahn), Paul, were all trained

of my work. You learn in life to become

even returning to the independent film

them, including Lead Actor nods for

from different acting conservatories,”

quiet and reserved and polite, and it’s

scene where she got her break as an

Olsen and her onscreen partner Paul

says Olsen. “We are all students of

really fun to have that opportunity to

actress a decade ago.

Bettany. It is the 3rd most-nominated

acting. I mean it was so dorky, we

access the skills that you’ve learned

show this year.

would do vocal exercises in hair and

throughout the years. It awoke my

Marvel,” she says. “The longer you

“Yeah, it’s odd,” muses Olsen. “After

“A lot of us, Teyonah (Parris),

“I’m really grateful for this show,”

“This has been a great gift from

makeup, trying to find this world

body up to what I love about work and

work for [them], the more included

seven years of playing the same char-

together. I would look to everyone

I’m feeling residual effects in a positive

you are in every step of the process.

acter, who would have predicted it? I

around me to figure out, ‘OK, are we

way preparing for my next job.”

And I really do appreciate that. I’m

got comfortable being in an ensemble,

really doing this cheese? Is this really

and I really liked trying to figure out

After traveling through multiple

also grateful from a financial stand-

what we’re doing?’ But we were all

fictional settings, Olsen’s next job took

point, because I’m now able to make

what my point of view was to the

doing the same amount of cheese,

her to the U.K. to continue playing the

decisions and take on opportunities

story as a whole. But with this show,

and as an ensemble we were sup-

Avengers’ Scarlet Witch in the upcom-

not based on the potential of its com-

we just thought, ‘This is the weirdest

porting and holding each other up.

ing film Dr. Strange and the Multiverse

mercial success.”

thing we’re ever going to be able to

That’s why it felt like such a fun show

of Madness. Leaving behind her tight

participate in, so let’s just swing for the

to work on, because you really felt that

group of theater comrades and step-

later, playing Wanda has come to a

fences and either it will crash and burn

camaraderie and necessity of all your

ping back onto the big screen after

perfect rewarding ending for Olsen.

or people will like it.’ We just had fun.”

scene partners, so it worked.”

two years of playing Wanda Maximoff,

That is, unless the MCU needs her

something felt different.

back for another round. ★

Spearheading the fun was director

10

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

Which made the different eras

Now it seems that seven years D I S N E Y+

allows for her to not be alone in the

“It was great to stay in the same


2

EMMY NOMINATIONS ®

INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES

HUGH GRANT


CHARTED TERRITORY At press time, here is how Gold Derby’s experts ranked the Emmy chances in the Best Comedy Series Actor and Best Comedy Series Actress races. Get up-to-date rankings and make your own predictions at GoldDerby.com

Dance Your Heart Out

Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist’s choreographer Mandy Moore tells the story through dance AS CHOREOGRAPHER OF THE NBC SERIES ZOEY’S EXTRAORDINARY PLAYLIST, Mandy Moore knows how important dancing is to the story. “We’re using each one of these songs to propel the story forward emotionally and narratively,” she says. “In any great musical,” she says, “when you can’t say it, you sing, and when you can’t sing, you dance.” In the show, Zoey (Jane Levy) discovers she has the power to hear people’s thoughts through ‘heart songs’, which often take the form of large group musical numbers. One example is “Let’s Get Loud”—a dance number for which Moore is nominated. “That number was a really tough one to crack story-wise,” she says, “because so much had to happen in the storytelling. ‘Let’s Get Loud’ was all about the MaxiMo opening and the people waiting in line would need to parallel the excited feeling of the people waiting to open the restaurant.” In addition to the dancers, Moore also considered where Zoey will be during the song, as she is usually the observer rather than a participant. “She almost becomes the pivot point for the camera at times,” Moore says. However, she prefers Levy to be introduced to the choreography after it’s completed. “Watching her see it for the first time,” she says, “her reactions are so organic and priceless.” —Ryan Fleming

The Flight Attendant Production Designer Sara K White on creating a physical form for the dark mystery

ODDS

1

Jason Sudeikis Ted Lasson

16/5

2

Michael Douglas The Kominsky Method

4/1

3

Kenan Thompson Kenan

9/2

4

Anthony Anderson Black-ish

9/2

5

William H. Macy Shameless

9/2

COMEDY SERIES ACTRESSES

ODDS

1

Jean Smart Hacks

16/5

2

Kaley Cuoco The Flight Attendant

39/10

3

Tracee Eliis Ross Black-ish

9/2

4

Allison Janney Mom

9/2

5

Aidy Bryant Shrill

9/2

stage that we could bring all of Cassie’s subconscious and psychosis into.” The “After Dark” episode has Cassie stuck in a nightmare. “We created a maze where she’s experiencing parts of her past as

For The Flight Attendant, production

who wakes up in a Bangkok hotel next

she’s running through the mind palace,”

designer Sara K White was excited to work

to the dead body of the mysterious Alex

she says. “We worked closely with our VFX

on creating spaces to physically represent

Sokolov (Michiel Huisman). “I wanted to

team to offer hallway extensions, but a lot

the main character’s internal struggles in

make sure that it felt very much a part of

of it was done very practically, where we

the midst of a thriller.

the one percent lifestyle that Alex Sokolov

would open up hallways, doorways, or turn

Kaley Cuoco stars as Cassie Bowden, a

gets to live,” White says. “While it felt like

a dead end into a room you could walk

flight attendant with a drinking problem,

a high-end hotel in Thailand, it was also a

through.” —Ryan Fleming

12

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

UP IN THE AIR Kaley Cuoco stars as Cassie Bowden in The Flight Attendant.

S E RG E I BAC H LA KOV/ N BC /H BO M AX

INTERRUPTED MEMORIES

COMEDY SERIES ACTORS


O U T S TA N D I N G L E A D A C T R E S S I N A L I M I T E D O R A NTH O LO GY S E RI E S O R MOV I E C Y NTH I A E RI VO

“A POWERHOUSE SHOWCASE FOR A

POWERHOUSE PERFORMANCE” -THE NEW YORKER

“ERIVO IS

UTTERLY SPELLBINDING AS ARETHA FRANKLIN” -INDIEWIRE

“ERIVO PRACTICALLY

BECOMES ARETHA BEFORE OUR EYES” -ROLLING STONE

“SHOWSTOPPING” -CNN

“ERIVO IS

PHENOMENAL” -PASTE

“CYNTHIA ERIVO

SHINES” -THE PLAYLIST

“CYNTHIA ERIVO ... IS SIMPLY

HEART-STOPPING” -BET

natgeotv.com/FYC


Mj Rodriguez is the latest cast member of FX’s groundbreaking series Pose to make Emmy history, earning the very first lead acting nomination for a trans woman. In conversation with Ryan Fleming she reflects on an achievement she never thought possible, and what she hopes it will mean. PHOTOGRAPHY BY Andrew Zaeh

14

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E


D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

15


Congratulations on making history. Thank you. I’m still gagging. It feels extremely surreal but liberating. I’ve never felt more liberated in my life, because one, it’s never happened before. And I’ll just say this, a girl has been working hard. She’s been really pounding the pavement. The concrete jungle is where it started for me, and it’s amazing to see that I pounded the pavement in the concrete jungle, and came over to the beautiful La La Land, and I feel like the doors have been opened up more. And seeing a woman like myself strive and get the things that I feel like I’ve always wanted… It feels so good. I feel so seen. And I hope I’m giving inspiration to people out there. I know that I am, but I hope it’s even bigger. Because the more imagery of a person like myself, or any woman who’s in this kind of position, it just broadens the spectrum for people to understand we have what it takes to really achieve our goals in the industries that we decide to go into, specifically for myself acting and singing. It feels good. It feels freaking amazing.

acclaimed for shining a light on the underground ball culture of New York City in that era, Pose has brought much-neededi visibility to the hidden struggles trans women of color faced at the start of the AIDS epidemic. Since its inception, the show has been breaking barriers for the LGBTQ community left and right. Created by Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Steven Canals, it features the largest cast of trans actors to date. And, in 2019, Billy Porter became the first gay Black man to be nominated—and to win—an Emmy in a lead acting category for his role as Pray Tell. Now, Rodriguez retraces the life and career steps that brought her to his momentous nomination, the struggles and successes that paved the way, and what she hopes it will all mean for the industry going forward.

What do you think that this nomination does for trans representation? I think it just really opens the gamut. I think it broadens the scope a little bit more, and it shows that not only are we human, but we take our class seriously. And we’re not just stereotypical characters, but we have multi-dimensional characters, multidimensional lives aside from what has been created around us. And that is being brought, and that means there are going to be more people coming to the table, showing their versatility, showing what they have, and showing that they’re equipped for the job simply by getting—and I’ll speak for myself— simply with a nomination like this, I can’t even believe I’m saying this, but being an Emmynominated actress, that even opens the door a little bit more to show that we do have the qualifications. I think that’s what it means, and I just hope that the door keeps being held open, or they put a little stopper in the door so it can stay open so that more people can really show what they’re capable of within the industry of the arts.

What kind of feedback have you received since the nomination? So many responses. I’ve received beautiful, uplifting responses. I’ve seen some heartfelt responses that made me break down in tears. The one I hear the most is, “You remind me so much of the mother that I once had, but is not here,” or, “The mother who was in my house.” And when I say not here, due to obviously HIV and AIDS back in the 1980s. Or, “I wish I had a mom like you.” And I will say this, this is one story, if I can talk about this, there was a boy who lived in Nigeria, and I made it my duty to get in contact with him. It just was in my spirit to get in contact with him. He got displaced from his home, and it was simply because he was gay. And he told me that his parents didn’t see him. It was very much like the story of Damon. And I remember just telling him, “You’re going to be fine. You’re going to be OK. If you need anyone to talk to, I’m here. I know it’s hard, but you’re going to get through this.” And I hadn’t spoken to him for I would say a couple of months, maybe a few months,

MOTHER LOVE Left to right: Mj Rodriguez as Blanca; Blanca and Charlayne Woodard as Helena St. Rogers celebrating after Damon’s performance; Blanca at a ball.

16

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

FX / PAR I DU KOVI C /M I C H AE L PA RM E LE E /JOJO W HI L D EN

G

rowing up in Newark in the ’90s, Michaela Jaé (Mj) Rodriguez never imagined she could have achieved what she has. Coming from a time where there were no trans women of color in the forefront of entertainment, the existence of a role like Blanca Evangelista in Pose seemed nigh on impossible. Having been cast in 2017, the FX series’ final season has now earned Rodriguez a history-making Emmy nomination—making her the first trans person ever to be nominated in a lead acting category. In Pose, Rodriguez’s character is a trans woman who decides to follow her dreams after finding out she has HIV. She creates the House of Evangelista, a new ‘house’ in the ballroom scene of New York City in the late ’80s and becomes a house mother to wayward young people of color looking for a place to belong. Critically


I think it just really opens the gamut. I think it broadens the scope a little bit more, and it shows that not only are we human, but we take our class seriously. -MJ RODRIGUEZ

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

17


When you were growing up, did you have any icons that you felt represented who you were? There weren’t a lot of trans women of color on the television screens in the forefront back in the day, so I saw a lot of strong, Black, cis women who I was inspired by, alongside my mother. My mother is who truly instilled my womanhood inside of me. But as far as the crafts, and women in the crafts in the industry, I would look at Angela Bassett, and Halle Berry, and Viola Davis, and Octavia Spencer, and it just ran the gamut of age brackets, it ran the gamut of class. These were women who were really fighting, and doing it well, and I looked up to them. And how did you get your start in acting? I started very young. A lot of people don’t 18

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

know that. I was, I would say, about 11 years old when I was old enough to be enrolled in an arts program called New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, New Jersey. And I just got my start there. I was enrolled in schools when I was younger, when I was four, but I was literally a toddler. When 11 came along, that’s when I knew, as an artist, that I wanted to take it seriously. My mom put me in classes, and I just knew that this was something that I love to do. I love creating characters. I love characters that were created, and people putting them in front of my face for me to portray them. I wanted to carry that through. And I checked in programs, I kept going to art schools. I went to an arts high school. And yeah, I just was trained in my craft of acting and music for all my life. Back then, could you ever have imagined that your role as Blanca was possible? No. I never imagined that. I never even thought that there would be a leading role for an Afro-Latina trans woman like Blanca. And so, my scope of life as far as trans women being in the forefront, especially trans women of color, was really never there. I was just a girl in the world trying to make that possible. And I know there were other girls alongside me, like Laverne Cox, and Trace Lysette, that were making it possible. I was that girl with that one-track mind who was doing the same exact thing, and just trying to make sure I did what I needed to do so that the door would be completely bust open, and there was no way of closing it. And who were your early supporters? Well, we can go deep. I’d say my earliest supporters are my best friend of 15 years, his name is Rayvon Middlebrooks. And my mother, Miss Audrey Rodriguez, and my father. I’m giving you all the names, because these are the supporters that are here from the beginning, and they will be there to the

end. My dad, and my family members, and my good friends who are a part of these great programs with me. And as time went on, and as time really made space for me in the industry with my colleagues, I started to see it from really dope people that I had been seeing on television that I never thought I would meet, like Zendaya, and like Tracee Ellis Ross. The list goes on. But these were people that really uplifted me, and I really cherish them in my life. Before joining Pose, were there times where you felt like giving up, or you were told you’d never make it? Oh yeah. I had this moment where I was in my room with my mother and my second dad, and I remember sitting on a stool, and just telling her, “I’m going to give up.” And this was literally right before Pose. It was three or four weeks before Pose, I had just had a couple of auditions, and I hadn’t gotten any bites. And I just said, “Mommy, the world doesn’t see me. I don’t think I’m going to be doing this anymore. I’m just going to blend in, and go into the life of normalcy, and just try my best to really succeed in whatever I can do.” And I remember her saying, “No, don’t do that just yet. It’s right around the corner. It’s just waiting for you.” And I held out that hope because my mom knows just how to influence me in the best ways. And literally two weeks later, I had gotten an audition for Once on This Island on Broadway, a final callback, and an audition for Pose. And another couple of days later, I got the offer for Pose. I was at the brink, and they always say, “Usually when you’re about to give up, something happens.” And honey, it happened, and I gagged. How did you hear about the role? I was completely immersed in auditioning with this one casting company. They’re called Telsey + Company; Bernie Telsey. And on the breakdowns of that company, they had Pose. And I remember seeing a list of these women.

