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Officers find stolen drugs in auto — Page 6A Sports

When lightning strikes Chase, East Rutherford and R-S Central all dealt with weather-related delays Friday

B Section

Sunday, August 23, 2009, Forest City, N.C.

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Fall sale moving to new location

NATION

By ALLISON FLYNN Daily Courier Staff Writer

Hurricane Bill weakens but stirs up surf

Page 9A

SPORTS

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

After months of construction, the new Rutherfordton Elementary school is read to open.

Rutherfordton Elementary ready By ALLISON FLYNN Daily Courier Staff Writer

Gator Nation is smiling again Page 1B

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RUTHERFORDTON – When school begins Aug. 25, students who attend Rutherfordton Elementary will walk through the doors of the brand-new school building, one school officials say was designed with growth and the future in mind. At 84,000-square feet, it’s one of the largest schools in Rutherford County. And compared to the old school, it seems palatial, said Principal Linda Edgerton, who was in on the design of the

school throughout the process. One of the design elements Edgerton was most concerned with was the front entrance. “I wanted a really nice front entrance so everyone would know where the front door is,” she said, gesturing to the large open area. The entrance is intentionally large. There’s an outdoor area designed with benches for students waiting on parents to pick them up. But for days when the weather is bad, the indoor area will Please see Elementary, Page 2A

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New classrooms includes interactive whiteboards for modernday instruction.

DEATHS Elsewhere

Floyd Henson Glenn Jackson Billy Washburn Page 5A

FOREST CITY – A “wee” business has made the move to a bigger location for its fall 2009 sale. WeeRuns, a children’s consignment sale held twice a year here, will be located in the former Steve and Barry’s building for the fall sale. The sale was held in the spring in a building adjacent to the Salvation Army Thrift Store. “We moved because we had outgrown the other space,” said Rutherford County WeeRuns Owner Kristi Germack. “We are so grateful for the Salvation Army letting us rent from them for so many years.” With the move comes more retail space for the fall sale. The Salvation Army building was 10,000 square feet, Germack said, and the thrift store graciously allowed WeeRuns shoppers to use its dressing rooms and restrooms. The former Steve and Barry’s building, Germack said, is 63,000 square feet and has dressing and restrooms. The larger space will provide more room for shoppers and more room for items. “Things will be spread out more and easier to see and we’ll be able to accommodate more items,” Germack said. “Shoppers will have more elbow room when browsing, too.” Some of those items include a separate section for school uniforms and in-style maternity clothes. Consignors can also bring larger size shoes to sell as well, as long as they are children’s styles, Germack said. Even though there will be more retail space, the layout of the sale will remain the same, Germack said, so shoppers will be able to Please see Sale, Page 6A

Hannah Saucier still has big dreams WEATHER

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By JEAN GORDON Daily Courier Staff Writer

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84 61 Today, and tonight, partly cloudy Complete forecast, Page 10A

INSIDE Classifieds . . . 5-7B Sports . . . B Section County scene . . . 6A Opinion . . . . . . . 4A Vol. 41, No. 201

Jean Gordon/Daily Courier

The Sauciers — Hannah holds the family pet, Sophie, surrounded by her Aunt Dawn (left) and her parents, Steve and Mia.

Now on the Web: www.thedigitalcourier.com

RUTHERFORDTON — Hannah Saucier wants to be a lawyer some day, trying cases like the lawyers on television’s “CSI.” She’s a great debater, her parents Steve and Mia Saucier testified at their Rutherfordton home last week. “I don’t like to be wrong,” Hannah joked. But it will be several years before she’ll be in court, arguing her cases. The 14-year-old freshman at Thomas Jefferson Classical Academy must finish high school before undergraduate studies and before she heads to law school at Harvard, Yale, Duke or Georgetown — one of her goals. There are other major goals to accomplish along the road. Hannah plans to walk again. Since June 11, 2007, she has been paralyzed and in a wheelchair, the result of a traumatic spinal cord injury that was the result of a diving accident. She injured vertebrae C5, C6 and a little bit of C7 as the result of a diving accident. Hannah is on a continual path of therapy and recovery. She spent her summer at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, Pa., where she underwent tendon transfer surgery on June 9, nearly two years to the date after her injury. Before the surgery, she was able to grasp things with her right hand, but the surgery will improve the right hand and provide pinching in her left Please see Hannah, Page 3A


2A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

LOCAL

New Rutherfordton Elementary opens Aug. 25 Continued from Page 1A

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

A modern playground also awaits the students at the new Rutherfordton Elementary School.

the perfect place for students to gather while staying safe from the elements. Traffic woes should be alleviated too at this location, Edgerton said. Bus traffic and car traffic enter by separate drives and there’s room at the front entrance for five cars to load and unload at the same time. The school’s main office was hard to locate in the old school, Edgerton said. In the new school, the office is clearly marked and the main reception desk features a lowered area for students. “I wanted students to be able to see who they were talking to when they come in,” she said. Divided into sections for grades kindergarten through fifth, each hallway and floor features additional storage space for teachers, including several book rooms. “We’ve got so much more storage here,” Edgerton said. In addition to storage so that everything has a place, there’s room so that everyone has a place. “The guidance counselor was literally in a closet at the old school,” Edgerton said, pointing to the guidance office. “She didn’t even have a phone.” Now an area in the administrative office suite is designated for the counselor to have conferences with parents. Edgerton said the cafeteria manager too will finally have an office – not to mention a new, large kitchen to cook in. “It’s like going from your home kitchen to Emeril’s kitchen,” Edgerton said. While the extra space is nice, the amenities of the new school will make for an even better educational environment. A drop-down screen with rear projection and a sound system will allow more opportunities for groups such as the PTA meeting at the school. The commons area, cafeteria, lobby and library have wireless Internet access. And classrooms where instruction will be held have Promethean boards and a new take on the teacher’s desk. “This will be their teaching station,” said Benny Hendrix, chief operating officer and technology officer for Rutherford County Schools. Designed by Hendrix, the mobile station will include audio/ visual equipment, computer and can be customized for additional equipment as needed. Also included in the mix is a new hands-free microphone for teachers and students to use. “Teachers will not be as tired at the end of the day from having to talk so loudly and if they have students who have trouble hearing, it makes a difference,” Hendrix said. “This is the minimum model we want all our schools to get to,” he added. “The board’s goal is to put a Promethean Board in every classroom.” Countywide there are 250 Promethean boards in use, Hendrix said. To cover every classroom in the county, around 600 are needed. Gone are the student desks of yester-year, replaced by new and improved units with backpack hooks and ergonomically designed chairs. “We tried to choose furniture that would last the longest through wear and tear,” Hendrix said. The school has also added a pre-kindergarten and Head Start program. For more information, contact Rutherford County Schools at 245-0252. Leaving the old location, which opened in 1955, is bittersweet for Edgerton, who has served as principal of Rutherfordton Elementary for more than 20 years. “I’m one of those who think you build on the past and we’ve got good memories in the old school,” Edgerton said. “But this is going to be so much better for the children. “I’m leaving home, but I’m glad.”

Ground-breaking event Tuesday for Rutherford Orthopedics

RUTHERFORDTON an even greater volume – Rutherford Hospital of orthopedic services Inc. will hold a ground- and care,” according to breaking ceremony Dave Bixler, Rutherford on Tuesday, August Hospital president and 25, at 6 p.m. for a CEO. new addition to the Rutherford Orthooffices of Rutherford pedics employs all Orthopedics. Surgeons board-certified orthofrom Rutherford pedic surgeons Dr. Orthopedics will join Mike Roberts and Dr. RHI board members, Chip Bond, along with Forest City Daily Courier_Rutherford County People_1.833inx3in administrators and Dr. Jason Glover, who staff in announcing the is a fellowship-trained project, which is expect- foot and ankle specialed to be completed late ist. this fall. The firm has consis“The addition at tently produced among Rutherford Orthopedics the highest patient is in response to growsatisfaction results ing demand by patients in the organization, and the surrounding Bixler added. In order communities to provide to more fully serve the growing numbers of patients at Rutherford Orthopedics, the practice is expanding. It is is located at 139 Dr. Henry Norris Drive.

Vassey & Hemphill Jewelers Inc. 110 W. Main St. Spindale 286-3711

Forest City Daily Courier Rutherford County People 1.833in. x 3in.


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 3A

LOCAL Hannah

About tendon transfer surgery

Tendon transfer surgery is a type of hand surgery that is performed in order to improve lost hand function. A functioning tendon is shifted from its original attachment to a new one to restore the action that has been lost. During tendon transfer surgery, the origin of the muscle is left in place; the nerve supply and blood supply to the muscle is left in place. The tendon insertion onto bone is detached and re-sewn into a different place. It can be sewn into a different bone, or it can be sewn into a different tendon.

Continued from Page 1A

hand. It will also provide the ability to lift her arms more easily and higher. She is going to physical and occupational therapy three times week at Cleveland Physical Therapy Associates. Hannah has some feeling and sensation below her arms, but no movement. At home last week, and sporting her new “I Love New York” T-shirt, and surrounded by her parents and Aunt Dawn Saucier of Italy and the family’s dog, Sophie, Hannah described her recent surgery in detail. Her father told teachers at TJCA the surgery took Hannah “two steps back to gain five steps forward.” As she is in postsurgery recuperation and rehab stages, she is gaining strength in her arms daily. When this therapy is completed in November, Hannah’s quality of life will be enhanced by 700 percent, her doctors explained before the operation. Last summer, the Sauciers traveled to Philadelphia, where they learned Hannah was a good candidate for the surgery and plans proceeded. For eight weeks her arms were in full cast, extended straight out and now she’s learning to regain use of her right hand and its functions. “And no electronics all summer,” she exclaimed, missing her cell phone, iPod and computer. Two weeks after the surgery, Mia asked doctors if she and Hannah could go home for Father’s Day weekend to surprise Steve. Courageously, Mia took the wheels of the family van and made the long 15-hour drive to Rutherfordton. They couldn’t stop for the night because Mia needed assistance transporting Hannah. “So we watched movies,” Hannah said, to which her mother responded, “She watched, I listened.” When they arrived home on Saturday night, Steve had gone out with a friend and was not home for their surprise. When Steve arrived, (the van was hidden), he began to make his walk upstairs when he heard a voice, “Hi dad.” Hannah was calling from her bedroom. Not expecting them home, Steve said he thought he was hallucinating and began to wonder about himself. All sorts of thoughts rushed through his

Hannah Saucier proudly sports her “I Love New York shirt” purchased during a sightseeing trip there early August. Jean Gordon/ Daily Courier

head. He even wondered if someone with Hannah’s identical sounding voice had broken into the house, then he figured he was surely hallucinating. “Hi, Dad. Can I have a kiss?” Hannah said she called out again. When Steve realized he wasn’t “just” hearing things, he rushed back down the stairs. “I fell on my knees and cried like a baby.” “It was the best Father’s Day,” he said. Following two weeks at home, Mia and Hannah returned to Shriners where they stayed until the first of August. Steve made a couple trips to visit and on the final visit, his sister, Dawn, flew to New York for a sight-seeing trip with Hannah. Dawn has been one of Hannah’s primary supporters since the accident. She was with her in Charlotte and at Shepherd’s Care during those hospitalizations. She was determined to enjoy New York with her niece. Thanks to a New York City tour guide — the brother of Mia’s best friend — the Sauciers had a front row seat to viewing everything in the city. Saturday was spent touring the city by car. “Lots of humanity,” Hannah said, of her first venture into New York City. Rains came on Sunday and forced them indoors after vis-

iting Ground Zero and Battery Park. But on Monday, the family got up at 5 a.m. to visit to the NBC’s “Today Show,” a mustsee for Hannah. “It was wonderful,” said Hannah. She personally met Meredith Vieira, Ann Curry, Al Roker and Matt Lauer and was presented an itinerary for the day’s show. Of the cast she said, “Al is shorter, Matt is taller, Meredith has some wrinkles and Ann is beautiful.” She was on the front row of the audience and at least three times during the broadcast, the camera scanned her with Roker. Friends from Rutherford County and her former home in New Orleans telephoned her, exclaiming they had seen her on television. Hannah and the family shopped in the NBC Store where she bought a “Saturday Night Live” t-shirt, visited the Top of the Rock, 70 stories up, where she and her mom had an aerial view of Central Park. “And I got an ‘I Love New York shirt,’” she said. She ate New Yorkstyle pizza, dined in an Italian restaurant in Frank Sinatra’s former hang out in New Jersey, had dinner in Greenwich Village and visited Times Square at night. Hannah had a wonderful time. “It was great.” She plans to go

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back as soon as possible. As Hannah is recovering from this surgery, there has already been talk with doctors about other spinal cord research that could enable her to walk. The family heard about the research on a “60 Minutes” show and also at Shriners. Some day further research will allow spinal cord patients to walk with the placement of a computer chip in the brain. “You think it in your brain and the brain will move

the leg,” is how the Sauciers described the procedure. “The spinal cord has nothing to do with it. it’s the brain chip,” they said. Hannah said Christopher Reeves’ accident certainly brought more awareness, education and funding for research for spinal cord injuries. Doctors at Shriners are optimistic about Hannah’s future and within three to five years, they believe even more progress will come her way. The Sauciers believe their daughter’s extremely positive attitude has brought her to where she is today and is keeping her focused on her future. Steve recalled the early days of Hannah’s injury, when she was in the hospital. “She was on a ventilator, unable to speak, was trying to overcome a serious bout of pneumonia and there were tubes everywhere,” he said. Steve was with Hannah as she was watching a movie late one night. “I pulled my chair right up to her bed and laid my head next to hers,” he said. “With her mouth, since she couldn’t talk, she mouthed to me, ‘This is fun.’” She is like that, he said. She makes the best of things and finds “fun” in every day experiences.

When she is not studying or texting, she enjoys her iPod, computer, telephone and Wii, which has proven to be great physical therapy. She also enjoys pottery and last year made all her Christmas presents at the pottery shop in downtown Rutherfordton. As Hannah has entered the high school chapter of life, where she is in honors classes, including an honors math class with only four students, she is expecting big things from her high school experience. She has a voiceactivated computer and doesn’t have to type all her notes. She uses the computer sometimes, and other times she takes the notes in her head, she said. Steve and Mia expressed their thanks and appreciation to everyone in Rutherford County and beyond who have supported them during these two years. The outpouring of love will never be forgotten, they said. And for anyone who some day may experience a traumatic spinal cord injury as she has, Hannah advises, “Don’t give up.” “She will walk,” Steve added. Send Hannah an e-mail: hannahsaucier@mac.com. Contact Gordon via e-mail at jgordon@thedigitalcourier.com.

New WIC Foods Promote Healthy Habits WIC…Healthy Habits, Healthy Families • Breastfeed your baby • Eat more fiber • Lower the fat • Eat more fruits and vegetables • Eat more whole grains • Drink less juice and sweetened beverages • Make family meals matter

Spindale - Starting on Oct. 1, North Carolina will make major changes to WIC, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. There will be more choices to support healthy habits such as breastfeeding, and eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains while lowering the fat. And, there will be more variety.

Whole-grain breads and cereals, tortillas, brown rice, fruits, vegetables and tofu are just some of the new items that will be available to low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infants and childrens until the age of five. The changes will encourage more breastfeeding. Women who breastfeed will receive more healthy foods than mothers who do not. As concerns about growing rates of overweight, obesity and diabetes continue, health experts say an overhaul was needed. “Originally, the WIC foods were meant to eliminate vitamin deficiencies. Today, it’s more a problem of eating too much and not getting enough physical activity that we have to deal with,” explains Becky Koone, direcor of the WIC Program for Rutherford, Polk, McDowell Health District. “The new foods follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” added Becky. In general, the foods available to the 4,179 WIC participants in the RPM Health District (2,166 from Rutherford County) will be higher in fiber and lower in fat. For the first time, selections like tofu, brown rice, tortillas and a wider variety of beans will meet more cultural preferences. At the WIC office in Spindale, Rutherford County WIC Program, families receive food instruments and cash-value vouchers along with recipes and tips on how to buy and use the healthier foods. “The WIC Program is especially helpful to families in this economy,” said Becky Koone. “Parents want to give their children healthier choices like more fruits and vegetables, and whole grains. Now they can.” The North Carolina WIC Program supports healthy habits for healthy families. Join us September 23, 2009, 10:00AM at the Rutherford County Health Center for a Kick Off of our “New WIC Foods” . For more information, contact Rutherford County WIC Program at 828-287-6238 between Monday-Friday 8:30-5:00 or go to www.nutritionnc.com and click on WIC. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


4A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 ■ A daily forum for opinion, commentary and editorials on the news that affects us all.

James R. Brown/ publisher Steven E. Parham/ executive editor 601 Oak Street, P.O. Box 1149, Forest City, N.C. 28043 Phone: 245-6431 Fax: 248-2790

E-mail: dailycourier@thedigitalcourier.com

Our Views Expansion of McNair great

W

ith all the tough economic news filling the news columns, it’s great to report a very positive story. That story is the expansion of the McNair Foundation program to Chase High. Bob McNair, the Rutherford County native, and his wife, Janice, have truly been county “angels” for a long time, establishing the foundation at East Rutherford High 20 years ago and for their efforts to help the Forest City Owls become established here. The contributions continue. Starting this school year, every Chase freshman will have a mentor. Grady Franklin, a veteran educator who taught at Chase for a number of years, serves as coordinator of the program at Chase. Monica Lee, the Foundation’s director, said the program has a track record to be admired. She noted that in 1994, 33 percent of the students at East met the admissions requirements for the University of North Carolina system. This year, the number was 69 percent. In addition to the McNair’s wonderful contributions, our hats go off to the 43 mentors who has stepped up to assist these students through their high school days. Franklin said the tradition at Chase “is exemplified today by the fact that many of the mentors are former Chase faculty and we also have former Chase students.”

Battling over public financing RALEIGH — It might be interesting to know how much Howard Manning has read of fellow judge Brent Benjamin. Manning is the Wake County Superior Court judge who recently made a ruling that could undermine the state’s public financing of appellate court races. Benjamin is the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals judge who has become the poster child for public campaign financing advocates. Benjamin obtained that distinction by gaining his job with the help of $3 million poured into his race by a West Virginia coal company executive. Then Benjamin cast the deciding vote in a case reversing a $50 million verdict against the same coal company. The U.S. Supreme Court, in June, found that Benjamin, by not removing himself from consideration of the case, blocked due process of the law. The justices came to the same conclusion that any rational person using common sense, and not hiding behind some legal distinction, would: Anyone who enjoys benefits gained from $3 million is going to be partial to the person who provided the money. North Carolina’s public financing laws are intended to prevent

Today in North Carolina Scott Mooneyham

that same scenario from happening here. They are far from perfect. To be honest, it seems a sad state of affairs when elected policymakers conclude that public money — gained through taxes or fees — are needed to keep corruption at bay. Self-restraint appears hard to find as Election Day nears and you’re trailing in the polls. But in a country where courts have held that money equals free speech — even when one person’s money has the ability to shout down and drown out other voices — public financing has emerged as a small seawall trying to hold back the waves of special interest money. The wall is far from perfect because what’s known as independent expenditure money, which doesn’t go directly to candidate’s campaigns, can overwhelm it. That’s what happened in 2006, when a group called fairjudges.net, dumped $200,000 into four appellate court races in the final days of

the campaign. The group was run by Democratic consultants, and three of the four candidates who benefited were Democrats. A 2008 U.S. Supreme Court decision also raises questions about the long-term survival of some public financing, especially provisions like one in North Carolina that allows additional “rescue funds” for candidates when an opponent receives a sudden influx of money. Manning’s ruling attacks the law on another front. He said the $50 fee charged to lawyers to raise the money for the program violates those lawyers’ free speech rights by forcing them to provide financial support to candidates with whom they might not agree. Manning attempted to split the baby by saying that the fee could continue to be charged by allowing lawyers to designate that their money go toward a voter guide that is also part of the program. Of course, if all lawyers do that, there will be no money for the campaigns. That’s OK. Maybe Benjamin will move to North Carolina and run against Manning. Scott Mooneyham is executive director of The Capitol News Service.

With the Lord, we need to get out of our own way

I

would like to share a story with you that happened in the past with my middle son. At the time he was four years old and was, of course, able to do some things for himself. As we returned home from an errand we stopped the vehicle and proceeded to go into the house. I opened my door and invited him out the driver’s side. He insisted on getting out his side. We had an exchange a couple of times and he said, “I want to get out my way.” I casually, under my breath said, “Don’t we all.” The Holy Spirit whispered into my heart and said, “Did you hear that, and your response to that?” That exchange speaks volumes about us. What you have just read is a condition of the fallen nature that refuses to go through the open door the Father has prepared for us. We insist on “getting out our way.” Life and all it brings into our lives can cause us to be ensconced into a veritable prison from which we seek to extricate ourselves. The “out” we seek, can take many forms: drugs, sex, fame, fortune and a host of other spiritual maladies. Jesus said He was the Way, the only way out of this prison called sin. The passion, crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ did not occur His way. It was the way of the Father that had been prepared. The path into eternal

Sunday Conversation Fr. Jonathan Lankford

glory and ultimate kingship for Christ was through the door of the Father’s Will which was the death to self (the Adam nature). I recall attending a powerful meeting in which a friend and mentor, Pastor Kelley Varner, who has since gone to be with the Lord, ministered a needed word about the body of Christ... a corporate anointing. He shared revelation about “the Body of Christ.” The Latin word “corpus” is where we get the word body. This word that was brought forth dealt with a corporate anointing which is being poured out and realized in the body of Christ of which Christ is the head. The results of Christ’s death and resurrection will not be realized our way. We are not the head — we are His body. How many times have we found ourselves being in a situation in which we needed to be extricated only to have an open door but yet wanting to get out our way. We needlessly toil and strive in exasperation to do it on our terms. The cross, which the Father had prepared for the Son,

was the way out of sin into His marvelous liberty and light. Israel, as one people, was led out of Egypt by a mighty hand. The hand of God is still at work, leading us through and into the place where He has prepared. The five-fold ministries of apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher lay hold of our lives to fashion, to lead us by His anointing and Word into the Most Holy Place where we experience the fullness of the Kingdom. The body of Christ that lay in the tomb was a picture of His elect, His Church from ages past and future that had to die to live. In St. John 12:24 the principle is revealed. The grain (Jesus) must fall into the grain or it abides alone. We abide with Him and the saints because He followed the way of the Father. The people of God, in the Old Covenant, were brought out as a body (one) though many; they were one people. Jesus took all our sins to us all into the realm of the eternal Kingdom. The way of our death into His life is a way that we struggle in. We must also learn to die to our own agendas and individual views of ministry so that we can move to an understanding that the anointing upon the body as a whole is greater than any individual anointing. The spices of the anointing

oil in Exodus 30 are brought together to create a blend from God that takes away the blindness of our self-will. Just as these many spices were brought into unity into the oil that would touch every vessel in that tabernacle, so this many-membered corporate man (Christ) in the earth is going to be joined together. The eyes, ears, fingers, etc. that are joined together as those spices were, will form an invincible presence in the earth that will manifest the Kingdom of light and destroy the kingdom of darkness. Moses said in Exodus 33:15, “if thy presence go not with me, carry us not up hence.” They were going to be carried into a land that was theirs but enemies were going to have to be destroyed. His presence with us in the land will bring great fear and dread in the hearts of God’s adversaries. For three and one half years they (the enemies of Christ) sought to kill Christ (the anointing) and after His resurrection and the day of Pentecost they sought to destroy, malign, and imprison God’s anointed leaders within the Church. The enemies of Christ joined together in a unified attempt to crush the seed and its subsequent life that would be made manifest. We will join together to be the offspring of that seed that will minister life and not death.

Just as the tomb (the realm and hold of death) could not contain Jesus Christ, so too, the realm of death in the earth cannot contain our restrain this corporate anointing. The lessor kingdom will give way to the greater Kingdom. In Exodus 30:33 Moses was admonished not to place this anointing oil upon a stranger. The strangers are those that are not in the covenant of God. Strangers are the uncircumcised of heart who are not in the New Covenant. We will not live His life in the earth or minister His life in the earth apart from the Body, or said another way, being individualistic. Relationships are key in our receiving and releasing this anointed life. All of Jesus was crucified and buried, not just a portion. All of Him came out of that tomb, also. The principle is this: all of His people must go the way of the Father before all of His anointing will be released in the earth. This sounds impossible, but it is possible with God. All of His Body shall be raised up into His glorious likeness. “I want to get out my way” is the heart of fallen and sinful Adam... I want to get out His way is the way of the exalted and victorious Christ... Then the resurrected life will appear. The release will come but it will be done His way, not ours.


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

5A

OBITUARIES/POLICE NOTES Pet of the Week

Billy Washburn Billy Gene Washburn, 81, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Rutherford Hospital. A native of Cleveland County and a retired Baptist minister, he was the son of the late Waylan and Frances Barnett Washburn. Survivors include his wife, Sue Ledbetter Washburn of the home, and three sons, Barry, Brent and Bill Washburn. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to your local cancer society. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Online condolences may be made at www.crowemortuary.com Crowe’s Mortuary & Crematory is in charge of arrangements.

Floyd Henson Floyd D. Henson of Nebo, formerly of Rutherford County, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Sunrise Rehabilitation and Care Center of Nebo. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced later by McMahan’s Funeral Home & Cremation Services.

Glenn Jackson

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

Community Pet Center youth volunteer Sarah Bearden holds a sweet 5 month-old black and white kitten looking to find a good home. This kitten’s pet ID number is A009980. This and many other loving animals are available for adoption at the Rutherford County Animal Shelter on Laurel Hill Drive in Rutherfordton. The shelter’s hours are Monday-Thursday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. . For more information call 287-6025. For the Community Pet Center volunteers office call 287-7738.

Police Notes n Burt Lamont Moore, 20, of 3126 U.S. 221 South; charged with disorderly conduct in public building or facility; placed under a $500 From staff reports BOSTIC – A mobile home secured bond. (FCPD) n Lonnie C. Ledbetter, 55, on Joe Bostic Road was of 680 St. Johns Rd.; charged destroyed by fire Friday with assault on a female; afternoon. placed under a 48-hour hold. Randy Jolley, chief of (RCSD) the Bostic Volunteer Fire n Lacy Jane Scoggins, 22, Department, said firefightof 171 Butler Rd.; charged ers were called out sometime with possession with intent between 3 and 3:30 p.m. The home was occupied, but to sell and deliver schedule information on the residents IV controlled substance and was not immediately avail- simple possession of schedable. There were no injuries ule IV controlled substance; released on a $17,000 unsein the blaze. cured bond. (RCSD) Bostic was assisted by Cherry Mountain, Ellenboro n Dominic Oneil Reynolds, 17, of 540 Bostic Sunshine and Hudlow firefighters. Highway; charged with No further information possession with intent to on the fire was available sell and deliver marijuana; Saturday afternoon. released on a $15,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) Sheriff’s Reports n Keven Ray Miller, 45, of n The Rutherford County 625 Chilly Bowl Rd.; charged Sheriff’s Office responded to with speeding, driving while 143 E-911 calls Friday. impaired and driving while license revoked violation Rutherfordton restored license; freed on a custody release. (RCSD) n The Rutherfordton Police n Kenneth Fitzgerald Department responded to 36 Rollin, 42, of 1311 Pleasant E-911 calls Friday. Hill Rd.; charged with two counts of simple possession Spindale of schedule VI controlled n The Spindale Police substance and possession of Department responded to 28 drug paraphernalia; released E-911 calls Friday. on a $5,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) Lake Lure n Jonathan Earl Ford, 21, of 148 Kendrick Farm Lane; n The Lake Lure Police charged with simple posDepartment responded to session of schedule III confour E-911 calls Friday. trolled substance; released on a $1,000 unsecured bond. Forest City (RCSD) n The Forest City Police n Clinton Russell Adkins, Department responded to 76 25, of 183 Hollywood St.; E-911 calls Friday. charged with failure to appear/failure to comply on community service and Arrests failure to pay money; placed n Otis Fredrick McEntire, under a $2,500 secured 60, of 921 Oakland Rd.; bond. (RCSD) charged with driving while n Vergia Dlice Mosley, 41, impaired and failure to stop of 387 Wells Drive; charged for stop sign/ flashing red with assault and battery; no light; freed on a custody bond listed. (RCSD) release. (FCPD) n Mashanda Rene Miller, n Montavious Eugene 36, of 332 Park St.; charged Parks, 18, of 166 Pointer with cyberstalking; no bond Rd.; charged with disorderly listed. (RCSD) conduct in public building or n Chad Jordan Bailey, 16, of facility; placed under a $500 123 Eastview Drive; charged secured bond. (FCPD) with simple assault; freed on n Joshua Gregory Bailey, a custody release. (RCSD) 22, of 106 W. Trade St.; n Timothy Lee Clark, 20, charged with breaking and/ of 275 Walter Horn Rd.; or entering and felony larcharged with possession of ceny drug paraphernalia; released

Fire guts mobile home

Obituaries

Forest Glenn Jackson Sr., 82, of 2413 Gaffney Rd., Mooresboro, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Cleveland Regional Medical Center. A native of Rutherford County, he was born July 28, 1927, a son of the late Archie Bynum Jackson and Nola Ree White Jackson. He was a member of Camps Creek Baptist Church, where he was a former deacon, former Brotherhood director and a teacher of the men’s

on a $1,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) n Lisa Marie Santana, 28, of 625 E. U.S. 74 Business; charged with violation of a court order; placed under a 48-hour hold. (RCSD) n April Hall Stacey, 28, of 125 E.J. Morrow St.; charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle; placed under a $5,000 secured bond. (RCSD) n Michelle Pack Lindsey, 34, of 395 Thermal View Drive; charged with driving while impaired and unsealed wine/liquor in the passenger area of a vehicle; released on a $1,000 unsecured bond. (RPD) n Brittney Ann Twymann, 20, of 106 Ryce St.; charged with consume alcohol by 19/20; released on a written promise to appear. (SPD) n Donald Ray Wilson, 67, of 481 Hunting Drive; charged with resisting a public officer; released on a $500 unsecured bond. (SPD)

Bible class. He was also a U.S. Navy veteran, serving in World War II. He was a retired planning manager for Dover Yarn Mills. He is survived by his wife, Lillie Mae Allison Jackson; one son, Forest Jackson of Mooresboro; one daughter, Glenda Brackett; one sister, Lois Elmore of Forest City; and two grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 4 p.m. Monday at Camps Creek Baptist Church with the Revs. Dennis Hester, Dale Welch, Justin Brackett and Charlie Blackwell officiating. Burial will follow in Cleveland Memorial Park. Visitation will be from 2 until 4 p.m. before the service at the church. Memorials may be made to Camps Creek Baptist Church, 2318 Camp Creek Church Rd., Mooresboro, NC 28114. McKinney-Landreth Funeral Home is serving the Jackson family. An online guest register is available at www.mckinneylandrethfuneralhome.com

Deaths Jonathan Byrd INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Jonathan Byrd, a longtime Indianapolis 500 car owner, died Thursday. He was 57. Paul Kelly, a spokesman for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, said Byrd died in Greenwood. Byrd had been disabled by a stroke since 2004. Byrd, an Indianapolis 500 entrant from 1985 until 2001, was the co-entrant of Arie Luyendyk’s all-time Indianapolis 500 record qualifier in 1996. Luyendyk turned a single lap in 237.498 mph and averaged 236.986 mph over four laps. Those records still stand. Although none of Byrd’s drivers won the race, several posted top-10 finishes, including Gordon Johncock (sixth in 1991) and Scott Brayton (sixth in 1993). Byrd also was a longtime sponsor of cars at the Indianapolis Speedrome short track.