FX / M OLLY P O LAY/J OJ O W H IL D E N /E RI C LI E BOWI T Z / M I CH AE L PAR M E LE E/

and then I heard from him again, and I remembered his picture. And he contacted me, and told me, “I’m doing so much better now. I found my family, and they’re taking good care of me, and I have a job now, and I’m living.” That alone. The words and the inspiration of a show like Pose, not even Michaela Jaé, but the characters of Blanca, Angel, Pray Tell, Elektra, they were influential to people all around the world, including this person in Nigeria who was displaced from his home. But receiving a message like that not only humbled me. It made me want to work harder and keep fighting through my craft even more. Because there are children out there who are 16, 15 years old, who don’t have homes simply because of the things that they choose to do, or who they are. If they want to go into acting, they say, “That’s a hard road. Choose one of the jobs that is in a better field.” No. Achieve your dream. Anyone who is of a specific orientation, whether you be trans, gay, gender nonconforming, or a person who identifies as cis, you can succeed and do it. And that story just turned my whole life around. It really did.


There was Blanca, Angel, Lulu, Candy, and Elektra. And I resonated with each and every last one of them, but the one who I felt most pull to was Blanca. I just saw this story of a woman who was nurturing, she was a little rough around the edges, not the stereotypical trans woman who has had the opportunity. Because some trans women, even though they were living in certain areas, and living a hard life, they were still able to upkeep themselves, and Blanca wasn’t that girl. She was a tomboy. I saw all of these things, and I was like, “Oh, this is me. This reminds me of me.” Tank top, shorts, and maybe some boots. And I remember reading it, and getting in contact personally with FX, and sending them a message saying, “Listen, I know this may seem unprofessional, I know this may seem out of pocket, but I would just really love to be seen for this part. Here’s my headshot. Hopefully I’ll be considered.” And a week later, I got the call for the first taping. And how did it feel when you found out you were cast as a lead? Oh, child, I broke down. I ran downstairs, I screamed all the way to the top of the freaking roof. I remember Ryan Murphy called me on the night. I think it was November. And he said, “Listen, don’t worry.” Because I think he could see in my eyes, when I came to the second test, I think he could see that there was a lot of worry in my eyes, and saw that this was probably the thing that I really dreamed of. And he said, “You have nothing to worry about. You have the part. Don’t worry.” And I just broke down. I cried. I ran downstairs to my mom and my second dad, and I just screamed. It looked like things were looking up, and the world saw me. Tell me about that connection you felt to Blanca right away. I related very closely to Blanca. She’s a hard worker, she’s someone who strives, and

WE ARE FAMILY Clockwise, from top left: An ACT UP protest at St. Patrick’s Cathedral; at the New School For Dance; with Angel (Indya Moore) at a protest; with Lulu (Hailie Sahar) at Angel’s wedding dress fitting; with Damon (Ryan Jamaal Swain); singing at an AIDS fundraiser, and lipsyncing “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” with Pray Tell (Billy Porter). D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

19


I never imagined that. I never even thought that there would be a leading role for an AfroLatina trans woman like Blanca. -MJ RODRIGUEZ

20

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E


has a drive, and is so loving, and caring, and nurturing. And those were all the qualities I encompassed and I had due to the upbringing that I had from my mom. Even though me and her obviously are very different. She didn’t have family, and she came up by herself, and still succeeded. I had my mother and my father, and my second dad, and the LGBT community collectively around me to love and support me. But through those differences, I still saw the similarities of the love that me and Blanca shared between the people and humans. I just I knew when I read that breakdown, and I knew when I started seeing the words on the pages come to life, I knew that’s what I had to do. I knew I had to play her.

FX / E RI C L IE BOW IT Z / M ACA LL P OL AY

What was your experience with ballroom before working on Pose? I had a good couple years in the ballroom scene. I wasn’t in it completely. I’d consider myself a bystander. I know that’s horrible to call myself, but I want to give respect to the ballroom when it’s due as well. I went on the ballroom floor once, got chopped, and I’m sure you know what ‘chopped’ means; it means eliminated. And after that, I was a little broken down. But that was just me being young, insecure, and not fighting. This was a world that I had just gotten immersed in with people like myself. But yeah, I was involved in it. I had a house father. I had three other brothers and sisters who were all part of the house. And though it didn’t last long, because houses change drastically within the ballroom scene, it was still beautiful, and I had a great surrounding group of people who loved on me even in the ballroom scene. It was an add-on, if you will, or plus to the life that I had with my mother and my father, and my other family members, my biological family. But yeah, I was immersed in it, and I’m very thankful because if I wasn’t, then I wouldn’t have been able to carry out the duty of Blanca, and the culture of this show. Were there other actors or actresses on set that came into Pose with no knowledge of ballroom? Actually, no. Billy Porter had been immersed around the ballroom scene. Even though he wasn’t in it, he’s been around it for 35 years. Indya Moore had a house family for a very long time. Hailie Sahar, Angelica, all the cast were embedded in ballroom, so it was great that it lended itself to the show. What was your favorite moment of the past season?

Oh, honey, my favorite moment was the seventh episode where me and Billy, Pray Tell and Blanca, had the moment to really perform “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”. And also, my favorite moment was the Whitney Houston performance. It just showed community. It showed what community looks like in America in an underground scene where a lot of people in that scene were not seen or deemed as worthy. And just to see a moment like that where Blanca comes in, and she sings the national anthem around beautiful people of color who are enthralled and just marinated in culture. And to have that moment, I thought that was kind of dynamic. I absolutely loved the “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” performance. I thought I was going to bust my butt though. No lie. That rain, honey [laughs]. What’s the best fan response you’ve received from your role as Blanca, or the show itself? My favorite response from my supporters and my fans are them saying they wish I could be their mom. That’s a big, big compliment to me. Because I don’t have children yet. I aspire, and hope, and pray to have children sooner than later. And to get the accolades of someone saying, “I wish you were my mom,” one, that gives me great confidence in knowing that I will possibly be a great mother when my child comes into this world, but also just to know that fans are receiving Blanca, and receiving the love that she gives to her children. That was my favorite reaction. Blanca also thrusted you into this position where you spoke for the community that the show represented. What was that like? It was great, because I feel like she’s a natural born fighter, and you don’t get to see trans women raising children, let alone children who are 16, and have minds of their own. Yet Blanca was able to show that through the television screen, and I think that’s what really made it such a monumental, and cultural moment, and gamechanger. No one’s ever seen a trans woman raise her children like any other mother would on a television show, and show the dichotomy between going to the ballroom scene, and living in the real world, and maneuvering around the real world as a person who just so happens to be trans. But a lot of people may not know, and a lot of people may know. That I think was the gamechanger for me and Blanca, and what made it different from the stories that were being told on television.

STRIKE A POSE From top: Blanca reflects; at a ball; an ACT UP meeting; performing at a ball in costume.

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

21


LOVE WINS Left to right: Blanca with the House of Evangelista at a ball; Blanca winning Mother of the Year.

The show has done so much too to educate about the AIDS crisis. I agree… If I can be really candid and be very truthful, when the AIDS epidemic came out, it was specifically about white men. There were not a lot of light shown on people of color. And then as time went on, and when information came out about the virus, they subjected it just to gay men, and still not even shining a light on the community of Black men. And I just love that Pose did both, it shed a light on Black gay men who were dealing with HIV and AIDS, and how they succeeded through it, and trans women who didn’t get 22

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

any light, or any help, or understanding as far as their plight in dealing with it. I love that you asked this question because Pose has really opened the door for so many things, especially that. It shed a light on just so many stories that were not told, especially when it came to HIV and AIDS. I found that part so incredible later in the season, where Blanca confronts the people who are running the experimental HIV drug study about the fact that there’s only white people involved. Yes. And that was going on for years. And even me, I had an understanding of HIV and AIDS, but it was only through my gaze of people of color, because that’s who I was raised around for my life, and that’s who I am. And as I got older, I found out this information. I wasn’t surprised, but I was a little disheartened because it was happening. As much as I didn’t want to believe it, it was actually happening, where people of color were not even getting the necessary treatments. Pose did a really good job of highlighting all those things, and I commend the writers, Janet Mock, and Steven Canals, and Ryan Murphy, the director. All of them really took a chance on faith, and risk, and understanding what this would have done to change the world. And honey, I’m blessed that it happened the way it did. Where do you go from here? There is so much that I feel like is next for me. I just recently did a movie with Lin-Manuel Miranda called tick, tick... Boom! written by Jonathan Larson. And I also have a new

television show that I’m going to be taking part in with Maya Rudolph called Loot. People get to see my comedic chops. And they get to see the versatility of Michaela Jaé and have differentiations between the characters that I play. And lastly is my music. I’ve been really working hard on my music. That has been actually my love from the very beginning, even before acting. And it’s finally come into full fruition. I finally have a single out called “Something to Say”, which I’m so happy people are receiving it the right way, because that’s exactly what I wanted when the song was created. And there’s a music video that’s going to be coming out soon. There’s a lot that’s happening for Michaela Jaé, and I’m very, very happy that the doors are flung wide open. I’m just going to run right through them, baby, and I’m going to give all the love that I can while I’m running right through them. What’s your absolute dream role? My absolute dream role is to play Elektra. Now, you got to be like, “Elektra from Pose?” No. Elektra from the comic book series, the Marvel comic book series. She’s a superhero, and she’s a badass, and she’s also hot, too. I just feel like I could really portray this woman, and also it would be a great homage to Miss Jennifer Garner. She did an amazing job playing Elektra with Ben Affleck back in the day. I would definitely go through rigorous training if they put me through it. Everything I would go through simply to make sure I deliver for her, because she’s a sick freaking character, and has a great story. ★

FX / E RI C L IE BOW IT Z /JOJ O W H IL D E N

What do you think is the most important thing this show has done for the trans community in terms of visibility? I think the exposure and the visibility from Pose has garnered a lot of respect for trans women. And knowing that trans women, trans men, cis women, cis men, people of color, people who are not of color have enjoyed the show, it went to show that marginalized people with all different types of intersectionalities at the end of the day are human beings. And it showed true understanding of what the human condition is. That’s what I believe. And I do believe a lot of shows show that as well, but when there’s a marginalized group that has not been seen, that people get to see through the lenses, or get to get a scope of what their lives were like—which is great being that it was a period piece in 1987—getting to see what their lives were like, and now seeing what our lives are like in 2021, I think that is probably the most poignant kind of message that anyone could ever receive.


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Barry Jenkins OU T S TA N D I NG L I M I T E D O R A N T H O L O GY S E R I E S OU T S TA N D I NG D I R E C T I NG F O R A L I M I T E D O R A N T H O L O GY S E R I E S O R M OV I E Th e Unde rg rou nd Rai l ro ad

This story is heartbreaking, both in Colson Whitehead’s novel, and now in this show, and so much is wrapped up in Cora, played by Thuso Mbedu. It’s hard to articulate, so soon after seeing it, what it is precisely that makes following her so enveloping. I apologize, but I’m very happy to have broken your heart with the show [laughs]. It’s interesting what you’re talking about, because I’ve been thinking about it as well. I also don’t know how to articulate some of these things, but I think making the show, and especially making it with all these people, is sort of how I find the language. If it wasn’t for Thuso—if someone else had been the main character—I think what the show was saying would probably be a bit different. I was just jumping through it myself this past weekend. It had been so much damn work that I had to get away from it for a little bit. Watching it now, it’s really amazing, some of the things she communicates through that character. And they’re not intellectual statements, or declarations, questions or reasonings. It’s very emotional and maybe almost spiritual.

Jean Smart OU T S TA N D I NG L E A D AC T R E S S I N A C O M E DY S E R I E S Ha cks

I’m trying to not be so softheaded when I talk about the show, but it really

ate it.

OU T S TA N D I NG S U P P O RT I NG AC T R E S S I N A L I M I T E D O R A N T H O L O GY S E R I E S O R M OV I E Ma re of E a sttow n

Some of these collaborators go all the way back to your time at Florida

does feel like it has become something else, just outside and beyond me, which I think makes sense since so many people had to come together to cre-

you’ve gathered even more since, through the three movies you made

How did you personally relate to Deborah Vance in Hacks?

before this.

Do you feel you need to relate to a character to play them?

It’s nice, the little family that we’ve built. It’s true that we’ve been grabbing peo-

I don’t think I need to relate to them. When I read a script for the first

ple every step of the way from Medicine for Melancholy to Moonlight to If Beale

time, I must somehow understand them or get them on some level.