John E. Carter HARVEY, Ill. (AP) — John E. Carter, the R&B lead tenor and two-time inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, died Friday. He was 75. His death was confirmed by Susan Fine, a spokeswoman for Ingalls Memorial Hospital in Carter’s hometown of Harvey. Carter, who was known for his falsetto, was the last surviving founding member of the Flamingos. The classic doo-wop group gained fame with such hits as “Golden Teardrops” and their reworking of the pop classic “I Only Have Eyes for You.” EMS/Rescue Carter left the Flamingos n The Rutherford County the first time in 1957 to do EMS responded to 30 E-911 military service, and left calls Friday. permanently in 1960 to join n The Volunteer Life Saving the Dells, which had been and Rescue, Hickory Nut formed in the early 1950s Gorge EMS and Rutherford County Rescue responded to by some of his high school friends from Harvey. 12 E-911 calls Friday. The Dells’ 1954 breakout

Fire Calls n Bostic firefighters

responded to a structure fire, assisted by Cherry Mountain, Ellenboro and Hudlow firefighters, and to a motor vehicle accident. n Cliffside firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Cherry Mountain firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Forest City firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident and to an industrial fire alarm. Green Hill firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Rutherfordton firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Spindale firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Sandy Mush firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident.

Mrs. Edwards opens a store CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — The wife of a former North Carolina senator and presidential candidate has opened a furniture store. Multiple media outlets report that Elizabeth Edwards opened the store called Red Window in downtown Chapel Hill Saturday. Edwards says the store will have styles similar to The Red Door, a charity store her mother managed in Japan. Edwards’ husband, former Sen. John Edwards, also attended the opening. He confessed last year to an affair with Rielle Hunter, a videographer on his 2008 presidential campaign. Elizabeth Edwards says she’s trying to ignore tabloid reports that her husband fathered Hunter’s child.

hit, “Oh What A Night,” sold more than a million records when it was reissued in 1969 with Carter on falsetto lead. The Dells were also famous for “Stay in My Corner,” one of the first R&B hits to run more than six minutes. The Dells performed publicly for one of the last times in 2004, when they did an outdoor concert in downtown Chicago to celebrate their induction into the hall of fame. The Flamingos were inducted in 2000. Frank Fertitta Jr. LAS VEGAS (AP) — Frank Fertitta Jr., the founder of casino operator Station Casinos Inc. who retired when his sons took the company public, died Friday. He was 70. The Las Vegas-based company said that Fertitta died after complications from a heart condition. Born in Beaumont, Texas in 1938, Fertitta moved to Las Vegas in 1960 and worked his way up in the casino industry over the next 17 years. Fertitta opened The Casino off the Las Vegas Strip in 1976 on the premise that he could attract locals to a casino if he offered value and great service. The casino’s name was changed to Bingo Palace in 1977 and to the Palace Station Hotel & Casino in 1983. Fertitta retired in 1993. Virginia Ramo LOS ANGELES (AP) — Virginia Ramo, a University of Southern California alumnus and patron who once funded a music building because she wanted it to bear her husband’s name, died Wednesday. She was 93. Her son, James, said Ramo died of natural causes at a Los Angeles hospital. Ramo was married to Simon Ramo, a co-founder of the TRW aerospace company. She also was a USC trustee, donor and a fundraiser. USC’s Virginia Ramo Hall of Music is named for her.

Airport Authority to meet Monday

The Rutherford County Airport Authority will hold a special meeting Monday at 5:30 p.m. On the agenda is the fixed base operator transition update and requests for proposals for fixed base operator, self-serve fuel, requests for proposals for an airport manager and attorney selection. Exiting FBO owner Greg Turner is currently serving as interim airport manager at the request of the board. Turner and his brother, Jeff, have operated Leading Edge Aviation as the fixed base operator at the county airport for the past three years, in charge of selling fuel, general upkeep and basic operations at the facility. The airport’s current hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

THE DAILY COURIER

Published Tuesday through Sunday mornings by Paxton Media Group LLC dba The Daily Courier USPS 204-920 Periodical Postage paid in Forest City, NC. Company Address: 601 Oak St., P.O. Box 1149, Forest City, NC 28043. Phone: (828) 245-6431 Fax: (828) 248-2790 Subscription rates: Single copy, daily 50¢ / Sunday $1.50. Home delivery $11.75 per month, $35.25 for three months, $70.50 for six months, $129 per year. In county rates by mail payable in advance are: $12.50 for one month, $37.50for three months, $75 for six months, $150 per year. Outside county: $13.50 for one month, $40.50 for three months, $81 for six months, $162 per year. College students for school year subscription, $75. The Digital Courier, $6.50 a month for non-subscribers to The Daily Courier. Payment may be made at the website: www.thedigitalcourier.com The Daily Courier is not responsible for advance subscription payments made to carriers, all of who are independent contractors.


6A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

Calendar/Local

Red Cross The following blood drives are scheduled: Aug. 24 — Race Path Baptist Church, 1171 Race Path Rd., Ellenboro, 4 to 8:30 p.m., call 4538321 to schedule appointment; Aug. 26 — Rutherford Hospital, 288 S. Ridge Crest, Rutherfordton, noon until 5 p.m., call 286-5338 to schedule an appointment; Aug. 31 — Red Cross Chapter, 838 Oakland Rd., Forest City, 2 to 6:30 p.m., call 287-5916 to schedule an appointment; All presenting donors (in August) may enter a drawing to win one of three $1,000 gas cards.

Meetings/other Board of directors meeting: Rutherford County Historical Society; Monday, Aug. 24, 7 p.m., at St. John’s Historic Church, Main St., Rutherfordton. Alzheimer’s presentation: Thursday, Aug. 27, 6:30 p.m., at Spencer Baptist Church FLC; “Accepting the Challenge — Faith Community Responding to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders,” with Larry Reeves, Program Manager for the WNC Alzheimer’s Association; sponsored by Green River Baptist Association. Young At Heart Club meeting: Saturday, Aug. 29, 11 a.m., at Rollins Cafeteria; Bingo and fellowship; Dutch meal at 11:30 a.m.; all senior citizens welcome; for more information call 245-4800. Chase Athletic Boosters will meet Monday, Aug. 31, at 6:30 p.m. in the office conference room; officers will be elected; members urged to attend. Veterans meeting: Tuesday, Sept. 1, 6:30 to 8 p.m.; at The Foundation Performing Arts & Conference Center, ICC; to learn more about the Veterans Health Clinic now under construction at 374 Charlotte Rd., Rutherfordton; representatives from the Charles George VA Medical Center in Asheville will be present. Motorcycle Club: Sport bike owners or riders interested in forming a club, contact Terry Padgett at 2458406. Memorial service: Annual Emergency Service Personnel Memorial Church Service; Sunday, Sept. 6, Long Branch Road Baptist Church; Sunday School 10 a.m., worship service 11 a.m.; lunch will follow; if you plan to attend, contact Kaye Ruppe at 287-1408.

Reunions 30th Annual Harris reunion: Sunday, Aug. 23, covered dish lunch 1 p.m.; White House Community Center, on Painters Gap Rd. Walker family reunion: Descendants of John R. Walker; Sunday, Aug. 23, covered dish lunch 1 p.m., at Providence United Methodist Church FLC. Caroleen Plant reunion: Saturday, Aug. 29, 1 to 5 p.m., Caroleen United Methodist Church, Mills Ave., off Boss Moore; all former employees of Burlington, Gayley & Lord, and Parkdale in Caroleen are invited to attend; bring finger foods to share; for information contact Kathy Harris, 289-7242, or Cathy Alexander, 248-1366. 4th Annual Graham Town reunion: Saturday, Sept. 5, 1 p.m. until 10 p.m., at Hardin Road Park, Forest City; fun, food, live entertainment; arts/crafts vendors welcome (no food vendors); for more information call 288-4760, 2891207 or 247-4142.

Fundraisers 5th Annual Power of The Purse: Thursday, Aug. 27, First Baptist Church, Forest City; silent auction and dinner; admission — adults $7, ages 12 and under $5; hor d’oeuvres and bidding begins at 5 p.m.; dinner at 6:15 p.m.; proceeds for Family Resources.

$2,000 in drugs found in car By LARRY DALE Daily Courier Staff Writer

RUTHERFORDTON — A broken down car may have kept some stores in Rutherford County from being hit by thieves Saturday afternoon. The Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Interdiction Team found some $2,000 worth of over-thecounter pharmaceutical items when they stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation on U.S. 74 and received consent to search the car. None of the three people in the vehicle, all from Gaston County, claimed the items, but an officer said it is “pretty obvious it is stolen.” Ironically, four apparently stolen UNC caps were found ... and two of those were on the heads of two of the suspects. During their investigation, officers found out that two of the people in

Community-wide yard sale: Saturday, Sept. 12, at Union Mills Learning Center, in conjunction with the all-you-can-eat breakfast; the public is also invited to tour the Computer Center and gymnasium.

Miscellaneous Foothills Harvest Outreach Ministries will hold an $8 (30-gallon) bag sale Aug. 24-28, on clothes and shoes. Also, a shipment of vintage books has been received. The store is at 120 E. Trade St., Forest City.

the stopped car, a man and a woman, apparently were in a vehicle that had broken down, and the third person, a man, was called to come pick them up. The three were stopped for the traffic offense before they could get to Rutherford County stores, officers believe. “That’s what kept them from ripping our stores off,” an officer said. The items apparently were unloaded from the broken down car and loaded into the car that officers later stopped. It was uncertain Saturday evening where the car that broke down is located. Only one of the three individuals, Scott Atkins, about 40 years old, was publicly identified. He is a fugitive with a criminal history that is at least 15 pages long, officers say. He has used seven or eight different aliases, officers report, and his

offenses range from domestic violence to armed robbery. He reportedly had been a fugitive since about 2006. Theft of over-the-counter pharmacy items is a very lucrative business, the RCSO Interdiction Team members report, with most of the items being sold at flea markets or to a fence who will buy the entire haul. “They go in a store, steal what they can, get out the door and go to the next store,” an officer said. Officers are still trying to determine which stores were hit, but it appears that at least part of the items are from Henderson County. The items that can be identified as being from specific stores will be returned to the stores. (The Daily Courier grants anonymity to Interdiction Team members for their security.)

Historic march effort gets grant From staff reports RUTHERFORDTON — History comes alive each year as the Overmountain Victory Trail Association’s re-enactors march through Rutherford County. This year, because of a National Parks Foundation Grant, additional events are planned during the march through the county. The primary grant is for activities related to the annual march, but there is a possibility of an additional $2,000 in funds be applied toward activities on National Trails Day. However, to receive the $2,000, a match of $1,000 must be raised locally for the October activities. Donations can be made to Rutherford County, designated for “OVTA Fund“ and sent to Jerry Stensland, Rutherford County Cultural and Heritage Planner, 141 W. Third Street, Rutherfordton, NC 28139. Word was received last spring, the historic trail is a finalist in the “Active

Sale Continued from Page1A#

locate what they need with ease. Lines will move more quickly than ever before, too. Previously volunteer clerks had to remove tags from items and hand key them into the register. Now the bar codes on the tags will be scanned. “The lines will move a lot faster and you’ll be able to keep a tally of what you spent for each item,” Germack said. Buying used clothing, toys and other items is en vogue right now, Germack said. “You can’t turn on the ‘Today Show’ or ‘Good Morning America’ without seeing financial experts saying this is the way to go,” she said. Kim Jones, who’s shopped the consignment sale for six years, doesn’t

Trails 2009” initiative. Alan Bowen, president of OVTA, said the grant will be used to attract visitors to enjoy the recreational opportunities and learn the historic significance of the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail in their community, “The anticipated benefits derived from employing the grant will include increased community awareness of improved health derived from outdoor activities, an increased sense of ownership by the communities for their heritage, a stronger community willingness to expand and grow events and programs in future years, and increased membership in OVTA.” The NPF “Active Trails” initiative grant is funded by the Coca-Cola Foundation. Communities and sites along the trail to receive funding include: Bluff City, Rocky Mount, and Sycamore Shoals in Tennessee; Spruce Pine, Marion, Morganton, Rutherford County, Polk County, Elkin and

Cowpens National Battlefield. Funds must be used for activities during the re-enactment march between Sept.20 - Oct. 9, 2009 or on National Trails Day on June 5, 2010. Kim Conner, who is organizing activities for Oct. 2 and Oct. 4 in Rutherford County said, “We have a budget of about $3,000 for the two days. Friday will be devoted to education when we hope to involve over 600 eighth grade social studies students in a field trip to historic Gilbert Town, the only location on the Trail where both Maj. Patrick Ferguson’s Loyalist army and the citizen soldiers who became known as the Overmountain men camped during their march towards King‘s Mountain. “The students will have an opportunity to walk a portion of the trail, hear story-telling by re-enactors and local historians dressed in period attire, visit several stations where they can learn more about Colonial life and history, as well as interact with the marchers,” Conner added.

buy anything unless it’s used and loves WeeRuns. “It’s a great way to repurpose clothing and toys so we don’t have to clog up our landfills and have things manufactured again,” Jones said. Jones said the clothes she buys her daughter are “more than wearable” and many are brand-new with the tags still on them. Consignors who opt to sell items through WeeRuns get 60 percent of the profits from the sale of their items. It may take time to check your items for stains or tears and to tag them, but the payoff is worth it, Germack said. “If you can pick up a few extra $100 for tagging items – if you’ve got the time, you can turn it into money,” she said. Sellers also set their own price for items, meaning you can find the same type of item in a wide price range.

WeeRuns suggests sellers price their items at half to a third of the retail price – a bargain for buyers, Germack said. “When my daughter was a newborn a jogging stroller I picked out retailed for $300,” Jones said. “I found it at WeeRuns, never used, for $45.” Because it’s only twice each year, Germack said the sale is an event. Volunteers and shoppers look forward to seeing those people they only see at WeeRuns. “It becomes an event,” she said. “People plan their vacations and C-sections around WeeRuns events.” For more information consigning, volunteering or shopping at WeeRuns, visit the Web site at www.weeruns. com. Consignments will be accepted by appointment, which can be made on the Web site, Aug. 29-Sept. 13. Sale dates for fall 2009 are Sept. 19-27.

About us...

Car wash: Saturday, Aug. 29, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Food Lion in Rutherfordton; cars $5, trucks $10; sponsored by the Trellborg Relay for Life team; proceeds for ACS. Yard sale/barbecue: Star Touring & Riding Chapter 468 of Rutherfordton; Saturday, Aug. 29, Race and Ride Motorsports, 363 Railroad Ave.; yard sale starts at 7 a.m.; barbecue begins at 11 a.m.; fundraiser to bring a tractor trailor of food to Rutherford County to help feed needy families; for information call Sonya Yelton at 2898555.

Larry Dale/Daily Courier

Officers filled two tables with drugs confiscated from a vehicle stopped Saturday on U.S. 74.

Circulation

Sally Glover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208 Virle Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208

Business office

Administration

James R. Brown/publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . .209 Steven E. Parham/executive editor . . . . . .210 Lori Spurling/ advertising director . . . . . . .224 Pam Dixon/ ad production coordinator . . . 231 Anthony Rollins/ circulation director . . . . .206

Newsroom

Scott Bowers, sports editor . . . . . . . . . . . . .213 Jean Gordon, features editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Abbe Byers, lifestyles editor . . . . . . . . . . . . .215 Allison Flynn, editor/reporter . . . . . . . . . . . .218 Garrett Byers, photography . . . . . . . . . . . . .212 Scott Baughman, reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216 Larry Dale, reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217 Bobbie Greene, typesetting . . . . . . . . . . . . .220 Virginia Rucker, contributing editor

Phone: 245-6431

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Advertising

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Classified

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Maintenance

Gary Hardin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222 An operator will direct your call during business hours, 8 a .m . to 5 p .m ., Monday-Friday . After business hours, you can reach the person you are calling using this list . As soon as you hear the automated attendant, use your Touch Tone phone to dial 1 and the person’s extension or dial 3 for dial by name .

Fax: 248-2790

Missed your paper? If you did not receive your paper today please call 245-6431 and ask for circulation. If you call by 9 a.m. on Monday through Friday, a paper will be brought to your home. If you call after 9 a.m., we will make sure your carrier brings you the missed paper in the morning with that day’s edition. If you do not receive your paper on either Saturday or Sunday and call by 8 a.m., a customer service representative will bring you a paper. If you call after 8 a.m. on Saturday or Sunday, the missed paper will be brought out on Monday morning. Our carriers are instructed to deliver your paper by 6 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, by 6:30 a.m. on Saturday and 7 a.m. on Sunday. Remember, call 245-6431 for circulation customer service.

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 7A

Business Briefs Lowe’s pays to settle suit SEATTLE (AP) — Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse Inc. has agreed to pay $1.7 million to settle in a sexual harassment case brought by three employees in Longview, including one who said she was sexually assaulted in 2006. Under the three-year consent decree signed Thursday by U.S. District Judge John C. Coughenour, Lowe’s also must revise policies on discrimination, harassment and retaliation; provide training on those concerns to all employees at the company’s 37 stores in Washington state and 13 stores in Oregon; and report regularly to the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission, which filed the lawsuit. “Severe sex-based harassment of young workers was permitted to run rampant at one of the nation’s largest retailers,” Acting EEOC Chairman Stuart J. Ishimaru said in a statement. “It is shocking that Lowe’s store managers actively engaged in and even encouraged such blatant unlawful conduct and then retaliated against the victims for objecting to it.” Lowe’s denied the claims of the three workers and did not admit any liability but settled “in the interest of avoiding additional disruption and litigation costs,” according to a statement issued by corporate parent Lowe’s Cos. Inc. in Mooresville, N.C. “Lowe’s is proud of our antidiscrimination policies and procedures and is pleased the company has been able to secure a settlement with the EEOC that supplements our ongoing efforts to prevent discrimination in the workplace,” the statement said, adding that the decree requires only “minor revisions” in sexual harassment policies. Lowe’s is the nation’s secondlargest home improvement retailer, trailing only The Home Depot Inc., with more than 1,675 stores in the U.S. and Canada. According to the three workers, their problems began within months after they started work when the store opened in November 2005. One, a 21-year-old woman, said she repeatedly was implicitly propositioned by the 44-year-old store manager and that he sexually assaulted here.

ACTS company gets top workplace award COLUMBUS — ACTS Retirement-Life Communities, a not-for-profit aging services organization and parent company of Tryon Estates in Columbus, has been selected to receive the 2009 Excellence in the Workplace Award from the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (AAHSA). The award is given in recognition of the organization’s effectiveness in advancing a healthy workplace culture and environment that promotes recruitment, retention and development of staff at all levels. ACTS will accept the award at AAHSA’s Annual Meeting & Exposition taking place in November. “To be recognized within the senior industry as a model workplace is a great honor,” said ACTS President and CEO Marvin Mashner. “We are very proud of our many dedicated employees and for all that they do each day to make life better for our residents. Their efforts touch many lives, and consistently demonstrate the lovingkindness that helps to make our organization grow and thrive.”

Cynthia Opderbeck talks with Ron Hoover about the plants she bought Friday.

Larry Dale/Daily Courier

He grows idea of sustainable living By LARRY DALE Daily Courier Staff Writer

SPINDALE — At Plant Wise Solutions, a first-year nursery plant farm, sharing information is as important as selling plants. Owners Ron and Janet Hoover are aware of the trend toward sustainable living, and they want to be a part of it through work that they love. “We enjoy gardening,” said Ron Hoover on Friday at his business at the very end of Bartley Street, off Spindale Street. “We try to make it an educational experience, and share what little bit of knowledge we have with other people. And we do a lot of that. People will come out, and we just talk gardening and give them directions and insights.” Hoover, a Rutherford County native, is typical of many county residents in that he has an agricultural and a manufacturing background. “I grew up on a farm, and didn’t want anything to do with it after I left and went to school,” he said. I worked in manufacturing for 30 years, the last 20 being with a Japanese manufacturing company.” Janet Hoover is a nurse. Looking at the approximately oneacre nursery around him, Ron Hoover added, “This is what I like doing. We grow about 75 to 80 percent of everything we have here. Very little resale.” Also like many county residents, he became dissatisfied with the food supply system in the country. “We want to grow a lot of what we eat,” he said. “Not so much driven by the economy as it is tired of going to the grocery store and buying a small

salad pack that’s got 3,000 miles on it by the time it gets here. And safety issues and recalls and things of that nature.” The frustration he was feeling is becoming a rising tide among consumers, and his business is positioned to support the changing attitudes. “There’s a lifestyle change,” Hoover noted. “One of the magazines I was reading said we’re going ‘back to the future.’ They’re going back to the lifestyles of the late ’50s and early ’60s, when people did raise a lot of their own products and things. “And the terminology is changing, like locovore, shopping local. And you don’t go on vacations; it’s staycations, staying at home and enjoying what you’ve got there. “And all kinds of trends in gardening about what’s hot and what’s not. People have smaller areas, going away from large, formal landscaping, high maintenance type landscaping to smaller, friendlier. Like your deck is now an extension of your living area. You go out on your deck, you’ll have a couple of containers of herbs or plants. In your landscaping you will mix in some edible landscaping. It’s really big. “We specialize in small fruits and berries—have 10 different varieties of blueberries. Some unusual things, like Oriental persimmons, pomegranates, juju berries, all the things that are supposed to be really healthy for you. High in antioxidants.” Hoover said he has fall crops, including broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and Swiss chard coming on now. Hoover cited the work of North

Carolina Cooperative Extension in boosting the trend toward buying produce grown locally. “There is a big push with the local harvest concept of the County Extension agency,” he said, “where we’ve got the farmers markets. And they have been kind enough to allow people to sell the seasonal vegetable plants and the herbs and things like that. Small fruits and berries. And that’s been well-received. “I have a really good association with Cooperative Extension in both Rutherford and Cleveland counties. It’s a wonderful resource and there are very few people that come in here that I don’t channel them back, because Jan (McGuinn) is a good agent, with a wealth of information that’s underused.” Hoover also noted that the trend toward healthier foods tempts some producers to make questionable claims about their businesses, such as claiming the “organic” tag. “It’s tough to be organic,” Hoover commented. “I’m organic based, and environmentally friendly. To be certified organic, and I think this is where there is a lot of confusion, anybody can state they are organic, and you just have to take that person at their word. “But if you’re certified organic, you have to present your plan to the Department of Agriculture. You’ve got to be chemical free for three years; they is a lot of things you’ve got to comply with to become certified. “To me, there’s a difference. Please see Living, Page 8A

Tentative shoppers walk away By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK — Pennypinching Americans are getting cold feet at the checkout — thinking twice about spending and ditching items before they’re rung up. They’re leaving sweaters in the dress department, dumping cookies near the grocery cashier and waiting until the last minute to weigh wants versus needs. Online, shoppers are abandoning their virtual carts as they search for better deals. People “want to be in the act of shopping, but they don’t want to be in the act of buying,” said Joel Bines, a director at AlixPartners, a turnaround consultant. It means more lost sales for stores at a time when there are already fewer customers because of the recession. For bricks-and-mortar shops already working with fewer staff, it also means more work because Please see Shoppers, Page 9A

Associated Press

A cart full of a groceries is seen at the check-out counter at a Kroger store in Gahanna, Ohio. Shoppers are increasingly ditching their items before they’re rung up, as they think twice about spending and obsess about saving amid worries about job security and financial woes.