Street Could Talk, and now this. And in a way, I think it’s all been kind of building

Often if I read something and if I literally don't hear their voice in my

to this show. The Underground Railroad is by far the biggest thing any of us has

head when I’m reading it, then I know it’s going to be more difficult for

ever done. And I mean emotionally as well as literally, even though it’s still quite

me. Sometimes I just hear it right away and I know what I want to do

intimate in spots. —Joe Utichi

with it. As soon as I read this big scene that I auditioned with, it just told me so much about her. I could hear her. And I just knew the kind of person she was and how she looked at things. In Mare of Easttown there's a different physicality to you. How did you develop that? I sometimes thought about my mom. She lived to be 94, and as you get older, the shoulders roll forward. There’s obviously a harder time getting up off the couch than you used to have. I can identify with that. It’s like the opposite of method acting; the idea of working from the outside in. The costume designer was so thrilled because I said to her, “I want a little padding around the hips and the butt. That’s just how I see her in my head.” So, between that and the polyester pants and sweater vests and the bad hair... —Antonia Blyth

ATS US H I N I S HI J I M A/AM AZON ST U D I OS /JAK E G I LES NE T T E R/ H BO M AX

State University—producer Adele Romanski, DP James Laxton—and


Hannah Einbinder The Hacks star explores the exquisite pain and pleasure of stand-up in her breakout role B Y A N T O N I A B LY T H

Hannah Einbinder is one half of Hacks’ dynamic duo, starring as Ava, a punchy, down-on-her-luck TV writer drafted in to freshen up the act of old-school Vegas stand-up Deborah Vance (Jean Smart). Einbinder admits she initially found the job “intimidating”, which seems more than fair, given it was her first ever major acting role. But actually, Einbinder is no comedy newbie. At age 23, she was the youngest person ever to perform stand-up on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. And now, in Hacks she more than holds her own as she slowly reveals Ava’s soft underbelly opposite comedy legend Smart.

26

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

What was your reaction the first

It was definitely intimidating and

time you ever saw the script?

frankly, I was pretty anxious for

I was so incredibly blown away

a good deal of it because I'm an

by how funny the jokes were,

anxious person, generally. And so,

almost immediately. And really

attempting such a huge part, it

how beautifully the art direction

definitely got in my head. But really,

was written. Every element that is

my saving grace were the people

communicated on screen struck me

who were around me… I felt that they

on the page. It felt like such a vivid

all made me feel so comfortable off

and real world and the characters felt

screen and on, that day after day, my

so incredibly relatable and personal

anxiety was losing the battle because

and vivid and fleshed out, that it

there was all of this overwhelming

excited me but more than anything, I

support to counteract it. And it

really loved the jokes in the script, and

was such a lovely gift, working with

they made me laugh out loud, which

them, because it really helped me to

is not something I had really ever

attempt something that is crazy and

experienced before when reading

huge and a big responsibility. And first

audition sides.

and foremost, it’s important to me that I'm honoring Paul (W. Downs),

This is your first major acting role

Lucia (Aniello) and Jen (Statsky)'s

on television and you brought so

work and making sure they're happy

much authenticity to Ava. Tell me

with it and they feel that Ava is how

about jumping into such a big part

they expected her to be. So yeah, it's

opposite Jean Smart. Obviously

pretty nerve wracking, but I feel so

you've done a lot of standup

much differently than I did the day

before but this had to feel like a

I started and that is a total credit to

huge new thing.

my peers and my collaborators.

JAK E G I LES N E T T E R/ H BO M AX

E mm y Nomi n ee s


FOR YOUR

EMMY

NOMINATIONS INCLUDING OUTSTANDING

MAKE HISTORY10DRAMA

®

CONSIDERATION

BILLY PORTER LEAD ACTOR MJ RODRIGUEZ LEAD ACTRESS OUTSTANDING OUTSTANDING COSTUMES MAKEUP MAKEUP HAIRSTYLING DIRECTING WRITING

OUTSTANDING OUTSTANDING CONTEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY

(NONPROSTHETIC)

OUTSTANDING OUTSTANDING PROSTHETIC CONTEMPORARY

OUTSTANDING SHORT FORM NONFICTION OR REALITY SERIES

FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION

SERIES


Who was Ava to you when you first approached her and what do you feel you brought to the character? To me, she was someone who was talented but had lost sight of what was really important. It's easy for people who move to Los Angeles from other places to get caught up in the lure and the pace of things here, and I think she's absolutely one of those people. But that to me, is not a fixed quality. I just always saw potential in her because I think everybody who, as we see in Episode 10, is drawn to this work, is coming at it out of a necessity, a place of needing the work, needing comedy, needing this thing that is ultimately filling or attempting to fill a void internally. And that I have a lot of empathy for, I definitely experienced that. I feel like what I imbued into Ava was—I think it's there in the script,

Which ones made the cut?

had a very privileged path in the

certainly—but I tried to emphasize

There's, "Fuck you, Lemony Snicket."

game. I think that I've been really,

that I had showbusiness connections

this person who is difficult, deserves

There's, in Episode Five in the

really fortunate to work with mostly

because there's never been a time

compassion and sympathy and is

basement when Ava and George run

women, especially on this project,

in my life that I have used them. Not

capable of being better. That's my

into Deborah and she's drunk, there's,

mostly women and queer people.

that there would be any to really use. I

hope at least.

"You look like you let your tailor loose in

And as far as stand-up, I found a

mean, not for stand-up, you can't.

an antique carpet store." There are a

really supportive, loving group in

few more, but those are my favorites.

Los Angeles after a couple months

No. Either you can do it, or you

in the open mic scene where I was

can't do it, right?

sabotages things so badly. I can't wait to see Season 2…

Jean told me a story about how,

kind of a loner… I started in really the

Yeah. No one can help me when I'm

I haven't heard a single thing, I'm

when you auditioned, you just had

height of the #MeToo era, which I

standing alone on stage in front of 800

waiting right there with you. I'm so

this chemistry right away.

benefited from a ton because it really

people. When it comes to my sense of

beyond invested and so curious to see

From the very start, Jean and I, from

rightfully made men a little bit more

humor and who I am, I think like a lot

how it plays out.

the screen test, we really speak the

conscious, especially men in Los

of people, I get my comedic sensibility

same language as people. Ava and

Angeles, a little more cautious about

from my parents, from watching them,

As a person who writes your own

Deborah, they eventually get to a

the way that they behaved. There are

from humor being our love language.

comedy, how much did you bring to

place where Jean and I started out at.

so many women who came before

From the movies that I saw as a kid,

the dialogue yourself? Did you get

We share their language. It's never as

me and women today who did not

from the TV shows that I saw as a kid,

to just riff with Jean?

vicious as they are, it's fun and playful

benefit from the same experience

from the cartoons, from everything.

Yeah. There must be hours of footage

and sometimes sort of roasty and

and that is definitely highlighted in

And so, I owe who I am to them,

of Jean and I, and really everyone else

diggy, and it's just a joy, it's the best

this show.

certainly. I definitely do…

with each other, doing that off-the-

thing. Like Deborah says, "It's really

cuff riffing. A ton of it made the final

exciting when you find someone who,

You come from a successful

Deborah says she loves it when her

cut and Paul, Lucia and Jen were so

when you share a sense of humor with

comedy family (Einbinder’s

stand-up act bombs. What do you

open to it and really encouraged it,

someone, it's like you speak your own

mother is SNL original cast

think of that?

which was so nice. And I hear that's

little language."

member Laraine Newman and

It’s honest and at least for Deborah,

her father is comedy writer Chad

she’s at the point in her career where

There’s a speech Deborah gives

Einbinder), but no one knew that

she doesn’t bomb and she doesn’t

because, like you said, as someone

to Hannah about how she doesn’t

about you when you were coming

bomb because she’s doing safe jokes.

who writes my own comedy, I started

know how hard life is. Deborah

up doing open mics. You’ve done

to get in Ava's head and jokes she

has come up in a male-dominated

this on your own.

I love how Ava and Deborah

would make started to come to me. In

world of comedy long before

I came up in the LA scene and there

ultimately support each other.

fact, I stopped writing my own standup

#MeToo. How did what she said

are a lot of really good friends that

The qualities that at first make

for the entire duration of shooting. I did

resonate for you?

I have, and they know me and they

them butt heads, end up being what

not have any ideas for myself. The only

I have to say, it is an experience that

were with me every night of the week

brings them together and it's just

jokes I was concerned with were Ava's,

rings true for almost every single

in the shitty open mic in the bar. And

so beautiful. Especially to see it as a

so I just was thinking in her voice really

female comedian or non-male

they saw me there and I was there

relationship between two women of

and so they let me toss in a couple. It

comedian on planet Earth. Aside from

with them and that's real and it

these different generations. It's so

was really nice.

your everyday misogyny, I have really

happened, and that was my path.

powerful and so needed, I think. ★

not often the case. So, it was just such a blessing

28

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

A NN E M A R IE FOXX / H BO M AX

At the end of Season 1 Ava

And like you said, no one knew


THOUGHT-PROVOKING”“FORCED A CULTURAL RECKONING “BLOCKBUSTER”

“COMPELLING” “ ” “THOROUGH, CONSIDERATE AND ENRAGING” DEVASTATING

“HEARTBREAKING”

“POWERFUL”

“EXCELLENT”

®

FX CONGRATULATES OUR EMMY NOMINEES

FOR YOUR EMMY OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY SPECIAL FOR A NONFICTION CONSIDERATION OUTSTANDING PICTURE EDITING PROGRAM


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Michael Douglas OU T S TA N D I NG L E A D AC T O R I N A C O M E DY S E R I E S Th e Kom insk y Metho d

What’s been the character in your career that is most like you? Probably Sandy Kominsky, he’s got a lot. I was trying to work on that, or that kind of simplicity on it. So, I think that was certainly one. I can’t say he was all like me, but I liked Wonder Boys a lot, I think all the characters in Wonder Boys were well done. But I think Sandy’s pretty damn close. How was it doing this third season without your co-star Alan Arkin? It was always going to be delicate doing without Alan for this season, but he did a lot without showing up. I was glad we did a third season; I really enjoyed it and we kind of left Season 2 hanging. And so, I said, “Well, I just want to wrap this up. I’m enjoying it, let’s tie this together and finish it up.” So, I’m glad about it, it feels like we accomplished something, and I was really impressed with the adjustments Chuck (Lorre) made with the characters. It all felt good. It was a lovely experience. I really felt like I accomplished something new in my career. Something I had not done before, this area, both in the format and the tone. —Antonia Blyth

Juno Temple OU T S TA N D I NG S U P P O RT I NG AC T R E S S I N A C O M E DY S E R I E S Ted L asso

This character is a new challenge for you. What excited you—and perhaps terrified you—about taking part? I know, right? Normally I’m cast as very dark, dark characters. This one came to me personally through Jason (Sudeikis). I got a text from him, because I’ve known him for a couple of years. I genuinely thought he’d texted the wrong person by accident. I was like, “Oh, no. He’s going to think I’m funny. This’ll be a disaster.” I kept waiting for him to text again and say, “Shit, I meant this for someone else.” But that never came. Then I read the pilot, and I thought it was just such a genius idea. We got together and he told me a little bit about the plan for Keeley’s journey from the start to the end of the season. Not in he described the show he wanted to make in terms of the British Office meets Friday Night Lights. I thought, If he can pull that off, that’s some kind of wizardry. What was it like to reunite with the cast for the upcoming second season? I feel truly grateful to come back. It’s the first time I’ve ever returned to a character. I did a TV show a while ago which was supposed to go for more seasons, called Vinyl, but it didn’t. So, this was new to me too, and a little daunting. But getting into the headspace of Keeley—who truly is a bundle of light—during this crazy time to be alive, where the world is hurting on so many levels and people are closing doors rather than opening their ears and hearing each other, has been special. Keeley has saved my mental health, truly. —Joe Utichi

30

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

N E T FLI X /COURT ESY EV E RE T T COL L ECT IO N /A P P LE TV +

any crazy detail—that’s always kept quite close to his chest—but


EMMY AWARD NOMINEE ®

OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SPECIAL OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DOCUMENTARY/NONFICTION PROGRAM

kJESSE MOSS AND AMANDA McBAINE

EXHILARATING”

THIS DOCUMENTARY IS AMERICAN POLITICS DISTILLED.” BOB MONDELLO

ELECTRIFYING”


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Daveed Diggs The Tony and Grammy-winning actor and rapper recalls Hamilton’s trailblazing trajectory. BY NADIA NEOPHY TOU

It may be more than six years since Daveed Diggs made his entrance in the first performance of the Broadway phenomenon Hamilton, but the Oakland-born artist is still collecting praise for it today. The production took him from substitute teaching to pursuing his twin passions of acting and rapping full-time, and now, the film version of Hamilton is just one of the productions Diggs was in this past year—alongside Snowpiercer, The Good Lord Bird, Central Park and Soul. His Hamilton Emmy nomination is for him, an affirmation of the impact that can be created when working with friends.