8A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

STOCKS/BUSINESS

THE MARKET IN REVIEW

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

u

NYSE

6,676.26+122.86

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last ExprsJet rs 2.68 FredM pfK 3.00 FstAccept 3.05 GreenbCos13.46 FMae cvpf 2.20 Mirant wtB 2.45 Salesforce 53.67 MS Nik10 29.21 Brunswick 9.59 HFF Inc h 6.44

Chg +1.09 +.55 +.50 +2.20 +.35 +.35 +7.49 +3.96 +1.26 +.81

%Chg +68.6 +22.4 +19.6 +19.5 +18.9 +16.5 +16.2 +15.7 +15.1 +14.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg BkAtl A rs 4.16 -1.37 IFC VI pf 2.85 -.48 UrsBid pfD 18.96 -2.54 FredM pfQ 2.03 -.27 MS AIG45 11.40 -1.35 SwESPRet105.25 -.50 FootLockr 10.34 -.96 DirxEnBear16.62 -1.43 ProUSR3K 30.90 -2.54 SafFDJI14 n10.63 -.86

%Chg -24.8 -14.4 -11.8 -11.7 -10.6 -8.7 -8.5 -7.9 -7.6 -7.5

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg Citigrp 13137760 4.70 +.22 FannieMae h2685230 1.20 +.10 BkofAm 2290822 17.46 +.32 SPDR 1940951 102.97 +1.98 FredMac h 1583502 1.73 +.13 SPDR Fncl 985822 14.55 +.28 GenElec 891720 14.21 +.40 iShEMkts 735284 36.31 +.54 DirFBear rs 586231 23.80 -1.58 Pfizer 570440 16.64 +.41 Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

2,490 591 87 3,168 90 1 5,977,140,376

u

AMEX

1,707.33 +27.62

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last TrnsLx 2.36 Rentech 2.16 FrontrD g 4.30 OrchidsPP 21.45 LazKap 2.83 Wstmlnd pf 17.25 MexcoEn 12.11 OrleansH 4.30 Westmrld 9.56 SagaCm rs 14.25

Chg +1.17 +.31 +.47 +2.30 +.30 +1.80 +1.16 +.41 +.79 +1.15

%Chg +98.3 +16.8 +12.3 +12.0 +11.9 +11.7 +10.6 +10.5 +9.0 +8.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last PSBMetDS25.59 IEC Elec n 5.14 ManSang 2.06 NwGold g 3.49 NovaBayP 2.00 VKMAV 12.18 ConmedH n 3.40 InovioBio 2.03 Emergent n 6.91 PwSBMetS27.02

Chg %Chg -2.51 -8.9 -.41 -7.3 -.14 -6.5 -.22 -5.9 -.10 -4.8 -.57 -4.5 -.15 -4.2 -.09 -4.2 -.29 -4.0 -1.14 -4.0

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg Rentech 327732 2.16 +.31 PSCrudeDL 72934 4.86 +.09 Hemisphrx 30302 1.90 ... GoldStr g 25536 2.50 +.07 Taseko 23462 2.61 +.11 GranTrra g 22957 4.00 +.11 NwGold g 22782 3.49 -.22 EldorGld g 21726 11.02 +.36 HicksAcq 21267 9.76 ... InovioBio 18520 2.03 -.09 DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

367 168 74 609 7 2 142,399,314

u

DAILY DOW JONES

NASDAQ

Close: 9,505.96 Change: 155.91 (1.7%)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Sinclair 2.85 Kingstone 2.45 EdacTech 4.30 WirlsRonin 3.00 ExideTc 7.65 SuperHosp 2.18 SuprtlH pfA 8.03 Opnext 2.69 CarrollB 6.49 LSB Fn 12.69

Chg +.70 +.55 +.94 +.60 +1.34 +.38 +1.32 +.42 +.99 +1.94

%Chg +32.6 +28.9 +28.0 +25.0 +21.2 +21.1 +19.7 +18.5 +18.0 +18.0

Chg -.55 -.96 -.47 -1.55 -2.00 -.44 -1.97 -.49 -.59 -.88

9,080

10 DAYS

8,800 8,000

6,469.95 2,134.21 288.66 4,181.75 1,130.47 1,265.52 666.79 397.97 6,772.29 342.59

STOCK MARKET INDEXES Name

6,400

DIARY

1,988 703 147 2,838 71 6 2,222,754,390

Net Chg

YTD %Chg %Chg

+1.67 +2.58 +2.08 +1.87 +1.64 +1.59 +1.86 +1.94 +1.88 +2.26

+8.31 +6.52 +2.72 +15.97 +22.17 +28.15 +13.60 +22.54 +16.38 +16.43

12-mo %Chg

-18.25 -25.50 -20.66 -20.27 -18.09 -16.31 -20.59 -19.06 -19.79 -21.16

MUTUAL FUNDS

F

M

A

M

J

J

Total Assets Obj ($Mlns) NAV

Name

A

PIMCO TotRetIs American Funds GrthAmA m American Funds CapIncBuA m American Funds CpWldGrIA m TOCKS OF OCAL NTEREST Fidelity Contra Vanguard TotStIdx YTD YTD American Funds IncAmerA m Name Div Yld PE Last Chg%Chg Name Div Yld PE Last Chg %Chg American Funds InvCoAmA m AT&T Inc 1.64 6.3 13 26.00 +.46 -8.8 LeggPlat 1.04 5.5 70 18.88 +.51 +24.3 Vanguard 500Inv Vanguard InstIdx Amazon ... ... 56 85.00 +.91 +65.8 Lowes .36 1.7 15 21.16 +.77 -1.7 American Funds EurPacGrA m ArvMerit ... ... ... 8.59 -.03+201.4 Microsoft .52 2.1 15 24.41 +.74 +25.6 American Funds WAMutInvA m Dodge & Cox Stock BB&T Cp .60 2.1 15 28.03 +.25 +2.1 PPG 2.12 3.9 24 54.55 +1.40 +28.6 Dodge & Cox IntlStk BkofAm .04 .2 47 17.46 +.32 +24.0 ParkerHan 1.00 2.0 16 49.49 +.88 +16.3 American Funds NewPerspA m BerkHa A ... ... 62101400.00+1400.00 +5.0 Fidelity DivrIntl d Cisco ... ... 21 22.19 +.30 +36.1 ProgrssEn 2.48 6.3 14 39.45 +.21 -1.0 American Funds BalA m ... ... 56 22.28 +.34 +68.5 American Funds FnInvA m Delhaize 2.01 3.0 ... 67.00 +.78 +6.4 RedHat Dell Inc ... ... 14 14.49 -.06 +41.5 RoyalBk g 2.00 ... ... 47.43 +.41 +59.9 PIMCO TotRetAdm b DukeEngy .96 6.1 16 15.61 +.12 +4.0 SaraLee .44 4.6 19 9.65 +.18 -1.4 American Funds BondA m FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m ExxonMbl 1.68 2.4 11 69.92 +1.33 -12.4 SonicAut ... ... ... 13.66 +.02+243.2 Vanguard Welltn FamilyDlr .54 1.8 15 29.72 +.31 +14.0 SonocoP 1.08 4.1 18 26.40 +.47 +14.0 Fidelity GrowCo Vanguard 500Adml FifthThird .04 .4 ... 10.91 +.50 +32.1 SpectraEn 1.52 8.0 13 19.10 +.37 +21.3 Vanguard TotStIAdm FCtzBA 1.20 .8 32 144.58 +2.62 -5.4 SpeedM .36 2.3 ... 15.56 +.58 -3.4 Vanguard TotIntl GenElec .40 2.8 11 14.21 +.40 -12.3 .36 1.7 68 21.08 +.57 +7.4 Vanguard InstPlus GoldmanS 1.40 .9 32 163.51 +1.53 +93.8 Timken Fidelity LowPriStk d 1.80 3.4 26 53.62 +.85 -2.8 T Rowe Price EqtyInc Google ... ... 32 465.24 +4.83 +51.2 UPS B KrispKrm ... ... ... 2.93 +.06 +74.4 WalMart 1.09 2.1 15 51.36 -.35 -8.4 Hartford CapAprA m Pioneer PioneerA m Alliance Bernstein GrowIncA m Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 Goldman Sachs ShDuGovA m percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the DWS-Scudder REstA m Hartford GrowthL m last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants.

S

%Chg -16.7 -16.7 -16.7 -15.5 -14.3 -13.4 -12.7 -12.6 -12.6 -12.3

Last

Dow Industrials 9,505.96 +155.91 Dow Transportation 3,767.63 +94.85 Dow Utilities 380.84 +7.76 NYSE Composite 6,676.26 +122.86 Amex Market Value 1,707.33 +27.62 Nasdaq Composite 2,020.90 +31.68 S&P 500 1,026.13 +18.76 S&P MidCap 659.60 +12.53 Wilshire 5000 10,575.72 +195.22 Russell 2000 581.51 +12.83

7,200

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg PwShs QQQ1050731 40.29 +.53 Microsoft 680511 24.41 +.74 Cisco 559777 22.19 +.30 Intel 543961 18.89 +.18 BrcdeCm 526535 7.66 -.39 ETrade 435380 1.41 -.03 Oracle 290052 22.11 +.17 Dell Inc 289955 14.49 -.06 CellTher rsh 285663 1.69 +.04 HuntBnk 261915 4.62 +.10 Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

11,790.17 5,259.34 486.64 8,466.12 2,093.33 2,456.96 1,303.04 826.86 13,324.87 761.78

9,300

9,600

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last AtlSthnF 2.75 MackFn 4.79 Quigley 2.35 ParkeBcp 8.43 BankSC 12.00 WaccaBk 2.86 MaysJ 13.50 HampRdBk 3.40 Shiloh 4.11 AnikaTh 6.27

9,520

Dow Jones industrials

2,020.90 +31.68

52-Week High Low

L

I

Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day’s net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

NEW BUSINESS

CI LG IH WS LG LB MA LB LB LB FB LV LV FV WS FG MA LB CI CI CA MA LG LB LB FB LB MB LV LB LB LV GS SR LG

99,791 60,573 55,198 50,929 49,935 49,010 45,570 45,458 43,659 37,683 37,090 36,779 36,546 31,332 29,745 29,624 27,846 27,676 26,683 26,476 25,992 25,647 25,390 25,000 23,020 22,341 22,092 21,776 13,826 9,833 3,934 1,169 1,105 339 174

10.67 25.17 45.64 31.48 51.93 25.30 14.44 23.92 94.89 94.30 35.80 22.73 88.68 29.73 23.38 26.18 15.21 29.86 10.67 11.52 1.92 27.34 61.13 94.91 25.31 13.57 94.30 29.43 19.62 27.92 32.49 2.78 10.43 11.94 13.74

Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt

+1.3 +11.7/A +5.9 -17.1/B +5.3 -10.7/D +8.3 -12.3/B +4.5 -18.1/C +8.2 -17.2/C +6.6 -8.7/C +6.1 -14.0/B +7.7 -17.4/C +7.8 -17.3/C +8.3 -8.2/A +6.5 -18.3/D +10.1 -19.1/D +10.4 -12.9/C +7.4 -10.5/A +7.7 -18.9/D +5.3 -8.8/C +6.8 -18.0/D +1.3 +11.4/A +1.9 +0.1/E +5.6 -7.1/E +5.4 -5.3/A +6.3 -17.3/C +7.8 -17.4/C +8.3 -17.1/C +8.2 -13.1/B +7.8 -17.3/C +8.8 -10.2/A +10.5 -14.1/B +8.0 -18.3/D +6.6 -19.4/D +5.3 -18.2/D 0.0 +6.8/B +21.7 -31.8/D +6.1 -17.2/C

+6.4/A +3.5/A +4.8/C +7.5/A +5.0/A +1.5/B +3.0/B +1.7/B +0.6/C +0.7/C +9.3/A -0.1/D +0.7/C +8.0/A +6.6/B +5.7/C +2.0/C +4.6/A +6.2/A +2.3/D +3.3/B +5.1/A +5.3/A +0.7/C +1.6/B +7.3/A +0.8/C +4.9/A +1.4/B +4.9/A +1.5/B -1.1/E +4.5/A +0.4/C +0.7/D

NL 5,000,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 3,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 3,000 NL 5,000,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 5.75 250 NL 2,500 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 5,000,000 3.75 250 4.25 1,000 NL 10,000 NL 2,500 NL 100,000 NL 100,000 NL 3,000 NL200,000,000 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 5.50 1,000 5.75 1,000 4.25 2,500 1.50 1,000 5.75 1,000 4.75 0

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

After a year of crisis, Bernanke’s star rises By JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — Last year, as the gravest financial crisis since the Great Depression shook the banking system, Ben Bernanke seemed nearly as beleaguered as the institutions themselves. The Federal Reserve chief had initially underestimated the crisis — and then seemed to inject new risk by unleashing breathtaking sums of money to fight it. Now, a strengthenGarrett Byers/Daily Courier ing economy is raising Bernanke’s standing Pops Performing Arts on Main, owned by Casey Jolley, left, and Dennis just as President Barack Rodriguez, is located at 187 North Main Street, Rutherfordton. Pops Performing Arts Academy provides top instruction in tap, jazz, ballet, lyrical, and hip-hop dance Obama must decide as well as musical theater, gymnastics, acrobatics, vocal, musical instruments and whether to reappoint pilates. Instructions and classes are offered for ages two-and-a-half to adults. With him. structures for recreational, professional or competitive programs. Class Hours are His supporters say Monday-Thursday 3 p.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. All others by appoint- Bernanke, 55, a scholar ment. Phone: 704-948-9179. Website: http://popsperformingarts.com. of the Great Depression, has the knowledge and ability to guide a sustainable recovery withHoover said having fun is an out igniting inflation. important part of his nursery busiAnd they argue that ness, but he added a caveat. without his bold interContinued from Page 7A “I’m doing what I enjoy doing,” he said, “with a twist on trying to share ventions, the global financial crisis could what little bit I know with people. “I don’t want to mislead anybody. I have been much worse. It’s gotta be fun, or I don’t want to use fertilizer. Plants like it. But I use “He has risen to the do it. You’ll look at it and say, ‘I don’t an organic-based potting soil, and occasion admirably understand the fun part,’ when you I don’t use any chemicals. But I’m after what you might don’t have a dry thread on you.” not certified organic. In this busiargue was a slow start,” He said that contrary to popular ness, people will say, ‘I am organic.’ says Alan Blinder, a belief, the plants are not self-suffiIt’s such a trend and such a niche Princeton professor cient. and people want that, that they’ll “It takes a lot of attention,” he said, who was Fed vice chairtake them at face value and pay an man in the mid-1990s. but added that the work is worthextra price because they say they are “His performance merwhile. organic, and they may not be.” its reappointment.” “People are starved to death for Plant Wise Solutions includes a Bernanke, having just knowledge and access to plant mategreenhouse and a hoop house and a rial, and not having to go to a big-box wrapped up the Fed’s wide array of plants, making it a desannual conference in store,” Hoover said. “Being able to tination of choice for birds and butdeal with someone who really under- Jackson Hole, Wyo., terflies, and for the residents of the remains under pressure stands the plants—tell you how to bee hives on the site. to help speed a recovplant it, how to take care of it, how “I’m the benefactor of going to the to raise it and even how to prepare it. ery. (Rutherford County) Beekeepers’ His critics see failures That’s what we are doing.” meeting and giving them a little talk in Bernanke’s perforon bee-friendly plants. And now mance. They say he (Plant Wise Solutions is open Thursday they’ve come in. We have two bee overplayed his hand by through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., hives, and try to stay environmenand other times by appointment.) swelling the Fed’s baltally friendly. We don’t use pesticides ance sheet to nearly or herbicides. And anything out here $2 trillion, a onceContact Dale via e-mail at ldale@thedigiyou could walk up and eat as is.” talcourier.com unthinkable threshold.

Living

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(828) 286-3332

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Kadance Mae Chapman

celebrates her 4th birthday on August 24th. She is the daughter of Ashley Parris of Bostic and Tim and Kandi Chapman of Bostic. Kadance has two step brothers, Aaron West and Garrett West. Maternal grandparents are Eugene and Jane Curtis of Bostic and the late Doug Goforth. Paternal grandparents are Steve and Wanda Lovelace of Bostic and Scott and Tammy Chapman of Bostic. Great-grandparents are Lucille Goforth of Caroleen, Faye Chapman of Bostic and Leitha Smith of Bostic.

Associated Press

Federal Reserve chief Ben Bernanke testifies before a Congressional committee in Washington, D.C.

They argue that the success of the emergency rescue programs has been inconsistent. And they blame Bernanke for politicizing the Fed: They point, for example, to his role in deciding which banks would benefit from taxpayerfunded bailouts and which would not. “His handling of the crisis has put the Fed in an awkward political position,” says William Poole, former president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, who doesn’t think Bernanke should be reappointed. Regardless of the criticism and Obama’s verdict, Bernanke will go down as a monumental figure, for better or worse, in the history of the Federal Reserve. Which is ironic. When Bernanke became chairman in February 2006, after Alan Greenspan’s 18-year tenure, he tried to tilt the spotlight away from himself, preferring to elevate the agency itself. The financial crisis demonstrated Bernanke’s ability to build consensus at the Fed and to engineer creative solutions not normally in the agency’s playbook, said Allen Sinai, chief global economist at Decision Economics Inc. “Those are huge pluses,” Sinai said. While many leaders on Capitol Hill

and Wall Street credit Bernanke for the unconventional thinking that defined his response to the financial crisis last fall, few said so back then. For months, the Fed chief came under intense criticism as he worked with the Treasury Department to bail out banks and pump trillions into the financial system to try to ease credit clogs. Even before the crisis intensified last fall, the Fed took the historic step of letting investment firms draw low-cost emergency loans from the central bank — a privilege long allowed only for commercial banks. After a run on Bear Stearns pushed it to the edge of bankruptcy, the Fed and the Treasury nudged what was the nation’s fifth-largest investment bank into a takeover by JPMorgan Chase & Co. Bernanke’s advocates point to two steps that they say were especially critical in managing the crisis. n In January 2008, Bernanke started pushing through super-sized rate reductions to prop up the ailing economy. n Early last fall, after the Fed and Treasury stood by as Lehman Brothers collapsed, Bernanke rolled out programs to spur lending and stabilize financial markets.

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 9A

NATION/BUSINESS

Bill weakens but churns coastal surf By JASON BRONIS Associated Press Writer

Associated Press

A surfer is seen watching a wave at Rockaway Beach in Queens, New York, Saturday. The beaches were closed to swimmers due to rough surf caused by Hurricane Bill.

Shoppers Continued from Page 7A

orphaned items have to be restocked. Hard numbers are difficult to come by, but Burt P. Flickinger III, a retail consultant, estimates that in 25 percent of shoppers’ trips to the store, they’re ditching at least one item. In the recession of the early 1990s, it was 15 to 20 percent. In good times, it’s more like 10 percent. Ashley Nichols Guttuso of Midlothian, Va., dumped a red cardigan last week at the counter at the local Limited store after she found out she couldn’t use a $15 store coupon on the $15 sweater. Guttoso says she could have afforded it, but she has focused on necessities since losing her job as a copywriter for Circuit City in January, as the chain was preparing to go out of business. “I went in there thinking I could get something for free,” said the 27-yearold. “I couldn’t rationalize it — even spending $15 to $20. I am watching everything now.” Besides abandoning goods while standing in line, they’re paying close attention once checkout begins. They ask cashiers to provide a total while they’re still scanning items to see where they stand, or to have necessities like health care basics scanned first, said Dan Fishback, chief executive of DemandTec Inc., a retail technology company. When they hit their limit, they forgo what’s left in the basket. Lower credit limits are also contributing to the abandonment. Shoppers say credit card transactions are being denied if they go over their limit just a bit, said Ben Woosley, director of marketing and consumer research at CreditCards.com. In the past, issuers would often approve purchases up to 10 percent over the limit. Web stores are taking a variety of steps to get consumers to complete

purchases. They include sending e-mails to remind customers about abandoned items, simplifying the online checkout process and offering extra discounts to lasso would-be quitters. Web retailers have always grappled with high abandonment rates because of confusion and technology glitches. Plus shoppers are less invested in the process because they didn’t have to drive anywhere. But even online stores say orphaning has escalated. Internet research company Forrester Research estimates as much as 59 percent of online purchases are being dumped during checkout. Those rates had ranged from 47 percent to 53 percent in the past six years, according to industry surveys. The Container Store, which sells storage items, has seen its online abandonment rate rise to 68 percent. The company has launched an e-mail campaign to remind shoppers of their abandoned purchases and a service that lets shoppers pick up online purchases at the store to avoid shipping costs. And SkyMall.com has cut its abandonment rate to 49 percent from 56 percent by reducing the steps in the checkout process and sending out e-mail reminders, online marketing manager Shea Beck said. Online shoppers are scrutinizing extra charges that wouldn’t have slowed them down in a better economy, right up to clicking the “place order” button. Eric Younan, 35, of Farmington Hills, Mich., who said he had never quit during the checkout process, has abandoned online shopping carts four times in recent weeks because he discovered extra charges late in the game. “Two years ago, a $10 handling charge wouldn’t have fazed me, but now I would just drop it,” said Younan, a publicist. “Back then, I had more disposable income, and my time was worth money.”

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EDGARTOWN, Mass. — A weakening Hurricane Bill spun northward Saturday, churning up rough seas, creating dangerous rip tides and closing beaches to swimmers up and down the eastern seaboard, including President Obama’s vacation spot, Martha’s Vineyard. The Category 2 hurricane was expected to pass the mainland well off New England, but was still packing high winds and waves that had safety officials urging extreme caution. At Robert Moses State Park in New York, the beach was shut down as the high tide submerged the sand, though the beach opened later Saturday for sunbathing. Along some beaches in Delaware and New Jersey, no swimming was allowed. “It’s just too dangerous right now,” Rehoboth Beach Patrol Capt. Kent Buckson said. At mid-afternoon Saturday, the storm was about 370 miles south of Nantucket and losing strength as it moved over cooler waters, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. But the storm was still carrying maximum winds of 100 mph. A tropical storm warning was issued Saturday for Massachusetts, including the islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard, meaning tropical storm-force winds of 40 mph (64 kph) or more could hit the coastline in the next 24 hours. The worst of Bill was expected to pass about 150 to 200 miles east of Martha’s Vineyard before Obama’s arrival on Sunday, and there was no word from the White House that the Obamas were changing vacation plans. On Saturday, nearly all south-facing beaches on the island were closed to swimmers and large signs blocked roadways to shorefronts. Meanwhile, lifeguards used caution tape to rope off access points, and police patrolled the beach to enforce the closings. “The concern we have now is that the riptides are very strong,” said lifeguard James Costantini. “There’s a very strong undertow.”

Longtime Vineyard vacationer Jack DeCoste, 69, of Plymouth, Mass., was unimpressed with the storm as he lounged in a beach chair in Edgartown. “I don’t think it’s going to impact things that much,” DeCoste said. “I think it’ll be in and out of here fairly quickly.” The high waves that worried safety officials had surfers buzzing. Scott Fisher, 38, was at Nantasket Beach in Hull, where the morning’s moderate waves were expected to build throughout the day. “People wait all summer for this,” he said. The storm was expected to reach Canadian waters early Sunday, and the Canadian Hurricane Center on Saturday issued a hurricane watch for areas of Nova Scotia, where winds speeds could hit 74 mph (120 kph) with gusts of 87 mph (140 kph) Marine Atlantic suspended ferry service between Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and North Sydney, Nova Scotia, beginning Sunday morning, saying the risks were just too high. In Nova Scotia, provincial parks have been shut down and people advised to stay clear of beaches. “The waves, they’re very pretty to look at but very dangerous,” Barry Manuel of the Halifax Emergency Management Office said Saturday. In Atlantic City, N.J., surfers gathered Saturday on beaches where 20-foot waves were expected. But only a few were willing to take their boards into the big swells. Atlantic City Beach Patrol Chief Rod Aluise told The Press of Atlantic City that some surfers just stood on the beach “with their eyes popping out” at the size of the waves. “This is only for experienced surfers,” Aluise said. Hurricane Bill moved past Bermuda earlier Saturday, leaving behind sunny skies, debris and flooding, but no casualties. The storm mostly spared the pinksand shores, though it cut power to about 3,700 customers and flooded some roads along the northern coast. The airport was closed overnight and expected to reopen Saturday afternoon. All ferry service was canceled.

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10A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

weather/nation Weather The Daily Courier Weather Today

Tonight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Precip Chance: 20%

Precip Chance: 10%

Precip Chance: 5%

Precip Chance: 5%

Precip Chance: 5%

Precip Chance: 5%

84º

61º

84º 63º

85º 64º

88º 65º

89º 66º

Almanac

Local UV Index

Around Our State Today

Statistics provided by Broad River Water Authority through 7 a.m. yesterday.

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+

Temperatures

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

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.89 .69 .86 .62

Precipitation 24 hrs through 7 a.m. yest. .0.03" Month to date . . . . . . . . .3.23" Year to date . . . . . . . . .30.44"

Barometric Pressure

City

Asheville . . . . . . .78/59 Cape Hatteras . . .87/76 Charlotte . . . . . . .85/63 Fayetteville . . . . .90/68 Greensboro . . . . .85/64 Greenville . . . . . .89/69 Hickory . . . . . . . . . .82/61 Jacksonville . . . .90/71 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .85/76 New Bern . . . . . .89/71 Raleigh . . . . . . . .88/65 Southern Pines . .89/67 Wilmington . . . . .88/70 Winston-Salem . .84/63

Sun and Moon Sunrise today . Sunset tonight . Moonrise today Moonset today .

. . . .6:53 . . . .8:06 . . .10:31 . . . .9:47

a.m. p.m. a.m. p.m.

Moon Phases

High yesterday . . . . . . .30.08"

Relative Humidity

First 8/27

High yesterday . . . . . . . . .88%

pc t pc pc pc pc pc mc mc mc mc pc mc s

79/60 83/77 84/65 88/67 83/64 87/69 81/63 87/69 83/76 86/70 87/65 87/66 88/71 83/63

s pc s s s s s s s s s s s s

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

New 9/18

Last 9/11

Full 9/4

North Carolina Forecast

Greensboro 85/64

Asheville 78/59

Forest City 84/61 Charlotte 85/63

Today

Raleigh 88/65

Kinston 90/69 Wilmington 88/70

Today’s National Map 70s

Monday

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . Baltimore . . . . . . Chicago . . . . . . . Detroit . . . . . . . . Indianapolis . . . Los Angeles . . . Miami . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . Philadelphia . . . Sacramento . . . . San Francisco . . Seattle . . . . . . . . Tampa . . . . . . . . Washington, DC

.86/63 .85/68 .74/58 .73/61 .72/56 .85/63 .91/80 .83/66 .85/66 .87/60 .68/56 .71/56 .89/76 .85/67

s sh s pc s pc t sh t s mc mc t pc

Greenville 89/69

Fayetteville 90/68

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Across Our Nation

Elizabeth City 88/72

Durham 87/65

Winston-Salem 84/63

87/66 83/67 80/67 81/63 82/64 83/63 90/80 85/65 83/64 92/58 68/56 72/58 90/76 83/66

s pc s s s s t s s s s pc t pc

L

70s

HURRICANE BILL

80s 70s

L

100s

H

90s 80s

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This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon. Cold Front

Stationary Front

70s

Warm Front

L

Low Pressure

H

High Pressure

U.S. Today Stole painting now in jail

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska man who stole a painting of the Virgin Mary to finance an abortion for a teen he raped has been convicted of firstdegree sexual assault and felony theft. Aurelio VallerilloSanchez, 39, of Omaha pleaded no contest to the charges Friday and faces up to 70 years in prison when sentenced in October, Douglas County prosecutor Brenda Beadle said Saturday. A call to the county public defender representing VallerilloSanchez wasn’t answered Saturday. Beadle said VallerilloSanchez fled to Mexico with the 300-yearold painting worth $100,000 and the pregnant teen in March 2007.

“The plan was that when they got to Mexico, she was to undergo an abortion,” she said. When an abortion wasn’t possible, Vallerillo-Sanchez pushed to have the baby given up for adoption, Beadle said: “He wanted to do everything he could to get rid of this baby ’cause it was evidence against him.” The teen returned to Nebraska after giving birth, the prosecutor said. Vallerillo-Sanchez was arrested in February after DNA linked him to the September 2006 assault of the then-14year-old girl.

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Associated Press

Monday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Reserve and other central banks to ward off inflation by boosting interest rates from the current super-low levels, they shouldn’t pussyfoot around, an economist and expert on monetary policy warned Saturday. Even though the U.S. and the global economy are healing from the worst recession since the 1930s, many economists think it will be a while before central banks start lifting rates. In the United States, economists think the Fed won’t begin pushing up rates until next summer. Still, when that decision is made, interest rates will need to be “increased aggressively,” said Carl Walsh, professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, discussing a paper he presented on the topic at the final day of an annual Fed conference here.

Large Texas bank fails

WASHINGTON (AP) — Guaranty Bank became the secondlargest U.S. bank to fail this year. The Texas lender was shut down by regulators and most of its operations sold at a loss of billions of dollars for the U.S. government to a major Spanish bank. The transaction approved by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. marked the first time a foreign bank has bought a failed U.S. bank. The bank failure, the 10th largest in U.S. history, is expected to cost the deposit insurance fund an estimated $3 billion.

Fire and smoke lights the night air around the Northpoint Training Center, a medium-security prison on Burgin, Ky., Friday night, after inmates rioted and set fire to trash cans and other items.

Kentucky prison rioters create extensive damage By JEFFREY McMURRAY Associated Press Writer

BURGIN, Ky. (AP) — Rioting inmates set fire to trash cans and other items inside a central Kentucky prison, and damage to some buildings was so extensive that officials were busing many of the facility’s 1,200 prisoners elsewhere, police said Saturday. By early morning, firefighters had extinguished the fires at the medium-security Northpoint Training Center in a rural area 30 miles south of Lexington, state police Lt. David Jude said. Eight inmates were treated for minor injuries, and eight staff were also injured in the melee, although none of the employees were admitted to the hospital, said Cheryl Million, a spokeswoman for the Kentucky Department of Corrections. Officers in riot gear rushed the prisoners with tear gas about 9 p.m. Friday, and all the inmates were subdued in less than two hours, authorities said. Six buildings had burned, including a kitchen, medical center, canteen and visitation area. Million also said all but one of the dormitories, a 196bed unit, were damaged and uninhabitable. A bus carrying some 42 inmates deemed higher security risks left the property shortly after 6 a.m., heading to an undisclosed facility. It wasn’t clear how many other inmates would have to be moved. Gov. Steve Beshear praised corrections officials and state police for handling the situation without any serious injuries. “Their work last night in the face of the most trying circumstances was truly remarkable,” Beshear said in a statement. “Corrections officials are currently assessing the extent of damage to determine the needs going forward for safely housing prisoners in the coming days and for the long term.” Some of the inmates would be able to stay at Northpoint, Million said.

“As we continue to assess the situation, other inmates could possibly be transferred,” Million said. “Decisions to transfer would be based on facilities security levels and inmates’ needs.” Jude said the prisoners were being kept in an outdoor courtyard surrounded by prison guards. Police formed a perimeter around the outside of the facility to make sure no one escaped. Portable toilets were brought in, and prison officials were using temporary food stations to feed the prisoners because the fire in the kitchen destroyed much of the prison’s food supply. “Everything seems to be at a calm,” Jude said. “They’re sitting down, kind of going with the program right now.” Jude didn’t immediately say what caused of the rioting, which began around 6:30 p.m. Friday. Prison spokeswoman Mendolyn Cochran said Friday the prison had been on lockdown since Tuesday, when one group of inmates assaulted two others, The Advocate-Messenger of Danville reported. Later Friday, some inmates started setting fires in trash cans, she said. Million wouldn’t confirm the report, saying only that some of the fires started in trash cans and that some inmates had access to matches because smoking is allowed in parts of the prison. The melee in Kentucky comes two weeks after more than 1,000 inmates rioted at the California Institution for Men in Southern California. The prison was designed to hold about half as many inmates, although investigators say they don’t know if crowding helped spark the racially charged riot. Northpoint has more than 1,100 general population inmates housed in six open-bay dormitories, according to its Web site. Another 60 special management inmates are housed in single cells in a separate structure, and 40 minimum-security inmates are housed in another separate structure.