How has your relationship to

Well, it was in one way, a continuation

Hamilton changed since you first

of the way I’ve always worked,

walked down those stairs as

which is just to make things with my

Thomas Jefferson?

friends, for the most part. I feel I have

I feel the same way, just blown away

very talented people around me,

that it keeps having these different

and I always have. And by the time

lives. As a person who grew up doing

we made Hamilton, I’d known Lin

theater, it’s so uncommon for a play

(Manuel Miranda) and Tommy (Kail,

to have that. And so, everything

director) and most of the creative

about the show was unexpected to

team for almost a decade through

me. But I think the fact that it’s not

Freestyle Love Supreme. So, my friend

only stayed relevant to people, but

asked me to come do something,

relevant to new generations of people

and I said yes. And it was the most

and to the world at large, in a different

successful thing I’ve ever done.

time. It’s just a fundamentally

But that way of working was how I

different world than we lived in,

worked before. Fortunately, because

in 2016, when we recorded this

it was so successful, it allowed me to

production. That’s a performance

continue to work like that since then.

of mine from 2016. It’s an odd time

If there’s such a thing as a big break,

capsule for a theater practitioner. But

Hamilton is that for me.

it’s nice.

32

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

success of Hamilton have on your

before you joined the cast, but

other projects, like your band

what place does it hold for you in

Clipping and improv hip-hop

your career?

group Freestyle Love Supreme?

D I S N E Y+

What impact did the initial You were rapping and acting


that was pretty eye-opening to me.

mean. All of these things, I don’t

on tour, after Hamilton had existed,

know. But what I do know is that

we were still playing relatively small

One of the best gifts of Hamilton

making art in this way, where you

venues and pretty grimy, grungy

is that it’s a gateway to explore

lean on your collaborators and try to

places. And our audiences tended to

the work you and the other cast

be kids or young adults who sort of

members had made before.

felt themselves outcasts and Clipping

It was nice also to be around those

was like this mode of release for them.

artists too: I still get to make music

And I remember just looking out at the

with Jasmine (Cephas-Jones), or

audience and seeing it start to change,

write a TV show for Jasmine, or be in

the demographics of the audience

the studio with Anthony Ramos), or

getting way different. Just like, these

with Leslie (Odom Jr). And we all have

kids didn’t have enough piercings to

projects together. We’re working on

be the same kinds of kids who came

things together all the time. Were it

to the shows. And I remember at first

not for this show, I’m not sure our lives

for the band, it was a little like, “If they

would have collided like that to the

are here expecting Hamilton, this ain’t

point where we’d be collaborators.

it.” But that wasn’t what happened at

The secret sauce with Hamilton was allowing everybody to be their full selves onstage.

design moments for them to shine, I know that works. And so, when I get pushback from somebody who has maybe been doing it longer for me, I can say, “Yeah, yeah. You’re right about everything, except this. And here are the 10 to 20 examples I can show you why I know this is going to work.” So, I also get to be an expert in a couple of things, in a field that I’m totally a novice in. Hamilton brought comfort to many during the pandemic. Did

all. It turns out this music was also for

What did you learn from being in

these kids who happen to be from a

Hamilton that’s continued to help

got you through last year?

different community, who came to it

your career now?

I mean, nothing zeitgeist-y. I am

in a different way. But if they’re coming

The secret sauce with Hamilton was

obsessed with British detective

to the show, they’re as obsessed with

allowing everybody to be their full

shows, so I got to discover a bunch

the crazy intricate lyricism and the

selves onstage. The bonus that comes

that I didn’t know yet. I watched

noise production and everything else,

along with it is all of that person’s

all of Rosemary & Thyme, that was

all the off-putting scary shit that we

collaborators too. Now you know

really good in getting me through for

do as anyone else. And so, I got to look

them also. And so, getting to work in

a while. I’m still watching Vera, which

out at the audience and watch the

the TV space, which was new to me

is a great show, which I somehow

demographics get more mixed than

as a creator, I’m taking a lot of advice

had not seen before, despite it being

they were before, but in kind of a good

all the time about how this is done

exactly the kind of show I like. So

way, and with all people who were

and what it is to run a writers’ room

yeah, things like that are what got

really genuinely fans of the project. And

and what does the budget of a show

me through. ★

34

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

you watch any shows/films that

D I S N E Y+

The first time my band Clipping went


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Josh O’Connor OU T S TA N D I NG L E A D AC T O R IN A DRAMA SERIES Th e Crow n

The Charles you play in Season 3 is angry and frustrated, but we get a sense of the human soul underneath. Did it change your relationship to the part? Totally. Whenever I think about the soul of Charles, and why people have connected to him in this show more than you might expect, I always think about how I felt when they first came to me about the role. It’s no secret I was very apprehensive about it, and it was partly for that reason. “Where’s the soul?” But Claire Foy is a great example of this, because in that first season of The Crown she really humanized the superhuman. What I mean by that is the Royal Family feels like postage stamps or historical figures to us; they don’t feel real. And what eventually convinced me to say yes was thinking about the idea of Charles as this young man who must wait for his mother to die for his life to take meaning. That’s like, “Boom. We’re done.” In that way, did you play the strife with Princess Diana as any other marriage falling apart? For Season 4 almost my entire research process was focusing on marriage and reading books about marriage failure. The thing that struck me was how much love there always is in divorce, and in separation. We’re fed this story of, “They were doomed to fail,” but I think what Emma and I tried to achieve was to have you feel, at some points, “Maybe it’ll work out.” Charles wouldn’t have married Diana if he didn’t think it could have worked. It’s more complicated than we’ve been led to believe. —Joe Utichi

Emma Corrin OU T S TA N D I NG L E A D AC T R E S S IN A DRAMA SERIES T h e C row n

Is it true that you were originally brought into the audition room for The Crown to read Princess Diana opposite actresses auditioning for Camilla Parker Bowles? It’s mad how it happened. It was a complete no-pressure audition, because I thought the idea of me doing the part was a complete pipe dream. But I was also walking into a room full of incredible creative people in the industry and I was like, “This is an opportunity to show them what I can do.” So, I prepared. I wasn’t really doing much, so at least I had the time. I watched a bunch of documentaries and

Was there a lightbulb moment where things clicked, and you knew how to play her? I have no living memory of Diana, but the weird thing is that my mum used to look incredibly like her, and even got mistaken for her in public. My mum’s also the most empathetic, open, sweetest person I know, and is like my best friend. Because of her love for Diana, and I think probably something about the resemblance, I kind of assimilated the two in my mind. I felt like I was playing my mum in some ways. That’s when it clicked for me. —Joe Utichi

36

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

N E T FLI X /AL E X BA I LE Y/ D ES W I LL LI E

really practiced. And now I’m here. It’s insane, really.


“STRONGER

THAN

” EVER. THE WASHINGTON POST

6 EMMY® NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES STERLING K. BROWN OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

CHRIS SULLIVAN

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

To watch the entire season, please go to DTSawards.com.


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Ewan McGregor The Halston star embodies a fashion icon’s complex and storied persona B Y M AT T H E W C A R E Y

closed down, and then we came back later in September to December with

tried to become him. I’ve done it a few times—playing

the height of Covid there in New York

people who have lived. And I got

City. So, it was very difficult to shoot,

so much out of photographs. I’ve

and the Covid people at the Netflix

always found that they’re very telling.

production were incredible and kept

And especially the photographs of

us all safe. But it was a tall order to

Halston. And that’s really how I ended

do that.

up involved in the project anyway, because I met Dan and he showed

Ewan McGregor has earned some of the best notices of his long career—and an Emmy nomination—for his lead role in Halston, the Netflix limited series about the famed American fashion designer. The Scottish actor threw himself into preparations for the performance, even going so far as learning to sew—as he told Jimmy Kimmel, he practiced by stitching pants for himself, but inadvertently placed one pocket on the inside of the garment. Given that mishap, it’s perhaps fortunate that McGregor wasn’t called upon to design any Halston costumes—that was left in the capable hands of Jeriana San Juan, who is also Emmy nominated.

How did you find the character

me these incredible big blown-up

to the point that you could truly

photographs of Halston… I didn’t

embody Halston so comfortably

know who he was. I didn’t know this

on screen?

man. But there was something about

I watched a lot of interviews of him. I

him in those photographs, where I

read a lot about him in books. I spoke

just knew I had to play him. There’s

to his friends that were surviving,

that sort of steeliness in his eyes.

although there’s not many left really.

And you could see how he wanted

And I just tried to get a sense of who

himself to be seen, almost. There’s a

he was. And then, of course, I worked

very ‘meant-ness’ about the way he’s

with Dan on that, and I worked with

holding himself—that’s not a word—

It must have been delicious to

with (director) Dan Minahan on the

Jeriana, the costume designer, on

but he’s striking a pose, almost.

portray Halston, because he

series. A brilliant leader. He had a

his look and his clothes, and that’s

Beautifully so.

was so gifted and stylish, and he

great tone and a great eye. And he

all informative. And there’s a lot of

could also be so catty with people

was able to, especially during Covid,

footage of Halston, too. He liked to

One of the things you capture is

around him.

make a ’60s and ’70s New York come

shoot his world. He liked to shoot his

Halston’s walk, how elegantly he

He was an amazing character to play.

alive, against the odds, really, because

workshop and he liked people to see

moved through the air.

Absolutely wonderful to play. He

we were shooting January to March

him designing and fitting. And so, I

He didn’t walk like me, so I had

really was. And I really loved working

in New York City, and then we were

watched a lot of that stuff and then

to walk like him. If you’re playing

38

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E


the same time, I do believe that that

all the scenes with Liza (Krysta

sort of in itself suggests that there’s

Rodriguez). There’s a very special

a fakeness to him. And I don’t think

nature to their friendship, to Halston

that there was. I think that that is

and Liza Minnelli. And it’s one of the

who he was. He had to create himself

great friendships of all time. I really

to become who he really was meant

believe that.

to be. Because I don’t think it felt fake to him. I think he just thought that’s

One of the striking things about

exactly who he was, this grand voice

the series was how frankly it

and elegant life. Everything had to be

depicted Halston’s sexuality,

grand and fabulous.

including scenes of him having sex with various male partners.

Were there particular scenes that

It’s just love and exploring a

you relished? One that stood

character’s romantic life and sexual

out to me was when Halston

life. And they weren’t necessarily the

works with Adele, played by Vera

same things with Halston. I think he

Farmiga, the woman who helped

had a very separate sexual life, which

him formulate the aroma for his

was without romance. And then there

signature fragrance.

were his loves. It’s all what makes him

I loved working with Vera because

up. The odd thing about it, I suppose,

she came in for that very important

was he was very private about it.

storyline. And that was an important

And in speaking to a lot of people

part of Halston’s success, this

who knew him, they would all say, in

perfume. And he was absolutely

the earlier years before Studio 54,

involved in making it. Like all his

he would go out for dinner and then

creations, he wouldn’t delegate

he would disappear about 10pm. He

anything. He couldn’t put his name

wanted to leave early, because he

to something that he hadn’t created

would go home, and he would sleep

himself. He just wouldn’t do it. So,

with rent boys in his apartment. He

he did go to those lengths, and the

would always dial someone up and

perfume did take an enormously

they would come over and have sex.

long time to make because of that.

And they would leave, and he’d go to

And also, he had those fights with his

sleep. But it was very private. And I

backers over the shape of the bottle,

knew that he was very private about

and he was adamant about it, even

it. And then for us to show it in the

though the bottle was very difficult to

series, I wonder if there was a slight

make and difficult to produce. And he

betrayal of him. He was private about

was just such a great creator that he

it, and here am I showing that side of

wouldn’t have it any other way. And

him. But I think probably he wouldn’t

then it was one of the world’s best-

have minded. In today’s society, he

selling perfumes of all time. He was

probably would have thought it was

right about all of it.

quite funny, maybe. Quite fun.