Obama may visit Kennedy By GLEN JOHNSON Associated Press Writer

BOSTON — When Barack Obama’s presidential prospects sagged, Sen. Edward Kennedy lifted the candidate with a coveted endorsement. When brain cancer kept the Massachusetts Democrat from delivering his stepdaughter’s college commencement address, Obama left the campaign trail and stood in for his then-Senate colleague. And when Obama made one of the most closely watched decisions of his young presidency — the type of puppy for his daughters — it was Kennedy who gave him “Bo,” a Portuguese Water Dog like the pair that have been a fixture in Kennedy’s Capitol Hill offices. With Kennedy now at his vacation home in Hyannis Port on Cape Cod and Obama setting off on his weeklong stay on nearby Martha’s Vineyard, there’s speculation the president may come see the ailing senator. A visit could provide a rallying point for Democrats as Obama seeks to achieve one of Kennedy’s career goals: overhauling the nation’s health insurance system to provide nearuniversal coverage. It also would show anew the close relationship between the first African-American president and the last vestige of the Camelot White House era. Despite a gulf in age, race and life experience, the 48-year-old Obama and the 77-year-old Kennedy have forged a personal bond evident in the tribute the president paid Kennedy and his assassinated brothers,

President John F. Kennedy and Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, before he signed the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act into law in April. “I want all Americans to take up that spirit of the man for whom this bill is named; of a president who sent us to the moon; of a dreamer who always asked, ‘Why not?’ — of a younger generation that carries the torch of a single family that has made an immeasurable difference in the lives of countless families,” Obama said. Those who know both men find the relationship understandable, despite the age difference. “He is the kind of president that Kennedy can relate to,” said Robert Shrum, who helped drafted the senator’s famous 1980 Democratic National Convention concession speech and remains a close personal friend. “He’s trying to do very, very big things. He’s appealed to people’s idealism. He’s appealed to their notion of service, things that have been touchstones of Kennedy’s life,” Shrum said. Capitol Hill aides say the two men were not especially close during Obama’s first 18 months in the Senate, which began in 2005. They shared a mutual bond in opposing the Iraq war, but there was little more than a collegial relationship. The turning point came in 2006, when Obama visited Kennedy to ask whether he should run for president. “Your time only comes once, and this is your time,” Kennedy told Obama, said a Kennedy aide who spoke on condition of anonymity.


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 11A

washington

Obama: stop phony claims on health care

With little to go on, feds built drug case

By DARLENE SUPERVILLE

By DEVLIN BARRETT

Associated Press Writer

Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is challenging critics of his push to overhaul the health care system to stop making “phony claims” about proposals now the subject of intense coastto-coast debate. “This is an issue of vital concern to every American, and I’m glad that so many are engaged,” Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address Saturday. “But it also should be an honest debate, not one dominated by willful misrepresentations and outright distortions, spread by the very folks who would benefit the most by keeping things exactly as they are.” “So today, I want to spend a few minutes debunking some of the more outrageous myths circulating on the Internet, on cable TV and repeated at some town halls across this country,” the president said. Obama said the overhaul would not cover illegal immigrants nor use taxpayer dollars to pay for abortions, and he does not intend a government takeover of health care — as critics have claimed at contentious town hall-style meetings with members of Congress. He also took a swipe at “death panels,” an idea former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin introduced on her Facebook page. “As every credible person who has looked into it has said, there are no so-called death panels — an offensive notion to me and to the American people,” Obama said. “These are phony claims meant Associated Press to divide us.” President Obama used his Saturday address to attack Obama angered his liberal base this past week myths being promoted as fact in the health care overafter seeming to suggest he would be OK with a haul debate. plan that didn’t have a government-run health insurance option. “This is one idea among many to provide more competition and choice, especially in the many places around the country where just one insurer thoroughly dominates the marketplace,” Obama said. “Let me repeat: It would be just an option; those who prefer their private insurer would be under no obligation to shift to a public plan.” Republicans, in their weekly address, accused Obama of being the one misrepresenting his proposal. “As opposition to the Democrats’ government-run health plan is mounting, the president has said he’d like to stamp out some of the disinformation floating around out there,” said Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga. “The problem is the president, himself, plays fast and loose with the facts.” Price said the whole idea should be scrapped and lawmakers should start anew with a plan that ensures sure patients — not Washington or insurance providers — are the top priority.

WASHINGTON — Federal agents hunting leaders of a multibillion-dollar Mexican drug cartel began their case with crumbs: a fake container of corn chips and a threat scrawled on a Hallmark greeting card. It took two years of sleuthing before top U.S. law enforcement officials were able to gather in Washington this past week to announce indictments that targeted criminal leaders who oversee mass amounts of cocaine and heroin flowing into U.S. cities. The case began to take form on a muggy night in Chicago in the summer of 2007, just before the July Fourth holiday, according to law enforcement officials and court documents. A government informant for the Drug Enforcement Administration wore a recording device to make a small drug buy on the west side of Chicago. Another break came when a traffic stop caught a man with an illegal gun. He told investigators he got it from a drug dealer because he was scared someone was trying to hurt him and his family. “Last night when he walked to his car, he found a Hallmark card with a threatening message in it,” court documents said the man told investigators. The next morning, another card, another threat. Seeking leniency for the gun charge, the man agreed to cooperate with investigators and bought more guns from the suspected dealer — under DEA surveillance. And a police stop caught a suspect with a fake “can of Fritos” hiding drugs, according to court papers, and again the suspect agreed to cooperate with investigators. That suspect helped investigators home in on a different Chicago-based drug dealer known as “Fat Mike.” Investigators caught “Fat Mike” talking on the phone about his Mexican supplier, “Slow Poke.” “Slow Poke,” the dealer suspect said, is “real cool” and has a lot of money, according to a transcript of the conversation in court documents. The evidence they gathered eventually led the agents to begin chasing two bigger Chicago drug suspects, twin brothers Pedro and Margarito Flores, who are now charged with operating a key distribution hub in the Windy City for the Mexican cartel bosses. U.S. officials say the brothers, who were allegedly bringing about 4,000 pounds of cocaine to Chicago every month, were threatened with violence by each side if they did business with the other.

“As every credible person who has looked into it has said, there are no so-called death panels — an offensive notion to me and to the American people,. These are phony claims meant to divide us.” — President Obama

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To patients and friends of Dr. Paul H. Cartwright: Our father practiced chiropractic in Rutherford County for as long as we can remember. Many of you may have known him through his practice, Forest City Chiropractic, on Main Street in Forest City. He worked hard at being the best doctor he could be, and he loved caring for all of you. He was planning to retire, and turn his practice over to someone who could take care of those that he could no longer help. He was having a hard time giving up his practice, and retired before he could let everyone know his plan. He planned to leave you in the hands of Dr. Charles Sayre, an excellent doctor, who could continue caring for those he left behind. Dr. Charles Sayre is a native of Rutherford County. His father practiced dentistry here for 25 years. Dr. Charles Sayre graduated from RS Central High School, and received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Life University in Georgia. After practicing in Tennessee and Alabama for the last 11 years, he has returned home to care for the people here. Dr. Sayre is still caring for and treating those of you who seek help at Forest City Chiropractic. He may not be dad, but he works hard at being the best doctor he can be and cares for those he helps. Forest City Chiropractic is still open and still caring. May God Bless you, Krista, John, Ali, and Hannah Cartwright

Announcing Our New Arrival Sharai Amaya, M.D. Hometown: Gaffney, SC College: Erskine College, Due West, SC Medical School: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC OB-GYN Residency: Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC

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12A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

THE WORLD

World Today Wildfires send Greeks fleeing

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Dozens of wildfires broke out across Greece, torching olive groves, cutting off villages and sending residents fleeing Saturday as one of the largest blazes swept perilously close to the capital’s northern suburbs. Fanned by high winds, the fires have stretched the state’s resources thin as firefighters tried to extinguish at least half a dozen major conflagrations. “A total of 65 fires have broken out across Greece since late (Friday),� fire brigade spokesman Yiannis Kalpakis said. Flames raced toward the villages of Grammatiko, Kalentzi and Varnavas near the town of Marathon, 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the Greek capital, cutting the villages off from the road.

Iraq security men aided bombers

BAGHDAD (AP) — The suicide bombers who blew up explosives-laden trucks outside government buildings in Baghdad may have been aided by members of Iraq’s security forces, the foreign minister said Saturday, even as the government insisted Iraqi forces could still protect the nation. Anger is mounting over the security lapses that allowed the bombers to drive trucks past checkpoints and position them close to government targets that included the foreign and finance ministries. Wednesday’s attacks killed at least 101 people and wounded more than 500. The violence has shaken confidence in a government eager to demonstrate that it can take over responsibility for the country’s security from American troops, who withdrew form Iraq’s cities nearly two months ago. “We have to face the truth. There has been an obvious deterioration in the security situation in the past two months,� Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari told reporters during a news conference Saturday. “We will investigate that,� he said.

Pakistan Taliban elect new leader

KHAR, Pakistan (AP) — Hakimullah Mehsud, a Pakistani Taliban commander behind several serious attacks including a deadly attempt to take the Sri Lankan cricket team hostage, has been appointed the new head of the militant group, the aide to another commander said Saturday. Bakht Zada, a close aide to commander Maulvi Faqir Mohammad, told The Associated Press a 42-member Taliban council, or shura, appointed a new head because Taliban chief Baitullah Mehsud was ill. Washington and Islamabad have said Mehsud was almost certainly killed by an Aug. 5 CIA missile strike, but top Taliban commanders deny that although they have provided no proof he is still alive.

Britian denies pushing deal By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press Writer

LONDON — Britain on Saturday rejected any suggestion that it had struck a deal with Libya to free the Lockerbie bomber — questions that arose when Moammar Gadhafi publicly thanked British officials as he embraced the man convicted of killing 270 people in the 1988 airline bombing. Gadhafi praised Prime Minister Gordon Brown and members of the royal family by name for what he described as influencing the decision to let the terminally ill Abdel Baset al-Megrahi return home to die. Thousands greeted al-Megrahi at the airport as he arrived in Tripoli after being freed Thursday from a Scottish prison. But British officials insisted they did not tell Scottish justice officials what to do — and in any case, they could not, because the decision was not theirs’ to make. “The idea that the British government and the Libyan government would sit down and somehow barter over the freedom or the life of this Libyan prisoner and make it form part of some business deal .... it’s not only wrong, it’s completely implausible and actually quite offensive,� Business Secretary Peter Mandelson told reporters in London. Britain has walked a fine line in the issue, as the government in London must distance itself from local affairs in Scotland. While outraged at the jubilant reception al-Megrahi received in Libya, British leaders have refrained from criticizing the decision to free the man convicted in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, a decision made in Edinburgh under Scotland’s separate judicial system. Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill decided to release al-Megrahi on compassionate grounds because the Libyan has prostate cancer and was given only months to live by top British doctors. Compassionate leave for dying inmates is a regular feature of Scottish justice.

Associated Press

Libyan Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, who was found guilty of the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, center, is helped down the airplane steps on his arrival at an airport in Tripoli, Libya Thursday . Britain has condemned the “upsetting� scenes of jubilation in Tripoli at the return of Abdel Baset al-Megrahi and considered canceling a royal visit to Libya as a sign of displeasure.

In Washington on Saturday, FBI Director Robert Mueller blasted MacAskill for allowing the Lockerbie bomber to return home, saying the decision gave comfort to terrorists around the world. “Your action,� he wrote MacAskill, “makes a mockery of the grief of the families who lost their own on December 21, 1988.� President Barack Obama earlier called the decision “highly objectionable.� Most of those killed were Americans, and their families have been scathing in their criticism of the Libyan’s release. As the cameras rolled in Tripoli, Gadhafi hugged alMegrahi in a meeting Friday and al-Megrahi kissed the Libyan leader’s hand. Libyan television showed pictures of Gadhafi singling out Brown, as well as “the Queen of Britain, Elizabeth, and Prince Andrew, who all contributed to encouraging the Scottish government to take this historic and courageous decision, despite the obstacles.� A Buckingham Palace spokesman said Saturday the release was “entirely a matter for the Scottish government.� The offi-

cial spoke on condition of anonymity in keeping with palace policy. Gadhafi’s embrace fueled outrage that has simmered at al-Megrahi’s reception in Libya, where joyful celebrants threw flower petals as the 57-year-old former Libyan intelligence agent stepped down from the jet late Thursday. British Foreign Secretary David Miliband on Friday condemned the scenes as “deeply distressing.� The constant videos of the Gadhafi hug and the kiss have only added to the woes of Britain’s leaders. Mandelson left the hospital Saturday after a prostate operation only to find a scrum of reporters demanding answers about an alleged deal. He insisted that London and Tripoli did not negotiate. To further drive home the point, Brown released the text of a letter he sent to Gadhafi urging that al-Megrahi’s return be treated as “a purely private family occasion.� “A high-profile return would cause further unnecessary pain for the families of the Lockerbie victims. It would also undermine Libya’s growing international reputation,� Brown wrote.

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Great Travel Destinations with a

Sat. Sept. 5th ..... World’s largest flea market at Hillsville, Va ..... $49.00

You will truly find “treasures from around the world� at this great event! Vendors will be there from all across the United States.

Sun. Sept. 6th ... Atlanta Braves vs. Cincinnati Reds ...... $44.00

Enjoy a great Sunday afternoon baseball game between two great teams. Includes roundtrip motor coach transportation and field level seats.

Sept. 10 - 13 ... Pennsylvania Amish Country Tour ...... $459.00

This two features two great productions “In the Beginning� and “Abraham & Sarah - a love story� plus two great Amish meals, guided tour of the Amish farmlands, visit to “Chocolate Town, USA� - Hershey, Pa. and lots of other sites and attractions.

Sun. Sept. 21st .... Atlanta Braves vs the Philadelphia Phillies .... $44.00

This is a great Sunday afternoon game between two of the top teams in the league (this could very possibly be the two teams in the National League playoffs). Trip includes roundtrip motor coach transportation and upper level seats behind home plate!

Sept. 26 - 27 ... George Jones at Renfro Valley, Kentucky .... $199.00

See this legendary country music star in person at famed Renfro Valley. Also includes the Renfro Valley Bam dance show at the “Old Bam�, boarding house dinner, visit to the Lincoln Memorial Museum and lots more.

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This tour features the best of the Vermont, New Hampshire, Upstate New York and more. Grandma Moses Schoolhouse, Ben & Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ice Cream, Porter Music Box Company, Rock of Ages Granite Quarry, Stowe Vermont and ten meals.

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Oct. 24 - 25 ... Big South Fork Railway & Tenn. Riverboatin ... $199.00 Enjoy a great train ride, hobo lunch, visit to restored mining town, Cumberland Falls State Park, Riverboat Cruise (with lunch & entertainment) & stop at Pigeon Forge. All overnight tour prices are based on per person - double occupancy

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 13A

HOT NIGHTS, COOL RIDES

Here are winners of 2009 ‘Cool Rides’ judging Best import/Sport all — Ron DeFoe, 2001 Intrepid. Best truck original — Jerry Griffir, 1950 Chevy Deluxe Best truck modified — Eddie Kee, 1962 Ford Unibody Best classic original — Denny Track, 1970 Superbird Best classic modified — Kevin Saam, 1965 Falcon Best street rod — Randy Willingham, 1940 Ford 2-door Best pro street or race car — Don Adams, 1968 Camaro Best old muscle car — Shayla Faulkner, 1965 Malibu Best modern DOM, muscle car — Bob Moore, 1988 Monte Carlo SS Best glow off — Craig Butler, 1997 Dodge Viper Best female owned auto/motorcycle — Shannon Smith, 1979 Camaro Best motorcycle — Randy Roper, 2008 Big Dog Best paint — Don Adams, Pro Street Camaro Best engine — Mike Pruett, 1955 Belair Best interior — Chuck Smith, 1969 Camaro Mayor’s choice — Ken Strickland, 1949 Hudson Judges’ choice — Todd Miller, 1951 Cadillac 1 top classic Chevy (original) — Jerry Morrow 2 top classic Chevy (modified) — Larry Strikeleather 3 top classic Ford (original) — Charles Durand 4 top classic Ford (modified) — Ray Wallace 5 top classic Mopar (original) — Marty Robbins 6 top classic Mopar (modified) — Steve and Nancy Hill. 7 top classic other (original) — Keith Conner 8 top classic other (modified) — Keith Randall 9 top classic modified cars (3 mods) — Joe Pesey 11 top antique original (1945 and older) — James Wilkie 12 top antique modified (1945 and older) — Rick Humphries 13 top Chevy street rod car — Gregg Philips 17 top Ford street rod car — Ronnie Stroupe 24 top street rod truck 1948 and older

— John Buchanan 26 top European — Joe Alltrans 27 top rat rods — Paul Duval 28 top Corvette original C1 and C3 — Johnnie Adkins 29 top Corvette original C4 and present — Myra Downey 32 top Corvette modified C1 and C3 — Ken Barrett 33 top Corvette modified C4 to present — Greg Barneycastle 35 top Mustang original 1964 to 1978 — Richie and Carolyn MarshB 36 top Mustang Downtown Forest City’s Main Street was packed with car lovers and beautifully restored vehicles last weekoriginal 1979 to endd. present — Andrew Garris Older)— (Tie) Gary Brooks and Gleen Fender 38 top Mustang modified 1964 to 1978 Gentry 78 Top Tri-5’S (Modified)— Mike Pruett — Shorty Hall 59 Top Modern Original Muscle (1982 79 Top Classic Modern Modified— 38 top Mustang modified 1979 to pres- and Up)— Susan Hoack Jimmy Edwards ent — Jordan Brooks 60 Top Modern Modified Muscle (1982 250 Top GM, Pontiac, Buick (Modi40 top Mustang Saleen all — Larry and Up)— Craig Buttler fied)— Paul Mills Brown 63 Top Vw Bug Classic Ori (Air 251 Top Nova and Chevelles (Modi41 top Mustang Shelby all — Charles Cooled)— Warrenn Richardson fied)— Jimmy Ellenburg Koon 64 Top Vw Bug Classic Modified (Air 252 Top GM, Pontiac, Buick (Origi44 top Mustang Roush all — Sandie Cooled)— Danny Lynch nal)— Wayne Regan Hughes 65 Top Under Construction— (Tie)Todd 253 Top Nova and Chevelles (Origi52 top Camaro original 1967 to 1981 Miller and Brian Wood Tie nal)— Claude Street — James Hayes 66 Top Unique/Other (What Dosen’t 211 Top Import—Chris White 53 top Camaro original 1982 to presFit)— Robert Lewis Jr 212 Top Sport Compact—Edward ent — David Norris 67 Top Replica / Kit Car— Joe Hender- Boland 55 top Camaro modified 1967 to 1981 son 198 Top Mini Truck—John Green — Cristy Packell 68 Top Truck Classic (Original 1900 To 214 Top Import/Sport Compact Wild 56 top Camaro modified 1982 to pres1959)— Bob Pervea All—Jamieson Clark ent — Brian Brittle 69 Top Truck Classic (Original 1960 To 5002 Antique Motorcycle 35 years and 57 top old original muscle (1981 and 1980)— Luther Shelton older—Dick Balmer older) — Kevin Moore 70 Top Truck Classic (Modified 1900 5003 Custom Individually built or small 58 top old mod muscle (1981 and To 1980)— George Regan manufacturer—Jamie Fender older) — tie, Garry Brooks and Gleen 71 Top Truck (Original 1981 and 5004 Dyna Super Glide, Low Rider, Gentry Up)— Durrant Newton Wide Glide—Barbara Price 59 top modern original muscle (1982 72 Top Truck (Modified 1981 and 5005 Metric Cruiser Yamaha V-Star, and up) — Susan Hoack Up)— Dwight and Martha Bowman Honda Shadow, Suzuki—Curtis Epley 60 top modern modified muscle (1982 73 Top 4x4’s— Chuck Smith 5006 Metric Sport Hyabusa, Honda and up) — Craig Buttler 74 Top Suv / Vans All— Lance White GSXR—Reco Jones 57 Top Old Original Muscle (1981 and 75 Top Survivor 1979 and Older All 5008 Softail Fat Boy, Heritage, Softail Older)— Kevin Moore Original— Danny Dotson (Custom and Deluxe)—Regina Brooks 58 Top Old Mod Muscle (1981 and 77 Top Tri-5’S (Original)— Chris 5010 Trike All—Terry Parris

2009 - 2010 Events th

THE FOUNDATION PERFORMING ARTS & CONFERENCE CENTER

Isothermal Community College

Ronnnie Milsap

10 Anniversary An All American Season The Lettermen

“American Big Band”

September 19, 2009 - 7:30 PM Adult: $21 & $25 Youth: $5 & $7

Doc Watson

“Hills of Home” with David Holt, a part of the

Snuffy Jenkins Music Festival Reunion

November 7, 2009 - 7:30 PM Festival: Adult: $30 Youth: $20

North Carolina Symphony Holiday Pops

December 9, 2009 - 7:30 PM Adult: $19 & $23 Youth: $5 & $7

Riders In the Sky “Christmas The Cowboy Way”

December 12, 2009 - 7:30 PM Adult: $18 & $22 Youth: $5 & $7

Doc Watson

Paragon Ragtime Orchestra

“The Clown Princes”

NC Symphony

featuring silent films by Chaplin, Keaton & Lloyd January 29, 2010 - 7:30 PM Adult: $16 & $20 Youth: $5 & $7

Ronnie Milsap

Saturday, March 27, 2010 - 7:30PM Adult: $26 & $30 Youth: $5 & $7

A Musical Comedy Review February 12, 2010 - 7:30 PM Adult: $13 & $17 Youth: $4 & $6

“The Piano Men Starring Jim Witter”

Major Funding Provided by The Stonecutter Foundation, Inc.

For Tickets or Information

on-line ... www.FoundationShows.org (24/7) Tuesday - Friday

828-286-9990 11 AM - 5 PM

A Musical journey through the 70’s featuring the songs of Billy Joel & Elton John April 16, 2010 - 7:30 PM Adult: $16 & $20 Youth: $5 & $7

The Lettermen

May 29, 2010 - 7:30 PM Adult: $20 & $25 Youth: $5 & $7 (Memorial Day Weekend Concert)

“And More”


14A — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

NORTH CAROLINA

He rebuilds 1830s home plank by plank By JANICE GASTON Winston-Salem Journal

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Bob Pearl is, if nothing else, a patient man. He has the persistence to painstakingly remove layers and layers of paint or varnish to get back to the original finish on a piece of antique furniture. He has the diligence to hand-carve a missing piece of molding to complete an antique cabinet. And for 10 years, he had the endurance to live in a small mobile home with his wife and two children while he meticulously took down a big, 1830s house in Davidson County and rebuilt it, plank by plank, in Clemmons. He did it, he said, “with kids, schools, bills to pay and a business to run.” The Winston-Salem Journal reported that his love for old things and his desire to restore them to their original state has been his vocation and avocation for most of his life. Pearl tracks down and sells fine antiques — he specializes in Southern pieces — and restores old houses. His most impressive achievement has to be the house that he calls home. The house sits on 40 acres, which his family shares with 40 cows, that has been in his wife’s family since the 1850s. Pearl and his wife, Vicki, had long looked for an old house to buy. The one they found was unusually big for a house of that period — about 2,400 square feet — and it had been built by a member of

a premiere family of cabinetmakers, the Swicegoods, in the Piedmont. Pearl paid $5,000 for it. He tore it down, stored its pieces in a barn, and cleaned each piece. He kept track of them with a coding system of numbers, symbols and colors, then put everything back together without any paper plans. “Everything you see here is where it was,” he said. “Every plank is where it was, every brick in the chimney.” He added an addition that brings the size of the house to 3,200 square feet. His house is rich with period details, including hand-planed boards and decorative painting on moldings and mantels. Pearl loves old houses, he said, and he seldom sees one he doesn’t want to stop and walk through. Pearl has always worked on houses in some form. He worked at a painting business to pay his college tuition, then took over the business. He then became interested in antiques, which became his main focus. He traveled the country, studying finishes and styles of construction, and he picked the brains of such local experts as Tom Gray and the late Frank Horton. He became a self-taught expert in furniture from the Piedmont. His expertise is such, said June Lucas, that when she gets stumped, she turns to him. Lucas is the director of research at Old Salem Museums and Gardens. She calls Pearl a scholar, a dealer and a collector. “He’s my resource; he’s of real help in identifying and locating things.

AP Photo/Winston-Salem Journal, David Rolfe

Bob Pearl, an antiques dealer, moved his 1830s house from Davidson County to Clemmons. He dismantled the house piece by piece and reassembled it exactly as it was originally, including restoring a lost two-story front porch and portico.

He has a phenomenal memory and has been doing this so long,” she said. “He probably has had his eyes and hands on more Piedmont North Carolina stuff than anybody I know, especially furniture.” Pearl taught himself how to restore furniture. Getting down to the original finish of a piece isn’t always possible, he said. “It has a lot to do with the type of paint put over the original paint and the original paint itself.” Solvents can dissolve modern paints and leave some old paints intact. Other original paints will be destroyed in the stripping process. “A lot of times, you can only discover the original colors,” Pearl said. He removes paints and finishes carefully, layer by layer, using either trisodium phosphate or a chemical stripper. He has learned, after taking the stripping process too far one too many times, how to make finishes that look like the original. “I know what not to do and what to do — most of the time,” he said. Some people don’t want their antiques all shiny and polished; they

prefer them to remain as authentic as possible. Pearl has a tall chest in his living room that is lighter at the bottom and increasingly darker toward the top. Drifting smoke from cooking would have darkened the finish, he said. “The people I sell to would pay a lot more money for that than if it was refinished.” Pearl drifted into restoring houses professionally when he hung doors and repaired plaster in a few Victorian houses in West End. He then helped rebuild and restore an 18th-century house in Bethania after a fire. He used a mixture of baking soda and water to remove the burnt odor and the charring on the walls. Pearl isn’t sure what draws him to the process of taking something old and putting it back the way it used to be. “My youngest son is taking psychology,” he said. “In about three years, I guess I’ll have the answer to that.” Information from: Winston-Salem Journal, http://www.journalnow.com

Perdue video asks help By EMERY P. DALESIO Associated Press Writer

OF RUTHERFORDTON yamaha 363 Railroad Ave., Rutherfordton, NC • (828) 287-2100 Tuesday - Friday, 9:30 - 6 • Saturday, 10 - 3

*$1000 Customer Cash offer good on 2009 (and prior year) Roadliner and Stratoliner between 6/27/09 and 9/27/09. **Finance offer subject to credit approval, applies to purchases on all new Star Motorcycles made on a Yamaha Installment Financing loan account from 6/27/09-9/27/09. Minimum contract length is 24 months and maximum length is 72 months. Minimum amount financed is $5,000. Fixed APR of 6.99%, 8.99%, 11.99% or 13.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. Monthly payments per $1,000 financed based on 72 month term are $19.33 at 6.99%, $20.75 at 8.99%, $22.24 at 11.99% and $23.26 at 13.99%. Offer good only in the U.S., excluding the state of Hawaii. Some models shown with optional accessories. Yamaha and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation encourage you to ride safely and respect the environment. For further information regarding the MSF course, please call 1-800-446-9227. Dress properly for your ride with a helmet, eye protection, gloves and boots. Do not drink and ride. It is illegal and dangerous. ©2009 Yamaha Motor Corp., U.S.A. Cypress, CA 90630. StarMotorcycles.com

RALEIGH, N.C. — Gov. Beverly Perdue is popping up in the e-mail accounts of thousands of North Carolina teachers and state employees in a video asking for their help in a recession that has led to layoffs from government payrolls. “It’s part of her effort to keep everybody engaged,” spokesman David Kochman said Friday. “Everything that the state needs

to do from educating our kids, to improving the way we build roads, to working on public health issues, it all depends on state employees and teachers.” Perdue asks for money-saving suggestions that can be posted to a web site or phoned into her office in the videos distributed Wednesday. She also praises the government workers for their efforts despite tough times. The videos are also posted on a channel that Perdue established this spring on the YouTube video sharing web site. This week’s videos were the first specifically targeting state employees, Kochman said. “It’s my pleasure to communicate directly with you,” Perdue said at the start of each video, all running just under four minutes. The videos also allow Perdue to explain she tried to limit the impact on public employees of the downsized state

budget she signed into law two weeks ago. About 700 state workers are to be laid off and hundreds of teaching jobs are in question as local school boards cope with reduced state allocations. But Perdue said she offset more serious cuts in employment and programs while advocating against acrossthe-board tax increases. Perdue supported raising revenues by more than the nearly $1 billion in higher sales, income and other taxes the General Assembly approved. “Although some employee positions are being eliminated, I know and you know that things could have been far worse without all of our efforts,” Perdue said in the video state agency personnel officers were asked to e-mail to workers. “Every day, every single day, I’m thankful for what state employees do for this great state, for your commitment for doing more when there are less resources.”