Listen, I’ve got lots of favorite Halston is nominated production

somebody who’s been alive and

who do know who he was and people

all those different actors. I loved

design, period costumes, makeup,

who’s loved and respected, you’ve

who have no idea, like myself.

working with David (Pittu) who

music supervision, as well as your

played (fashion illustrator) Joe Eula.

performance. What does the

him right. And that’s all of him, it’s

There’s a pivotal moment in

And I think some of the scenes are

Emmy recognition mean to you?

everything about him. And I never

the first episode where you, as

really great acting scenes, there’s

I’m really delighted about it. It was a

met him. And I don’t know that I got

Halston, are looking in the mirror

great drama in them. And then

total surprise and I was very happy

him right. But I felt like I got him as

and you suddenly slick back your

there’s a horrible scene that I played

about it. And I absolutely think of it

right as I wanted him to be. I suppose

hair. And then you pull the black

with him where Halston breaks up

as a nomination for me and Dan, who

working with Dan and working with

turtleneck over your head, and

with him. And he was just horrible to

wasn’t recognized, which is a shame,

Ryan (Murphy)’s scripts, we’re trying

become the Halston people then

him. Halston was just so cutting and

considering I was, and the design

to show a man’s life. And you’re not

came to know.

cruel. And it was a great scene to play

was, and the costuming was, and the

showing all of his life, but sort of the

Yeah. It’s nice, that sort of

as two actors because it was really

makeup was. That somebody who

highlights, if you like, or the lowlights

culmination of the persona, if you

painful, very upsetting to play that

was at the helm of all those things

sometimes. Just to portray him to

like. It’s interesting, the idea that

scene. And David, the way he played,

wasn’t [nominated] is a shame. So,

the audience so that people can get

somebody adopts a persona... I

it was so beautiful that it felt like I’d

for me, it’s definitely a nomination for

a sense of who this man was: people

think he did curate himself, but at

really hurt him. And I liked playing

me and Dan. ★

got a massive responsibility to get

N E T FLI X /ATS US H I N IS H I J IM A

scenes. Because I liked working with

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

39


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Uzo Aduba OU T S TA N D I NG L E A D AC T R E S S IN A DRAMA SERIES In Trea t m e nt

What initially attracted you to the premise of In Treatment? There have been a lot of films and TV shows that have addressed, or tried to tackle, the conversation of mental health. I don’t know of any that have been done with someone like myself in this particular chair. And, I guess, a partial motivator was that I’ve played a role, and been involved in TV Shows and roles, where I’m a character that’s dealing with something having to do with mental health, and it was interesting to now be in this project where I’m sitting in the opposite chair. Tragically, you lost your mother shortly before shooting began. And

Brad Ingelsby

your character is also grieving a parent. How difficult was that for you to approach? Loss of any kind is intense. If you don’t know it, I hope you never feel it. If you know it, my heart breaks and stands in support of you. It’s hard to pretend like it wasn’t something that I myself didn’t notice in the script. Of course I did. I think the things that I’m grateful for are having had some time and space to honor my mother and her life, and to move into

OU T S TA N D I NG W R I T I NG F O R A L I M I T E D O R A N T H O L O GY S E R I E S O R M OV I E OU T S TA N D I NG L I M I T E D O R A N T H O L O GY S E R I E S Ma re of E a sttow n

the world of Brooke Taylor’s life and experience. A lot of work that I do is creation and invention, but there are glimpses that I can identify as things that track with my own life. —Antonia Blyth The show is set in your hometown. How much pressure did you feel to get this right, even down to the ‘Delco’ accent? I only wanted to do it if I was convinced we could tell it in an honest way, and in a sympathetic way. And also in a way that really was able to capture the community. If we were able to get the details right, from the beer, to the pizza shop, to the t-shirts, to the music that was playing in the bars, it was all incredibly important to me and to the cast. About the accent in particular… I was a little bit apprehensive to ask a whole group of actors to try to nail that accent, but it was Kate (Winslet) that said, ‘No, listen, if we’re going to tell a story about this community, and about this part of the country, then we have to get it right.’

to do that? I grew up around a lot of women. My mom had three sisters, and I grew up with a stutter as a kid, so I didn’t like to talk a lot. I always was a good listener, and so I spent a lot of time listening to my mom and her sisters and my sisters, and I was always just so moved by their relationships and the way they took care of each other and each other’s kids. They talk to each other, and they were able to lean on each other, and so those relationships were meaningful in my life and I was able to pull from those experiences a lot. —Antonia Blyth

40

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

H BO M AX /M I C H E LE K . S H O RT/ HBO

Your story is centered around women. How did you decide


E mm y Nomi n ee s

Anya Taylor-Joy The Queen’s Gambit star on connecting with Beth Harmon as an outsider looking to belong B Y R YA N F L E M I N G

How did you get involved with The

think that her yearning to be part of

Queen’s Gambit?

a world where she made sense. For

I was working on two projects at

Beth it’s chess and for me it was the

the same time when I was told that

arts. And I don’t think either of us

Scott Frank wanted to meet with

felt like we made any sense or had

me on a project where there was no

anything to contribute on the planet

script, but there was a book. And so,

until we found both of these worlds.

I remember being really stressed out

And that was my in to the character.

For Netflix’s limited series, The Queen’s Gambit, Anya Taylor-Joy felt compelled to tell the story of Beth Harmon, a young chess prodigy with a sheltered past who struggles with an addiction problem. While dealing with her addictions and navigating a new world, outside of the orphanage she grew up in, Harmon finds her purpose in chess. She aims to beat the grandmasters, while countering everyone’s preconceived notion that only men can be masters at chess. Taylor-Joy connected with the character on a deeper level, as a person searching to find a place where she can fit in.

I met him. I wolfed it down in about

What do you think was the most

an hour and a half, and the second I

important part of her character

turned the last page I physically ran

arc throughout the series that

to meet Scott. I had so much energy

made you think, “This is her and I

and I was bursting with so many ideas

have to get this across?”

that the only way to handle it was to

That’s really interesting. I love the fact

run. So, I ran to meet Scott and then

that her biggest obstacle, despite

I semi-terrified him because I burst

being a female chess player in the

into the restaurant, and I just kind of

’60s who is an orphan, I think her

yelled at him and said, “She has to

biggest obstacle is facing her own

have red hair,” and he agreed with me

personal demons and struggling to

and then we were making it.

live with herself, who is her greatest ally and her greatest adversary, and

And what aspects of Beth did you immediately connect with?

42

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

trying to find that level of peace. I think she’s really uncomfortable

I really connected with her inherent

all the time, unless she’s playing

loneliness. That’s something that I’ve

a game of chess, unless she is

carried my whole life. And I really do

attacking or she can see things and

P H IL B RAY/N E T FL IX

about trying to read this book before


FILM

A S erie s of Exclu s i ve Eve nt s D e s i g ne d t o G i ve AM PA S, BA F TA a n d G u i l d M e mb e r s a n O ver vi ew of Th i s Ye a r ’s Awa rds S e a s on F i l m s

LONDON

LOS ANGELE S

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14

HAM YARD HOTEL

DGA THEATER

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

D O C U M E N TA R Y

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21

WARSAW, POLAND

VIRTUAL

N E W YO R K

THE NOMINEES

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4

TO BE ANNOUNCED

MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N A N D T O R S V P P L E A S E V I S I T:

C O N T E N D E R S F I L M . D E A D L I N E .C O M


they make sense to her. I think she really feels like nothing else makes sense. And hopefully by the time we got to the end, when we filmed that final sequence in Russia, there was such little skin between the two of us at that point. Like I could really... I was feeling far more at peace with myself, and so was Beth, and that was a really emotional sequence to shoot. You hadn’t really played chess before starting the series, right? No, no. So then how did you go from being a chess novice to playing speed chess with multiple people? I love speed chess so much. It’s probably some of the proudest moments in my career. I’m not going to lie. One of my favorite things about

classify herself as a female chess

also geniuses, that have the same

finished making it he said, “You know,

my job is being put in situations where

player. She was simply, in her eyes, the

coping mechanisms, are described

this is my favorite thing that I’ve ever

you just have to do something and

best chess player. And I thought that

as hot messes and are erased from

done, and I don’t care how people feel

there’s no real... It doesn’t really matter

was a good way of presenting that kind

history. That again, goes to our point

about it, because I am so proud of it

how you do it, you just have to make

of feminism.

about being a female anything,

and we did what we wanted to do.” So

sure that it’s done. And I think there is

she just is, she is an individual who

obviously now with hindsight, that’s

something to be said for believing you

It came across really well when she

is complicated and who struggles

pretty special.

are a person so much that if something

would question, “Well, why can’t

because of her intelligence, because

comes easy to them, it comes easy to

women play chess?” and there was

of the places that she’s come from to

What was your favorite moment in

you. But I do think that my background

no good answer.

cope with day-to-day life.

the series?

as a dancer really helped, because

I think it reflects upon the characters

I saw it as dance choreography for

around her as well because all of them

character the same liberties

I really enjoyed probably the moment

my fingers. And then I’m also, I didn’t

semi-question it to begin with. And

that male characters have had

that she realizes that she’s won,

realize this until I played Beth, but

then when presented with her skill,

throughout history... Again, it makes

probably the moment that you realize

I’m very competitive, mostly against

that very quickly goes away. You go

me really proud.

that you’ve just taken the final step

myself. So, the competition element

from the twins meeting her for the

of seeing how quickly I could do it

first time and kind of rolling their eyes

Did you expect the show to

you’re there, that shock. That instant

and how quickly we can nail it was

at this absurd, in their mind, little girl

become such a hit?

feeling of, “Oh my God I’ve done it, I’m

something that really appealed to me.

that wants to play these people, to

I don’t think any semi-adjusted

pretty sure that I’ve done it.” That was

the next tournament being like, “I am

person thinks that they’re going

a very intense thing to feel. And then

What do you think about the

not playing you. There is no world in

to reinvigorate the game of chess

for myself, I loved speed chess. I had

story’s take on feminism?

which I’m going to do that to myself.”

[laughs]. So no, not really. All I knew

such a good time. It was so much fun.

One of my favorite things about Beth is

And I thought that was a good way of

is that I think it was the strongest

Especially Thomas (Brodie-Sangster)

that she seems weirdly out of time, it’s

framing it. I just, I feel very, very proud

compulsion that I had felt to tell a

and I, we’re good friends and we just

almost like she wasn’t born with the

of our show.

story since my first movie, The Witch,

had a ball. It was just so much fun.

Oh goodness there are so many. I think

to the top of the mountain and that

since I first was aware of that feeling.

to want and strive for in the late ’50s,

How was playing the ‘genius-with-

And I was obsessed with it. I didn’t

Where do you think Beth’s story

early ’60s. Potentially you can argue

an-addiction’ trope as a female,

even think I really twigged when

would go from there?

even today, she’s genuinely baffled

when historically those characters

people would ask me what I was

I really hope that she’s taking the

by people bringing up her gender. She

have mostly been men?

doing next. And I was like, I’m playing

opportunity to continue to do

genuinely doesn’t understand it. And I

Well, it’s so interesting to me because

a chess prodigy. I don’t think I really

whatever the hell she wants in the

think that was something that I really

you’re right. We’ve been presented

twigged the fact that they were like,

sense of just allowing herself to enjoy

enjoyed and wanted to present the

with a plethora of male geniuses

OK, sure, go and do that.

it a bit more. I think her life has been

audience with, because I think that’s

that are just... “It’s so difficult to be

kind of what we should be striving for.

that clever, and obviously that’s why

with making this was so invested

luxuriating a little bit and just being like,

The idea that regardless of gender,

I do this, this and this and that.” Our

and cared about it so much. So, it

OK, I’ve proved what I need to prove,

you’re just appraised on what you’re

society’s almost accepted it, like, “Oh,

really did feel like a passion project

and now I can have a bit more fun with

bringing to the table as an individual.

he’s a genius so he’s kind of allowed

for all of us. Scott actually said—very

it. So yeah, I hope she’s somewhere in

And I loved the fact that Beth didn’t

to be this way,” whilst women who are

sweetly, in hindsight now—when we

Russia just living it up. ★

44

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

Just everybody that was involved

a struggle and I want to see her

P H IL B RAY/N E T FL IX

rule book of what women were allowed

So I felt like we afforded the


THE ACTOR’S SIDE Intriguing one-on-one conversations between Deadline’s awards editor and leading actors of film & television NEW VIDEOS EVERY WEDNESDAY WATC H NOW AT D EA D L I N E.C O M


EMMY HANDICAPS 46

AS THE PANDEMIC CONTINUES, PETE HAMMOND TAKES A LOOK AT THE RUNNERS AND RIDERS OF AN UNUSUAL YEAR IN EMMY HISTORY

A few months ago, the race

for the marquee categories of the 73rd Annual Emmy Awards seemed pretty much assured. In its fourth season, The Crown seemed to be on the path to finally bagging the elusive Best Drama Series award after winning key accolades on the early precursor awards circuit. Apple TV+’s breakthrough into the big leagues seemed assured, as Ted Lasso grabbed major recognition from the guilds and critics’ awards. Meanwhile, Netflix’s The Queen’s Gambit appeared unstoppable after a long list of precursor awards wins that included SAG, CCA, DGA, Golden Globes, PGA and WGA. In fact, the complete pre-Emmy sweep by this series is unprecedented in Emmy history. So, is it really all over, or are some upsets looming?  Now in its fourth season, Drama Series 2017 winner The Handmaid’s Tale is hard on the heels of Peter Morgan’s royal blockbuster, with 21 nominations to The Crown’s 24. Then there’s HBO Max’s Hacks, which nabbed 15 nominations just under the wire—if there’s a challenge to Ted Lasso, that’s where it may come from. And what about that lock for The Queen’s Gambit? The late-season arrival Mare of Easttown may have stolen some its thunder, while the earliest contender of them all—June 2020’s I May Destroy You—appears to be the comeback kid after making a huge impact at the Baftas. And then there’s Disney+’s WandaVision with an impressive 23 nominations, considerably more than The Queen’s Gambit’s 18 and Mare of Easttown’s 16. All of this is adding up to high drama as the campaigns end and voters make their voices heard.  Here’s how I see it playing out…

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E


FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION ®

9 NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES ROSIE PEREZ KALEY CUOCO OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

TO VIEW COMPLETE EPISODES, GET THE WBFYC APP AT


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES The Boys

Bridgerton

Perhaps the most surprising nominee is this comic book series from Amazon about a bunch of rogue superheroes led by Karl Urban’s Billy Butcher. After only getting a Sound Editing nomination in its first season, it has come roaring back with five nods, including this biggie in Emmy’s most prestigious category. It certainly doesn’t fit the mold of what we’d ordinarily see here, but the critical acclaim and original writing style clearly got voters to take a look—and they obviously liked what they saw.

This first-season period romance comes from Shondaland, and, unlike Shonda Rhimes’ ABC series (Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal), this one made an immediate impact on Emmy voters, who embraced it almost as much as the public, showering it with 12 nominations. Its popularity is unquestioned, and viewers are eagerly awaiting a second season, even without breakout star RegéJean Page, whose storyline was just a one-off. This, like The Boys, is further evidence that maybe Television Academy members aren’t elitist snobs after all.