S ummer is slipping away… and its carefree days will soon be just a memory. Road rage said basis for P lan a final summer memory with your family and discover the hidden attempted murder charge treasures that abound throughout our region. T he memories are priceless…and these day trips are priced less.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee state troopers say a North Carolina man fired his gun at a driver in what they describe as a road rage incident on Interstate 75 in Bradley County. The Tennessee Highway Patrol says 50-year-old Alexander Milne Denison III of Topton, N.C., was arrested Friday night after the driver of another pickup truck told a trooper the man had shot at him as their vehicles tried to merged

near a construction zone. The trooper said he found a fresh bullet hole at head level just behind the driver’s door, and a .38 caliber Smith & Wesson behind the driver’s seat of the pickup truck Denison was a passenger in. The pistol and slug have been sent to the Tennessee Bureau Investigation for ballistics testing. Denison was arrested on two counts of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm.

SHOP THE CLASSIFIEDS


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 1B

Inside Scoreboard . . . . . . . . . Page 2B Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4B Favre’s debut . . . . . . . Page 5B

Off The Wall

Real Thunder & Lightning

Scott Bowers

Cornbread heads and Yalla Yalla Over the last four years, there has been a scene in my life that keeps repeating, almost like the movie “Groundhog Day.” I go out to East Rutherford High and walk up to the gate and see Timothy Bird sitting at the gate, taking tickets. The rest plays out like this: “So, when are you going to write a column about those of us that work the gates,” asks Bird. “Soon,” I reply. That has gone on for four years. I owe Bird a really good column. He and countless others work hard, with little thanks, behind the scenes to make everything go smoothly at our prep games. But, today isn’t the day. Sorry Tim, maybe next week. No, today is all about ‘cornbread heads.’ When I was a freshman in high school, I went to work for the school’s newspaper. The first assignment I drew from the teacher in charge of the school paper was going to interview our new football coach. In a state rich in football tradition, like Georgia, Berkmar was an ugly pimple. The one school that couldn’t get out of its own way to win football games. Despite the fact that we were then a 4A program (now the school is 5A), we got thumped every time we took the field. Scores like 62-0 or 72-3 were not that uncommon for us. I did get to cover good players — they were just always on the other team. We fired more coaches than I can remember. In fact, Berkmar was the one place where a coach could always get a job; they just wouldn’t have it for very long. Coach Brewer was convinced he could change all that. “Do you like cornbread?” the salty old coach asked of me. “Well, yeah,” I said. “Good. ‘Cause we have a team full of cornbread heads,” said Brewer. “Their brains are full of small holes and nothing we put into them stays for very long. “We can’t tackle, we can’t block and I think I have one kid that can actually catch a football, but he’s too slow to ever get open — other than that we’re going to be really, really bad.” So, bad that he actually invited me — a scrawny kid in a back brace — to come play. I declined. Hey, I could see the writing on the wall. The team went 1-10 that season. I don’t remember who we beat, but they were forced to leave the state and never return. Friday night may have brought some frustration for our area coaches. I am sure there are moments when they feel like they may have a group of ‘cornbread heads.’ But, it could be worse. Opening nights always have a touch of the weird and this year’s openers were no exception. Mistakes are not uncommon, this early in the season, but our teams will continue to improve (well, they will). My favorite song right now is ‘Yalla Yalla,’ by Cracker. It roughly translates from Arabic to mean, ‘pick it up’ or ‘let’s go.’ The phrase is used a lot by our troops in Iraq. In fact, the video on YouTube features soldiers dancing to the song. For our gridiron guys: Yalla Yalla, fellows, next Friday is coming fast.

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

R-S Central’s defense digs in prior to the snap during the game against Bessemer City, Friday, at the Palace. Rain and lightning caused delays at many of the prep football games across Western N.C. Friday night. More prep coverage see Page 2B, 8B.

Area storms slow action across region FOREST CITY — The term ‘Thunder & Lightning’ took on its intended meaning for all three area schools playing endowment games on Friday night. East Rutherford’s game against Lincolnton was delayed by 20 minutes after a lightning strike was witnessed by officials. At R-S Central, heavy rains caused a 30 minute delay in the action and, roughly, 30 minutes following the resumption of action lightning caused an additional hour long delay. The Trojans, who were the only team on the road, were delayed for an hour following the games’ halftime. Chase trailed 13-0 at the half, but the team had to wait for an hour after lightning in Flat Rock caused several delays. The delays at East Henderson High caused confusion as it was reported early in the evening that the game had been Garrett Byers/Daily Courier suspended. The reports were incorrect East Rutherford players raise their helmets prior to the kick off of the game against and the game resumed with the Eagles Lincolnton Friday. pulling out a 25-7 win.

Chase makes ‘young mistakes’ in loss at East Henderson From staff reports

FLAT ROCK — Thunder and lightning descended on East Henderson Friday, forcing officials to suspend play. The home-standing Eagles of East Henderson led 13-0 at the time play was suspended and, following an hour long delay, the Eagles went on to capture a 25-7 victory. “The odd thing was there had been

lightning, but no thunder and the lightning appeared off in the distance,” said Chase coach Brad Causby. “Later, after we had sat for an hour, there was thunder and lightning, and this time much closer, but they were ready for us to play. So, it was a little strange.” The Trojans found the end zone on a 15-yard touchdown pass from Dache

Gossett to Keyshawn Crawford. Chase’s Blake Moffitt tacked on the extra for the seventh point. “We put together several nice, long drives in the second half, but we made a lot of young mistakes,” said Causby. “We had one sequence were we received the opening kick of the

Please see Chase, Page 8B

Four Inducted Into East Rutherford Hall of Fame

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

East Rutherford inducted four former student-athletes into the school’s Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame Class of 2009 included Doug Haulk, Class of 1967; Dameon Daniel, Class of 1994; Ashelea Flack Chaney, Class of 1998; and Clayton Toney, Class of 1998. Haulk (far righ) and Toney (second from right) were on hand to accept their award. The Flack family of Forest City accepted for their daughter, Ashelea, and Daniel was unable to attend.

Florida is No. 1 in AP preseason Top 25 NEW YORK (AP) — As Tim Tebow and the Florida Gators prepare to make a run at their third national title in the last four seasons, the defending champions have already made some history. Florida is No. 1 in The Associated Press’ preseason Top 25 released Saturday, followed by Texas, Oklahoma, Southern California and Alabama. But the Gators are in a class by themselves, the most overwhelming preseason No. 1 in the history of the

media poll. Florida received 58 of the 60 firstplace votes, or 96.7 percent. Texas got the other first-place votes. The previous highest percentage of first-place votes for the AP preseason poll, which started in 1950, was 95.4 percent for USC in 2007. Those Trojans got 62 of 65 first-place votes — and didn’t play for the national title. Ten preseason No. 1s have won the national championship. If the Gators

can become the 11th, they will have put together one of the great runs in college football history. Only one program since 1950 can claim three national championships in four years; Nebraska won it all it 1994 and 1995, then earned a split title in 1997. With expectations soaring in Gainesville, Fla., coach Urban Meyer has been on a mission to keep his team’s eyes on the small prizes — to

Please see Top 25, Page 3B


2B — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

sports

Scoreboard BASEBALL National League East Division W L Pct 69 50 .580 65 57 .533 64 58 .525 57 65 .467 43 79 .352 Central Division W L Pct St. Louis 70 54 .565 Chicago 61 59 .508 Houston 60 62 .492 Milwaukee 59 62 .488 Cincinnati 51 70 .421 Pittsburgh 50 70 .417 West Division W L Pct Los Angeles 73 50 .593 Colorado 68 54 .557 San Francisco 67 55 .549 Arizona 54 69 .439 San Diego 52 72 .419

Philadelphia Florida Atlanta New York Washington

GB —  5 1/2 6 1/2 13 1/2 27 1/2 GB —  7  9  9 1/2 17 1/2 18  GB —  4 1/2 5 1/2 19  21 1/2

Friday’s Games Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 7, Washington 3 N.Y. Mets 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 5, Atlanta 3 Houston 1, Arizona 0 San Francisco 6, Colorado 3 San Diego 4, St. Louis 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, Chicago Cubs 1 Saturday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Arizona at Houston, late Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, late Milwaukee at Washington, late Florida at Atlanta, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, late San Francisco at Colorado, late St. Louis at San Diego, late Sunday’s Games Philadelphia (P.Martinez 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (O.Perez 3-3), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 2-4) at Pittsburgh (K.Hart 4-2), 1:35 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 9-8) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 12-8), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (M.Parra 8-9) at Washington (Stammen 3-6), 1:35 p.m. Arizona (Garland 6-11) at Houston (Norris 3-1), 2:05 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 12-3) at Colorado (Jimenez 11-9), 3:10 p.m. St. Louis (Smoltz 0-0) at San Diego (Carrillo 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 6-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 12-6), 4:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 4:35 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. American League New York Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Detroit Chicago Minnesota Cleveland Kansas City Los Angeles Texas Seattle Oakland

East Division W L Pct 77 45 .631 69 52 .570 66 55 .545 56 64 .467 50 72 .410 Central Division W L Pct 65 56 .537 62 60 .508 59 63 .484 52 69 .430 47 74 .388 West Division W L Pct 73 47 .608 68 53 .562 63 59 .516 53 68 .438

GB —  7 1/2 10 1/2 20  27  GB —  3 1/2 6 1/2 13  18  GB —  5 1/2 11  20 1/2

Friday’s Games Seattle 9, Cleveland 4 Toronto 5, L.A. Angels 4 N.Y. Yankees 20, Boston 11 Tampa Bay 5, Texas 3 Minnesota 5, Kansas City 4, 10 innings Baltimore 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Saturday’s Games L.A. Angels 7, Toronto 3 Boston 14, N.Y. Yankees 1 Chicago White Sox 4, Baltimore 1 Seattle at Cleveland, late Texas at Tampa Bay, late Minnesota at Kansas City, late Detroit at Oakland, late Sunday’s Games Seattle (F.Hernandez 12-4) at Cleveland (Carmona 2-8), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (T.Bell 1-0) at Toronto (R.Romero 10-5), 1:07 p.m. Texas (Feldman 12-4) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-5), 1:38 p.m. Baltimore (Berken 2-11) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 11-6), 2:05 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 10-9) at Kansas City (Bannister 7-9), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 10-7) at Oakland (Tomko 2-2), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 14-7) at Boston (Beckett 14-4), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Miami Buffalo

National Football League Preseason Glance AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF 1 0 0 1.000 12 1 1 0 .500 45

PA 9 41

New England N.Y. Jets

1 0

Houston Tennessee Indianapolis Jacksonville

W 1 2 1 0

Baltimore Pittsburgh Cincinnati Cleveland

W 1 1 1 0

Oakland Denver San Diego Kansas City

W 1 0 0 0

1 0 1 0 South L T 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 North L T 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 West L T 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0

.500 33 .000 20

32 23

Pct 1.000 .667 .500 .000

PF 16 58 26 9

PA 10 68 28 12

Pct 1.000 1.000 .500 .000

PF 23 20 14 0

PA 0 10 23 17

Pct 1.000 .000 .000 .000

PF 31 16 14 23

PA 10 17 20 33

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 1 0 0 1.000 24 Dallas 1 1 0 .500 40 Washington 0 1 0 .000 0 Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 40 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 17 Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 46 Carolina 0 1 0 .000 17 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 20 North W L T Pct PF Minnesota 2 0 0 1.000 30 Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 27 Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 17 Chicago 0 1 0 .000 20 West W L T Pct PF San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 17 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 20 St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 36 Arizona 0 1 0 .000 10

PA 17 41 23 50 PA 7 40 24 27 PA 16 26 0 27 PA 16 14 40 20

Thursday’s Games Cincinnati 7, New England 6 Indianapolis 23, Philadelphia 15 Friday’s Games Dallas 30, Tennessee 10 Atlanta 20, St. Louis 13 Minnesota 17, Kansas City 13 Saturday’s Games Carolina at Miami, late Detroit at Cleveland, late Pittsburgh at Washington, late Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, late Buffalo at Green Bay, late New Orleans at Houston, late N.Y. Giants at Chicago, late Oakland at San Francisco, late San Diego at Arizona, late Denver at Seattle, late Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 27 Jacksonville at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 28 New England at Washington, 8 p.m. Green Bay at Arizona, 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29 Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Oakland, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Tennessee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. San Diego at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Baltimore at Carolina, 8 p.m. N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 8 p.m. San Francisco at Dallas, 8 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 30 Chicago at Denver, 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31 Minnesota at Houston, 8 p.m. PREP FOOTBALL Albemarle 35, Mt. Pleasant 7 Alexander Central 3, Davie County 0 Anson County 21, Marshville Forest Hills 14 Apex Middle Creek 40, Northern Durham 6 Brevard 14, Black Mountain Owen 13 Mountain Heritage 53, North Buncombe 12 Cameron Union Pines 34, Red Springs 20 Canton Pisgah 34, Asheville Erwin 21 Cape Fear 52, Hoke County 36 Carrboro 26, St. Pauls 7 Catawba Bandys 22, Newton Foard 14 Central Davidson 28, North Stanly 20 Charlotte Catholic 34, South Mecklenburg 14 Charlotte Christian 36, Carolina Pride 6 Charlotte Independence 42, Mallard Creek 41 Charlotte Myers Park 37, Charlotte Garinger 30 Charlotte Waddell 28, North Gaston 27 Cherokee 13, Sylva Smoky Mountain 12 Clinton Union 41, North Johnston 12 Clover, S.C. 28, Belmont South Point 21 Croatan 29, Dixon 0 Dunn Midway 21, South Brunswick 18 Durham Hillside 22, Greensboro Grimsley 0 Durham Jordan 17, Orange County 7 East Bend Forbush 32, North Surry 20 East Davidson 19, Randleman 14 East Duplin 70, North Lenoir 13 East Forsyth 21, North Forsyth 14 East Henderson 13, Forest City Chase 0 East Mecklenburg 28, West Charlotte 20 East Rowan 7, North Rowan 0 East Rutherford 7, Lincolnton 0 East Surry 28, Hickory St. Stephens 13 East Wilkes 50, West Davidson 26 Eastern Alamance 42, Cedar Ridge 0 Edenton Holmes 21, Northampton-East 14 Elkin 24, Surry Central 9 Farmville Central 27, Plymouth 23 Fayetteville Britt 30, East Wake 0 Fayetteville Byrd 21, Hope Mills South View 6 Fayetteville Pine Forest 28, Lumberton 26 Fayetteville Westover 7, Fayetteville Sanford 2 Forsyth County Day 32, Fayetteville Christian 0 Franklin 20, Asheville Roberson 6 Fuquay-Varina 38, Knightdale 14 Gastonia Forestview 20, Nation Ford, S.C. 14 Gastonia Huss 36, East Gaston 12 Graham 39, Warren County 0 Green Sea Floyds, S.C. 24, West Columbus 6 Dudley 28, Winston-Salem Carver 20 Page 54, Winston-Salem Parkland 14 Greensboro Smith 40, Winston-Salem Atkins 0 Harnett Central 42, Apex 7 Havelock 21, New Bern 3 Hertford County 47, Gates County 14

Hickory Grove 51, Gastonia Highland Tech 6 Hope Mills Gray’s Creek 26, Fairmont 0 Hopewell 38, West Mecklenburg 21 Jacksonville Northside 14, White Oak 8 Jamestown Ragsdale 39, Southern Guilford 7 Kannapolis Brown 35, Statesville 7 Kernersville Glenn 19, North Davidson 14 Kernersville McGuinness 41, Union Academy 0 First Flight 55, Perquimans County 37 Kinston 23, Jones County 6 Lake City, S.C. 34, South Columbus 13 Lake Norman 39, Person County 22 Lenoir Hibriten 34, Morganton Freedom 20 Lexington 27, Eastern Randolph 0 Madison County 68, Rosman 6 Maiden 20, North Lincoln 17 Manteo 34, Currituck County 19 Marvin Ridge 30, Concord 0 Matthews Butler 35, Mt. Tabor 14 McCallie, Tenn. 38, Providence Day 12 Monroe 23, Indian Trail Porter Ridge 13 Monroe Sun Valley 14, Gastonia Ashbrook 7 Morganton Patton 28, Vldese Draughn 0 Mt. Airy 41, Boonville Starmount 28 Murphy 38, Q Foundation 12 New Hanover County 42, Goldsboro 6 North Duplin 28, Chocowinity Southside 12 North Henderson 33, Enka 28 North Mecklenburg 41, Charlotte Olympic 30 Raleigh Christian 13, Northside Christian 6 North Stokes 22, Alleghany County 0 Northeast Guilford 30, High Point Andrews 19 Northern Guilford 43, Western Guilford 36 Northwest Cabarrus 35, Mooresville 14 Northwest Guilford 40, Eastern Guilford 28 Oxford Webb 48, Granville Central 6 Pembroke Swett 20, Fayetteville Smith 6 Pikeville Aycock 39, Bunn 38 Pittsboro Northwood 24, East Chapel Hill 0 Polk County 26, Waynesville Tuscola 14 Princeton 19, Hobbton 12 Providence Grove 21, Asheboro 14 R-S Central 22, Bessemer City 9 Raleigh Athens Drive 21, Raleigh Sanderson 14 Raleigh Broughton 21, Cary 6 Raleigh Cardinal Gibbons 20, Clayton 7 Raleigh Leesville Road 35, Panther Creek 28 Raleigh Millbrook 34, Garner 24 Raleigh Ravenscroft 40, Northern Vance 6 Raleigh Wakefield 31, Morrisville Green Hope 7 Reidsville 53, Western Alamance 7 Richmond County 27, Charlotte Providence 17 Roanoke Rapids 41, Northampton-West 0 Robbinsville 41, Avery County 14 Rocky Point Trask 21, North Brunswick 18 Rosewood 13, Raleigh Wake Christian 12 Salemburg Lakewood 14, East Columbus 3 Scotland County 19, Seventy-First 14 Jordan-Matthews 38, Eden Morehead 20 Smithfield-Selma 28, Erwin Triton 26 South Caldwell 32, McDowell County 0 South Davidson 53, Wheatmore 6 South Granville 33, Chapel Hill 6 South Johnston 57, Southern Lee 0 South Lenoir 44, Spring Creek 19 South Rowan 38, Salisbury 20 South Stanly 24, West Stanly 21 Southeast Raleigh 41, Holly Springs 17 Southern Alamance 14, Williams 14, TIE Southern Durham 47, Greenville Rose 17 Southern Nash 37, Franklinton 28 Southern Pines Pinecrest 41, Raleigh Enloe 20 Southern Vance 46, Southeast Halifax 0 SouthWest Edgecombe 42, Northeastern 6 Southwest Guilford 20, Southeast Guilford 10 Southwest Onslow 28, Wilmington Ashley 3 Swain County 42, Mitchell County 7 Swansboro 40, Lejeune 12 Tarboro 39, Nash Central 0 Thomasville 31, Cox Mill 0 Trinity 16, Thomasville Ledford 7 Wake Forest-Rolesville 41, Durham Riverside 0 Warsaw Kenan 35, Clinton 16 Washington 27, North Pitt 0 Weddington 69, Cuthbertson 0 West Caldwell 34, North Wilkes 0 West Craven 32, Southern Wayne 15 West Forsyth 24, Asheville Reynolds 14 West Henderson 14, Hendersonville 7 West Iredell 31, Wilkes Central 16 West Johnston 37, Spring Lake Overhills 13 West Montgomery 28, South Robeson 8 West Rowan 54, Central Cabarrus 0 West Stokes 36, Pfafftown Reagan 27 Western Harnett 20, Lee County 6 Williamston 39, Ayden-Grifton 20 Wilmington Hoggard 15, Whiteville 9 Wilson Beddingfield 29, Northern Nash 14 Wilson Fike 14, Greenville Conley 8 Wilson Hunt 42, Eastern Wayne 14 Reynolds 20, High Point Central 7 Yanceyville Yancey 40, South Stokes 9

BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Indiana 19 6 .760 Atlanta 14 11 .560 Connecticut 13 12 .520 Chicago 13 13 .500 Washington 13 13 .500 Detroit 9 14 .391 New York 10 16 .385 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Phoenix 18 9 .667 Seattle 14 11 .560 Los Angeles 12 13 .480 Minnesota 11 14 .440 San Antonio 11 15 .423 Sacramento 8 18 .308 Thursday’s Games Atlanta 93, San Antonio 87 Sacramento 67, Indiana 62 Friday’s Games New York 85, Connecticut 83, OT Los Angeles 67, San Antonio 66, OT Washington 91, Phoenix 81 Saturday’s Games Minnesota at Connecticut, late Detroit at Chicago, late Indiana at Seattle, late Washington at Sacramento, late Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Atlanta, 3 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Detroit, 6 p.m.

GB —  5  6  6 1/2 6 1/2 9  9 1/2 GB —  3  5  6  6 1/2 9 1/2

Lincolnton 28, East Rutherford 21 LN — 7 14 0 7 ­— 28 ER — 7 0 14 0 — 21 First Quarter ER — A. Wilkins 71 yard run (R. Bailey PAT) LN — B. Wilson 19 yard run (Miller PAT) Second Quarter LN — D. Littlejohn 10 yard run (PAT blocked) LN — M. Cunningham 40 yard Int. return (2-point conversion) Third Quarter ER — T. Hamilton 55 yard run (R. Bailey PAT) ER — A. Wilkins 16 yard run (R. Bailey PAT) Fourth Quarter LN — B. Wilson 1 yard run (Miller PAT) Rushing LN — B. Wilson 17-72-2 TD; D. Littlejohn 8-30TD; T. Avery 3-45; Team 5-29 ER — T. Hamilton 13-101-TD; A. Wilkins 11-1282 TD; T. Wilkerson 7-24; Z. Price 1-7; L. Watkins 1-5 Passing LN — B. Wilson 4-10-63 ER — M. Baxter 3-11-INT-12 Receiving LN — B. Ebert 1-42; D. Littlejohn 2-21; T. Avery 1-0 ER — T. Wilkerson 1-8; R. Wilkins 1-7; T. Hamilton 1-(-3)

R-S Central 22, Bessemer City 9 BC — 3 0 6 0 — 9 RS — 0 9 13 0 — 22 First Quarter BC — T. Blake 33-yard field goal Second Quarter RS — O. Murray 1-yard TD run (C. Owens point after misses) RS — C. Owens 22-yard field goal Third Quarter BC — K. Wilson 63-yard fumble recovery for TD (two-point conv. no good) RS — O. Murray 84-yard kickoff return for TD (C. Owens point after) RS — O. Murray 5-yard run for TD (C. Owens PAT no good) Rushing RS — O. Murray 21-107-2 TD, C. Green 9-37, J. Kinlaw 8-27, W. Lynch 2-(-2) BC — J. Coleman 11-53, X. Logan 14-(-2), D. Huskey 2-(-5), T. Dawkins 1-3, Jq. Mackey 1-4, Js. Mackey1-6, D. Swanger 1-8 Passing RS — J. Kinlaw 1-6-INT-3 BC — X. Logan 6-14-54 Receiving RS — V. Staley 1-3 BC — T. Dawkins 3-34, B. Corry 3-20

Tense pre-race ride for Busch, Vickers at Bristol BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) — There was an awkward moment at the start of Saturday night’s race when feuding drivers Kyle Busch and Brian Vickers shared the same truck for their introductory lap around Bristol Motor Speedway. The two drivers didn’t appear to speak as they stood shoulder-to-shoulder in the back of a truck and waved to the sold-out crowd. Some fans and an ESPN camera crew shared the ride, which appeared to be tense. Busch and Vickers, former teammates, had a run-in last week at Michigan International Raceway when hard-racing between the two on the last lap of the Nationwide Series allowed Brad Keselowski to sneak by and steal the victory. Busch was angry about how Vickers raced him, and Vickers has not minced words since. “I hate that he lives in such an angry place,” Vickers said. “It must be miserable to live like that. That’s just not the way I want to live my life.” Busch has not discussed the feud all weekend, and said before the start of the Sprint Cup Series he was trying to bounce back from a heartbreaking finish in Friday night’s Nationwide race. He had just passed Kevin Harvick for the lead when 19-year-old Chase Austin turned left directly into Busch to wreck his car. Busch couldn’t afford a repeat in the Cup race: He started the night 15th in the standings with just three races before the 12-driver Chase for the championship field is set. “Last night was a pain in the neck,” Busch said. “It wasn’t a good feeling to get wrecked. But we’re here tonight and focused on what we’ve got to do in order to get everybody fired up.” Vickers started 14th and Busch was 15th to set up their pre-race ride. FUEL INJECTION: NASCAR is considering moving to fuel injection engines, but any such change probably wouldn’t happen until the 2011 season. The move is being considered after NASCAR met with several engine builders about how to make the cars more fuel efficient. The current cars have used carburetors since the 1980s, which has little application to what is currently sold on showroom floors. INTERESTING INTRODUCTIONS: Bristol officials added an entertaining twist to the prerace introductions, allowing each driver to choose a song to play as they emerged from behind a curtain. It made for some interesting selections: The reserved Sam Hornish Jr. came out to the Beastie Boys “Fight For Your Right (To Party)” while Reed Sorenson came out to Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean.”


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 3B

sports Game 2: Panthers vs. Dolphins

Top 25 Carolina Panthers quarterback Jake Delhomme, above center, drops back in the first quarter of a preseason NFL football game. Miami Dolphins running back Ronnie Brown, left, celebrates a touchdown with quarterback Chad Pennington in Miami, Fla., Saturday. As of press time, the Dolphins lead the Panthers, 20-14.

Continued from Page 1B

heck with history. “There’s a lot of guys getting patted on the back and being told how good they are,” Meyer said in a recent telephone interview. “Their only focus is on survival to the next day and working hard in practice. “I don’t want them to even think about that kind of stuff. Our goal is to get to Atlanta” for the Southeastern Conference championship game. The rest of the top 10 includes two Big Ten powerhouses (No. 6 Ohio State and No. 9 Penn State) and the defending Atlantic Coast Conference Associated Press champion (No. 7 Virginia Tech). No. 8 Mississippi is in the preseason top 10 for the first time since 1970, when the Rebels were ranked fifth. Oklahoma State is tied with Penn State for No. 9, the Cowboys’ highest preseason ranking since No. 16 in 1985, when Thurman Thomas was in the backfield. Florida is preseason No. 1 for the third time (1994 and 2001), and the Gators are the 20th defending national champ to start the season on top. From the moment Florida wrapped up its 24-14 victory over Oklahoma in the BCS championship game in January, talk of a repeat started. And when Tebow a few days later announced at a rally on campus celebrating the national title that he would come back for his senior year, there was no doubt the Gators would be the runaway preseason No. 1. Florida’s rugged, multidimensional quarterback won the Heisman Trophy in 2007 and finished third behind Oklahoma quarterback Sam Bradford and Texas quarterback Colt McCoy last year. As good as Tebow is — he has a chance to end his career as the most decorated player in college footNo, there shouldn’t be any problems. If there are, it doesn’t bal history with three national title rings and two matter anyway because Calipari Heismans — Meyer sees areas for improvement. “I’d say in the passing game he can certainly can just claim ignorance and the spineless NCAA will let him improve some things,” Meyer said. “Leadershipsign a new $32 million contract wise he used to get angry when he felt other guys weren’t working as hard as he was. Now he gets somewhere else. those players to play at that level.” That’s what happened when While Tebow leads an offense with plenty of Calipari bolted from Memphis speedy gamebreakers, All-American linebacker just as the probe into Derrick Brandon Spikes — another guy who passed on a Rose’s eligibility heated up. Calipari claimed he had no idea chance to enter the NFL draft to return for his that Rose’s SAT test wasn’t legit- senior season — leads a defense that has potential imate, the NCAA said it wouldn’t to be the best in the country. All 22 players on the defensive depth chart for sanction the coach, and the celthe BCS title game are back. Among the standouts ebration began in Lexington. are defensive end Carlos Dunlap and cornerback That’s another great thing about Kentuckians. They believe Janoris Jenkins and Joe Haden. All that experience will allow defensive coordinaa man when he gives them his tor Charlie Strong to good deep into his playbook. word. “Our defense has been installed at a much greater Never mind that Calipari is pace than ever before,” Meyer said. “That allows the typical control freak coach who knows everything from the you to put in a lot more different packages, three down (linemen) and four down.” number of socks his team goes The Gators are one of five SEC teams ranked in through in a season to what his the Top 25, matching the Big 12 for the most from backup center had a week ago for breakfast. If he says he didn’t any conference. Joining Florida, Alabama and Ole Miss are LSU at No. 11 and Georgia at No. 13. know the star he recruited to No. 23 Nebraska and No. 25 Kansas are the other lead Memphis to the championBig 12 teams, along with Texas, Oklahoma and ship game failed the SAT three times in Chicago before turning Oklahoma State. Utah, which finished No. 2 last season and was in a passing grade from Detroit, the only undefeated team in major college footwell, that’s good enough for ball, is ranked 19th to start this season. But the them. Utes aren’t even the highest ranked team from the The same goes for Pitino in Mountain West Conference. Louisville. If his attorney says the money he paid out was for health care, not an abortion, then it’s reasonable to believe that Pitino was simply an early adopter of the single payer system. 149 South Main, Rutherfordton, NC No need for lengthy explana286-2266 tions. This is Kentucky, after all. A great place to be a basketball coach.

Kentucky a great place to be a basketball coach By TIM DAHLBERG AP Sports Columnist

Rick Pitino had an athletic director and a university president in his corner. John Calipari one-upped him with the governor. It really is a great time to be a college basketball coach in Kentucky, where the paychecks run bigger than hats at the Derby and winning games means never having to say you’re sorry. Get caught with your pants down and someone is right there to pull them back up for you. Disgrace your old school and someone will lead the cheers to make sure everyone knows it wasn’t really your fault. Just win, baby, win. That seems to be all that matters in college hoops, a world increasingly populated by scammers in fine Italian suits who a generation ago would have been selling vacuum cleaners on your doorstep. Though they still troll neighborhoods today, the target has changed from housewives to 18-year-olds who might lead them to the promised land that is the Final Four. The dirt is still flying. Unlike the vacuum salesmen, though, they don’t clean it up themselves. Pitino had assistants to tidy up his sordid mess. Calipari left it to his former employers to sort things out. The great thing is they can do no wrong. As long as they don’t commit the ultimate sin of losing at home (see Billy Gillispie), they get a free pass from both the faithful and the powerful. Sure, Louisville could have invoked a morals clause in his

contract and fired Pitino for having sex in a restaurant with a woman he had met just hours earlier, then giving her $3,000 as she headed across state lines for an abortion. But why get all hot and bothered about a little indiscretion when the Cardinals need Pitino on the bench when they travel Jan. 2 to Lexington to take on the Wildcats? And what’s the point of punishing Calipari for what happened in Memphis a few years back? Old news, and they’re just a bunch of losers now, anyway. Remember, this guy has been to the Final Four more than once. So what if they keep taking his wins away? Kentuckians sure are an interesting bunch. Maybe the best thing about them is they are quick to forgive and forget. The people running the University of Louisville almost tripped over themselves in their haste to come to Pitino’s defense, with athletic director Tom Jurich immediately declaring he was behind the coach “a million percent.” Calipari did his rival coach one better, getting an endorsement from the governor when the NCAA ordered his old school to forfeit all 38 wins from two years ago — the second Final Four season Calipari has had wiped off the books in his career. “I’m not worried about it because they have never said Coach Cal did anything wrong at all,” Gov. Steve Beshear said. “I think he’s a very upstanding guy. I think that’s his reputation and I think that reputation will be with him here. I really don’t foresee any problems.”

Monograms & More

Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org

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4B — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

sports

Riley, Garcia share Wyndham lead GREENSBORO (AP) — Sergio Garcia and Chris Riley were both 13 under par through 10 holes to share the clubhouse lead Saturday night when play was stopped midway through the third round of the rain-plagued Wyndham Championship. Steve Marino, Fred Couples, Kevin Stadler and Justin Rose were 12 under and Brandt Snedeker and Bill Haas were 11 under through varying stages of their rounds when play was suspended due to darkness. Tournament officials said the round was scheduled to resume Sunday at 7:30 a.m., with a second cut and the final round to begin at roughly 11 a.m. During yet another long day with abbreviated play at the Donald Ross-designed course at Sedgefield Country Club — where two weather delays combined to last nearly 5 1/2 hours — there were a few highlights. Associated Press

Marino, who started the round Team USA’s Paula Creamer, left, hugs Juli Inkster as six strokes off the pace, had they lose their foursome match on the 15th hole at the Solheim Cup golf tournament Saturday, at Rich Harvest seven birdies to vault up the leaderboard — including one on Farms in Sugar Grove, Ill.

the par-3 No. 16 in which his tee shot landed 7 inches from the flagstick. Couples, the U.S. President’s Cup captain who’s still considering his final picks, birdied four of his first eight holes to move into contention for his first vicSUGAR GROVE, Ill. (AP) — Not so fast. tory since 2003. And Rose had With Michelle Wie and Christina Kim partyfive birdies to rally after starting ing on the green and their teammates leading or squared in another two matches, the United States the round four strokes back. But once again, the dominant looked as if it was in for a big day at the Solheim storyline at this stop-and-start Cup. Europe had other ideas, though, making an impressive rally to win the fourballs 2 1/2-1 1/2 and tournament was the weather. Play was halted twice during even the Solheim Cup at six points apiece ahead of Day 3 because of heavy rains Saturday afternoon’s foursomes. “It was just phenomenal,” Europe captain Alison and lightning. After the second Nicholas said. “The girls just made a few mistakes round was completed mid-morning, the start of Round 3 was but carried on, looking forward.” The United States needs 14 points to win its third pushed back 2 1/2 hours while a band of thunderstorms passed straight Solheim Cup. Europe needs 14 1/2 to win through. its first on U.S. soil. Then, nearly four hours into Wie and Kim had the already festive crowd in the third round, everyone went a frenzy with an easy 5-and-4 victory over Helen scurrying for cover again while Alfredsson and Tania Elosegui that showcased Wie’s considerable talents. They were still exchang- another wave of storms pelted the central North Carolina pieding hugs and high-fives on the 14th green when Cristie Kerr holed in from the fairway on 12 to even her and Nicole Castrale’s match with Anna Nordqvist and Suzann Pettersen, and chants of “The Cup stays here!” began to ring out across Rich Harvest Farms. SUNRIVER, Ore. (AP) — “All you need is a little momentum,” Kim said. Brad Bryant came off the And Europe has it now. course Saturday at the Jeld-Wen Women’s British Open champion Catriona Tradition with a huge grin. Matthew and Diana Luna were down two through He had just shot a 5-under 67 16 holes and hadn’t made a birdie since the turn. to take a two-stroke advantage But Brittany Lang and Angela Stanford gave them over Mike Reid into the final an opportunity on the 17th. Lang’s tee shot went round. into a bunker and she dug out for all of about 70 Bryant padded his lead to go to feet, while Stanford overshot the green. 15 under at Crosswater Golf Club Matthew then buried a 30-footer from the left in central Oregon. He has stayed edge of the green for a birdie. atop the leaderboard after shootLang had a chance to win the match, but her ing a career-best 10-under 62 in 30-foot birdie putt from the bottom of the green the opening round, matching a stopped 5 feet short. Luna then buried a 12-footer tournament record. to halve the match, pumping her right fist and “I’d like to play tomorrow leaping as the ball went in the cup. exactly like I played today. If I “It’s just amazing,” said Luna, a Solheim Cup do that, I don’t care if I win or rookie who didn’t play Friday. “Catriona said to me, not,” he said. “If I play as well ’Come on, knock it in for the glory.’ I had a great tomorrow as I did today and partner, we got really lucky.” somebody beats me, they deserve There was more to come, too. it more than me.” The rookie pumped her fist and yelled when the ball dropped in the hole and Pettersen — who had Reid birdied the par-4 No. 18 lost both her matches Friday — jumped up and to finish with a 66 and go to down. 13 under in the fourth of five Maria Hjorth and Gwladys Nocera were 3-up majors on the Champions Tour. after 10, but Brittany Lincicome and Kristy Bryant had back-to-back birdMcPherson made three straight birdies to even ies on the 15th and 16th holes. the match through 15. But Hjorth put her tee shot He came close to another one within 18 inches on the par-3 16th, and knocked it on the par-3 No. 17, but his putt in for what would be the decisive birdie. came to rest on the lip of the “You really just have to start making putts,” hole. Hjorth said. “If you make putts, they get a little bit John Cook had a 68, putquieter, that’s how you’ve got to pump yourself up.” ting him at 12 under going into

Europe battles back in Solheim Cup

Associated Press

Spectators leave the area due to a weather delay during the third round of the Wyndham Championship PGA golf tournament at Sedgefield Country Club in Greensboro, Saturday.

mont. Cups overflowed with water, fairways more closely resembled streams and power was briefly knocked out to the clubhouse during a television interview with Couples. After a 2-hour, 49-minute delay — the third weather-related suspension of the tournament — play finally resumed for about an hour before dusk fell. Organizers already had been racing to play catch-up after a 4-hour delay during the first round. Riley opened his round with an eagle on No. 1, using a 9-iron to knock his approach shot about

165 yards into the hole. After the delay, he ran a 55-foot eagle putt to within 3 feet on No. 5 and tapped it in for birdie. The former UNLV player who’s contending for his second top10 finish of the year — and second career PGA Tour victory — shared the 36-hole lead with Maggert and Ryan Moore at 11-under 129. Standing in the way: A weather-created, 26-hole marathon Sunday for both Riley and Garcia. Then again, that’s nothing new during this tournament for Riley — who took his first lead Friday while playing 21 holes.

Bryant leads going into Tradition’s final round Sunday’s final. Larry Mize was at 10 under after a third-round 70. “Definitely could have been a little more tidy today,” Cook said. “But I’m happy with that.” Bryant’s low opening round matched Tom Watson’s mark set in 2003 and Doug Tewell’s in 2001. Bryant’s best finish of the year was fourth at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open in June. He has four overall tour victories, his last coming at the Senior U.S. Open in 2007. “That was one of the most solid rounds I’ve played all year,” Bryant said Saturday. “Actually, today was more encouraging than when I shot 62.” Bryant was vying to become the first player to go wire-towire in a Champions Tour major since Tewell in the Tradition in 2001. Reid has just one win on the Champions Tour, the 2005 Senior PGA Championship. “I think this week things have come together,” he said. “Some of the promising signs are turning into good scores.” Watson rebounded with a 69 on Saturday after a 74 the day For great local sports coverage, read

The Daily Courier

before, but making a run at the leaders in the final round will be tough at 6 under. Watson had one of the biggest galleries on the 7,533-yard course built in the shadow of Mount Bachelor. He has said this week that he’s encountered many well-wishers in the past month after losing in a playoff to Stewart Cink at the British Open. After temperatures nearly hit 100 on Thursday, a cooling trend expected to continue through the weekend brought highs into the mid-80s. Last year, Fred Funk shot a final-round 69 for a three-shot victory over Mike Goodes and his first win in a major on the tour. Funk had a 73 Saturday and was 8 under after three rounds. The Tradition started at Desert Mountain in Scottsdale in 1989 before moving to Superstition Mountain for a year in 2002. With the help of Oregon native Peter Jacobsen, the event moved again in 2003 to the Reserve Vineyards and Golf Club west of Portland, and in 2007 came to Crosswater.

Hendrick: Keselowski won’t go far in 2010

BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) — Brad Keselowski may be moving to Penske Racing next season, but team owner Rick Hendrick said Saturday he’ll find a way to bring the talented young driver back to his organization. “I’m not saying he’s going to be with us next year and I’m not saying he won’t be,” Hendrick said at Bristol Motor Speedway. “But wherever he goes, he’ll always be close enough for me to get him and bring him back.” Hendrick then asked to “make sure all the other car owners know I said that.” The 25-year-old Keselowski is the hottest young prospect in NASCAR, in large part to his surprise victory at Talladega in April. He currently drives in the Nationwide Series for JR Motorsports, a team co-owned by Hendrick and Dale Earnhardt Jr., but he’s been hoping for a promotion to the Sprint Cup Series. He thought it would come in 2010 when Mark Martin relinquished the No. 5, but Martin decided to stay on for another season. That left Hendrick with no room to place Keselowski, who went through a brief period of exclusive negotiations with Hendrick to determine if a seat could be found with one of the many teams affiliated with HMS. As time ran out, rival team owner Roger Penske asked for and received permission to speak to Keselowski.


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 5B The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, SUNDAY, August 23, 2009 — 5B

sports

Favre shaky but Vikings beat Chiefs in his debut

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Brett Favre jogged onto the turf to a chorus of cheers and a hero’s welcome — the kind of reception he’s grown used to over 18 brilliant seasons in his Hall of Fame career. There was one major difference this time around. Those cheers were coming at the Metrodome. Favre made his debut for the Minnesota Vikings in a preseason game against the Kansas City Chiefs, going 1 for 4 for 4 yards in a 17-13 victory on Friday night. The game capped a whirlwind week for the 39-yearold quarterback. On Monday he was throwing to kids at a high school in Mississippi, still in retirement and starting to be called “Coach” by the teenagers who were catching his passes.

On Tuesday, he flew to Minnesota to sign with the Vikings, his mortal enemies during 16 record-setting seasons with the Green Bay Packers. By Friday, Favre was playing in a real game, starting for the Vikings and looking every bit as rusty as one would expect a soon-to-be 40-year-old who was sitting on a tractor last weekend. Vikings fans may not have forgotten about the beatings Favre handed their favorite team over the years. But it was clear on Friday night that all is forgiven. Purple Favre jerseys were all over the Metrodome, and flashbulbs accompanied a roar when he joined the huddle for the first time as a Viking in the first quarter. “With all the attention, it’s

hard not to feel like you don’t have to live up to this hype. Not that I don’t want to do that, but the most important thing is to lead this team to victory somehow, someway,” Favre said. “I definitely didn’t want to get off on the wrong foot by fumbling snaps. I wanted to call the plays right, get in and out of the huddle, be as smooth as possible.”

• • • Carry: That's probably a question best answered with Murphy's Law: "If anything can go wrong, it will." Murphy may not have been in real estate, but the rule of thumb probably still applies.

and stay focused on the goal at hand. Just tried to go out here and get better.” New Chiefs quarterback Matt Cassel had plenty to work on as well. He was acquired in a trade with New England in the offseason and signed a $63 million contract, but new coach Todd Haley has been frustrated so far with Cassel’s progress. After going just 2 of 5 for 15 yards in his debut last week, Cassel led the Chiefs on two scoring drives. He threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to Dwayne Bowe early in the second quarter against Minnesota’s second unit. Cassel faced plenty of pressure, taking three sacks, and finished 9 for 14 for 99 yards. “I thought the quarterback play across the board was better,” Haley said.

Fast Facts En-titled

Reader Humor Medium Rare

Title insurance on your home can be important if you ever have a problem, but how often is it really used? Compared to other types of insurance, the number of claims are small. In 2008, auto and home insurance companies used about 70 percent of their premiums to pay customer claims. In the same year, title insurance companies used only about 5 percent of premiums to pay claims.

The captain at our firehouse is always on top of things. We responded to a call for a fire that started with a barbeque and quickly spread to the entire deck. As the guys and I put out the flames, a crowd gathered to watch. When we were done, our captain came forward to investigate. Looking at the crowd, he approached one man in particular. "Sir," he said, "I'm guessing you're the owner of this home and probably the one responsible for the fire." Seeming rather amazed, the owner asked my captain how he knew. "I have had years of extensive training," he boasted. "And besides," he added looking at the man's outfit, "you're the only one wearing an apron that says, 'Kiss the Cook'!" (Thanks to Darren H.)

He didn’t manage a first down in two series of work, completing only one pass to rookie Percy Harvin before giving way to Tarvaris Jackson. But he made no major mistakes and absorbed a couple of big hits as he looked to start getting back in the groove of being an NFL quarterback. Still, his presence in a

Ask the Guys Dear Classified Guys, When it comes to buying a home, I think there are always more questions than answers. My husband and I found a cute colonial that we just fell in love with. It had all of the amenities we wanted including a well-maintained yard. We found the home advertised in a classified ad and were the first to respond. The owners are a middle-aged couple who lived in the house for over 20 years. They raised their daughter there until she went off to college last year. The couple was forthcoming about the pros and cons of the house and very easy to negotiate with. We came to an agreement rather quickly. That has me wondering. Since we are buying directly from the owners and developed a friendly relationship, do you think my husband and I need to buy title insurance? If they've lived in the house for 20 years without issue, what could go wrong?

Vikings jersey and getting cheered in the Metrodome made the exhibition game feel like some sort of alternate universe. “For us, it’s still a little surreal,” receiver Bobby Wade said. “We’re still trying to process it.” Jackson has probably had to make the biggest adjustment. Five days ago, he was competing with Sage Rosenfels for the starting job. Now he’s trying to earn a spot as Favre’s backup. He responded in impressive fashion, completing 12 of 15 passes for 205 yards and two touchdowns, including a 64-yarder to Darius Reynaud. “I’m not going to say it wasn’t hard,” Jackson said. “But I just tried to stay focused on what I had to do

Duane “Cash” Holze & Todd “Carry” Holze 08/23/09 ©2009 The Classified Guys®

Cash: There are a lot of details when

buying or selling real estate, and as you mentioned, they can raise a lot of questions. Each detail should be handled carefully to make the sale a safe transaction for both parties. And since buying a home is typically the largest investment you'll make in a lifetime, it pays to protect yourself. Carry: You've already done much of the hard work in finding a house that you love. However, don't let your admiration for the home or the owners alter your judgment when dealing with the paperwork. Cash: The purpose of title insurance is to cover a broad range of issues that can arise after you purchase a home or

property. It's often used to protect you against previous mortgages, unknown owners, judgments against the property and a host of other issues that may not be known by you or the current owners. Carry: While you may be looking to save the cost, realize that doing so could leave you unprotected in the future. If you plan on getting a loan from a bank or mortgage company, they may require you to get title insurance before the purchase. Cash: By dealing with the owners directly, you've collected some great information about the house, property and neighborhood. So hopefully the sale will go as smoothly as your meeting with the owners and you’ll prove Murphy wrong!

This Old House If you've traveled to Europe, you know that homes dating back hundreds of years can be quite common. On the contrary, homes found in the United States are relatively young in comparison, with the exception of one house located in St. Augustine, Florida. This home, which resides on Francis Street, dates back to 1562 when immigrants began it’s construction. The walls were made with a stone-like material called "coquina" which is produced from the remnants of seashells. The house still stands today, more than 400 years later. The Spanish owned the home until 1821, when the territory of Florida officially became part of the United States. •

Got a question or funny story? Email us at: comments@classifiedguys.com.

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CLASSIFIEDS Contact Erika Meyer to place your ad!

4 FOR 24 AUTOMOTIVE WEEKLY SPECIAL NEED TO SELL YOUR VEHICLE? LET US HELP!

Call: 828-245-6431 Fax: 828-248-2790 Email: emeyer@thedigitalcourier.com In person: 601 Oak St., Forest City

DEADLINES: New Ads, Cancellations & Changes Tuesday Edition.............Monday, 12pm Wednesday Edition......Tuesday, 2pm Thursday Edition......Wednesday, 2pm Friday Edition...............Thursday, 2pm Saturday Edition................Friday, 2pm Sunday Edition......................Friday, 2pm

Please check your ad on the first day that it runs. Call us before the deadline for the next edition with corrections. We will rerun the ad or credit your account for no more than one day.

*4 line minimum on all ads The Shiloh-Danieltown-Oakland Volunteer Fire Department is seeking a highly motivated professional for the position of CAREER FIREFIGHTER The successful applicant must have a high school diploma or GED, have a Level I Certification, have at least 5 years fire service experience and have or be able to obtain a Class B driver’s license. Applicants may pick up application at the SDO FD from the Chief, Assistant Chief or Secretary. All applications must be returned by the close of business on September 8th, 2009. Position open until filled. Shiloh-Danieltown-Oakland Volunteer Fire Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Apartments September Special Ask about free month’s rent! Senior Citizen Piney Ridge Apt 2BR Appl., w/d hookup, carpet, cent. h/a. One person. No pets! $400/ mo. + $400 dep. 1 yr. lease. 245-4263 (day) or 245-4083 (evening) Richmond Hill Senior Apts. in Rfdtn 1BR Units w/handicap accessible units avail. Sec 8 assistance avail. 287-2578 Hours: Mon., Tues., & Thurs. 7-3. TDD Relay 1-800-735-2962 Equal Housing Opportunity. Income Based Rent.

1 WEEK SPECIAL

Run ad 6 consecutive days and only pay for 5 days*

2 WEEK SPECIAL

Run ad 12 consecutive days and only pay for 9 days*

3 DAY WEEKEND SPECIAL

YARD SALE SPECIAL

Run a 20 word yard sale ad Thurs., Fri., & Sat. for ONLY $20.

Additional words are only 75¢ each. Deadline: Wed. at 2 p.m.

Apartments Price Reduced for August only! 1BR $375/mo. & 2BR $400/mo. Clean & spacious Water & heat incld. Arlington Ridge Apts. Call 828-447-3233

Homes For Sale

Mobile Homes

Mobile Homes

Mobile Homes

For Rent

For Sale

For Sale

For Rent

Beautiful 2BR/1BA on 3.5 ac. on Hudlow Rd. Hdwd floors & bsmt. $500/mo. 704-376-8081

5BR/2BA DW 14 ac. Another mobile home hook up on property. $119,000 Owner fin. w/down pmt. 657-4430

Cleghorn Condos 1BR/1BA $600/mo. 3BR/2BA $1,100/mo. Utilities incld. and appl. furn. for both. Call 828-429-9442 2BR/1BA House in Spindale $400/month + $350 deposit Call 828-442-0799 after 5p

Homes

3BR/2BA New home in Rfdtn. Hardwood floors, appliances furnished, 2 car garage $875/mo + dep. Ref’s. required. No indoor pets. 828-289-5800 or 828-429-3322

3BR/1BA FC area Heat pump, carport, storage building, new windows, doors, and carpet. $625/mo + $625 dep. Ref’s. required. 245-1621

* Private party customers only! This special must must *Private customers only! be time of of ad ad placement. placement. be mentioned mentioned at the time Valid 8/24/09 6/22/09 -- 8/28/09 6/26/09

Homes

3BR/2BA Brick Home Natural gas heat & cent. air. $80,900 Call 828-229-0308

For Rent

4 Lines • $2400 One Week In The Paper

Trade your home, any size or shape! Any payoff!!

704-484-1677 LAND OWNERS BRAND NEW HOMES Well, septic, grading. We do it all!

704-484-1640

Sell or rent your property in the Classifieds! Place your ad today!

1996 14x76 Single wide $6,500 Call today 704-481-0895

Mobile Homes For Rent 2BR/2BA on private lot. Chase area. Water & appliances furnished! $525/mo. + $525 deposit. References required.

Call 248-1681 2BR in Ellenboro Pleasant Acres Mobile Home Park $375/mo + $375 dep. 453-9565

2BR & 3BR in quiet park. $350/mo. & up. Call 287-8558 Single & Double wide Shiloh: 2BR/2BA & 3BR/3BA No Pets! 245-5703 or 286-8665

3BR & 2BR/2BA SW in Rutherfordton! RENT TO OWN!

Will Finance! No Banks! Hurry! You pay no lot rent, taxes, or insurance!

NEG. $99 wk + dep

704-806-6686

2 & 3BR Stove, refrig., cable, lawn service & trash incld. $260-$350/mo. + dep. No cats! Long term only! Call 453-0078 or 429-8822


6B — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, SUNDAY, August 23, 2009 Mobile Homes For Rent 3 Bedroom/2 Bath near Harris grade school. $100 per week 245-8031 or 305-8827

Business Services Rollback Services Cars Rolling $40 local Utility Bldgs. $95 local After 5pm & weekends extra 828-289-8346

Business Opportunity Seeking Seasoned Entrepreneurs New local bail bondsman Start up cost $3,165 (includes state license fees). Serious inquiries only. 866-255-9520

New Wireless Telecommunication Co. is now offering distributorships in your area. www.mygvbiz.com/mandj

704-434-9308 Changing the World of Communication

Instruction

Professional Truck Driver Training Carriers Hiring Today! • PTDI Certified Course • One Student Per Truck • Potential Tuition Reimbursement • Approved WIA & TAA provider • Possible Earnings $34,000 First Year SAGE Technical Services

& (828)286-3636 ext. 221 www.isothermal.edu/truck

Help Wanted Carpenter with 7 yrs. experience. Tools and transportation a must! Call 828-625-4117

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Pavillon, a premier inpatient facility near Lake Lure, NC for adults recovering from substance addiction seeks a full time Maintenance Technician to be part of our Facilities Team. Ideal candidate will have plumbing skills and knowledge of building and landscape maintenance, and skill in safely operating equipment used. Also, assists in light duty electrical repairs, furniture repair, painting, etc. Position requires high school diploma/equivalent and demonstrated interpersonal and organizational skills. Competitive salary and benefits package, EOE. Visit our website at www.pavillon.org to download an application - fax application and/or resume: 828-694-2326 Pavillon will perform criminal background check & requires clean urine drug screen.

Bayada Nurses needs CNA’s for Polk Co. M-F days. Please call 828-696-1900

WHITE OAK MANOR, TRYON Accepting applications for: Licensed Medication Technician Full-time, 3rd shift for Assisted Living. Must have C.N.A. and completed Medication Technician training. C.N.A. Full and part time. We welcome enthusiastic, dependable applicants who are dedicated to the elderly. Experience preferred, but will train. Apply at 70 Oak St., Tryon, NC 28782 EOE

Maintenance Technician - 5 years or more experience required. Knowledge of all aspects of electrical, hydraulic and mechanical industrial maintenance. This position will be a full-time, long term to permanent hire for the right candidate. Clean criminal background and DT required. Resumes preferred for review. Interviews will be scheduled as qualified candidates are presented. Pay will be DOE based on Maint. Tech Levels I, II and III qualifications. Apply in person PSU, 144 E. Main Street, Forest City, NC Mon-Thurs 9am-4pm Looking for Grooming Assistant w/2 yrs. exp. Pick up application between 9am-Noon at 108 W. Trade St., Forest City. Absolutely No Phone Calls!

Part time Habilitation Technician Local company is seeking part time individual to provide direct care services to individuals with MR/DD diagnosis. Min. req.: proof of HS diploma/GED, CPR/FA certification (training available), criminal/ DMV background check, proof of valid DL and vehicle ins. Contact Judith at 828-247-0622 or apply in person to 284 West Main St., Forest City

STAFFING SPECIALIST

QUOTATIONS ANALYST/INSIDE TECHNICAL SALES

PSU is seeking a high-energy, outgoing, competitive person to join our team!

POSITION AVAILABLE

This position is responsible for recruiting, interviewing, and job placement. Must have successful track record in a fast-paced environment, be customer service focused, organized and want to learn. Human Resource experience is a plus. Successful candidate must have excellent computer skills, and be able to work part-time or full-time. This is YOUR opportunity for a rewarding and challenging new career!

Apply in person: Personnel Services Unlimited 144 E. Main St. • Forest City, NC Monday - Thursday 9am-4pm

Philips Professional Luminairies NA is in search of a Quotations Analyst/Inside Technical Sales candidate for our Shelby, NC campus. In this position you will support our outside specification sales effort by preparing quotations and providing technical support while working with lighting professionals using our products. Candidates should have exceptional interpersonal and communications skills and a willingness to work in a fast paced environment. Sales/ Customer Services experience in lighting/electrical field is desirable but not necessary. We offer a competitive salary and excellent benefit package.

Please send resume to: Attn Human Resources PO Box 1769 • Shelby, NC 28151 or email to kristy.maynor@philips.com

Help Wanted

NOW HIRING Earn $65k, $50k, $40k (GM, Co Mgr, Asst Mgr)

We currently have managers making this, and need more for expansion. 1 year salaried restaurant management experience required.

Fax resume to 336-431-0873 Isothermal Community College seeks Part-Time Parking Attendant(s) for The Foundation Performing Arts and Conference Center. Hours are sporadic and include evening/ weekend hours. Successful candidates must complete mandatory training. Required: High School Diploma or equivalent. Preferred: Crime Control or Law Enforcement exp. Great customer service a must! Apply in person at Isothermal Community College, Human Resources Department, 286 ICC Loop Rd., Spindale, NC EOE

PART TIME BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT Position requires working w/the public, computer skills, knowledge of Internet applications and Excel spreadsheets preferred. Send cover letter and resume to: Jessica Higgins Office Manager The Daily Courier PO Box 1149 Forest City, NC 28043

No phone calls, please. EOE.

Help Wanted

Want To Buy

RN Weekend Supervisor, RN Supervisor 3-11P, & C.N.A.’s all shifts Apply in person at: Brookview Healthcare Center, 510 Thompson St., Gaffney, SC 29340 Call 864-489-3101 for directions. Brookview is a drug free workplace EOE/M/F/D/V

I PAY CASH FOR DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Up to $10 per 100 ct. Call Frank 828-577-4197

Veterinary Assistant General office skills but must work well under stress in a fast-paced environment. High energy, positive attitude, and a love of animals are required! Part-time position 2535 hrs/wk - days/hours may vary as need demands. Solid opportunity for temp to permanent hire for the right individual. Apply in person PSU, 144 E. Main Street, Forest City, NC Mon-Thurs 9am-4pm WANTED: PIANIST for small church in Union Mills. Call 828-287-9141

For Sale Hay for sale large round bales. 1-4 rolls $25; 5 rolls & up $20 Call 288-3715 Maintenance Free Golf Cart Batteries discount on multi-sets $250/set 657- 4430 New Maytag Refrig. Side by side, white. $550 obo. GE Washer & Dryer white $250 obo 828-305-8661

Musical Instruments Starr Richmond, IN. used upright piano Must pickup. Donation accepted to Outreach Center. Call 245-8518

Sport Utility

1995 Landrover Discovery All wheel drive. Exc. cond.! Must sell! $4,200 980-8009

Motorcycles Attention Sport bike owners or riders. Anyone interested in starting a club. Please contact 245-8406

Pets

Free to a good home! Pit bull and Black Lab mix puppies 6 wks. old Call 704-472-5706 if no answer, lv. msg.

Lost Small female black pit About 8 mo. old. Lost 8/5 from Ellenboro area, close to fire dept. Call 447-2649 Reward! F Boxer, needs meds. Brindle w/white. Lost 7/12 from 225 Harmon Rd. in Ellenboro 429-6747

Found

Male puppy Found Tuesday 8/18 in Green Hill on Cove Road Call to describe 287-7100

LOST OR FOUND A PET? Place an ad at no cost to you. Ad runs for one week. Call today 828-245-6431

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK AUCTIONS •RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT AUCTION- Wednesday, August 26 at 10 a.m., 264 Wilson Park Rd., Statesville, NC. Selling for the NC Department of Revenue & First Citizens Bank. 5 Restaurants, Ice Cream Shops, Hundreds of Pieces of Equipment. www.ClassicAuctions.com 704-888-1647. NCAF5479 •AFFORDABLE CONDOMINIUMS. Ideal for Investment or Residence. Greensboro, NC. Studios & 1-2-3- BR Units. Convenient Location. At Auction. Online Bidding Only! www.rogersrealty.com. (336) 789-2926. NCAL#685 •ABSOLUTE LAND AUCTION, 109.2 +\- acres, divided. Rural acreage with large timber, streams, rolling topography, Randolph County, NC. 8/25/09. Iron Horse Auction, 800-997-2248, NCAL3936. www.IronHorseAuction.com •ABSOLUTE AUCTION, Logging Equipment & Machinery, 8/29/09, 10 a.m. Wadesboro, NC. Iron Horse Auction, 800-997-2248, NCAL3936. www.IronHorseAuction.com. AUTOMOBILE DONATION •DONATE YOUR VEHICLE- Receive $1000 Grocery Coupon. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer info: www.ubcf.info. Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted, 1-888-468-5964. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY •ALL CASH VENDING! Do You Earn Up to $800/day (potential)? Your own local route. 25 Machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-753-3458, MultiVend, LLC HELP WANTED •MANAGEMENT COUPLES- Work together! You will be actively involved in daily operations, sales, marketing & lead generation for retirement community. Locations throughout VA & NC. Live on-site. Competitive salary/benefits. Minimum 5 years verifiable experience in Management and/or Sales. Both resumes to dennis.fitzgerald@holidaytouch.com or fax 919-387-0449. •SLT- IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for CDL-A teams, solo drivers willing to team. $1000 sign-on bonus. $1100/wk. minimum pay. Hazmat & 1 year experience. Background check required. 1-800-835-9471. •CDL/A FLATBED DRIVERS, up to 40/cents. Good benefits, Home Time, Paid Vacation. Lease Purchase Available. OTR experience required. No felonies. 800-441-4271, x NC-100 •DRIVER- CDL-A. Professional Flatbed Drivers Needed. True Longhaul - out 2-3 weeks. Run 48 states. Competitive pay & BCBS insurance. Late-model equipment. Limited tarping. Must have TWIC Card or apply within 30 days of hire. Western Express. Class A CDL, 22 years old, 1 year experience. 866-863-4117. •HOST FAMILIES for Foreign Exchange Students, ages 15-18, have own spending money/insurance. Call Now for students arriving in August! Great life experience. 1-800-SIBLING. www.aise.com. •PTL OTR Drivers. New Pay Package! Great Miles! Up to 46cpm. 12 months experience required. No felony or DUI past 5 years. 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com. •SPECIAL OPS U.S. NAVY- Do you have what it takes? Elite Navy training. Daring missions. Generous pay/benefits. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-662-7231 for local interview. •ATTN: CDL-A Drivers. At Cypress Truck Lines, Business Continues to be Strong! Great Pay and Benefits. Call or apply online: 800-545-1351. www.cypresstruck.com. REAL ESTATE •RECESSION PROOF! 1 acre w/river access only $24,900. Similar lots sold for as much as $70k not more than 9 months ago. Take advantage of the bottom of the market. 1 1/4 miles of common river front, pool, ballfields for the kids, walking trails and much more. Call now 888-654-0639. •SUMMER CLEARANCE at Clayton Homes of Clinton. Several Lot Models Must Go! Modulars, Doublewides & Singlewides. 100's of Floor plans To Choose. Call 910-596-0200 for info. •Your ad can be delivered to over 1.7 million North Carolina homes from the doorstep to the desktop with one order! Call this newspaper to place your 25-word ad in 114 NC newspapers and on www.ncadsonline.com for only $330. Or visit www.ncpress.com. •CRYSTAL COAST, NC Waterfront at drastically reduced prices! Nearly 2 AC water access only $39,900; 5 AC w/navigable creek just $69,900. Enjoy kayaking, canoeing, jetskiing or boating, w/boat launches on site. No time frame to build. Great financing available. 877-337-9164. CAMPGROUNDS •FREE CAMPING for first time visitors. Come enjoy our beautiful resort for FREE in North Carolina. Amazing Amenities and Family Fun! Call 800-795-2199 to Discover More! SCHOOLS/INSTRUCTION •ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. Medical, Business, Paralegal, Computers, Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. •AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387. •DRIVERS/TRAINEES NEEDED. National Carriers Hiring Now! No experience needed! No CDL? No problem! Training available with Roadmaster. Call Now. 866-494-8459. •Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment 3 week training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local job placement assistance. Could qualify for GI/VA benefits. 866-362-6497 MISC FOR SALE •DIRECTV Satellite Television, FREE equipment, FREE four room installation, FREE HD or DVR Receiver Upgrade. Packages from $29.99/mo. Call Direct Sat TV for details. 1-888-420-9486. •SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $2,990.00. Convert your Logs To Valuable Lumber with your own Norwood portable band sawmill. Log skidders also available. norwoodsawmills.com/300n. Free information: 1-800-578-1363, ext300-N.

WATCH YOUR BUDGET Shop the Classifieds!

The Daily Courier Call 828-245-6431 to place your ad.


The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, SUNDAY, August 23, 2009 — 7B

WEB DIRECTORY Visit the advertisers below by entering their Web address

AUTO DEALERSHIPS

HEALTH CARE

NEWSPAPER

REAL ESTATE

HUNNICUTT FORD

BUSINESS&SERVICE DIRECTORY (828) 245-1626 www.hunnicuttfordmercury.com

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(828) 286-1311 www.keeverrealestate.com

To List Your Website In This Directory, Contact The Daily Courier Classified Department at (828) 245-6431 Erika Meyer, Ext. 205

AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING

CONSTRUCTION

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

5A

OBITUARIES/POLICE NOTES Pet of the Week

Billy Washburn Billy Gene Washburn, 81, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Rutherford Hospital. A native of Cleveland County and a retired Baptist minister, he was the son of the late Waylan and Frances Barnett Washburn. Survivors include his wife, Sue Ledbetter Washburn of the home, and three sons, Barry, Brent and Bill Washburn. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to your local cancer society. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Online condolences may be made at www.crowemortuary.com Crowe’s Mortuary & Crematory is in charge of arrangements.

Floyd Henson Floyd D. Henson of Nebo, formerly of Rutherford County, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Sunrise Rehabilitation and Care Center of Nebo. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced later by McMahan’s Funeral Home & Cremation Services.

Glenn Jackson

Garrett Byers/Daily Courier

Community Pet Center youth volunteer Sarah Bearden holds a sweet 5 month-old black and white kitten looking to find a good home. This kitten’s pet ID number is A009980. This and many other loving animals are available for adoption at the Rutherford County Animal Shelter on Laurel Hill Drive in Rutherfordton. The shelter’s hours are Monday-Thursday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. . For more information call 287-6025. For the Community Pet Center volunteers office call 287-7738.

Police Notes n Burt Lamont Moore, 20, of 3126 U.S. 221 South; charged with disorderly conduct in public building or facility; placed under a $500 From staff reports BOSTIC – A mobile home secured bond. (FCPD) n Lonnie C. Ledbetter, 55, on Joe Bostic Road was of 680 St. Johns Rd.; charged destroyed by fire Friday with assault on a female; afternoon. placed under a 48-hour hold. Randy Jolley, chief of (RCSD) the Bostic Volunteer Fire n Lacy Jane Scoggins, 22, Department, said firefightof 171 Butler Rd.; charged ers were called out sometime with possession with intent between 3 and 3:30 p.m. The home was occupied, but to sell and deliver schedule information on the residents IV controlled substance and was not immediately avail- simple possession of schedable. There were no injuries ule IV controlled substance; released on a $17,000 unsein the blaze. cured bond. (RCSD) Bostic was assisted by Cherry Mountain, Ellenboro n Dominic Oneil Reynolds, 17, of 540 Bostic Sunshine and Hudlow firefighters. Highway; charged with No further information possession with intent to on the fire was available sell and deliver marijuana; Saturday afternoon. released on a $15,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) Sheriff’s Reports n Keven Ray Miller, 45, of n The Rutherford County 625 Chilly Bowl Rd.; charged Sheriff’s Office responded to with speeding, driving while 143 E-911 calls Friday. impaired and driving while license revoked violation Rutherfordton restored license; freed on a custody release. (RCSD) n The Rutherfordton Police n Kenneth Fitzgerald Department responded to 36 Rollin, 42, of 1311 Pleasant E-911 calls Friday. Hill Rd.; charged with two counts of simple possession Spindale of schedule VI controlled n The Spindale Police substance and possession of Department responded to 28 drug paraphernalia; released E-911 calls Friday. on a $5,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) Lake Lure n Jonathan Earl Ford, 21, of 148 Kendrick Farm Lane; n The Lake Lure Police charged with simple posDepartment responded to session of schedule III confour E-911 calls Friday. trolled substance; released on a $1,000 unsecured bond. Forest City (RCSD) n The Forest City Police n Clinton Russell Adkins, Department responded to 76 25, of 183 Hollywood St.; E-911 calls Friday. charged with failure to appear/failure to comply on community service and Arrests failure to pay money; placed n Otis Fredrick McEntire, under a $2,500 secured 60, of 921 Oakland Rd.; bond. (RCSD) charged with driving while n Vergia Dlice Mosley, 41, impaired and failure to stop of 387 Wells Drive; charged for stop sign/ flashing red with assault and battery; no light; freed on a custody bond listed. (RCSD) release. (FCPD) n Mashanda Rene Miller, n Montavious Eugene 36, of 332 Park St.; charged Parks, 18, of 166 Pointer with cyberstalking; no bond Rd.; charged with disorderly listed. (RCSD) conduct in public building or n Chad Jordan Bailey, 16, of facility; placed under a $500 123 Eastview Drive; charged secured bond. (FCPD) with simple assault; freed on n Joshua Gregory Bailey, a custody release. (RCSD) 22, of 106 W. Trade St.; n Timothy Lee Clark, 20, charged with breaking and/ of 275 Walter Horn Rd.; or entering and felony larcharged with possession of ceny drug paraphernalia; released

Fire guts mobile home

Obituaries

Forest Glenn Jackson Sr., 82, of 2413 Gaffney Rd., Mooresboro, died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Cleveland Regional Medical Center. A native of Rutherford County, he was born July 28, 1927, a son of the late Archie Bynum Jackson and Nola Ree White Jackson. He was a member of Camps Creek Baptist Church, where he was a former deacon, former Brotherhood director and a teacher of the men’s

on a $1,000 unsecured bond. (RCSD) n Lisa Marie Santana, 28, of 625 E. U.S. 74 Business; charged with violation of a court order; placed under a 48-hour hold. (RCSD) n April Hall Stacey, 28, of 125 E.J. Morrow St.; charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle; placed under a $5,000 secured bond. (RCSD) n Michelle Pack Lindsey, 34, of 395 Thermal View Drive; charged with driving while impaired and unsealed wine/liquor in the passenger area of a vehicle; released on a $1,000 unsecured bond. (RPD) n Brittney Ann Twymann, 20, of 106 Ryce St.; charged with consume alcohol by 19/20; released on a written promise to appear. (SPD) n Donald Ray Wilson, 67, of 481 Hunting Drive; charged with resisting a public officer; released on a $500 unsecured bond. (SPD)

Bible class. He was also a U.S. Navy veteran, serving in World War II. He was a retired planning manager for Dover Yarn Mills. He is survived by his wife, Lillie Mae Allison Jackson; one son, Forest Jackson of Mooresboro; one daughter, Glenda Brackett; one sister, Lois Elmore of Forest City; and two grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 4 p.m. Monday at Camps Creek Baptist Church with the Revs. Dennis Hester, Dale Welch, Justin Brackett and Charlie Blackwell officiating. Burial will follow in Cleveland Memorial Park. Visitation will be from 2 until 4 p.m. before the service at the church. Memorials may be made to Camps Creek Baptist Church, 2318 Camp Creek Church Rd., Mooresboro, NC 28114. McKinney-Landreth Funeral Home is serving the Jackson family. An online guest register is available at www.mckinneylandrethfuneralhome.com

Deaths Jonathan Byrd INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Jonathan Byrd, a longtime Indianapolis 500 car owner, died Thursday. He was 57. Paul Kelly, a spokesman for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, said Byrd died in Greenwood. Byrd had been disabled by a stroke since 2004. Byrd, an Indianapolis 500 entrant from 1985 until 2001, was the co-entrant of Arie Luyendyk’s all-time Indianapolis 500 record qualifier in 1996. Luyendyk turned a single lap in 237.498 mph and averaged 236.986 mph over four laps. Those records still stand. Although none of Byrd’s drivers won the race, several posted top-10 finishes, including Gordon Johncock (sixth in 1991) and Scott Brayton (sixth in 1993). Byrd also was a longtime sponsor of cars at the Indianapolis Speedrome short track.

John E. Carter HARVEY, Ill. (AP) — John E. Carter, the R&B lead tenor and two-time inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, died Friday. He was 75. His death was confirmed by Susan Fine, a spokeswoman for Ingalls Memorial Hospital in Carter’s hometown of Harvey. Carter, who was known for his falsetto, was the last surviving founding member of the Flamingos. The classic doo-wop group gained fame with such hits as “Golden Teardrops” and their reworking of the pop classic “I Only Have Eyes for You.” EMS/Rescue Carter left the Flamingos n The Rutherford County the first time in 1957 to do EMS responded to 30 E-911 military service, and left calls Friday. permanently in 1960 to join n The Volunteer Life Saving the Dells, which had been and Rescue, Hickory Nut formed in the early 1950s Gorge EMS and Rutherford County Rescue responded to by some of his high school friends from Harvey. 12 E-911 calls Friday. The Dells’ 1954 breakout

Fire Calls n Bostic firefighters

responded to a structure fire, assisted by Cherry Mountain, Ellenboro and Hudlow firefighters, and to a motor vehicle accident. n Cliffside firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Cherry Mountain firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Forest City firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident and to an industrial fire alarm. Green Hill firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Rutherfordton firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Spindale firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident. n Sandy Mush firefighters responded to a motor vehicle accident.

Mrs. Edwards opens a store CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — The wife of a former North Carolina senator and presidential candidate has opened a furniture store. Multiple media outlets report that Elizabeth Edwards opened the store called Red Window in downtown Chapel Hill Saturday. Edwards says the store will have styles similar to The Red Door, a charity store her mother managed in Japan. Edwards’ husband, former Sen. John Edwards, also attended the opening. He confessed last year to an affair with Rielle Hunter, a videographer on his 2008 presidential campaign. Elizabeth Edwards says she’s trying to ignore tabloid reports that her husband fathered Hunter’s child.

hit, “Oh What A Night,” sold more than a million records when it was reissued in 1969 with Carter on falsetto lead. The Dells were also famous for “Stay in My Corner,” one of the first R&B hits to run more than six minutes. The Dells performed publicly for one of the last times in 2004, when they did an outdoor concert in downtown Chicago to celebrate their induction into the hall of fame. The Flamingos were inducted in 2000. Frank Fertitta Jr. LAS VEGAS (AP) — Frank Fertitta Jr., the founder of casino operator Station Casinos Inc. who retired when his sons took the company public, died Friday. He was 70. The Las Vegas-based company said that Fertitta died after complications from a heart condition. Born in Beaumont, Texas in 1938, Fertitta moved to Las Vegas in 1960 and worked his way up in the casino industry over the next 17 years. Fertitta opened The Casino off the Las Vegas Strip in 1976 on the premise that he could attract locals to a casino if he offered value and great service. The casino’s name was changed to Bingo Palace in 1977 and to the Palace Station Hotel & Casino in 1983. Fertitta retired in 1993. Virginia Ramo LOS ANGELES (AP) — Virginia Ramo, a University of Southern California alumnus and patron who once funded a music building because she wanted it to bear her husband’s name, died Wednesday. She was 93. Her son, James, said Ramo died of natural causes at a Los Angeles hospital. Ramo was married to Simon Ramo, a co-founder of the TRW aerospace company. She also was a USC trustee, donor and a fundraiser. USC’s Virginia Ramo Hall of Music is named for her.

Airport Authority to meet Monday

The Rutherford County Airport Authority will hold a special meeting Monday at 5:30 p.m. On the agenda is the fixed base operator transition update and requests for proposals for fixed base operator, self-serve fuel, requests for proposals for an airport manager and attorney selection. Exiting FBO owner Greg Turner is currently serving as interim airport manager at the request of the board. Turner and his brother, Jeff, have operated Leading Edge Aviation as the fixed base operator at the county airport for the past three years, in charge of selling fuel, general upkeep and basic operations at the facility. The airport’s current hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

THE DAILY COURIER

Published Tuesday through Sunday mornings by Paxton Media Group LLC dba The Daily Courier USPS 204-920 Periodical Postage paid in Forest City, NC. Company Address: 601 Oak St., P.O. Box 1149, Forest City, NC 28043. Phone: (828) 245-6431 Fax: (828) 248-2790 Subscription rates: Single copy, daily 50¢ / Sunday $1.50. Home delivery $11.75 per month, $35.25 for three months, $70.50 for six months, $129 per year. In county rates by mail payable in advance are: $12.50 for one month, $37.50for three months, $75 for six months, $150 per year. Outside county: $13.50 for one month, $40.50 for three months, $81 for six months, $162 per year. College students for school year subscription, $75. The Digital Courier, $6.50 a month for non-subscribers to The Daily Courier. Payment may be made at the website: www.thedigitalcourier.com The Daily Courier is not responsible for advance subscription payments made to carriers, all of who are independent contractors.


Inside Weddings. . . . . . Pages 4-5C Engagements . . . . . Page 6C Sunday Break. . . . . Page 7C

Sunday Brunch Jean Gordon

Remembering school days from the past I wish I could remember my first day of public school, but I can’t. I could tell you I was accompanied to the first grade by my sister, who was a second grader, but I don’t remember. I know I rode the bus and ate lunch in the lunchroom. Mary Hutchins was my teacher and our room was at the end of a very long, oilcleaned floor. I remember the Grade Mothers and the day one little boy crawled under the book case and got stuck. Drs. Ann and Harold Lane showed up at school to give us all a check-up. I wore a button down blouse that day so they could listen to my heart better. My first Halloween carnival was eventful. I didn’t go to school that day because of a stomach ache, so later that night at the carnival when I was preparing to “go fish,” my mama stuck her head around the fishing wall and informed the folks I had been sick that day. In my fishing pole was perfume in a lamp shaped bottle. The lamp shade was red. The perfume stunk. My first day of school as a fourth grader was unforgettable. Our family moved from the country to the edge of city and into the Forest City Elementary district — the county’s largest elementary school at the time. Culture shock does not define what my sisters and I experienced. Scared to death, Daddy took us for the first day. I knew one person at the school, a cousin, but I never saw her. At Shiloh, there was one class for each grade. At Forest City there were four to five classrooms per grade. The lunchroom was huge and food was placed on a tray we had to carry. At Shiloh, teachers would help carry the food especially on soup day. There was no such thing as a food tray and certainly not a locker at Shiloh. Lockers I liked. Tray holding took practice. Lots of tears were shed those first days at Forest City. One day Mama had to drive away from the school with three of her four girls squalling, with their heads down on their desks. But that, too, passed and we adjusted. I actually loved the large school environment. However, for children of all ages, the first day of school can be tough. A little girl arrived at school in tears last Thursday. She was comforted by a teacher with hugs and soft words. One mother was attempting to get a photograph of her unhappy daughter. “Smile. Please. It’s your first day of school. Please.” No amount of pleading brought a smile. These are monumental days for more than 11,000 school students across Rutherford County and they need our support — from the 5-year-old to the 16-year-old. Schools look different today than in 1958 when I entered first grade. Can you imagine a school without a computer or a student without a laptop, an iPod, or a cell phone for texting. My school supplies in 1958 —pencil, a blue denim notebook and paper with three holes in the side. Things, they are ‘a changing. Every day. Contact Gordon via e-mail:jgordon@thedigitalcourier.

Boy Scout Troop 129 of Spindale recently took a trip to Canada. The High Adventure trip was intended to teach Scouts leadership skills, decision making and how to solve day-to-day problems in the remote wilderness. The scouts and leaders canoed nine days in four canoes.

A high adventure Boy Scout Troop 129 spent . nine days in Canadian wilderness Nine days canoeing 80 miles in Canada’s Northern Tier Canoe Base, Atikokan, Ontario, was a life changing experience for Boy Scout Troop 129, Spindale, and as tough as the trip was, the Scouts would do it all over again. There were times during the adventure when the mosquitoes literally bit through their clothes like needles, their feet were never dry, they paddled six hours one day in “freezing cold rain” and on one trek, actually canoed to a dead-end stream before realizing they were lost and had to turn around. Scoutmaster Terry Henderson admitted there was a time or two when the troop wondered if it was going to make it to the next lake. The trip was a High Adventure trip to teach Scouts leadership skills, how to work together as a boy-led crew, to fully understand the sense of urgency of making decisions and solving dayto-day problems in a remote wilderness. For 18-months, Scouts Tyler Cole, Lee Roberts, Dustin Atchley, Adam

Blecher, Eagan Newton, Russell Callahan and Drew Henderson and adult leaders Terry Henderson, Scoutmaster; Mark Cole, assistant Scoutmaster; Tim Atchley and Robert Blecher, troop committee members, prepared for the grueling wilderness adventure. The Northern Tier Canoe Base is one of the premier High Adventure Bases operated by the Scouts of America along with Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico and Sea Base in the Florida Keys. Once in Canada, they were led by Northern Tier guide Peter Gruber of Boston, Mass., for the nine-day laketo-lake canoe trip. The group decided upon arrival they would study the maps and compasses and would make their own decisions regarding paths they would take. If it was evident Scouts were going to make a costly, time-consuming mistake on a particular lake route, Gruber was asked to inform them, but they

Text by Jean Gordon Contributed photos

Scouts never took their boots off while swimming and bathing in the frigid lakes.

Please see Scouts, Page 8C


2C — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

Out & About

local

Cavalier Crazies

Making Yard Work Fun

Allison Flynn/Daily Courier

Members of the Cavalier Crazies worked to recruit new members this week during Abbe Byers/Daily Courier Freshman Kick-off Day at East Rutherford High School. Chase Middle School student Chris Suhy drives a lawn mower at his grandparent’s home on Doggett Road, while stepbrother Jeremy Miller navigates from the hood. The boys were doing yard work for their grandparents, Clem and Sara Suhy, on Thursday morning. Older brother Cole Suhy (far right), who was doing the trim work, walks alongside the cub tractor. Cole is a student at Chase High School, and Jeremy is a student at Harris Elementary.

Dessert Anyone?

Spindale Mayor Mickey Bland told the board of commissioners Monday night, “the air conditioning in the Spindale House gym is a far cry from what it used to be there,” and added you might not ever run it... might not can afford it.” he said. The town received a grant to help fund the heating/air conditioning system.

Commissioner Toby Tomblin recommended the steering committee appointed to rename some streets in town, not name the streets “after a person, or another state or tree.”

And when Commissioner Tommy Hardin learned newly elected officials in November will be mandated by state law to attend ethics training next year, he joked with the board, “I’ve just decided I’m not going to run.”

“This is where I make friends and enemies. Who’s going first?” Jimmy Dancy said to about 300 people attending the annual American Cancer Society’s Survivor’s Dinner at R-S Central High School Tuesday night. The survivors and their guests were anxiously waiting their turn to go through the “chow” line in the school cafeteria, as Dancy called out the serving order. Pat Allen, president of the Union Mills Learning Center reported there were more than 80 alumni at the annual Alexander School Reunion, Aug. 8-9. Alumni from several states and as far as Florida attended and the oldest alumni who graduated from the school in 1937, attended. Pat emphasized that many of these folks came in on Friday night, stayed in motels in the county.

Jean Gordon/Daily Courier

Lilly Greene helps serve dessert Tuesday night at the annual Rutherford County Survivor’s Dinner, sponsored by Rutherford County’s Chapter, American Cancer Society.

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 3C

local Window Shopping

Contributed photo

Three members of Boy Scout Troop 132 were awarded the rank of Eagle Scout. Pictured (from left) are Sharon, Matt and Tony Buchanan; Vicki, AJ and Art Malanga; and Chris and Sherry Hammett.

Three Scouts awarded the rank of Eagle

Jean Gordon/Daily Courier

A display of stuffed animals captured the eyes of Tristan Stanford, 4, of Shelby, as he peered in the window at Smith’s Drugs in Forest City early Thursday. He and his mom, Marcia Stanford, were among dozens of people who stopped by the drug store to greet Matt Stockman and Carol Davis, broadcasting the Matt & Carol show from 106.9 The Light from the drug store. The radio staff hosted a Day of Hope in Rutherford County Thursday.

College News Shytle named L-R Teaching Fellow

HICKORY — Lenoir-Rhyne University recently welcomed its new class of N.C. Teaching Fellows. The 23 students entering the Teaching Fellows program this year represent the largest group in the program’s three-year history at Lenoir-Rhyne. The list includes Ashley Shytle of Forest City. The students chosen for the highly competitive program have each made a commitment to a career in education. Each Teaching Fellow will receive a $26,000 scholarship/loan from Shytle the state in $6,500 annual increments. The full loan is forgiven after the Fellow has completed four years of teaching in the North Carolina public schools. Participants also receive a $26,000 scholarship from Lenoir-Rhyne, or $6,500 a year. The freshman Teaching Fellows will live together in Conrad Residence Hall. They each received a MacBook Pro laptop computer from LRU. Each Teaching Fellow will engage in a four-year research project, guided by an LRU faculty member. During their sophomore year, they will participate in a spring break service project. In their junior year, the Teaching Fellows will travel to a foreign country to study different educational systems. Current high school seniors who would like to apply for next year’s Teaching Fellows Program should contact their guidance counselor for an application form, which is due in October. More information about the Teaching Fellows Program at Lenoir-Rhyne is available at www.lrc.edu/ admissions/teaching_fellows2.htm. You may also contact Professor Joyce Davis at 828-328-7458 or at davisjo@lrc.edu. Information about the statewide program is available at www.teachingfellows. org.

Gardner-Webb University awards degrees during summer graduation

RUTHERFORDTON — Three members of Boy Scout Troop 132 were awarded the rank of Eagle Scout on Aug. 8. AJ Malanga, Chris Hammett and Matt Buchanan received Scouting’s highest honor during a ceremony attended by family, friends and fellow Scouts. To achieve this rank each young man had to complete six years worth of effort culminating in an Eagle project that impacts the community, earn 21 merit badges and hold a leadership position in the Troop. Among the three Eagles, they earned a total of 101 merit badges and each participated in high adventure trips to Northern Tier in Minnesota/Canada, Philmont in New Mexico, and Florida Sea Base in the Florida Keys. Malanga’s service project was to acquire, fold and distribute pocket-sized flags to United States service personnel abroad. He will be a sophomore this fall at Catawba College studying chemistry. Hammett cleaned up the landscaping and created new flower beds and an entrance way at Autumn Care Nursing Home. He will attend

Rutherford County native donates WWII uniform From Staff Reports

FOREST CITY — Columnist D.G. Martin wrote to tell us (The Daily Courier) that his column about military uniforms mentioned a Rutherford County native, Bob Patton. The column was illustrated with a photo of Patton donating his World War II uniform to the history museum of Scharding, a small Austrian town that sits on the Inn River near the German border. Martin wrote, “In May, 1945, in the very last days of the war, Robert Patton was serving in the 65th Infantry Division, which was part of General George Patton’s (no kin) Third Army. Robert Patton’s unit captured

Scharding. In recent years, Patton and others from the 65th Division revisited the town and developed warm relations with people there. In 2006, veterans from Scharding awarded decorations to three 65th veterans, including Patton. “When Patton learned that the museum in Scharding was seeking an American Army uniform, he quickly made a decision. When he returned to Austria a few months ago, he brought his old uniform, the same one he was wearing in May 1945 on his first “visit” to Scharding.” Martin told us that Patton’s parents kept the uniform for him in the attic of their home

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Contributed photo

Rutherford County native Bob Patton (far right) recently donated his World War II uniform to the history museum of Scharding, a small Austrian town.

in Rutherford. When they died, Patton took it to his home in Chapel

Hill and then donated it to the Scharding museum.

Visual Arts Center announces upcoming calendar events RUTHERFORDTON — Artists in all visual media are invited to submit applications for the Rutherford County Visual Artists Guild’s Celebration of the Arts. This show and sale will be held in the lobby of the Foundation Building at Isothermal Community College from Sept. 18-22. An opening reception will be held Sept. 18, from 5 to 7 p.m. to announce winners of awards in both two and three dimensional art. The judge is Dale McEntire, painter, sculptor and arts teacher at ICC, Polk campus.

Applications may be picked up at the Visual Arts Center, 173 N. Main St., Rutherfordton or downBOILING SPRINGS — Gardner-Webb University loaded from the Guild website: www.rcvag.com. Completed applications are due by Sept. 11. For recently held its 2009 summer commencement exercises, where a total of 321 students graduated. questions, call the center at 288-5009. Graduates from Rutherford County include: Bostic Jessica Campbell received a BA degree and majored in Theatre Arts. Stacy Newton received a BSN degree and majored in Nursing. Chanity Watkins received a BS degree and majored in Accounting. Ellenboro Leslie Mooney received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. Joseph Strickland received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. Forest City Jennifer Armstrong received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. Please See GWU Page 5C

UNC-Pembroke as a freshman to study education. Buchanan raised funds through a pancake supper for a display case at Thomas Jefferson Classical Academy, which holds a rare book collection. He will enroll as a freshman at HampdenSydney in Virginia with plans to study medicine. The three Eagle projects represent a combined service to the community of over 250 hours. During the ceremony Scoutmaster Dean Perry said, “Only 25 percent of the boys in America will ever participate in Scouting, and of that group, less than 2 percent will attain the rank of Eagle. These young men have set themselves apart not just for what they have accomplished but for what is expected of them.” “The rank of Eagle is not a milestone to be reached and forgotten. It is the designation that these are leaders and young men of character,” Perry added. “They have accepted into their daily lives the principles of the Scout Oath and Law and a dedication to continue to serve God, their country, and their fellow man.”

Other Artists Guild events include: n Art for Fun Night Thursday, Aug. 27, 6 to 8 p.m., at the Visual Arts Center; choose to make a mosaic or paint with acrylics; all materials provided; catered meals by Angie’s $25; pre-register by calling 288-5009. The Visual Arts Center is at 173 N. Main Street, Rutherfordton. n August Exhibits at the Visual Arts Center, 173 N. Main Street, Rutherfordton. n Wheel and Coil and Slab Pottery Show: Tuesday through Saturday, 10 to 3. Nature Prints by Lori Loftus, Featured Artist of the month, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 to 3. n Guild Artists in the Libraries include paintings by Pam Peters at Norris Library through September, and photographs by Amy Owens at Spindale Library.


4C — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

local Weddings Couple Wed

Evelyn Martin McCurry and Jerry Lee Dugger were married on August 9, 2009 in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. Following the wedding, the couple extended their stay in Gatlinburg, Tenn. They make their home in Forest City.

Blue Ridge Parkway celebrates 75 years

ASHEVILLE– The Blue Ridge Parkway, a 469-mile scenic byway connecting Shenandoah National Park in Virginia with Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina, will celebrate its 75th Anniversary with a year of exciting events along its route throughout 2010. A series of opening events will be held November 12-14 in Cherokee and Asheville. The weekendlong celebration will highlight specific areas of Parkway history related to Western North Carolina and introduce a new generation of stewards to caring for public lands, such as the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Ensley and Hancock joined in marriage Michelle Lamarr Ensley and Michael Ray Hancock, Jr. exchanged wedding vows Saturday, July 25, 2009 at Element Church in Forest City. Chaplain (CPT) Matthew M. Hamrick, Fort Carson, Colo., was the officiating minister. His wife, Jennifer Hamrick, was the wedding photographer, assisted by Audrey Byers and Cathy Franklin. Music for the one o’clock ceremony was provided by David Roach, pianist, and Mitchell Ensley and Candace Franklin, vocalists. The bride, daughter of Mitchell and Mitzi Ensley of Cliffside, was escorted to the altar and given in marriage by her father. She wore a formal gown featuring a halter neckline and lace overlay with pearl accents. Her veil was detailed with scalloped edges and pearl beading. She carried a bouquet of blue and white Gerbera daisies and chocolate ranunculus, made by her aunt Diane Caffell. The bride chose her cousin, Candice Franklin of Cliffside, as maid of honor. She wore a truffle-colored, sleeveless chiffon dress with a charmeuse rounded neckline and sash at the waist. The bride also chose her sister, Megan Ensley of Cliffside, as a junior maid of honor. She wore a capri blue, sleeveless chiffon dress with a charmeuse rounded neckline and sash at the waist. Bridesmaids were Mikaela Kuckhahn of Columbia, S.C., Shannon Franklin of Cliffside, Heather Ensley of Cliffside, sister-in-law of the bride, Cara Hurley of Hickory, and Micaela Cantrell of Forest City. They wore alternating dresses of truffle and capri colors. The honor attendants and bridesmaids carried small

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ray Hancock

clutches of turquoise and cream Gerbera daisies with chocolate ranunculus, stem-wrapped with ivory ribbon and a pearl-headed pin. The groom is the son of Michael and Paulajane Hancock of Fredericksburg, Va. He chose his father as best man. Groomsmen were Patrick Hancock of Fredericksburg, brother of the groom, Rob Griffith of Colorado Springs, Colo., Tim Griffin of Chicago, Ill., Shane Wiley of Fredericksburg, and Miles Ensley of Cliffside, brother of the bride. Raegan Pate, cousin of the bride, served as flower girl, and C.J. Smith, was ringbearer. They entered the ceremony in a white satin and lace covered wagon. Eryn Ruppe, Shay Deyton and Marie Franklin, cousins of the bride, attended the register and handed out wedding programs. Immediately following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception in the Element Celebration gymnasium. The three-tiered wedding cake

featured square layers decorated with blue Gerbera daisies and brown dot trim. Reception attendants included the bride’s aunts, Cathy Franklin and Melissa Cantrell, as well as Michelle Flynn, Midge Hopper and Ray Vickery. Susan Hurley served as the wedding coordinator. The groom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at West Point Farms in Rutherfordton. A buffet meal was served with groom’s cake for dessert. The bride is a 2006 graduate of Chase High School and is currently a senior at Liberty University, majoring in nursing. She will enter the United States Army as a second lieutenant. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Chancellor High School of Fredericksburg and a rising senior at Liberty University. He currently serves in the Army National Guard 229th Military Police Company. His unit will be deployed in September. The newlyweds honeymooned in Savannah, Ga., and Palm Coast, Fla.

Locks of Love Donation

Scheduled events include: Thursday, Nov. 12: An afternoon school program and an evening public program will highlight tribal legacies in national parks. Both events will take place at the new “green” school campus in Cherokee,.

Friday, Nov. 13: A ceremonial torch passing from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2009, to the Blue Ridge Parkway will occur at 10 a.m. on Friday, also in Cherokee, and will be highlighted by a performance of the Warriors of AniKituhwa dancers and remarks from both park superintendents and Eastern Band of the Cherokee Chief Michell Hicks. Saturday, Nov.1: A panel discussion on the history of the landmark campaign to route the Blue Ridge Parkway in Western North Carolina will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 14 at the Folk Art Center at milepost 382 on the Parkway in Asheville. The event will also feature craft demonstrations, traditional music, and book signings. A second panel on the routing issue will convene at 1 p.m., also at the Folk Art Center.

Contributed photos

Six-year-old Skylar Hardin, daughter of Joey and Tracy Hardin of Forest City, recently donated 11 inches of her hair to Locks of Love. Locks of Love is a public non-profit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under age 18 suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnoPlease See Blue Ridge Page 5C sis. For further information visit www.locksoflove.org.

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 5C

local Weddings

The Barnraisers

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Anderson, Jr. Contributed photo

Couple married at The Cedars

Joyce Tate Black and William D. “Corky” Anderson, Jr. were united in marriage Saturday, July 11, 2009 at The Cedars in Hendersonville. The Reverend George Holley of Waynesville performed the six o’clock ceremony, which took place at the outdoor gazebo. Music was provided by Mr. C’s of Hendersonville. The bride was escorted to the altar by her son, Jason Black of Ellenboro. She wore a formal A-line gown of diamond white satin styled with an asymmetrical drape in front, and beaded crystal and lace adornments. Her fingertip veil featured scalloped, beaded edges and she carried a cascading bouquet of gardenias with ivy. Lori Black of Spindale, daughter of the bride, served as maid of honor, and Courtney Toney Black of Ellenboro, daughterin-law of the bride, was matron of honor. They wore floor-length dresses of sage chiffon

with a pleated bodice and sash at the waist. A matching necklace and earrings of green pearls and crystals completed their attire. Each carried a bouquet of pink peonies with greenery. The bride’s granddaughter, Emily Roberts of Spindale, was a bridesmaid. She was dressed identically to the honor attendants. The groom chose Ronnie Trull of Asheville, as best man. Groomsmen were Ray Burnette of Asheville, and Doug Mitchell of Hazelwood. A dinner/reception followed in The Cedars ballroom, where the tables were skirted with white linens and centered with pink roses and candles atop mirrored plates. The four-tiered wedding cake was decorated in the bride’s colors and topped with the couple’s monogram. Dancing was held on the veranda following the sit-down dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Lannie Hopper of Charlotte, hosted a pre-wedding social for the couple.

GWU Continued from Page 3C

Sheila Byers BS degree and majored in Social Sciences. Whitney Conner received a BA degree and majored in Sociology. Henrietta Jerry Wease received a MA/EDS degree and majored in Mental Health Counseling. Mooresboro Brandi Barker received a BM degree and majored in music education. She was also an honor student receiving Magna Cum Laude status. Jamie Carroll received a BS degree and majored in Social Sciences. Brian McGill received a BA degree and majored in Theatre Arts. Stephenie Taschereau received a MBA degree and majored in Business

The 7th annual Southern Coastal Bluegrass Festival will be held Sept. 19 and 20, at Fort Fisher Military Recreation Center by Cape Fear River at Kure Beach. The Barnraisers (pictured) are part of the large variety of Bluegrass entertainment. For more information visit coastalbluegrassfestival.org.

The bride’s daughter hosted a bridal shower at her home in Spindale prior to the wedding. Co-hostesses were Emily Roberts, Courtney Black, Cindy Snyder, niece of the bride, and Linda Short, sister-in-law of the bride. The bride is the daughter of the late Bill and Ersell Tate of Mooresboro. She is a registered nurse and holds a degree from Caldwell Community College. Mrs. Anderson is employed by National Health Care Review as a contract employee of Rutherford Hospital, Inc. The groom is the son of William D. Sr. and Helen Anderson of Arden. He holds a degree in correctional administration from East Carolina Contributed photo University and is retired Nanci Griffin is one of the entertainers slated for the 75th anniversary celebration from the N.C. Division of Blue Ridge Parkway. of Prisons after 34 years of service.

Celebration Concert

The couple took a wedding trip to Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada. They reside in Tryon.

Administration. Rutherfordton Joanna Garren received a BS degree and majored in Social Sciences. Cornelius Murray received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. Kristen Pearce received a BS degree and majored in Social Sciences. Roxanne Terry received a BS degree and majored in Social Sciences. Stacie Whitesides received a MBA degree and majored in Business Administration. Spindale Jonathan Bland received an MBA degree and majored in Business Administration. Monica Curbeam received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. Darrell Poole received a BS degree and majored in Business Administration. He was also an honor student receiving Cum Laude status.

FREE TICKETS To The

Southern Ideal Home Show And Kitchen and Bath Show

Aug. 28th-30th At The Park

(formerly Charlotte Merchandise Mart) Courtesy of The Daily Courier 601 Oak St., Forest City Mon.-Fri 8AM-5PM

Blue Ridge Continued from Page 4C

The celebration weekend will wrap up with a benefit concert at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in Asheville, at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 14. The performance, a musical tribute to the Parkway and its presence in Western North Carolina, will include

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award-winning singer/songwriter Nanci Griffith as well as a onetime only collaboration of bluegrass all-Stars showing their support for the Parkway – renowned musicians Doyle Lawson, Sammy Shelor, Bryan Sutton, Tim Surrett, and Jim VanCleve. The dramatic and colorful Warriors of AniKituhwa will also perform, and the entire evening will be hosted by Asheville’s own Grammy award-winning musician David Holt.

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6C â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

local Camp Day was a Favorite Event

Engagements Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nece Phillips, Shannon Briscoe Calvin and Yvette Phillips of Boiling Springs, S.C., announce the engagement of their daughter, Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nece LaVontĂŠ Phillips, to Johnny DeShannon Briscoe, Phillips Briscoe, son of Johnny Lee and Ruth Briscoe of Tryon. High School and The bride-elect gradu- attended USC Upstate. ated from R-S Central He holds an associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High School and degree from Isothermal Isothermal Community Community College College, cosmetoland is employed by Polk ogy program. She is County Virtual Early employed by Bonitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College in Columbus Boutique in Forest City as a computer tech and as a hair stylist and facilitator. also employed as a resiUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nece and Shannon dential counselor with plan to be married Reynolds Youth Service. Saturday, September The groom-elect grad- 12, 2009 at New Birth uated from Polk County Greenville in Greer, S.C.

Judyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childcare Center #2 in Forest City held vacation-themed days this summer. Camp day turned out to be a favorite among the children (clockwise from top) Marissa Arwood takes a rest by the makeshift campfire; campers Nicholas Holland and Chloe Johnson get their sleeping bags ready for a nap; and Emily Jessup (teacher) helps Jabin Smith with his campfire artwork.

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Sara Paulson and William Harding

Spotlights Every Sunday and Wednesday

The Daily Courier

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Harding of Rutherfordton, announce the engagement of their son, William Robert Harding, to Sara Elizabeth Paulson, Harding, Paulson daughter of David M. and Susan P. Paulson of Va., and Macon and Benson. Katherine Piercy of An October 24, 2009 Haymarket, Va. wedding is planned The groom-elect is at St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal the grandson of the Church in Smithfield. late Robert and Ruth The bride-elect is Harding of Oakfield, the granddaughN.Y., and the late ter of the late Merlin Chester and Lenore and Cleo Paulson Wilga of Buffalo, N.Y. of Fredericksburg,

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The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009 — 7C

Sunday Break

Cell phone snap shots can help find missing children Dear Abby: I have an idea that may prove useful to parents. I have worked in law enforcement for more than 18 years, including as a state police dispatcher. There are often stories in the media of children lost or abducted in the blink of an eye. Because of the proliferation of cell phones with cameras, there is now a way to help law enforcement officials get the word out via Amber Alerts and news bulletins. Parents should take advantage of these photo opportunities. Before leaving home for the day on a shopping trip or family outing, take a picture of your children in the outfits they are wearing that day. Once you are all back home, safe and sound, you can delete

Dear Abby Abigail van Buren

that picture and the next day take a new one. That way, you’ll always have a current photo of how your child looks “today,” not six months or more ago at a special event. You also won’t have to rely on your memory of exactly what your child was wearing if he or she should go missing. Time is of the essence, so take advantage of the technology that’s available in today’s world. — Janet Dear Janet: That’s a great idea. I am sure many thou-

Statin side-effect revisited Dear Dr. Gott: You have talked about cholesterollowering medication side effects several times. One of your more recent columns about this subject sparked a discussion in my household. A number of my friends who belong to a local running club have complained about muscle weakness after taking these medications. Their running performances were dramatically affected in a negative way. My friends and I don’t believe that the pharmaceutical companies who manufacture these drugs are being candid about this issue. I know that they state that muscle weakness is rare. Every runner in this club who takes these medications now has this so-called “rare disorder.” It would be interesting to have a research study done about these medications’ effects on runners. Dear Reader: I believe you are confusing two of the side effects of cholesterol-lowering statins. First, the “rare disorder” that is mentioned as a side effect of these drugs is rhabdomyolysis. This condition occurs in only one of every 15 million prescriptions for statin medications and causes the muscle damage. When they break down, the chemicals and enzymes released can

PUZZLE

Ask Dr. Gott Dr. Peter M. Gott

essentially poison the body. This can lead to muscle weakness and pain, kidney and/or liver damage and — if left untreated — death. Muscle weakness and pain are other side effects that are more common, and some cases may be severe enough to interfere with activities such as running, climbing stairs or even walking. While these are also symptoms of rhabdomyolysis, it does not mean that the sufferer actually has the condition. However, a blood test will show whether muscle damage is the problem. Another common side effect of statin therapy is liver damage. Because this usually does not present with symptoms until the late stages, regular blood work to monitor liver enzyme levels can determine whether any abnormalities are present. I generally recommend people get checked at least once or twice a year. Those with pre-existing liver conditions or who are on other medications that have the potential to cause liver damage need to have their levels checked more often.

sands of parents will be grateful for your suggestion. Thank you! Dear Abby: I am an early education schoolteacher in my third year of teaching. I love my job and value the importance of education. Another teacher in my grade, “Natalie,” is a nice woman, and we get along well. However, it is almost impossible to have an adult conversation with her. Every time we chat, I have to explain the meaning of a word I used. I am somewhat bookish, but I don’t think I use words that are hard to understand. Natalie is unfamiliar with the definition of words someone her age should know. Other teachers have voiced the same opinion to me.

Some people have a low opinion of teachers, and I feel that Natalie’s narrow vocabulary adds to this. Am I whining needlessly? — Young Educator Dear Young Educator: You’re not whining needlessly; you are whining to the wrong person. If you and the other teachers are concerned about Natalie’s qualifications to teach, you should voice those concerns as a group to the head of your department or the principal of the school. Dear Abby: Due to a low platelet count and a case of pneumonia, my physician put me on steroid medication. The drug has side effects, and one of them has been a dramatic weight gain — an instant, longlasting bloat.

Our Prissa is looking for a very special home Prissa came to the attention of the Community Pet Center’s Cat Adoption Program Coordinators several months ago. She had been terrorized by larger dogs who shared the same household with her, and, for safety’s sake, her owners decided she needed to live somewhere away from the toothy canines who were making her life miserable. However, these experiences have given her the maturity and majestic air of an older, wiser feline. Having been through many of life’s twists and turns, she still has managed to land gracefully on her feet! She would make a perfect match for a mature cat lover who might welcome spending time with her. Hopefully, the perfect human companion will find enjoyment in spending his or her “seniority” in Prissa’s fine company. In fact, Prissa would be willing to go to just the right senior citizen for a special adoption fee. Prissa is a wonderful smoky gray cat with sparkling

IN THE STARS Your Birthday, August 23 Lady Luck could make the year ahead a special one, so don’t be surprised if a number of fortuitous breaks come your way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Concentrate on matters that can add to your resources, because there will be several excellent opportunities to engage in things to multiply your finances. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You will be luckier than usual when involved with people you know socially, whether at a get-together or meeting a friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You could have an unusual amount of good things happening that will affect you personally. Each one will reveal itself as the events of the day start to unfold. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Regardless of what others may think about your ideas or concepts, believe in yourself. It doesn’t matter if your thinking is a bit outlandish. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Even though this may be a day of rest, go ahead and focus on endeavors that could make or save you money. Your instincts for growth are right on target. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Those marvelous powers of observations should not go unutilized. Study the success patterns of others you admire to see how they can suit your needs. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — It doesn’t matter that another is controlling the timetable with regard to something you would like to do. You will pull it off in good time. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t be reluctant to ask a favor from a friend. Your pal is in your corner and would like to see you succeed at whatever you’re trying to accomplish. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Now is the time to elevate your sights a bit because conditions look more favorable than usual at this time, especially concerning goals and ambitions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Work on developing the relationships you have with people who know how to get things done, because they will be a good influence for you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Get an early start because this is one of those days when you will be able to clear up all those ugly jobs and matters left hanging. The satisfaction will make you feel great. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You do well in partnership situations when you have a mind to, even when working with a temporary alliance formed for a specific purpose. This could be one of those days.

When I eat anything that contains salt or sugar, my face becomes swollen. People approach me every day telling me to “hit the gym,” etc., so I go around constantly making excuses about my appearance. I work seven days a week. Either I take the medicine or I won’t be here. I hate facing the world each day, hearing people’s remarks and having to always excuse myself. Abby, what would you do? — Miserable Dear Miserable: I would tell anyone who was rude enough to comment on my appearance that the weight gain is a side effect of a medication my doctor had put me on. I would not make excuses, I would not be apologetic, I would simply tell the unvarnished truth.

The Pet Project Produced by Jo-Ann Close and Lynne Faltraco Community Pet Center

green eyes. She loves attention and enjoys sitting on a warm lap. So, if it is a lap cat you are looking for, Prissa could definitely be the one for you. Because she has been declawed and because of her unhappy history with dogs, she will be happier and safer in an indoor home without dogs since she can’t really defend herself against them. She tolerates other cats after a “getting to know you” period but she would prefer to be the only pet in the household. She is just waiting for the right quiet, loving home. Should you decide that Prissa might be the right cat for you, she will reward you with many hours of quiet affection and company. On top of all this, she is altogether gorgeous! We have promised Prissa that we will help her find just the right lap so if you think you might fill the bill, please contact us at the Community Pet Center office @ 287-7738.

Beat-the-heat frozen treats The first tip offers a creative twist on homemade Popsicles. I’m sure it would work with Crystal Light or fruit juice, too. If you’re not a Popsicle fan, try homemade pudding pops by combining a 3.4-ounce box of chocolate pudding, 2 cups milk and 1/2 cup whipped topping. Spoon into Dixie cups (3/4 full), and insert a Popsicle stick. Freeze until frozen through. Peel off cup before eating. Enjoy! DRIPLESS POPSICLES: 1 package fruit-flavored gelatin 1 packet Kool-Aid 2/3 cup hot water by Sara Noel 1 cup sugar 2 cups cold water In a large pitcher, mix together gelatin, Kool-Aid, sugar and hot water until dissolved. Then add cold water. Pour into molds and freeze. — Sara, e-mail

Frugal Living

HOBBY THAT PAYS: I make walking sticks and canes and sell them at the flea market. I walk in the woods and look at small trees that are different and have some curves or other features. If you dig down and get the root, you can have a natural cane. I take the bark off most of them and paint a picture of some kind. — Harold Lockard, e-mail POISON-IVY REMEDY: I used to have to get shots every summer from getting serious doses of poison ivy. Wash with Fels-Naptha soap. It’s sometimes hard to find. Hardware and grocery stores might have it, but seek and ye shall find. It relieves itching, so there’s no scratching, your skin feels refreshed, and a restful sleep is rewarding. — Thelma, Indiana SAUSAGE CASINGS: My husband and his relatives still carry on our Austrian-Hungarian traditions of making bologna and “bludsin” (blood sausage — it tastes better than it sounds). They ask the local grocery store to order casings, either natural (intestines) or plastic, and the butcher calls when they arrive. One year, my husband and I made our own casings for bludsin out of white-cotton fabric (probably muslin). We bought several yards and cut it into strips of about 9 inches wide. We folded the strips in half, and I sewed a 1/2-inch seam with a small stitch (12 per inch) up the side, which meant each casing was 8 inches wide. We cut the strips in about 12-inch lengths. I sewed a straight bottom hem using the same size stitch, but some people round the bottom hem. We left the tops open so “the boys” could stuff them and then tied them with cotton string. Of course, the white cotton turned red, but my husband thinks using cotton rather than natural or plastic casings helped render out some of the lard. That was a fun project. — Ann, Kansas

HIRE A HANDYMAN: We’ve had a handyman for about 10 years now, and I can’t tell you how much money and aggravation he has saved us. Whenever something needs repair or replacement, I call him first. With so many people out of work, it should be easy to find a handyman. — Erin H., e-mail


8C — The Sunday Courier, Forest City, NC, Sunday, August 23, 2009

LOCAL

Scouts and their leaders from Spindale Troop 129 in Canada’s Northern Tier are (left to right), front row —Adam Blecher, Egan Newton, Russell Callahan and Drew Henderson; back row — Robert Blecher, Northern Tier guide Peter Gruber of Boston, Mass.; Tyler Cole, Terry Henderson, Lee Roberts, Mark Cole, Dustin Atchley, Tim Atchley. The troop, sponsored by Spencer Baptist Church, was founded in 1937.

Scouts

“We are able to keep going. It was a dangerous thing and totally unexpected,” Henderson said. “We were literally praying to God each Continued from Page 1C morning that we had enough strength and stamina to make it was asked to inform them, but they to the next day. You would solve the problems. The group arrived in the wilderness never knew what you were going to run via float plane hauling canoes. into,” he said. After canoeing specified miles for It was a true wilderthe day, Scouts found places to camp ness adventure. after portaging through the wilderThe trip required 80 ness. Evenings were spent preparing miles of canoeing in nine days and camp, cooking, cleaning, studying then a safe return to the base cap. maps for the next day’s canoe trip and escaping from large mosquitoes, Three scouts, Lee Roberts, Russell one Scout described as big enough to Callahan and Drew Henderson decided to canoe an extra 20 miles. They “eat you alive.’” did that by canoeing an additional 11 “They have these little needles that hours, back and forth across the lake will go through our clothes,” said at one of the camps. Tyler Cole, Life Rank scout. “I would do it all again. I enjoyed it Scouts carried all their food in so much. You are out there by yourpacks and the fish caught each eveself. That week was relaxing,” said ning was a bonus with the meal. Tyler Cole. One evening a Scout spotted a red Dustin said the group bonded squirrel, and told fellow Scouts if he could get close enough he’d kill it and together and had an awesome time. “It was a once in a lifetime chance for cook it. Sure enough, he killed the some of these boys and I’d go again squirrel with a stick, skinned it and with the same group. the scouts had an additional bonus Scout Egan Newton was described one evening. “It tasted like hot dogs as the fire-master, as his specialad chicken mixed,” Drew said. Scouts were in their tents by 9 p.m. ity was building fire with wet wood. each night with mosquito nets cover- After canoeing six hours in the cold rain, where the boys were soaking ing their faces. wet and freezing, they had to have a They used vital skills day by day to fire. navigate the canoes, from reading “We challenged him,” said maps and compasses to building fires Scoutmaster Henderson of Egan. with wet wood and preparing meals. Egan had bags of different fire The most unforgettable day was starter in his pack, including birch canoeing about 11 miles in the freezbark and gel cotton balls, with petroing rain. “We were paddling in the leum jelly. “In about 15 minutes, he pouring rain, very cold. We were all soaking wet within the first five min- had a little inferno going. It picked all of our spirits up,” Henderson said. utes,” Dustin Atchley said. “We had no food, no fire and two “We were singing, screaming and Scouts were on the verge of hypershivering, trying to make the best of thermia. In an emergency situation, a miserable situation,” he said. he got the fire going. He saved the When it became evident a Scout entire day. He showed his Scout was nearing hyperthermia, Gruber told the leaders they needed to hurry skills,” he added. Every Scout was assigned a task and and get to a campsite and get warm each Scout understood his respective liquids into the Scout or he was going tasks. to be in trouble. Scouts exhibited leadership qualities that will last a lifetime, Knowing they were approaching Henderson believes. very fast rapids, the guide told the ‘“They can overcome any kind of leaders they would either portage around the rapids or take the chance obstacle in life if they are bound and on going down the rapids, which was determined to get it done,” he said. “If they can conquer a trip like this, the fastest. After deciding to canoe the rapids, all except one canoe made when they face everyday obstacles in their future, they can look back on it through. The final canoe slammed this and pull from this and the expeinto a rock and the water starting rience. They will overcome.” pouring in.

Left, a grueling task was portaging, as shown here by Tyler Cole. Scouts had to portage from lake to lake, through the wilderness to the next point of the trip. Scouts were responsible for getting fellow scouts from Point A to Point B by reading maps and compasses. Above, fire starter Egan Neton (right) and Adam Blecher.

Scouts also earned their Duty to God award during the trip. With Adam Blecher as the chaplain, each Scout prayed daily and had his own individual devotion. “They grew spiritually,” Henderson said. But some Scouts admitted they missed air conditioning, indoor plumbing – after digging cat holes daily – missed technology and all electronics. “You don’t realize how much you rely on technology. I wouldn’t last two weeks without technology,” Drew said. “Two weeks without MySpace, Facebook ....I felt like I was lost,” Tyler added. “I missed the simple things,” Dustin said. “Like air conditioning, the things we have every day.”

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The Daily Courier August 23, 2009