Amazon

In terms of past winners who might be in line to take the Outstanding Drama Series crown again, Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale is the only one of eight nominees in this category that has won before here—and that was in 2017, when it was in its first season. Last year’s winner Succession succeeded on its second try but is ineligible this year due to Covid-forced production delays, while Game of Thrones, a four- time winner here, is obviously no longer a factor. Still, the list of contenders is an interesting one. Like the Comedy category there is little to boast about for the broadcast networks, with only NBC’s This Is Us gaining entry for the fourth time after being absent last year. The Crown, another veteran of the category, is angling to hit the winners’ circle with its fourth nomination. Here’s the rundown…

The Crown Netflix

Peter Morgan’s landmark series about another upper-crust family is probably more likely to bring home the gold for Netflix than Bridgerton, but after three previous nominations it still hasn’t done the trick. However, this fourth season, which focused on Prince Charles and his rocky marriage to Diana Spencer, got lots of attention and early precursor awards, and is generally considered the frontrunner here, despite never having a previous victory. This remains Netflix’s best shot in the major categories.

The Handmaid’s Tale Hulu

Streamer Hulu became the first to crack the code of this category in 2017 with the debut season of this much talked about and admired series, which picked up a whopping 21 nominations, mostly for its cast. It had a very good year, changed locales, and clearly got its mojo back in a big way, but the bigger question remains: can it return to the winners’ circle, or will the Academy feel they have already been there/done that?

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

48

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

Netflix

Lovecraft Country

The Mandalorian

Pose

This Is Us

The Emmy juggernaut cable network withheld announcing their decision to cancel this deliciously ambitious series until after all the votes were in. Whether it would have made a difference is unknown, but Emmy voters clearly liked the first— and now final—season enough to reward it with 18 nominations, including five for its actors. An impressive haul indeed for a series that, though ostensibly set in the 1950s, spans time and genres and has much to say about race in America, both then and now.

As you might expect, this Star Wars spinoff has been a huge hit for the nascent Mouse House streamer. It nabbed seven wins in its first season, out of 15 nominations, and has upped the ante in its second with a co-leading 24 nominations, although the bulk of these nods are in the crafts categories. Nevertheless, it seems to be following Game of Thrones by proving that a special effectsdriven series doesn’t have to be relegated to technical nods. Could it be a dark horse to win?

This ground-breaking series is in its third and final season and still making lots of noise. Although Billy Porter made history by winning Lead Actor in a Drama Series in its first season, Pose has yet to claim a Drama Series win, and wasn’t even nominated here last year. This time, producers are waging a targeted campaign to remind voters that a vote for Pose will also make a statement of inclusion—and this is the last chance they have to do that.

The real victory for this much-loved network series is its consistent showing in this category, even though it was passed over last year. If you think that meant voters were tiring of this drama, think again—it’s back with six nominations overall, to add to its total of 38 over its lifetime. It’s had just four wins, generally for its actors, so a win for a network series here would be a real long shot at this point. Still, never say never.

HBO

Disney+

FX

NBC


FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION ®

“JUST TRY TO RESIST ITS CHARMS — WE DARE YOU!” – OPRAH DAILY

OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE DEBBIE ALLEN OUTSTANDING CHOREOGRAPHY FOR SCRIPTED PROGRAMMING

NOMINEE ND

32 ANNUAL PRODUCERS GUILD AWARDS OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF TELEVISED OR STREAMED MOTION PICTURES

WINNER TH

29 ANNUAL MOVIEGUIDE AWARDS

DOLLY PARTON GRACE PRIZE FOR MOST INSPIRING PERFORMANCE FOR TV

WINNER ND

72 ANNUAL CHRISTOPHER AWARDS TV, CABLE, & STREAMING

TO VIEW COMPLETE EPISODES, GET THE WBFYC APP AT


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR

IN A DRAMA SERIES Three past winners in the category meet three firsttime nominees in an interesting showdown that does not include an opportunity for last year’s winner, Jeremy Strong, to repeat, since his series Succession was delayed by Covid. This means that acting winners from other recent Emmy seasons do have a chance to come back and repeat, but only two of those are still in the same roles that won them the Emmy— Sterling K. Brown in This Is Us, and Billy Porter in Pose, the latter with his final chance to repeat for that landmark series. Matthew Rhys, who eventually won for The Americans in its final season, is back for the first go-round of Perry Mason. The interesting thing tying all the newcomers—Jonathan Majors, Josh O’Connor and Regé-Jean Page—is that, for various reasons, they all have a one-and-only chance to win.

Regé-Jean Page

Billy Porter

Matthew Rhys

A certified breakout star in another Netflix smash hit, Page became the most talked-about star of the season, even to the point of hosting Saturday Night Live (a gig that did not win him a Guest Actor nod, sadly). It was, however, just one memorable season for Page—in and out, as it were—as Bridgerton moves on to other stories and other stars. No matter what happens Emmy-wise, it turned out to be a hell of an audition for the role of James Bond.

Porter won this prize in an enormously popular moment on the Emmys two years ago. It was a history-making win, but he did not repeat in the second season— likely because voters felt he’d had his due. A smart campaign this year, noting the historic nature of the show as it leaves the air, just might reignite his chances and bring him back as a formidable contender if voters respond to the moment. However, co-star Mj Rodriguez has a more compelling narrative this time round, and they may honor her instead.

Raymond Burr won the Emmy as Mason in this category on his very first nomination in 1959, and was subsequently nominated twice more for it. Can Rhys find that same Mason magic and match Burr’s form as the titular TV lawyer? It may help that, unlike Burr, Rhys also gets to do his best Bogart imitation in this origins story, which sees Perry starting out as a ’30s-era P.I. It’s irresistible stuff, and could bode well for a win, even if Rhys is the only one of the six nominees here not in a series also nominated for Best Drama.

Bridgerton

50

Pose

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

Perry Mason

Sterling K. Brown

Jonathan Majors

Josh O’Connor

A perennial nominee in this category, Brown has been nominated in all five seasons This is Us, having won the trophy in 2017, which followed his win in the Limited Series category the previous year for The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. It’s exceedingly rare for an actor to come back to the winners’ circle for the same role with such big a gap between victories—Emmy voters tend to drift toward shiny new objects. But he’s well-liked and is the only nominee here with a second chance this year, since he is also nominated for his role as Narrator in Lincoln: Divided We Stand.

With his first Emmy nomination, Jonathan Majors had a juicy role in the genre-spanning HBO series that gave him plenty to do in episodes that moved from horror to fantasy to science fiction and beyond. Unfortunately, HBO cancelled the series shortly after the Emmy nominations were announced, so this is Majors’ only opportunity to win for this role—which could be a plus or a minus, depending on how voters perceive it.

Like Majors, O’Connor— who brilliantly played Prince Charles and has already been honored with some precursor prizes for it—does not have a chance to come back next year should he lose, since the role of king-in-waiting will be going to another actor as the character ages in the ongoing series. Since this season focused heavily on the wedding woes of Charles and his wife Diana, it seems like this is his time, especially if the series shows signs of sweeping.

This Is Us

Lovecraft Country

The Crown

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES There are a whopping eight nominees in this category. Three belong to The Handmaid’s Tale—Bradley Whitford, Max Minghella and O-T Fagbenle—so, assuming they cancel themselves out, we have five intriguing choices. These include perennial loser Giancarlo Esposito, up this time for The Mandalorian; perennial winner John Lithgow (six times on 13 nominations) for a four-episode role on Perry Mason; Tobias Menzies, looking to be part of a sweep for The Crown; Chris Sullivan, singled out once again for This Is Us; and Michael K. Williams as the conflicted father in the cancelled Lovecraft Country. With this many nominees, it is sometimes smart to look to those in a show that is widely seen and admired, and this year that could be The Crown—which means that Menzies’ performance as Prince Philip might well be the ticket, especially in the year that the 99-year-old Prince died. If he wasn’t competing with his co-stars, I would probably be more decisive in settling for Max Minghella in The Handmaid’s Tale. This year’s category is a tough nut to crack.

The Winner: Max Minghella, The Handmaid’s Tale


FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION ®

OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL (PRE-RECORDED)

THOMAS SCHLAMME OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL

TO VIEW COMPLETE EPISODES, GET THE WBFYC APP AT


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS

IN A DRAMA SERIES There is history to be made again this year in a category that is as diverse as they get. With Mj Rodriguez aiming to be the first-ever transgender winner here, that could be quite a hard scenario to resist for voters who might want to throw a bone to Pose in its final go-round. Like Drama Series Actor, the winner here last year, Zendaya, isn’t competing again, since the new season of Euphoria didn’t make the eligibility dates. But it doesn’t mean we don’t have some proven Emmy favorites to contemplate here: Elisabeth Moss remains the only one of the six nominees to have won before, and there are two incredibly strong turns from The Crown in the mix as well, plus there’s one performer who seems to win and break some kind of record just about every time she’s in the race.

Elisabeth Moss

Mj Rodriguez

Jurnee Smollett

As mentioned, Moss is the only one of the six nominees to have won in this category before, and it was for this role in her first season. Now, with a very strong fourth season, she is as formidable as ever, and even added her much publicized directing debut to the mix. Being a 13-time Emmy nominee is proof positive that Academy members do respect her, so it would not be a surprise if she were to win again, since, with 21 nominations, The Handmaid’s Tale may indeed be enjoying something of an Emmy renaissance this season.

She is already making history as the first transgender nominee in a leading category at the Emmys, so can she take it one step further and become the first ever winner? There are a lot of pundits out there betting she can. It doesn’t hurt that she was excellent here, and that the producers are waging a campaign to remind voters of just how important this series has been as it prepares to sail off into the sunset.

This fine actress got a role worthy of her talents in a mindbending series that is clearly favored by the actors’ branch of the Television Academy, who nominated no less than five of its stars this year. Could Smollett benefit from a sympathy vote, since HBO upset the applecart by cancelling the series despite 18 nominations overall?

The Handmaid’s Tale

52

Pose

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

Lovecraft Country

Uzo Aduba

Olivia Colman

Emma Corrin

The reboot of HBO’s drama series gave Aduba the opportunity to step into the shoes of Gabriel Byrne and she proved to be an excellent choice. Aduba is an Emmy darling, no question about it. Having won in two different categories and genres for the same show, Orange is the New Black (Guest Actress in a Comedy, Supporting Actress in a Drama Series), as well as just last year as Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie (Mrs. America), can Aduba now triumph in a fourth category as lead actress in a drama series? Don’t count her out.

You never want to count Colman out whenever she is nominated for anything, and as Queen Elizabeth II in the past two seasons of The Crown she certainly has made her mark. However, it seems that her co-star Emma Corrin may have upstaged her, just as Diana upstaged the Queen in real life. It doesn’t feel like a win for Colman this time.

Fireworks were set off between Corrin’s Princess Diana and Josh O’Connor’s Prince Charles in this season, and it seems like that’s all anyone can talk about in the buzziest year ever for Peter Morgan’s series. A winner of some earlier awards, Corrin looks like the one to beat here, even if she and Colman represent the only actors in the category that are competing from the same series, often meaning they could cancel each other out.

In Treatment

The Crown

The Crown

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES Well, either the Academy’s performers branch didn’t watch a wide variety of shows, or they just really, really liked The Crown and The Handmaid’s Tale—or at least it seems that way, if you look at the eight nominees up in this category. The sheer density of actors from those two shows dominate here, with Ann Dowd , Madeline Brewer, Yvonne Strahovski, and Samira Wiley all named for their performances in The Handmaid’s Tale, while Gillian Anderson, Helena Bonham Carter, and Emerald Fennell (this year’s Best Original Screenplay Oscar-winner for Promising Young Woman) are up for The Crown. With the potential for each of these nominations to kill each other off in the final vote, it would seem almost a lock for Lovecraft Country’s sole contender, Aunjanue Ellis, to take home the gold, especially since she really got to stretch herself. However, a smart bet is for Anderson, who just killed it as U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in The Crown and has already won a few prizes along the way for playing the same historical figure that won an Oscar for Meryl Streep. It is likely to be Anderson’s second Emmy win as well.

The Winner: Gillian Anderson, The Crown


FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION ®

4 NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL (PRE-RECORDED)

BEN WINSTON OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL

TO VIEW COMPLETE EPISODES, GET THE WBFYC APP AT


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES Black-ish

Cobra Kai

In the past, Emmy voters tended to like one show and then let it repeat for several seasons as the champ in the Comedy Series category. Until very recently, just three series enjoyed multiple runs at the gold: there were three wins in a row for 30 Rock, followed by five wins in a row for Modern Family, then three wins in a row for Veep. However, in recent Emmy Awards the winner in this category has gone to three different shows in as many years: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (2018), Fleabag (2019), and Schitt’s Creek (2020). In all those cases the win was overwhelming, but also came with their first nominations as Best Comedy Series (and in the case of the latter pair, in their final season). What’s interesting about the race this year is that none of them will be defending their crown, since Fleabag and Schitt’s Creek are history, and Mrs. Maisel did not appear with a new season during this year’s eligibility dates. So whatever wins among the eight nominees we have in 2021, it is guaranteed that, for the fourth year in a row, we’ll have a fresh victor in the Comedy Series category.

After earning nominations in this category in 2016, 17, and 18, it returns to the race this year after failing to make the cut for the past two years. With 24 nominations in total over its seven seasons, the show has only won one Emmy— for Outstanding Contemporary Hairstyling—in that time. It also represents the sole nominee this year for Best Comedy Series from any broadcast network. Can it possibly win, or will voters decide to wait to crown it in its announced final season next year?

One of three nominees from Netflix which has never won here, Cobra Kai was on YouTube for its first two seasons but only managed a couple of stunt coordinator nominations. This third season was shot before the series officially announced its move to Netflix, and the switch seems to have made all the difference—it received four nominations, including the big one here. Its presence may seem a bit of a surprise, but this homage to The Karate Kid in middle age is a real crowdpleaser, and it has slowly but steadily been catching on.

Emily in Paris

PEN15

Ted Lasso

After breaking through with writing nominations last year in its first season, this clever Hulu series lands its first nod in this category. Starring two 30-something actresses/creators/ writers playing their 13-year-old selves against real young actors of that age is as original as any show in the category. It gets seriously big points for pulling off a nearimpossible premise and making it work.

With 20 nominations overall—the largest total ever for a Comedy Series in its first season—this feelgood show stars Jason Sudeikis as the title character, a kind and likeable American soccer coach taking on an English team. A fishout-of-water tale, it was immediately beloved, sweeping all the early precursor awards and enjoying record-breaking viewing figures for its perfectly Emmy-timed second season, which is now airing. The wind is at Ted Lasso’s back, and I would not bet against this frontrunner.

ABC

Netflix

Another first-timer in the race for Netflix is this popular new series set in the City of Lights—popular, that is, with everyone but critics, who blasted the Golden Globes for nominating it and were then shocked when Emmy voters followed suit. Full disclosure: I am one of those Emmy voters who marked their ballot for this delightful show. Darren Star’s charming series clearly struck the right notes to score this nod, and why not? Its chances for a win are pretty much nil, but the fact that it’s in the race is victory itself.

The Flight Attendant HBO Max

One of two shows from fledgling new streamer HBO Max, this mystery-comedy series starring Kaley Cuoco was an immediate hit—viewers, and Emmy voters, couldn’t binge it quickly enough when it debuted. Its international vibe certainly didn’t hurt on its way to garnering nine nominations overall, the third highest total in the category.

Hacks

HBO Max The other entry from HBO Max was this show about the relationship between a Joan Rivers-style Vegas comic and her new young writer, which is perhaps the show to watch out for in this category. It was late-breaking but immediately caught on—enough to score an impressive 15 nominations, despite coming in toward the end of the season. If there is a dark horse, it is probably this one—it immediately seemed to know exactly what it wanted to be and proceeded to deliver the goods.

The Kominsky Method Netflix

Chuck Lorre’s threeseason series for Netflix went out in style with a six-episode finale that seemed the perfect ending for a show about aging without giving in to old age. Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner, in a return to the chemistry of past movies like Romancing the Stone and The War of the Roses, made this highly watchable. It is Netflix’s best chance to get a win in this category, since it represents the last chance to do so. Still, it’s an uphill climb.

Hulu

Netflix

AppleTV+

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

54

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E


© Viacom International Inc.


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR

IN A COMEDY SERIES After last year’s Schitt’s Creek tsunami—the series completely dominated the comedy categories and crushed the competition in its final season, including a well-deserved win here for Eugene Levy—it’s more or less back to normal in this category with just five nominees, including several veterans. These include Anthony Anderson, with his seventh consecutive nomination here, as well as William H. Macy who has grabbed his sixth nod for Shameless after sitting the last two years out. Michael Douglas is also back for the third straight year. Overall, though, this is one of the weaker years for comedy categories.

William H. Macy

Jason Sudeikis

Kenan Thompson

Macy could probably be excused for thinking his days of being nominated for Shameless were in the past, after failing to show up in this category in 2019 and 2020 (some of that due to production schedules). Voters instead decided to give him—and by extension the Showtime series—a final rose with his sixth nomination, but a win is unlikely to be on the cards this year.

If there’s an unquestioned frontrunner in the category this year, it’s not the perennial Ted Danson (who somehow missed the cut for his new series Mr. Mayor), but Ted Lasso, TV’s new nice guy. The Apple TV+ series has given Sudeikis a role that has literally swept the precursor awards and shows no signs of abating when it comes to Emmys. He also has two nominations for writing, making his lifetime total of Emmy nominations three— and all this year.

Thompson enters this category for the first time after being nominated for the first season of his self-titled NBC show, Kenan. He’s clearly on the Academy’s radar, having won an Emmy for co-writing a song called “Come Back Barack” for SNL in 2018, and this year he has been nominated again in the Supporting Actor category for that show. It can’t hurt that he has lasted 18 seasons on SNL, making him the longest-serving cast member ever.

Shameless

Ted Lasso

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

56

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

Kenan

Anthony Anderson

Michael Douglas

No one has had a better, or more consistent, track record of being nominated here in the last few years than Anthony Anderson, making it seven years in a row and for the entirety of the run of Black-ish without missing a beat. Unfortunately, he has also done it without missing a loss. Batting zero for seven makes him the Susan Lucci of the category, but hopefully he won’t have to wait 19 years, like she did, to get his hands on that statuette.

Douglas went out in style in the third and final season of Chuck Lorre’s sitcom about keeping your dignity while aging. His storyline this season brought both a kind of dream conclusion for his character, Sandy Kominsky, and a reteaming with his former co-star Kathleen Turner, once again letting the sparks fly (she should have been nominated as well). A past winner for the television movie Beyond the Candelabra, Douglas is probably a longer shot to win here, despite never dropping the ball in this touching Netflix comedy series.

Black-ish

The Kominsky Method

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES Voters found many more nominees to anoint in the Supporting Actor Comedy category this year than they did for lead, but fully half of the eight contenders are all from the same show. In Ted Lasso, Brett Goldstein, Brendan Hunt, Nick Mohammed, and Jeremy Swift all proved their worth. But how do you choose just one of them? That may well open things up for the rest of the field. For example, veteran SNL star Kenan Thompson is nominated here again, this time against newcomer SNL breakout Bowen Yang. It is not inconceivable that Thompson’s nomination for lead actor for Kenan might help him eke out a win here. If not, maybe there’s hope for 11-time Emmy nominee Paul Reiser in The Kominsky Method. And if Reiser doesn’t benefit from the Lasso traffic jam, maybe the award will go to Karl ClemonsHopkins, representing Hacks, which has 15 nominations overall and could prove to be a sleeper.

The Winner: Brendan Hunt, Ted Lasso


© Viacom International Inc.


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS

IN A COMEDY SERIES

Aidy Bryant

Kaley Cuoco

Bryant is just fine in this Hulu comedy, but how many voters have even seen it? Her nomination was a surprise, but the less competitive nature of the category, and the fact several shows that might have made the cut were not on the air this season, helped her get this bid. Good as she is, there is little chance of winning. Voters love her though, and she is also up for SNL in supporting.

After 12 seasons of The Big Bang Theory, Cuoco took matters into her own hands, found Chris Bohjalian’s 2018 novel, took it to Warner Bros. and got a deal for her new series. Her efforts paid off: she landed it smoothly and got her first ever Emmy nomination for a role that takes her off into new directions, where the sky’s the limit. She could be a sleeper here, but there is some stiff competition on the flight path.

Allison Janney

Tracee Ellis Ross

Jean Smart

Janney won a couple of supporting Emmys for the first couple of years of this great sitcom, but then decided to go for lead status, regularly earning more nominations (she has 15 in her career and seven wins). A win here could tie her with Cloris Leachman in rarefied territory, and the series gets to end on a high note. Will that be enough? Or do voters think Janney already has enough?

Ross has proved herself and has been racking up Emmy nominations since 2016 for this sitcom, which only has one more year to go. Will voters wait to honor her on the final season, or will they throw what would be a major upset in the series’ seventh inning?

Smart has nailed the most memorable role of her career as Deborah Vance, an ageing Vegas female comedian (think Joan Rivers meets Elayne Boosler with a bit of Debbie Reynolds), in this darkly funny and biting series. She’s so good in this it would be a shock if she doesn’t pick up a fourth career Emmy.

Shrill

Like the Lead Comedy Actor group, this category only sports five nominees, including veterans Tracee Ellis Ross and Allison Janney, but also two new HBO Max shows providing sensational roles for a couple of TV sitcom veterans. Deservedly, the Emmy last year went to Catherine O’Hara of Schitt’s Creek, showing that voters do like to honor their icons when they can. However, this is a category that usually resists change: Julia Louis Dreyfus won it six times in a row for Veep, and Candice Bergen took it five times in a row for Murphy Brown.

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES Aidy Bryant has little chance of winning in the Lead category, and not much chance here either as one of three SNL nominees that also include two-time winner Kate McKinnon and another SNL vet Cecily Strong. I doubt any of them can win against some killer competition that also includes two more members of the Ted Lasso cast. Both are simply superb, but Hannah Waddingham as the team owner probably has the advantage over equally fine Juno Temple. Rosie Perez is always fun to have on board and she doesn’t disappoint in The Flight Attendant, but for edgy brilliance check out Hannah Einbinder, who is the other ‘hack’ in Hacks—believe me, she goes toe-to-toe with Jean Smart, and that’s no small task. With 20 noms for Ted Lasso and 15 for Hacks, it comes down to a question of which show got more eyeballs from Emmy voters. If Temple can pull just a few votes away from Waddingham, who has been a precursor favorite on the awards circuit, that could open the door for Einbinder. I’m really torn. Can we call it a tie?

The Winner: Hannah Waddingham, Ted Lasso

Mom

Black-ish

The Flight Attendant

Hacks

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

58

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E


© Viacom International Inc.


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR

IN A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES OR MOVIE

IN A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES OR MOVIE Hamilton dominates this category, as voters chose to nominate Daveed Diggs, Jonathan Groff, and Anthony Ramos for performances they delivered five years ago, just before the end of the run of the original Broadway cast. The show was taped, however expertly by Thomas Kail, but they belong in some other category that the Academy failed to create—so even though the program itself is classified as a Variety Special (Pre-Recorded) they somehow were made eligible here, thereby crowding out truly deserving actors such as the cast of The Underground Railroad, Donald Sutherland in The Undoing, Brendan Gleeson in The Comey Rule and more. Of the other three who managed to survive the Hamilton invasion, Thomas BrodieSangster in The Queen’s Gambit, Paapa Essiedu in I May Destroy You, and Evan Peters in Mare of Easttown would all be deserving winners. However, the latter’s complex turn was in a class by itself.

The Winner: Evan Peters, Mare of Easttown

60

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

Hugh Grant

Bettany could have been easily nominated here for his role in the nominated Television Movie, Uncle Frank, but those movies don’t figure much anymore in the acting categories. WandaVision, on the other hand, was so inventive it won 23 nominations overall, including a nod for Bettany, who not only recreates his Marvel Universe character of Vision, but gets to honor some of the greatest TV sitcom stars of all time, including Dick Van Dyke. It’s a dazzling turn.

Grant should have won this for A Very English Scandal, but he tops that here as a doctor suspected of murder in this nifty David E. Kelley thriller. Perhaps because it came out earlier in the season, this popular watercooler series did not get much love from TV Academy voters, but they did not forget Grant—he’s a possible default choice to honor the entire series as well. It certainly showed he is as adept in intense dramatic roles as he is in light comedy.

WandaVision

When it comes to acting nominations in this newly named category for performers you might as well just skip the part about Anthology or TV movies. All the acting nominations—this year at least—are from Limited Series (formerly called miniseries), or in the case of those seven nominations for Hamilton actors, come from a show otherwise only eligible for Variety Special (Pre-Recorded). Go figure. The Television Academy has been wrestling with eligibility in certain areas that just don’t seem to fit elsewhere, so they came up with this convoluted hodgepodge that makes little sense, shoehorning Hamilton’s cast in here because they couldn’t find any other place to put the stars of this video performance shot five years ago. Sadly, because of this, very worthy performances from the likes of Ethan Hawke, Jeff Daniels, Bryan Cranston, John Boyega, Joel Edgerton, Chris Rock and more have been shuffled off to the sidelines. Here are the Lead Actors who did make the cut.

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR

Paul Bettany

Ewan McGregor Halston

With all the competition out there, it isn’t surprising that Ryan Murphy’s Netflix limited series was overlooked, but it would have been shocking if McGregor’s superbly layered portrait of its title icon did not land on this list. He enveloped the style, spirit, and tragic decline of the eponymous fashion designer like no one else could.

The Undoing

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

Lin-Manuel Miranda Hamilton

It is hard to measure the performances of Hamilton against those created directly for television. There’s no question that the man behind this landmark Broadway production, as well as his performance in the original Broadway cast, is phenomenal and certainly deserved his Tony nomination, but he doesn’t really belong in this category. That isn’t Miranda’s fault— it’s the Academy’s.

Leslie Odom Jr Hamilton

He beat Miranda when pitted against him in the corresponding category at the Tonys over five years ago for this very same preserved performance. It is likely he will also garner more Emmy votes too, but it seems unlikely that most Emmy voters will want to just rubberstamp the Tonys.


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS

IN A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES OR MOVIE

Michaela Coel

Cynthia Erivo

After sweeping the BAFTAs, this virtuoso series has picked up great momentum in this race, landing this star with writing, directing, and producing nominations. Her performance is stunning, but might Academy voters decide she could win Emmys in any number of other categories and spread the wealth by giving this prize to a less versatile nominee?

Playing a well-known star is almost always a guaranteed ticket to awards buzz, and although critics were mixed on the overall bio series on Aretha Franklin, they were all agreed that Erivo knocked it out of the park. What will be more interesting is what the effect is of the theatrical movie of Franklin’s life, Respect, starring Erivo’s The Color Purple co-star Jennifer Hudson, which opens on the weekend that balloting begins for the Emmys. Erivo could be helped by the comparisons or possibly hurt.

Elizabeth Olsen

Anya Taylor-Joy

Kate Winslet

Like Paul Bettany, Olsen gets to show her range in paying tribute to some of the great comedy stars in American television history, and proving she is more than up to the assignment while also recreating her beloved character from the MCU. The sheer number of nominations—at 23, the most for any Limited Series this year—could mean that WandaVision might be seen by more voters than any other, and that could also help Olsen pull off a win.

No one came into this race with more momentum than Taylor-Joy, who swept every precursor award she could win in this role of the chess wunderkind. In the natural scheme of things, the Emmy would seem to be hers, making her the favorite. But since all those earlier awards shows, the competition has truly heated up—and it’s no slam dunk.

Winslet is a previous Emmy winner in this category for Mildred Pierce, and she remains the only one of this year’s new class of Emmy nominees to be repeating. Mare of Easttown was late to the race and made a lot of noise—now some pundits are saying the great Kate may be well be set up to win her second Emmy here in what is certainly her most complex role in years. This really is a toss-up, but can she beat Taylor-Joy?

I May Destroy You

An incredibly rich category where, fortunately, no one from Hamilton qualified, leaving room for one of the strongest fields in a long time, boasting a shortlist that cut out the likes of Nicole Kidman in The Undoing, Thuso Mbedu in The Underground Railroad, Kate Mara in A Teacher, Tessa Thompson in Sylvie’s Love and more. There is no question that, in terms of quality, the Limited Series category offers such a range of great work that this it truly deserves to be expanded to allow more nominees. It has become just too much of a heartache to limit it to just five finalists, but here we are with a lineup of four first-time Emmy nominees, and one very veteran Oscar and Emmy winner looking to do it again.

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS

IN A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES OR MOVIE The Hamilton effect strikes here again, with voters showering nominations on Renee Elise Goldsberry and Phillipa Soo, but I don’t expect either to triumph here (although Goldsberry could be helped by her nonnominated but acclaimed turn in new Peacock comedy series Girls5eva). Kathryn Hahn is one to watch here for her delicious work in WandaVision, and she is well liked by her fellow actors. Moses Ingram turned up toward the final episodes of The Queen’s Gambit and was memorable, but it is a head-scratcher to me that Marielle Heller was not nominated, as she made even more of an impression in that series. That leaves extraordinary work from both Julianne Nicholson and Jean Smart. Smart is almost certainly going to win Lead Comedy Actress for Hacks, so voters may feel they can reward her there, and leave room for Nicholson who really brought it all home in the harrowing finale of Mare of Easttown.

The Winner: Julianne Nicholson, Mare of Easttown

WandaVision

The Queen’s Gambit

Genius: Aretha

Mare of Easttown

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

62

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E


O UT S TAN D I N G T E L E V I S I O N M OV I E

ROBIN ROBERTS PRESENTS:


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D

WHAT SHOULD WIN?

OUTSTANDING

LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES The name of this category has evolved over the years— the new name is designed to find someplace other than Television Movie to showcase individual episodes of what are known as Anthology series. After Netflix continually triumphed with Black Mirror by entering separate episodes as TV Movies, the Academy wisely caught on and has now shuffled them off to compete with Limited Series where, basically, they don’t have a chance. The TV Academy really needs to expand this category as they did with Drama and Comedy series—this year’s also-rans include The Good Lord Bird, Small Axe, The Undoing, Your Honor, The Comey Rule, Fargo and many more. Looking at the five that did make the cut, it’s an almost impossible choice to make, which means the winner could be anyone’s guess.

Mare of Easttown HBO

This late-breaking limited mystery series with Kate Winslet in memorable form really got people talking, even if they weren’t gathered around the water cooler during the pandemic. The series itself was shut down due to Covid delays but managed to get finished in time for a late spring premiere and created immediate Emmy buzz. With 16 nominations, it is just two behind leader The Queen’s Gambit. Can it make it all the way?

The Queen’s Gambit Netflix

If ever there was a nominee coming in as a sure-fire favorite it is this fascinating period piece starring Anya Taylor-Joy as a young chess wunderkind who takes the world by storm. Its pedigree is impressive—the show has literally swept every precursor awards race since its release earlier in the season—and seemed unstoppable at the Emmys until Mare of Easttown and I May Destroy You started gaining momentum. Now it’s a race.

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

64

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

The Underground Railroad Amazon

Perhaps the single most ambitious undertaking of any entry this year, this mammoth and sweeping saga of a runaway slave in the Antebellum South was 10 episodes of extraordinary storytelling from Oscar-winning director Barry Jenkins—his adaptation of Colson Whitehead’s book would be Emmyworthy in any year. However, its puzzling lack of a writing or any acting nomination is a possible detriment in pulling off a win.

I May Destroy You HBO

This British drama from multi-talented Mchaela Coel about a writer trying to put her life back together after a sexual assault, is about as critically acclaimed as you can get, and its recent sweep of BAFTAs only adds to its momentum. Voters have caught on to seeing it, and now it is in a position to triumph here, where being British can be a plus. On the downside nine nominations is the second lowest total in the category, which indicates that it doesn’t have the kind of across-the-board support of some of its competitors. But I wouldn’t rule it out.

WandaVision Disney+

Marvel makes it to the Emmys with this wildly inventive and entertaining genre series starring Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, who in addition to reprising their roles from the MCU and Avengers films add some real fun to the mix by brilliantly playing several different TV icons. Even if voters were to resist the Marvel of it all, they might still be Bewitched by its delightful homage to a bygone era of television comedy—and that could be a real bonus for this Disney+ triumph, which earned 23 nominations.

No one can see everything, but in my capacity as awards columnist at Deadline, I certainly have seen a lot. And so much of it proves why so many A-list stars and directors and artisans are flocking to television projects now more than ever. It is an exciting time, and it is extremely difficult to start choosing sides.

The Crown

For Drama Series, the consistency of The Crown, after four seasons, is so high-grade it would seem about time to honor it as Best Drama Series. This is Netflix’s best chance to finally crack the code for a win in one of Emmy’s three marquee program categories. For Comedy Series, Apple TV+ has really put itself on the map with Ted Lasso. It is way out front, with 20 nominations, and its second season sees no drop in quality, but HBO Max is also another new streamer that really has made an impact in this category with both The Flight Attendant and especially Hacks, which, to me, is the television series of the year in any category. Hacks

In the ridiculously crowded Limited Series category there is an embarrassment of riches—and I’m talking just about the shows that didn’t get nominated. Of those that did, for sheer ingenuity I would choose Marvel’s WandaVision. For heartpounding period drama I would choose The Queen’s Gambit, which nailed (continued next page)


+++++ “A BREATHTAKING SCREEN SENSATION.”


EMM Y 2 02 0 H AN DICAPS / BY P ETE H A M M O N D (continued from previous page)

OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE

Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square Netflix

If ever there was more proof needed of the sorry state of the Television Movie category, once a proud beacon for the networks, it is that the combined total number of nominations for this year’s crop of nominees in the category is just a measly seven, spread amongst the five nominees. Compare that to 63 overall nominations for the five Limited Series nominees and you can see where the love is really being spread. Limited Series and Television Movie have been combined at various times in Emmy’s past, but the Academy wisely figured out that, in this day and age, television movies would not stand a chance at glory if that continued (in much the same way that anthology series are discovering). This is not to disparage the nominees this year, which is, for the most part, the best lineup in a long while in this category. It’s going to be tough to call.

Yet another entry in the ever-lovable Parton’s series of movies for Netflix, this wholesome seasonal musical entry featured Parton, Christine Baranski and others to offer up some satisfying Christmas cheer, even if the Hallmark Channel has cornered the market on this kind of thing by turning christmas flicks into a cottage industry. Parton, though, makes it special and once again lands a nomination here.

the huge challenge of making chess cinematically riveting, and for wild ambition, Barry Jenkins’ devastatingly fine The Underground Railroad. For a single achievement by just one person I would have to tip my hat to Michaela Coel’s I May Destroy You.

I May Destroy You

But for just plain good old-fashioned craft and execution, and for igniting (virtual) watercooler conversation I just still can’t get Mare of Easttown out of my mind, a weekly must-watch and a reminder that you don’t have to bingewatch to be enthralled. I have no idea what will win this category, and really wouldn’t be sorry to see a five-way tie.

Mare of Easttown

Oslo HBO

This television adaptation of J.T. Rogers’ Tony Awardwinning play about the secret negotiations behind the 1990s Oslo Accords is one of two nominees, apart from Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square, that managed an extra Emmy nomination overall (it is also up for music score). Ruth Wilson and Andrew Scott star in the film, but it’s the Executive Producer credit for a certain Steven Spielberg that may grab voters’ attention.

Robin Roberts Presents: Mahalia Lifetime

Not to be outdone by Dolly Parton, the GMA anchor also gets her name in the title of this rousing biopic of gospel superstar Mahalia Jackson, played by Danielle Brooks. Roberts is producing a series of films for Lifetime and this one really gets your juices going, especially during the bountiful musical numbers. And Brooks’ soaring voice does Jackson’s music true justice.

Sylvie’s Love

Uncle Frank

One of two films picked up at the Sundance Film Festival and turned into television movies rather than theatrical releases, this lovely throwback to the romantic dramas of the 1950s and ’60s features a fine cast led by Tessa Thompson and co-star/producer Nnamdi Asomugha as a couple who meet in a jazz record store in Harlem. They light up the small screen with all the swoon of Streisand and Redford in The Way We Were.

The other Sundance pick-up comes from Oscar and Emmy winner Alan Ball and stars Paul Bettany, whose presence in WandaVision could give this intense and moving family drama a boost here as well. Set in the ’70s, this is a road movie of sorts, in which a gay man travels from the big city and his current life back to the roots of his very different Southern past. The performances are outstanding and could lift it to the winner’s podium for that reason.

Amazon

Amazon

Among performances, there was so much good work it seems a shame they can’t all win. My personal choice would be Ethan Hawke in The Good Lord Bird, and he was considered a frontrunner—until he didn’t get nominated. The same goes for Nicole Kidman in The Undoing (apparently, she just makes it all look too easy). Of those nominated in various categories, I have to say both Paul Bettany and Elizabeth Olsen probably deserve the gold for WandaVision, simply for the difficulty of the high wire act they attempted, with both sticking the landing.

PETE’S

WINNER PICK

66

D E A D L I N E . C O M /AWA R D S L I N E

WandaVision


Elizabeth Cier and Gary Springer Mike Repsch and Tamara Nagahiro

Jamie Neumann and Diego Ongaro

Adam Morse and Julia Varvara

Melissa George

Cocktails with Deadline Disruptors on the Croisette

Noah Fisher and guest

J U LY 9, 2 0 2 1 CANNES, FRANCE Deadline celebrates the Cannes Film Festival and Disruptors with our annual beach cocktail party

Oxana Popkova and Frank Mannion

SPONSOR: Grandave International PARTNERS: Bodvár - House of Rosés, Eyepetizer

Alex Marx, Christen Guilen and Robin Guillen

The Deadline Team

Stanley Preschutti and Keith Leopard

68

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

Ann and Bodvár Hafström

Christopher Pickard and Mark Adams

M I CH A E L B UCK N E R/D E A D L IN E

Max Coen and Simon Porter


OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES

“COBRA KAI IS IRRESISTIBLE.” -LOS ANGELES TIMES

OUTSTANDING STRUCTURED REALITY PROGRAM

“THE JUGGERNAUT THAT IS ABC’S SHARK TANK.” -DEADLINE

© 2021 Sony Pictures Television Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Radosław Śmigulski

Arturo Chavez and Carly Standley

Danielle Campbell and Kayvan Mashayekh

Carly Standley and Laura Brady

JoJo Dye

Producers Without Borders Dinner

Arturo Chavez

70

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

James Axiotis and family: Sophia, Georgia and wife Jerri

Amir Ramses and Intishal Al Timimi

J OH AN N A B ERG H OR N / ROXAN NE R E IN E BACH

J U LY 9, 2 0 2 1 CANNES, FRANCE


Marta Lewandowska, Filip Jan Rymsza, Mariusz Włodarski, Agnieszka Wasiak, Stanisław Dziedzic

Anna Terej and Krzysztof Terej

Dennis Ruh and Jacobine van der Vloed

Radosław Śmigulski, Sandy Lieberson and Dariusz Jabłoński

Polish Film Institute Dinner at Cannes J U LY 1 1 , 2 0 2 1 CANNES, FRANCE Krzysztof Sołek and Fabian Glubrecht

Anna Waśniewska and Nataša Bučar

The Polish Film Institute held a dinner at the Cannes Film Festival

Jacek Bromski and guest

Benoit Ginisty & Alicja Grawon-Jaksik

72

D E A D L I N E .C O M / AWA R D S L I N E

A RN OL D JE RO CK I

Aneta Hickinbotham and Leszek Bodzak


Security that’s transforming Hollywood? Amazing.

Deliver amazing See how at verimatrix.com/deliver-amazing-entertainment/


Profile for Deadline Hollywood

Deadline Hollywood - AwardsLine - 08/18/21 - Emmy Nominees  

Deadline Hollywood - AwardsLine - 08/18/21 - Emmy Nominees  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded