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DAUCH CENTER FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISES

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DCMME

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


CELEBRATING THE VITALITY OF MANUFACTURING & OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

BRIDGING INDUSTRY, STUDENTS, & FACULTY FOR 30 YEARS

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excell Ex·cel·lence: the quality of being outstanding or extremely good. A continuously moving target.

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


lence CELEBRATING THE VITALITY OF MANUFACTURING AND OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE FOR THIRTY YEARS.

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


WITH DEEP APPRECIATION TO THE DAUCH FAMILY AND EACH OF THE CURRENT, PAST, AND FUTURE CONTRIBUTORS TO THE FURTHERING OF MANUFACTURING EXCELLENCE THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


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THE COURAGE TO LEAD Dick Dauch

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FOSTERING THE CENTER’S DEVELOPMENT 1987-1990

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HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING 1991-2004

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A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES 2005-2011

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STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED. 2012-2015

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A CENTER THAT CELEBRATES MANUFACTURING 2015-2017

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SMART LEAN CENTER FOR ENGAGEMENT

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TVS INDIA INTERNSHIP

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FACES OF DCMME

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APPENDIX

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REACHING GLOBALLY Richard Dauch, CoFounder American Axle & Manufacturing (AAM), Purdue alum and generous benefactor of the Center, “We know that competition on a global scale will require the best we have to offer. The same is true for educating our future manufacturing leaders and encouraging innovation in manufacturing and technology research.�

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For thirty years the DCMME Center (Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises ) has been the focal point within the Krannert School of Management for promoting education, research and industrial engagement with those interested in operations management and manufacturing management. The Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises was formally launched in 1987 with three main goals: to foster educational programs in manufacturing management, to identify a major research agenda, and to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas between the Krannert School and industry. The Center continues to accomplish these goals through various conferences, student competitions, and company projects that create venues for collaboration between firms, students and faculty across the state and around the globe.


Dear DCMME friends, On behalf of Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises, DCMME, I welcome you to enjoy this DCMME 30th anniversary photo book. This DCMME 30th anniversary book commemorates the center’s history, from its genesis in response to Dick Dauch’s discussions with then Krannert Dean Dennis Weidenaar, through its nurturing by the many faculty and staff directors and managing directors, the students who provided its continued energy and the companies that have provided nourishment through student projects, speakers and financial support. To all of you who have enabled DCMME to evolve into a resilient, enthusiastic supporter of the study of manufacturing, we say thank you. Please join us as we take a nostalgic tour through DCMME’s history through a combination of pictures, anecdotes, and insights from many of its stakeholders. A look through history should also help us chart a vigorous path through the future. I hope you will engage with DCMME all this year as we engage in selfreflection. You will hear from our current students about projects they are engaged in, opportunities for companies to join us in our Smart Lean Engagement Center, hear from faculty doing research on projects

affiliated with the center and more. We also want to take this opportunity to express our heartfelt appreciation to the Dauch family. The center’s existence was possible only by the generosity of Dick and Sandy Dauch. Its continued vitality is ensured by the roles played through the years by Rick Dauch and David Dauch. The employees of American Axle, in particular John Sofia and Chad Cannaday, are just a couple of the many who have helped the center stay focused on its mission. So, to everyone in the Dauch family and associated companies, thank you for your continued assistance. My role in the center started back in 2005, and it has been a wonderful personal journey. Learning from the center’s partners, its students and affiliated faculty has been an incredible intellectual experience. I look forward to continuing my shared journey with the center, and to welcoming all of you to be part of our future. I am confident that we will continue to be a vibrant part of the manufacturing ecosystem as a member of the Krannert School of Management. Thanks to Heidi Allwes, Melvin Durai, Steve Dunlop, and other staff and student contributors to this book. Enjoy your journey through time with DCMME as you flip the pages of this week.

Ananth V Iyer Director DCMME and GSCMI Susan Bulkeley Butler Chair in Operations Management Professor of Management Krannert School of Management Purdue University

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REACHING GLOBALLY Dear DCMME Supporters, Some 30 years ago, an idea took form to create a center devoted to manufacturing. At the time, the center had three stated purposes: to foster an educational program offering an undergraduate minor in manufacturing management, to identify a major research agenda and to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas between the Krannert School and industry. Three decades in, I am happy to report that we have achieved all that and more. The Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises (DCMME) has bridged cutting-edge faculty research with course content that stimulates the next generation of manufacturing leaders. As a result, the center has been able to provide innovative solutions for corporate partners, helping to boost our state and regional economy while providing students hands-on, experiential learning that impresses recruiters. It’s a win-win-win for faculty, students and corporate partners, and a model for engagement at the university. None of this would have been possible without support from donors who saw the potential for what the center could become and made early investments. The Dauch family led the charge

with a lead gift as part of the “Krannert at the Frontier” campaign in 1998. Today, partners such as American Axle, ArcelorMittal, Caterpillar, General Motors and Deere & Co. have continued to support the center, both through financial contributions and corporate projects. We are deeply indebted to their commitment. We also owe a huge thanks to the DCMME directors for their leadership roles in keeping the center a vibrant hub at Purdue. Lee Schwarz, Herb Moskowitz, George Shanthikumar and our present director, Ananth Iyer, have pushed the agenda of the center and made it a prominent focal point at Purdue. They’ve been aided by managing directors Tom Brady, Sarah Wassgren, Steve Shade, Amanda Thompson, Mary Pilotte, Annabelle Feng and most recently, Steve Dunlop. The center’s numbers speak for themselves. Twiceyearly annual conferences at Purdue have drawn nearly 400 companies to campus, with more than 250 industry speakers sharing their insights. More than 300 students have benefitted from DCMME scholarships, and 950 students have earned a certificate in manufacturing. A total of 58 faculty have been affiliated with the center, aided by more than 60 graduate students, and they have worked on projects from 63 different companies. The impact is clear. What’s equally clear is that our work is not done. In a manufacturing world that changes by the day, and with global competition more fierce than ever, we need centers of excellence like DCMME to remain at the forefront of education and engagement. I’m confident that the next 30 years will prove to be as exciting as the first 30. Thanks for your support. Sincerely, David Hummels Dean and Professor of Economics

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84 950 302 132 145 industry partners and sponsors

option certificate student recipients

student scholarships

project student teammembers

tvs interns

FACES OF DCMME

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61 15 58 398 254 63 25 internationally recognized: represented in 15 countries through education and projects.

Krannert faculty affiliates

conference affiliated companies

industry speakers

GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTS

companies engaged in projects

company scholarship donors

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

30 YEARS OF DCMME BY THE NUMBERS

READ THEIR STORIES

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dauch: manufacturing a leader

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urdue and the Krannert School founded our center in 1987 initiated with grants from Ameritech, Chrysler, Ingersoll Rand, Hillenbrand Industries, and TRW to help produce technically sound, globally aware professionals and academicians to enhance our country’s global manufacturing competitiveness. DCMME has remained active in ensuring that the manufacturing management curriculum addresses today’s and tomorrow’s issues and prepares our

students to devise tomorrow’s solutions. DCMME is a leader in training people in the skills necessary to lead manufacturing organizations in the future. In the fall of 1998, the Krannert School announced the naming of the Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises in honor of the Richard E. Dauch family. Richard E. Dauch, a 1964 graduate of the Krannert School, provided the vision and was a driving force in the creation and philosophy of the then-named Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises in 1988. He encouraged a $1 million gift from Chrysler to help found the center. Dauch was the chairman, CEO, and president of American Axle & Manufacturing before his passing in 2013. Dauch was recognized as a manufacturing strategist with an estimable career in the automotive industry. He was recruited from VW by Lee Lacocca to jump-start Chrysler’s manufacturing operations. In 1994, Dauch and other investors purchased the axle, forge, and prop shaft business from GM to create American Axle & Manufacturing. Dick Dauch’s managing style was represented by one of his favorite quotes seen in his office: “The One Who Says It Cannot be Done Should Never Interrupt the One Who is Doing it.” Dauch played for legendary football coach Jack Mollenkopf. Dauch married his high school sweetheart, Sandra Rule, and they left Purdue University in 1964 with their two sons, Rick and David. Dauch has been very generous to his alma mater. Beyond providing the Chrysler grant that was instrumental in the creation of the Center, he and Sandy have pledged millions of dollars to Purdue and Krannert through the years. In an interview with Krannert, Dauch

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

the key to any successful endeavor

THE COURAGE TO LEAD

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Dauch cont’d

“The one who says it cannot be done should never interrupt the one who is doing it.”

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said, “Working in the auto industry has been a constant pressure-cooker, full of stress, and I’ve loved every second of it.” One of American Axle’s employees and faithfully engaged partner with DCMME, Chad Cannaday, describes Dick’s impact on the center. “DCMME was created to establish a vital partnership between academia and the manufacturing community to develop people to enhance manufacturing competitiveness. I was very fortunate to see that vision put into action both on the campus with faculty engagement, student engagement, and technology advancement and in manufacturing facilities around the globe by an inspiring leader, Richard E. Dauch. The opportunity to attend and participate in multiple DCMME conferences, case competitions, a global internship, and a student project have been very rewarding and a constant reminder to me of the importance of this type of activity and the passion that Dick put into everything related to manufacturing and the responsibility of ‘planting


your seed corn’ for the preparation of the leaders of tomorrow.” Mike Crossk, Senior Value Stream Engineer-AAM reflects on his deep appreciation for Dauch. “As a proud Purdue Alumni and employee of American Axle, it is truly an honor to be a part of DCMME. I was very fortunate over years past to witness the dedication and commitment from Mr. Dauch to DCMME and the Purdue Community by the investment, education, and commitment he had to the future

Working in the auto industry has been a constant pressurecooker, full of stress, and I’ve loved every second.”

engineers and leaders of our industry. Back in 1997, as I graduated from Purdue, I was one of those future engineers that Mr. Dauch invested in. Now, it is truly an honor to carry on that dedication and investment

such that their futures will far exceed their expectations.” in DCMME and its students

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1987-1990

FOSTERING THE CENTER’S DEVELOPMENT

A 1990 Gala Banquet networking (Lee Schwarz, left)

fter two years of planning and consulting with faculty, alumni, and leaders in the field of manufacturing management, the Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises (CMME) hosted an inaugural conference in West Lafayette on September 9-10, 1988. The conference whose theme was “Managing Manufacturing: The Engine of Economic Growth,” attracted 150 participants from all over the U.S., representing dozens of

manufacturing and consulting firms and several schools and universities. The keynote address was given by Richard E. Dauch, who was at that time the executive vice president for manufacturing, Chrysler Motors. Lee Schwarz, who served as the founding director of CMME from 1988 to 1990, believes that the center has been an “agent of change” at Krannert and Purdue. The idea for the center came from the Dean’s Advisory Council. Bob Plante was an associate professor at Krannert in 1986 when then-Dean Ronald Frank asked him to chair a committee on manufacturing management. “Our

job was to form a group, come up with a definition of manufacturing management and see what Krannert could do,” recalled Plante, now the Lewis B. Cullman

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EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

Center initiated with grants from Ameritech, Chrysler, Ingersoll-Rand, Hillenbrand Industries, & TRW

1988


Professor of Management. Schwarz later learned that Dick Dauch was the earnest voice behind it. Though many people, including Dennis Weidenaar, former Dean of Krannert Graduate School of Management, played vital roles in initiating the center and fostering its development, Schwarz calls Dauch the rightful “father” of DCMME. “Dick’s enthusiasm for manufacturing and the importance he placed on education for manufacturing managers, his enterprise orientation, and his desire for Krannert to be a pre-eminent

1990 Ford Motor Company student club plant tour, Lee Schwarz (right) with Ford plant manager (left).

Establishes BSIM Manufacturing Management option Starts working paper series

1989

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1990 Gala Banquet, computer lab demonstration with industry guests 1990 Gala Banquet, speaker Carolyn Woo

School of Management were vital to (D)CMME’s birth,” said Schwarz, an Operations Management professor. Working with a part-time assistant, Schwarz formed a faculty committee to begin formulating principles by which the center would operate. They decided that the center should emphasize teaching and research, and funds were set aside for both. As director, Schwarz had two personal goals. The first goal was to ensure that the center was both management and enterprise oriented. The second goal was to ensure that the center developed partnerships with manufacturing enterprises. Through industryacademic conferences, plant tours, guest speakers, internships, and other initiatives, Schwarz sought to link the center to real-world manufacturing

“Well done so far. Keep innovating. Keep looking for ways to impact the school, the university, and the cultural enterprise.” -Schwarz Creates CMME computer lab for research and teaching

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Establishes Lewis B. Cullman Distinguished Professor of Manufacturing Management

EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

Founds Industrial Partners Steering Committee

1990


Students during manufacturing plant tour discuss process details with plant management

Among the initiatives that Schwarz helped nurture were the development of the first industry/academic conference focused on manufacturing management (1989), establishment of a Manufacturing Management minor for BSIM undergraduates with scholarship and internship support, development of a multi-disciplinary research program in manufacturing management, engagement with the Schools of Industrial Engineering and Technology, and support for course development outside traditional manufacturing areas, such as Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management, and Strategy. Schwarz hopes the center will continue to adapt to new directions in manufacturing through research and course development. “Well done so far,” he said. “Keep innovating. Keep looking for ways to impact the school, the university, and the cultural enterprise.” 1990 Gala Banquet, networking

management. Dauch provided a lot of guidance during the center’s early interaction with industry, Schwarz said. “He introduced us to people that were interested in us,” he said. “He helped us to arrange tours of companies.” The tours not only gave students an opportunity to view the manufacturing process, but also gave the faculty committee an opportunity to meet with management to get ideas on designing a curriculum of manufacturing management.

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1991-2004

Helping to Revitalize U.S. Manufacturing

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EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

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hen Herbert Moskowitz became director of CMME in 1990, U.S. manufacturing was in a crisis, reeling from Japan’s dominance in automobile, consumer electronics and other industries. Moskowitz recognized the need

Holds CMME conference for industry and academia “There are No Silver Bullets in Manufacturing”

1991


to develop and implement a plan for the center to become “a key player in revitalizing U.S. manufacturing.” The longest-serving director of DCMME (and formerly CMME), Moskowitz was initially the head of a search committee looking for a center director. The position was eventually offered to him, and he spent a decade and a half at the helm of the center. He recalls four stages in the development and growth of the center. In the first stage, the goal was to reinvigorate U.S. manufacturing and improve quality to compete with Japanese products. Forming industryacademic partnerships was crucial to the center’s ability to contribute to this goal. “It was important to understand that on some things industry was way ahead of universities and vice versa,” Moskowitz said. “Also important to note that this partnership would be a great opportunity as a training ground for our students and faculty.”The second stage involved the development of a vision and path toward

“re-achieving manufacturing respectability and dominance.” Key enablers were information technology (real-time sharing of data) and a heavy emphasis on quality. In the third stage, manufacturing transitioned

from art to science, with terms such as “advanced manufacturing” and “manufacturing science” coming into prominence. Total quality management (TQM) and Six Sigma had a big impact on manufacturing. Manufacturers had statistical tools and a wealth of data to process, but still needed to improve the decision-making process. The fourth stage is the new era, with manufacturing taking another leap forward through developments such as the Internet of Things, big data, and cloud computing. “Not only is it feasible for large companies to become smart manufacturing, but because of technology, smalland medium companies can as well, and I think this is a great opportunity,” Moskowitz said.

Although he jokingly calls himself a “dinosaur” who doesn’t carry a smartphone around, he gushes about the impact

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of information technology on manufacturing. “You can say it’s a big challenge, but it’s such a great opportunity. Imagine sharing information all the way through the value chain, from research to engineering to manufacturing to marketing, etc. It’s just absolutely amazing.” Training the workforce is one of the biggest challenges, he said. “You’ve

got to be wiser, smarter and more knowledgeable; otherwise you get left behind. People

have to get educated and be trained to get jobs that are really 21st century jobs.” During his tenure, the center benefited from faculty grant programs, generously funded by industrial partners; active links with

the Engineering Research Center, School of Technology and other parts of the university; and student internships and projects. In the fall of 1998, the center was named Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises in recognition of support from the Richard E. Dauch family. Dauch, co-founder and CEO of American Axle and Manufacturing, was a 1964 Krannert School graduate in Industrial Management and Science. He had also played fullback and linebacker for the Boilermakers. Moskowitz recalled a ceremony at Purdue where Dauch was being honored. Moskowitz had received an autographed football from Athletics Director Morgan Burke and Football Coach Joe Tiller to present to Dauch. After making a speech, Moskowitz looked at Dauch and said,

“Through Dick Dauch’s vision and leadership, his passion, drive, determination, commitment, and sacrifice, he has made great contributions to the field of manufacturing and manufacturing education. Our center wouldn’t be here without him.”

Develops executive education program “Bursting Barriers to Total Quality Mgmt”

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Hosts 10 visiting scholars, funds six Ph.D. dissertations

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EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

Holds CMME conference for industry and academia “Total Quality Mgmt.: Does the Journy Ever End?”

1992


“I hear running backs can’t catch.” He sent Dauch out for a short pass in the Krannert Drawing Room. Dauch caught the ball and pretended to stiffarm several guests as he ran with it. “Everybody had a good laugh about that,” Moskowitz said. Moskowitz visited American Axle a number of times to meet with Dauch and his two sons. “He was just such a positive force in the school and the center as well.” As he looks back on his tenure,

Moskowitz is grateful for the help he received from his staff as well as partners and supporters within and outside the university. “It was a heck of a learning experience for me, but I was very fortunate when I think of the people involved. Everyone was involved. … It was absolutely a wonderful, interesting opportunity for me and to make a contribution to manufacturing as best I could.” EYE-OPENING EXPERIENCES AT THE CENTER

When Thomas F. Brady joined CMME as assistant director in January 1992, it was his first academic position after years in the private sector and “it certainly opened my eyes to a lot of things,” he said. One of the more challenging aspects of the job was fundraising. Although the mission of CMME was clear, most large companies “took the perspective that they

Industry representatives gather for a group photo during the partner’s meeting 2002 2003 US Coast Guard project and tour Krannert students take a tour hosted by DCMME of the American Axle & Manufacturing facility 2003

Organizes Motorola TQM University Challenge for Purdue University; more than 100 faculty and staff go to Motorola University to learn about Total Quality Mgmt.

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were donating to Purdue and that Purdue would allocate the money out, which in some cases never happened,” he said. “Raising money is a necessary task for centers, and for the most part it was viewed as a zero sum game, thus clearly leading to sub-optimization for “I sent my first email Purdue and CMME.” While advances in when I was CMME technology always impact director and the explosion manufacturing, what Brady noticed during his of Internet technology tenure was a return to has transformed the the basics. “Having an Engineering way manufacturing and Industrial background, I knew it communication is done.” would be a matter of time before industry embraced the basics or simply went away,” he said. The development of the Internet has had perhaps the biggest impact on manufacturing in recent decades. “Clearly the Internet has introduced fundamental change into manufacturing and society as a whole,” he said. Brady, who worked at CMME until 1998, advises students at the center to “learn

how to work with others, be humble, and understand that

your learning has only just begun.” One of the most

enjoyable projects he worked on was the TQM University Challenge Program in which Purdue was paired with Motorola Inc. In June 1992, 100 faculty members spent a week at Motorola’s headquarters in Schaumburg, Illinois, to receive on-site education in TQM. “It was very eye-opening for me to see the divergent faculty opinions on the concept and how passionate Motorola was on the topic,” Brady said. “It was also extremely frustrating to see how little impact the challenge had on the university in the long term.” Among the most notable projects he recalls were ones with Eli Lilly, Case IH and RCA. Headquartered in Indianapolis, RCA sought CCME’s help in improving quality at its TVmanufacturing factories in Mexico.

“We spent a lot of time down in Mexico helping them and we did move them up in the quality rankings,” Brady said. Another highlight of his tenure was meeting Richard Dauch. “Although he had

Establishes Master’s level MTM Option Develops “Strategic Awareness” exec. education

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Funds faculty and student participation in 13 conferences

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EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

Organizes CMME Conference for industry & academia “Enterprise Integration: New Competitive & Organizational Landscapes”

1993


not funded the center at the time, he brought several of us up to see his operations in Detroit and really treated us special,” he said. “He was a very special person.” ENERGIZING EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS For Sarah Wassgren, one of the most enjoyable aspects of serving as assistant director of DCMME was seeing the results of students’ projects with various companies.

“The journey the students went through of researching the status at the company, analyzing how to overcome obstacles, and implementing

the techniques they were learning was energizing for both the students and companies,” she said. “It made

any legwork done on my part worth it!” The center played a vital role in connecting students with companies.

“Without the center, they would not have had the kind of experience that DCMME was able to bring,” said Wassgren, who served as Assistant Director from 1998 to 2001. She recalled a particularly interesting Kaizen Blitz at American Axle in Detroit. “The students were extremely impressed with not just the functionality, but seeing how it helped the people working on the

2001 MTM Certificate graduating class during certificate ceremony Students receive DCMME manufacturing scholarships at partner’s meeting. Krannert students attend 2002 Kaizen training, Wabtec in Tennessee.

Develops “Technical Training & Devt” executive education program Develops Quality Improvement Decision Support software series Holds CMME conference for industry and academia “Emerging Challenges & Opportunities: A Vision of World-Class Manufacturing in the 21st Century”

1994

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Companies were very attracted to MBA students with the combination of technical education and industrial work experience, as well as the drive to learn how to improve operations. She advises students to engage in industry outreach projects offered at Krannert and through DCMME. “If you have the opportunity to tour a facility and get a view how they operate, take it,” she said.

Herb takes on some tennis competition during trip to Mexico.

“Being floor and that it brought real changes, real improvements not just to efficiency but also to the day-to-day operation of the people,” she said. One of the biggest challenges of her job was finding funding for the center and its projects through new corporate partners. “What I quickly learned was that the manufacturing industry is very interested in both the education and research at DCMME and Krannert, once they know about it,” she said. “After meeting face-to-face and discussing the work done here by faculty and the skills being learned by students, we would find common interests and expand our outreach.”

able to implement improvement techniques you are learning at a manufacturing facility is fantastic experience! It will make you a better student, and a very attractive graduate.” Wassgren worked with a number of graduate students, including one who would eventually succeed her as DCCME assistant director: Steven Shade. “He was extremely involved and excited about operations and just innately interested in the field,” she said. “You could tell that it wasn’t something he was doing to

Herb Moskowitz and Robert Plante at street shops during Mexico trip

250th student graduates with a Manufacturing Mgmt option

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EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

WABCO hosts MTM students for Kaizen events Wins the Society of Manufacturing Engineers LEAD award

1997


Professor Robert Plante’s hands-on operations learning activity in action

further ambitions, but just because he found it intrinsically interesting. Students like Steve were really a great reason to come to work.” STUDENTS OFFER ‘ENERGY AND DEDICATION’ TO COMPANIES To truly appreciate DCMME, you have to meet the students and faculty involved in the center, says Steven Shade, who served as assistant director of DCMME

Landscape in Mexico

from 2001 to 2005,“People

really need to recognize what a resource DCCME truly is, when you look at the breadth of faculty expertise and faculty researchers that have been involved and are involved with DCCME, and most importantly the students, and the energy and dedication

Develops Supply Chain Mgmt & Project Mgmt active learning games Co-sponsors fourth annual Midwest Logistics/Mfg Roundtable Gives three customized workshops for industrial partners

1998

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and expertise they bring to all of the manufacturing management disciplines. It’s just stunning.” As assistant director, he had to let companies know what to expect from student projects. “You’re

going to see more expertise and better results that you can even imagine,” he told them. But there was a caveat: while the vast majority of students put

a lot of effort into their projects, it was not a professional consulting team and Shade could not make any guarantees. “On the whole, ninety percent of the students vastly exceeded the companies’ expectation for the results,” said Shade, who is now managing director of the Center for Advanced Manufacturing. “They just didn’t realize the expertise and dedication that the students would bring.” He recalled one project in which students received a company’s data in a thick pile of pin-feed printouts and had to spend two weeks digitizing the data. “I don’t think the company realized how much time students put in to

transcribe the data into a form they could analyze.” One of the challenges was getting companies to understand that student projects needed to fit into the academic calendar. It wasn’t uncommon for a company to bring a project to DCCME in the middle of one semester and expect it to be completed in the middle of the next semester. Shade advises students to get as much factory floor experience as they can. “Don’t

be afraid to go the shop floor and talk to the operators, talk to

Creates Lean Mfg Kaizen course sponsored by WABCO

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Founds the Mfg. & Service Ops Mgmt Journal (M&SOM)

EDUCATION RESEARCH NETWORKING

Initiates DCMME Undergraduate Discussion Series

1999


the supervisors, and see what it going on. There is

a wealth of information, it’s often intangible and you’re never going to collect it in bits and bytes, even

At the end of the day, manufacturing is still based on individual performance. You really need to get to know the individuals.”One of DCMME’s with the best IoT.

strengths was the willingness of faculty to reach across academic schools and departments to solve problems affecting companies. “We need more interdisciplinary collaboration,” he said. “DCMME and Krannert were doing it 20 years ago. That was like breathing to them. It was in their DNA.” Shade enjoyed working with DCMME director Herb Moskowitz and remembers the day when analog beat digital. Shade couldn’t find a message from a company in his email records, and went to Moskowitz’s office for help. “He

walks to his indecipherable pile of paper, flips through it and pulls it up. There’s the email we were looking

Herb Moskowitz with Tom Brady at banquet during RCA trip.

for,” Shade recalled. Shade had

been ribbing Moskowitz that he needed to move to the digital age, yet “he steadfastly held to his analog paper and books, and it never failed. To this day, I don’t know how he did it.”

Creates the E-Business for Manufacturing Enterprises lecture series Completes four faculty/industry projects

2000

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2005-2011

M

ary Pilotte remembers the day in September 2006 when DCMME director Ananth Iyer sprung an India trip upon her. She would be leading a group of students to India over winter break.

“The bigger surprise was that such a trip had never been orchestrated before,” said Pilotte, who was in her first year

as managing director of DCMME and GSCMI, a position she would keep until 2011. “Not only was it a novel thing to do in those days to take a group of students to India, but we were taking it one step further – we were going to work onsite in India at TVS motors.” She had never traveled to India, never met anyone at TVS Motors, and didn’t know if any students were interested in going. She spent a lot of time planning the internship opportunity, which drew interest from a dozen students. “TVS Motors worked so hard with us that first year to establish something fun and exciting, but more importantly, something that students could really sink their teeth into and learn about what it’s like to do business in India, what it’s like to

A Trip to India and Other Learning Opportunities

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solve problems on a global scale,” she said. During her time with GSCMI, she organized several more trips. The TVS India Internship program continues to this day, giving students an opportunity to apply classroom concepts to real-life business situations and also gain a global business perspective. “I’m so proud that the program has continued,” said Pilotte, who is now an associate professor of Engineering Practice in Engineering Education. She is also proud of all the graduate students she worked with and the success they

have achieved. Each year, four to six graduate students would work under her in DCMME and GSCMI. “We put on the conferences each year, had special road trips, held poster competitions, completed industry facing research projects, and generally helped the center keep running smoothly,” she said.

“So many of those students have remained in touch with me over the years, as I watch them marry, have

Students during the 2009 annual trip to India hosted by TVS Motors

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children, and find their own brand of success.”

calendar, probably quite purposely, time to make a call to us and ask us

Support from corporate partners contributed greatly to DCMME’s success. Pilotte recalled the dedication of Richard Dauch and the annual call she’d receive from him. “Mary, this is Dick Dauch. I just wanted to call and see if there was anything I can do for you today?” he would say. “It struck me that here was this chairman, this larger than life figure, he’s got a thousand things on his plate to worry about, and somehow he managed to fit in his

think I could have asked for just about anything, and he would have figured out a way to get it.”

what we needed,” Pilotte said. “I

A photo taken during Krannert’s 50th anniversary celebration shows her with Dauch, a former Purdue fullback and linebacker, and Mike Phipps, a former quarterback.

Mary Pilotte, Dauch, Mike Phipps at DCMME conference during networking break Partners at DCMME conference 2006

Caterpillar Inc. donation to Krannert School of Management-DCMME

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only a year, from 2005 to 2006, but she helped launch the Global Supply Chain Management Initiative, an important contribution to the center’s development. “The funny thing about this photo is that just minutes before this was taken, Mr. Dauch was using me as a prop to help him demonstrate one of his famous football moves to (Phipps),” Pilotte said. “It was quite the scene I am sure! Moments later, we are here looking very professional and dignified. It was very funny.” As she looks back at her time at the center, she believes that the lesson to learn is one of persistence – a lesson that will continue to be important.

“Even when the economy looks bleak, even when service sectors are weakening, I think our mission at the center should be the same. We should be emboldened to persist, knowing that there are students who are interested in manufacturing and supply chain management.” LAUNCHING THE SUPPLY CHAIN INITIATIVE Dr. Amanda Thompson served as assistant director of DCMME for

“The students were very excited that we were starting supply chain, and they were so interested in helping out,” she said. “I particularly remember that we worked on putting together the first partner meeting that transitioned to the global supply chain conference.” Launching the conference and the first case competition were among the most rewarding outcomes of her stint at the center. Students helped her organize the case competition and make it a success. “The students were so interested in making it a reality that they worked hard to recruit schools to bring in teams,” she said. The teams competed in a case pertaining to intellectual property law, provided by Eyal Barash, a patent attorney whom Thompson continues to work with today in her role as Entrepreneur-inResidence at Purdue Foundry. “I learned a tremendous amount in bringing that information and learning opportunity to the students,” she said. Launching GSCMI meant not just working on branding, but also interviewing companies who would be its new customers. “It didn’t really take that long to get off running, working with the different parties on this new effort,” she said. Aside from overseeing a number of projects, including one with Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT), Thompson also planned one of the first spring break

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trips to China. “Doing

the international trip was just an invaluable part of the education process for our students,” she said,

noting that students got to see that “the world is different, but a lot the same, too.” Acquiring corporate partners was the most challenging aspect of running DCMME. The job market was tight, so companies didn’t need to establish ties with universities to recruit talented students, Thompsons said. What made a huge difference was reaching

She advises students at the center to visit as many types of companies as possible and to participate in studyabroad or international internships to broaden their perspective and observe different methodologies. She also advises them to “gain experience through direct projects, which often lead to longer term engagements and meaningful dialogue in interviews.” Though her stay at DCMME was brief, she is thankful for the rewarding experiences and relationships.

“The center was excellent alumni for me,” she said. “I spent had Purdue and Krannert only a year there, but it as a focus for their was a wonderful year.” respective organizations and building those relationships solidified their commitment even in leaner times,” Thompson said. out to alumni. “Key

One of those alumni was Richard Dauch, co-founder and CEO of American Axle. Thompson visited the company in Detroit and recalled “lots of positive energy” around DCMME and its work.

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Speaker at DCMME fall conference 2006


2006 Best Practice student tour in China Student receives cash prizes and recognition for winning in the annual poster competition which provides students an opportunity to pitch their summer internship experiences to company representatives. 2006 Option certificate student graduation ceremony (Bottom right) Coast Guard project with DCMME Center group meeting (Bottom left) 2005 student scholarship recipient ceremony

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2012-2015

Student focused. Faculty directed.

“T

As we flew into the O’Hare Airport on August 13, my friend exclaimed ‘Welcome to the Land of Opportunities!’…and he was right....

he year 2012 opened a new period in the center’s history with a moto for the center, “Student Focused, Faculty

Directed.” Drawing from the vibrant skill diversity within Krannert’s student body was a vital resource during this period. Students gained invaluable exposure networking at conferences, taking leadership roles and developing detailed planning

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skills through assisting with center events. Students who were engaged during this period reflected with us on the impact that the center provided. Ravindran Damodaran (MSGSCM 2013) describes his experience with the DCMME center during his stay at Krannert. “As

we flew into the O’Hare Airport on August 13, my friend exclaimed ‘Welcome to the Land of Opportunities!’…and he

Chad Cannaday of AAM stands beside Pan-Pan, Krannert student, who participated as an intern in China at AAM.

Dr. George Shanthikumar (Center director) awards students for their work as graduate assistants with DCMME.

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was right. From day one of my

stay at Purdue, I could sense the aroma of opportunities surrounding me. Be it classroom engagement or career fairs or conferences at Purdue, ‘the sky is the limit.’ I learned about the DCMME student competition and manufacturing conference, and was excited as this would give me an occasion to exhibit my internship experience to the Krannert community. This experience was a mix of challenges and learning to me. The judges were highly accomplished leaders from


Mark Burton of John Deere awards Will Keiser for the John Deere sponsor choice award at the DCMME 2012 conference Judges line up to begin the 2013 poster competition at the manufacturing conference

the corporate world. I was excited but also anxious. The eagerness and amicability of the judges was such that with each passing round my enthusiasm quadrupled . Towards the end of the competition I became so engaged with the audience that I was ready to pitch about my internship for the rest of the day. Having

worked in research and development for over four years in India, I had groomed myself into an individual who can transform challenges into learning. So, this was one of

the biggest takeaways for me from the competition. ‘Brevity’ is a vital attribute in the corporate world. You will have just a few minutes to put the points across to your manager. You either use these moments or

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Students present their company project work conclusions at the annual industry conference.

Dr. Annabelle Feng (Associate Director, DCMME) and Dr. George Shanthikumar (Director, DCMME) at the DCMME conference.

VP of Subaru Automotive, Tom Easterday, speaks at DCMME 2012 conference about sustainability.

Student volunteers and competition participants at the DCMME 2012 conference

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lose them. The poster competition has simulated this real-life situation in an appropriate manner. Apart from the competition, the DCMME center also gave me an opportunity to network with management professionals from various organizations. I was able to learn from their experiences and career

Poster competition 2012

decisions. This

knowledge has definitely helped me a lot to plan for a successful career in management. My

participation with DCMME is one which I will cherish for the rest of my career.” The center continued to join with the student clubs to determine what needs the students had and how the center could best fill this role to further equip students with outside of the classroom practical everyday learning experiences. The annual fall manufacturing conference provided a venue for students searching for internships to network and learn more about companies engaged with the center. The Fall conference for 2014 was replaced by a “forum” on “My Career in Operations & Supply Chain” in which several industry guests were invited to share their career journey experiences and tips along with open Q&A time for students to learn more about their personal stories featuring topics regarding strategy, vision, management, creativity, ambition, energy, motivation, and work-life balance. Case competitions held in the spring semester provided handson business team solving skills. Students had the opportunity to take advantage of earning certificates in the areas of manufacturing and supply chain. Additionally, the center’s continued partnership

with TVS Motor Company in India provided a unique opportunity for students to globalize their resumes with practical hands-on experience. Pablo Martinez (MBA) reflects on his experience from May 2015,

“I have found the TVS Motors internship to be one of the richest and most fulfilling experiences in my life. At every stage, I was challenged in different aspects, not only professionally, but personally as well. The

internship has proven to be a must for anyone interested in doing business abroad.” “An amazing opportunity to work for a company in another part of the world and learn how business is done in a different culture. We were given real projects that TVS valued, and we therefore got to make a positive impact on the company.” (Sarah Tanoury- BSIM 2013)

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2015-2017

I

n more than two decades as a faculty member at Krannert, Ananth Iyer has fielded numerous questions from students, but few as amusing as the one from a young man headed to Bangalore, India, to participate in the TVS India Internship program, organized by DCMME.“Where do I go surfing?” the student asked. The student quickly learned that Bangalore is in the center of South India, far from the Indian Ocean. What made his

question even more memorable for Iyer was that the student accepted a position after graduation at a company where he had to coordinate with a supplier in Bangalore and was considered the “resident expert” on India’s high-tech capital. He was just one of a number of students who have benefited from DCMME-organized trips to India and China. “What

was interesting was to see the transformation of students when they got an opportunity to engage globally,” Iyer said.

Students have benefited from DCMME in a variety of ways, as Iyer has witnessed in his two stints as faculty director of the center, from 2005 to 2011 and 2015 onwards. Through projects with industry partners, students have received invaluable experience that allowed them to put their classroom learning into practice. Students have worked on projects for government agencies such as the Indiana Department of

A Center that Celebrates Manufacturing

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Transportation (INDOT) and Indiana Economic Development Corporation, as well as many private companies. “What we realized was that

having projects – live projects whose results had to be communicated to process owners – became a wonderful way for us to remain connected to current issues,” Iyer said. “It

because these reports became a public document of work done at the center.” While students have benefitted from the center, the center has also benefitted significantly from the dedication and resourcefulness of students. “We actually had a large number of students who had a big impact on the center,” Iyer said, noting that students have helped arrange conferences and are responsible for organizing the popular case competition at the spring conferences. The energy of students, as well as that of faculty and staff,

provided opportunities for students to work on interesting projects, it provided funding to cover center costs, and it also provided us visibility

DCMME provided a demostration of Eon Reality technology at the annual manufacturing conference highlighting technology’s role in the future of manufacturing.

GE plant leader, Eric Matteson, speaks at the DCMME conference- “Brilliant Machines.”

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firmly believe that.” has been vital to DCMME’s survival over 30 years. “It’s also survived because its primary mission is to communicate our enthusiasm for manufacturing,” Iyer said. “You don’t see too many

“That’s what makes DCMME unique – it celebrates manufacturing.”

Dr. Iyer (DCMME Director) awards the 1st place team at 2016 international, intercollegiate student case competition

manufacturing management centers in business schools,” Iyer said. “That’s because Krannert and Purdue represent a unique place.

There’s a tremendous amount of interest in actually making things, being competitive about making things, and continuing to believe that manufacturing has a very important role to play. I

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In celebrating manufacturing, the center has relied heavily on manufacturing partners for financial support, including the benefactor most responsible for its existence: Richard Dauch. “DCMME would not have existed without Dick Dauch’s vision very early on and his emphatic support for manufacturing,” Iyer said. “His insistence that Krannert can be a significant player in this space is what got us started.” It was important to Iyer, when he became director, to make sure the center was financially stable and received funding from a variety of sources. “In order for that to happen, we had to be constantly hungry for new projects,” he said. Those projects came through alumni, through Purdue’s connections with government agencies, and through a diverse group of managers who attended DCMME conferences. “The conference was a selling point, and more importantly, the students and their energy at the conference was a big selling point as to why people engaged with us,” Iyer said. While funding has been one of his


major challenges as center director, so has been the need to keep up with changes in manufacturing, including the switch to global supply chains. “The main change was that companies were not producing all the components themselves, but they were producing it at the right place in the world where they would get the highest quality at the most competitive price,” Iyer said. “My role as the center director was to maintain the enthusiasm for manufacturing, but at the same time recognize that there were some

fundamental shifts taking place in terms of how manufacturing was organized.” Adapting to changes in manufacturing is critical to the center’s success in the future. Iyer is particularly excited about the impact of new technology, such as 3D printers, drones and Internet of Things, on manufacturing.

“I’m very bullish about technology,” he said. “If one

new technology has come along, we’ve seen new applications that you would have never dreamed of.”

thinks about the role of technology,

virtually every time

(Bottom left to right) Brett Brune, Editor in Chief of Smart Manufacturing Magazine speaks at the 2016 DCMME fall conference. Charlie Chung, Senior Marketing Manager UPS Supply Chain Solutions speaks at DCMME conference on “Smart Lean Ecosystems” Antoine van Agtmael, Senior Adviser, Garten Rothkopf and founder, CIO and CEO, Emerging Markets Management, LLC; co-author of The Smartest Places on Earth. Keynote speaker at DCMME 2016 conference.

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SMART LEAN CENTER FOR ENGAGEMENT

SMART LEAN CENTER FOR ENGAGEMENT

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During 2016 we created the Smart Lean Ecosystem Engagement Center with its official opening scheduled during our 2017 spring Supply Chain conference. “The Engagement Center has multiple objectives: education, demonstration and application,” says Steve Dunlop, managing director DCMME.

Designed to provide a facility where students, faculty, staff and friends can experience technology that is currently being used or anticipated within manufacturing and supply chain environments. Below

are the primary system areas which will be updated on a routine basis as new technology is developed. There are also a variety of supporting videos displayed to enhance the explanations of the different areas. 1) Manufacturing - Small hands-on manufacturing area where participants can build circuit boards with lights and sounds. This area is set up to allow students to experience normal operations as well as interruptions

THE ENGAGEMENT CENTER OPENS WITH MULTIPLE OBJECTIVES: EDUCATION, DEMONSTRATION & APPLICATION

with the parts or materials availability, increased orders, and system break down. 2) Drones – This area has small drones that participants can fly within the room and experience both the details needed to achieve steady flight as well as the video capture capability and transfer of data. 3) 3D Printing – the demonstration area shows actual 3d printing capability and the degree of accuracy that is available even from a small printer. In the future we hope to have examples of metal 3d printing that is currently used in a manufacturing plant. 4) Video Analytics – based on cameras mounted on the center ceiling, software is being written to capture the different activities happening in the center. 5) Application / testing area for techniques and technology that are being evaluated for our current projects before we suggest possible recommendations to our project sponsors. 6) Space has also been allocated to allow for other types of technology

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3d printed race car printed for the DCMME manufacturing conference 2015 hosting guest speakers from Verizon IndyCar

and possible uses. Various types of virtual / augmented reality technologies have been used in the center to highlight these emerging areas. 7) Google glasses and similar types of technology are presented to allow for hands on use and discussion of potential applications. 8) Robotic arms and small programmable robots

PROJECTS OVERVIEW

Over the years, projects have been a main stay of the Center’s activities. Projects have been used to educate our students, provide data for research and scholarly papers, and a source of funding for the center. We are following in these same footsteps with a heavier emphasis on both short and long term projects. Currently we have projects covering such topics as: manufacturing floor space allocation, divisional or company consolidation, supply chain in both internal and external areas, and manufacturing and supply chain technology integration. Industry types include manufacturing, medical, start-ups, and non-profit organizations, each with unique and varying scopes. In many cases these projects result in a technical speaker for one of our yearly conferences.

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As powder color soars through the air on the lawn of the Purdue Memorial Mall for the celebration of the Holi Festival of Color, a group of Krannert students looks forward to globalizing their resumes in India.

T

he TVS India Internship organized by the DCMME Center in conjunction with the TVS Motor Company

was developed in 2006. Providing a unique study abroad internship opportunity in Bangalore, India, this trip assists students in developing a global business perspective while enhancing their resume profiles. TVS is a Deming Prize winning twowheeler manufacturing company producing motorcycles, scooters, and mopeds. TVS has been credited with many innovations in the Indian automobile industry, notable among them being the introduction of India’s first two-seater moped. Krannert alumnus Venu Srinivasan (MSM ‘77) is the chairman and managing director of TVS Motor Company. Participants have a distinctive occasion to take concepts learned -Dennis Hernandez, MBA 2017 in the classroom and apply them to real life business situations.

“At TVS, class-learned operations concepts come to life.”

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Krannert alumnus Venu Srinivasan (MSM ‘77) ,chairman and managing director of TVS Motor Compan, speaks at the annual DCMME conference 2006

the highlight of my Krannert Life. I “My experience at TVS was

learned strategic planning as well as operational execution. It was an amazing opportunity to apply my knowledge from Krannert and solve real world challenges,” says Hyejin Kim, MBA 2017. This innovative and challenging global program is celebrating 11 years with a total of 146 students having participated, represented by MBAs, MSHRMs, and engineering students. Work on this three credit course begins in mid-February when students begin communication with their mentors. Discussions with their mentors regarding project objectives and completion of research pre-departure for India

help to ensure a productive and successful internship for everyone involved. The course culminates in May with a three week visit to Bangalore, India where students continue work on their projects with TVS mentors and present their final work to TVS Company representatives. The internship lasts three weeks ending after final presentations to management on the final day. Students receive intimate exposure to TVS Motors and its strong culture through presentations and discussions from company leadership, a plant tour, and a visit to one of their corporate social responsibility villages. TVS also ensures that students get a taste of Indian culture outside of the office by coordinating dinner for the students to meet with various Indian families in their homes as well as provide an evening of classical Indian music and dance.

My internship at TVS “Bangalore is granted me a vibrant irreproducible city,” insight into how Dennis Hernandez, MBA A weekend trip to the companies work 2017. Taj Mahal is yet another overseas. highlight to the trip. TVS

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-Mason MBA 2017

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arranged a visit to the beautiful Bangalore Infosys campus where students learned about how the company develops its human


talent. Mason Preusser, MBA 2017 reflects on the company exposure during the trip, “My internship at TVS granted me irreproducible insight into how companies work overseas.

Both the exposure to consumer sentiment and business culture in India are invaluable assets.” TVS selects

their projects primarily based on meaningful work product. Part of the success of the program rests on the fact that students are aware that the consulting projects carry great importance to the firm, and if done well, they will likely become part

of an adoption and implementation strategy. The projects that the firm ultimately offers tend to have a unique balance of the following qualities: analytical complexity, urgency for resolution, lack of available resources to assign internally, and a desire to test a current business situation against international best practices. Projects cover many different management areas including Operations and Supply Chain Management, Human Resources Management, Sales, and Management Information Systems, naming just a few. Deron Leslie, MBA 2017, sums up the trip- “The TVS Motors

a new, refreshing perspective on friendship, culture, global industry and life in general.” Internship in India gave me

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K

rannert and DCMME was a very positive time and an important step in my life. I still remember those study nights at RAWLS..

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ANDREJS STRATEICUKS, MBA 2014

Amazon Transportation Services (Europe); Former CEO of Latvian Alcohol Industry Association

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DCMME Experience Translates to Career in Europe

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ndrejs Strateicuks calls his experience at Krannert and DCMME a “very positive time and an important step in my life.” He remembers all the nights he spent studying in Rawls Hall with

“wonderful and accomplished people from all over the world who all came to West Lafayette for one reason: to get great education.” DCMME provided

“We never know where our life will bring us in the future, but i can truly say that Krannert and DCMME have helped me to become who I am today, and I am very thankful for that.”

an important link between what he and other students learned in the classroom and the business world they aspired to join. Through conferences, poster and case competitions, and other events organized by the center, students were able to meet and learn from business people in different companies and industries. “This was as important to our professional development as the studies itself,” he said. As a graduate assistant at DCMME in the 2013/14 academic year, he was involved in organizing conferences and other events. “This was a new experience to me, as I had to cooperate not only with my colleagues and other students, but also with industry people of different ranks,”

he said. The experience has been helpful in his career, especially in his former role as CEO of the Latvian Alcohol Industry Association, which required him to work daily with politicians, state officials and leading business people. Last year, he joined Amazon Transportation Services Europe and continues to benefit from his DCMME experience. “Working

in Europe means dealing with different rules, regulations and mentality of the people, thus the experience from Krannert and DCMME with all its diversity is still very valuable to me,” he said.

Strateicuks, who earned his MBA in 2014 and also has a PhD in economics from University of Latvia, has served as deputy chairman of the Board of Trade in the Latvian Chamber of Commerce and Industry for the last three years. “We never know where our life will bring us in the future, but I can truly say that Krannert and DCMME have helped me to become who I am today and I am very thankful for that,” he said.

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Krannert Experiences Lead to Fulfilling Career Path

T

he MBA program at Purdue allowed Heather (Owens) Williams the flexibility to split her focus among marketing, strategy and supply chain coursework and obtain a certificate in Global Supply Chain Management through DCMME. “Pursuing my MBA was the best career decision I could have made,” said Williams, who graduated in 2012. “I not only was able to transition my career from risk management to marketing, but I also elevated my skills from those of a tactical planner to those of a strategic thinker.” After graduation, she spent two years as a category manager at Whirlpool Corporation, before joining Radio Systems Corporation (RSC) in Knoxville, Tennessee, as the PetSafe category manager for water and feed solutions. RSC is a leading pet product manufacturer whose brands include PetSafe, SportDOG, and Invisible Fence. After two years in water and feed, working on a booming growth business, Williams moved to PetSafe training and bark solutions. RSC’s training and bark category, the second largest in the company, has faced competitive challenges recently from direct import products.

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“My experience in case competitions during the MBA program enabled me to jump into the category without hesitation and to take quick strategic action,” Williams said. “I was

able to assess all parts of the business and not only find short-term opportunities, but also create a well-rounded plan for the future.” She believes that the highpressure and cross-functional business plans needed for case competition success gave her many of the tools she needed to succeed in her current role.

“I equate category management to being an entrepreneur with someone else’s funding,” she said.

She manages everything related to her category: research, product road mapping, development and launches, as well as marketing products, sustaining projects and sales and retailer support. Additionally, she is responsible for the P&L with the support of other teams throughout the company, such as engineering and graphic design. “My understanding of supply chain and manufacturing is critical,” she said. “I work with our supply chain, program management, logistics and forecasting teams to support inventory of our products for retail partners.” As she is launching a new portfolio of static trainers

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and discontinuing the current portfolio (which equates to half the revenue of her category), it is crucial that the company has the right inventory to support both load-ins and replenishment of key retailers such as PetSmart, Petco and Amazon. Having an understanding of not only component lead times, but also manufacturing processes, is key to the success of these product launches. Williams owns two Australian Terriers, Jack and Lily, with whom she competes in both obedience and agility trials. RSC is a dog-friendly workplace, so Jack accompanies Williams to the office every day while Lily goes to the on-site doggie daycare.

“I am so fortunate that I am able to combine my personal passion, dogs, with my professional passion of product development and strategy,” she said. “They love coming to work too!” Another bonus is working with two other Boilermakers, an engineering colleague and the chief marketing officer, which makes for a fun atmosphere during basketball season. “I love going to work every day, and I know I would not be on this career path without having attended the Krannert MBA Program,” she said.


“They love coming to work too!”

HEATHER WILLIAMS, MBA 2012

Category Manager, PetSafe® Training and Bark Solutions (Tennesee)

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GISELA CONDADO, MBA 2016

Senior program manager, Amazon headquarters (Seattle, WA)

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‘Holistic Academic Experience’ Leads to Exciting Job

G

isela Condado joined the MBA program at Krannert after earning an undergraduate degree in production engineering from Universidad Metropolitana in her native Venezuela and gaining four years of work experience at the multinational companies Cargill and Novartis. Possessing a passion for operations, she believed that a Krannert MBA would reinforce her leadership skills and technical knowledge, allowing her to take the next step toward her professional goals. In particular, Krannert “offered an innovative curriculum that joined the fundamental MBA toolkit and the flexibility to draw my career path in the operations concentration,” she said. The MBA program also allowed her to be more than just a student. “I became a key partner of classmates, faculty, and community, through working as the president of the Krannert Operations Club and being a graduate assistant at the DCMME center,” she said. As a graduate assistant during the 2015/16 academic year, she had the opportunity to participate in interesting consulting projects, conduct research on trending topics in the supply chain industry, and coordinate a variety of conferences and networking events that brought together students, faculty members and industry leaders. What she calls her “holistic academic experience” at Purdue led to her current job at Amazon. Through an MBA summer internship, she worked as an operation manager pathways intern at Amazon, where she managed the initial stages of a new self-service tool that helps customers solve their problems quickly while reducing operational costs for the organization. After graduating in 2016, she joined Amazon as senior program manager at the company’s Seattle headquarters.

“I have been working in exciting projects on Prime Now, coordinating more than 13 crossfunctional teams and finding a professional fit in the peculiar ‘working hard and having fun’ culture of the company,” she said.

Finding a professional fit in the peculiar ‘working hard and having fun’ culture

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Gaining Knowledge to Become a Better DecisionMaker

I

t is amazing to think that 4 years had passed since the day I became one of the Graduate Assistants at DCMME-GSCMI along with all the accomplishments I have made after graduated with a degree in MBA Operations Management; however, my successes paled when compared to 30 years of history at the center. So, I would like to congratulate the center and the team for reaching such a millstone. I can still remember vividly of all the activities I did as a Graduate Assistant for the DCMME-GSCMI center in addition to the MBA curriculum and how they shaped me to who I am today. Currently, as a Program Manager for United Technologies Corporation managing several international work transition programs I can see the

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importance of having knowledge in logistics, supply chain, finance, and strategy and how they assist with my business decision making process for the organization. Additionally, the experiences I gained as a master of ceremony from the two conferences I led helped to sharpen my wits to be quick on my feet, attempting to anticipate any possible outcome but being equally adaptable to the changing environment. Looking back, I would not have done anything differently and I am proud to be a part of DCMME-GSCMI’s history.

“Looking back, I would not have done anything differently and I am proud to be a part of DCMME’s history.”


Daniel Terayanont MBA 2015

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Akshit Bajpai MBA 2016

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A Pit Stop and Huge Boost at DCMME Center Provides ‘Perfect Platform’ to Interact with Industry

A

fter joining Krannert’s MBA program in August 2014, Akshit Bajpai’s first exposure to the DCMME-GSCMI Center came during the fall conference, entitled “Unlock the Value of Your Supply Chain with Analytics.” “I was instantly interested in the center activities and considering my interest in supply chain management, the center was the perfect platform to interact with industry leaders in supply chain domain,” he said. Bajpai joined the center as a graduate assistant in the fall of 2015. It was a time of transition and he recalls meeting with DCMME staff and learning about the new direction they envisioned for the center and the changing role and responsibilities.

“I remember being a little intimidated and excited for the road ahead,” he said. He and

other graduate assistants were soon researching and publishing blogs on the Trans Pacific Partnership and its effects on various partners and smart manufacturing. They also worked on industrial projects through the center, the first batch of graduate assistants to do so. “The projects we worked on

were interesting and challenging at the same time,” he said. Bajpai earned his MBA in 2016 and is back working in the field of supply chain, doing what he loves. He cherishes the time he spent at DCMME and the support he received in completing his MBA and searching for a job. He’s pleased to hear about the center’s progress and all the projects and technologies that students are working in. “I am really excited for the center and the future it holds, and I am glad that I got to be a part of this huge group,” he said.

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Leadership, Teamwork Skills Help Produce Success

W

“It’s not only our abilities but also our choices in life that make us who we are”

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hen Deepika Mokkarala walked out of Rawls Hall with an MBA and MS in Global Supply Chain Management in 2013, she had dreams and aspirations of a bright future. But her success so far has been better than imagined, she said, thanks to her experiences at Krannert and DCMME. She had been skeptical that her learning and experiences at Krannert would be completely useful at her new job at Amazon, but her doubts evaporated as soon as she began working as operations manager through the Amazon Pathways Program. The responsibility of handling the operations of a 1.1 million square foot warehouse meant that she had to balance leadership skills, team work and analytics, using various tools to understand the root cause of problems before proposing solutions. She found herself reflecting on some of the basics she had learned at Krannert, including concepts from “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt and Professor Suresh Chand’s class on dealing with bottlenecks. “I created simple tweaks in processes, enabling gains in throughput for my organization and processes improvements leading to $300k or more in savings during peak times at Amazon,” she said. In other aspects of her job, she found herself using her experiences from long case study nights at Krannert to understand and synergize with leaders in Amazon despite their conflicting views. This helped her make some challenging decisions while working with supply chain, retail and transportation teams. “I

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

think the most surprising part I noticed about myself was that I had developed my leadership and negotiation skills while working in teams and with study abroad programs,” she said.

Her job has taken her to fulfillment centers around the country and even to Ontario, Canada, making her appreciate the diversity and opportunities at Krannert that allowed her to experience different cultures.

“This set me up for success and allowed me to be flexible while transitioning in and out of my various roles,” she said. Last

year, she became a senior operations manager at Amazon and moved to New Jersey to launch a new fulfillment center for the company, which was similar to launching a small business. “Experiences within Krannert and DCMME equipped me with the ability to work with organizations outside and the ability to be poised and negotiate to support the needs of my team versus the needs of business, making the launch successful,” she said. But she added that it hasn’t been all smooth sailing in her job. She’s had to overcome roadblocks and face a number of challenges, from making important decisions to prioritizing tasks to adapting to growing responsibilities. “In those moments, I was glad that I was a Krannert alumnus as I found myself looking back to the basics in operation, or drawing from leadership lessons at Rawls, or Professor Lee’s life lessons to bring back the focus,” she said.


Deepika Mokkarala MBA 2015

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Vijay Sachdeva MBA 2013

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ijay Sachdeva began his career as a software engineer in a Japan-based telecom company in 2005 and joined its office in India. By 2011, having spent six years in technology, he had a sound

perspective on ‘how’ things work, but felt that he was missing a major piece on ‘why’ things work the way they do.

“I find my journey as adventurous as learnable...”

“I was deriving the solutions but I was not questioning the operability and the need for those solutions,” he said. “At that point, I

knew that I needed to pause, introspect and educate myself to gain wider perspectives.” He joined the MBA program

Broadening Horizons through the MBA Program

at Purdue, where he learned how projects and companies operate, their processes, and the rationale behind executive decisionmaking. Practical lessons while working with GSCMI taught him operations fundamentals, and upon graduation in 2013, he was ready to apply them to the real-world. InCode Consulting, a division of Ericsson Inc., which specializes in telco-focused management consulting, gave him the opportunity to leverage his domain knowledge and management degree to solve business problems of the telecom world. He has worked on a variety of engagements with telecom operators, equipment vendors and private equity clients in North America, Europe and Asia, tackling diverse business problems ranging from sales-channel optimization and spectrum auctions to fiber deployment strategies. The audience of his deliverables has changed from engineering-teams to executives – but the core nature of the work is still the same: to solve problems. “I find my journey as adventurous as learnable,” he said. “Be it

my professors at Krannert and mentors at GSCMI for their immense support and motivation to pave a management career path for me.”

building the software for 2G back in 2005 or creating strategies for 5G now, I learnt lesson from each experience. My

MBA was the link that helped me to expand the horizons of my thinking, and I thank THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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From Finance and Accounting to ‘Operations Guy’ “the world of accounting just wasn’t going to do!”

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hen Byron Gully joined Krannert’s MBA program in 2000, he had a background in finance and accounting, but no operations experience. DCMME was the “perfect incubator” for what would become his future success, he said. “DCMME provided me with the opportunities for hands-on experience and repeated direct exposure to industry leaders that propelled me into the career that I have today,” he said. He vividly remembers his feelings of fear and uncertainty, as well as excitement, as he passed up a job offer as a financial accounting advisory service consultant at a multinational firm. “After learning more about the exciting world of manufacturing and operations, and being so enamored with it, the world of accounting just wasn’t going to do!” he said. He made the life-changing decision to apply to Krannert with the hope of starting a successful career in operations. He became heavily involved with DCMME and was subsequently

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selected as a graduate assistant, giving him valuable exposure to key influencers in manufacturing enterprises. Two companies in particular stood out for him as he considered where he wanted to start his career: Wabtec Corporation and Allison Transmission, Inc. (formerly Allison Transmission, division of General Motors). Both companies gave him the opportunity to conduct case studies in operations at their facilities, offered him internships, and invited him to be part of their companies upon graduation. He ultimately chose Allison Transmission because of Ann Schneider, a DCMME industry partner. “Like many

of the DCMME industry partners, Ann became a mentor of mine and then ultimately a champion for me within the organization once I was brought aboard at Allison Transmission,” Gully said. “Through her efforts as an effective champion, I was able to see the world, literally.” He was assigned to the Asia-Pacific Region and, within a month of joining the company, was on an international flight to China, a country he had never visited before. He would spend the next

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

few years traveling internationally for the company and working to develop his operations skills. In 2010, he found a new path in his career, providing operations consulting for the U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) agency within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). For over seven years, he has worked as a consultant to improve the efficiency of service operations to help make the U.S. government more efficient and effective. Outside of work, DCMME has helped him to further develop relationships and experiences with companies and entities he would have never thought of. “This is due in no small part to the specific operational framework that was taught to me through the Krannert operations concentration, and reinforced within me, while an active part of DCMME,” he said. He has conducted operations consulting onsite at some of Club Méditerranée SA’s (Club Med) luxury resorts around the world. He has worked with key influencers at the North American division of Maserati S.p.A to be a part of bringing the first Maserati dealership to Indiana. He has helped two community-enhancing nonprofit entities launch their operations in both Indianapolis and Chicago because leaders of those organizations considered him the “operations guy.” “DCMME has helped to give me a view of the world where discerning the interrelatedness of people, processes and systems is almost second nature,” he said. “Just as important, it has helped me to earn an informal title that brings a smile to my face: the ‘operations guy.’”


Byron Gully MBA 2002

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Tony Fisher MBA 2012

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Impactful Projects Create Bridge to Professional Success

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ony Fisher can’t help smiling when he considers how far he has come in the last seven years – from the wide-eyed, hopeful and nervous student beginning the MBA program at Purdue in 2010 to a confident planner and leader at Dow AgroSciences. He recalls all the great experiences he had through the MBA program and his graduate assistantship at DCMME-GSCMI, the relationships he formed, the “tremendous” education he received, and how he was challenged to grow professionally. “I can confidently say all of those

combined experiences more than equipped me to hit the ground running in the professional world, and for that and more, I am grateful,” said Fisher, who

received his MBA in 2012. He remembers his first meeting with the DCMME-GSCMI team and the opportunity he was given to dive right in and work with Dr. Ananth Iyer on a consulting project for a firm in Indianapolis. “What struck me about that project and others later was the very real impact our project analysis and results could have to the respective companies’ bottom

line or strategic initiatives,” he said. “This is one of many benefits DCMME-GSCMI offers to graduate assistants and students alike in providing opportunities to translate classroom experience to real-life business needs.” In June 2017, he celebrated his 5th anniversary with Dow. “My tenure there is without question due in part to my experiences as a graduate assistant with DCMME-GSCMI and my Purdue MBA,” he said. In his time with Dow, he has been a global supply chain planning specialist, North America refuge advanced supply chain planner, and is currently the North America corn supply chain planner and team leader. “While I didn’t know the nuances of agriculture when I first started with the company, the critical thinking, analytical skills, and general concepts I learned in the classroom and as a graduate assistant prepared me for every role I have held,” he said.

“General concepts I learned in the classroom and as a graduate assistant prepared me for every role I have held.”

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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aylor Haws graduated from Krannert’s MBA program in May 2017, so his memories of being a graduate assistant at DCMME are still fresh. “The consulting projects I was able to work on have been extremely beneficial in preparing me for my career,” he said. “I not only got to work on different projects, but I was able to play an active management role, have conversations with our executivelevel partners, and find solutions to real-life problems.” In addition to his professional experiences, he immensely enjoyed opening the Smart Lean Engagement Center. “Who doesn’t want to play with drones and 3D printers?” he quipped, adding that he learned a lot about new technologies and their emerging applications in today’s markets. While graduates are happy to be part of the Purdue and Krannert families, Haws is also grateful to be a member of the DCMME family. “I received great training, mentoring, and exposure to learning opportunities during my graduate assistantship in DCMME, and I hope to be able to pass

“Who doesn’t want to play with drones and 3D printers?”

on some of the lessons I have learned to others in the future.”

Grateful to be a Member of the DCMME Family

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


Taylor Haws MBA 2017

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Gustavo Amorim MBA 2015

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An Opportunity to Learn from Industry Leaders

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“Today I feel that I am a better professional and a leader in the company, stretching myself to new challenges, even if outside of my area of expertise...”

ustavo Amorim was thrilled to be selected as a graduate assistant for DCMME because the center’s activities aligned with his professional experience. Before joining Krannert’s MBA program, he had worked for a large heavy mining equipment company in his native Brazil, where he was responsible for the service department operations, proposals, and financial reports. “The center gave me the opportunity to learn directly from industry leaders their best practices, new technology, and solutions to problems that I had never thought at the time,” Amorim said. He was pleasantly surprised to get the opportunity at DCMME to use his marketing and design talent to help the center with conference logos, website coding and design, and even discover talents he didn’t know he possessed. For his first conference as a graduate assistant, he was responsible for running the poster competition. He gave participants instructions and guided judges throughout the competition. “It was something that I had never done before, but this experience prepared me for what was coming at the next conference,” he said. At the following conference, he was asked to be the master of ceremonies.

This required him to learn about the speakers, welcome everyone, and be the host for the conference. “It was a growing experience that I really enjoyed,” he said, adding that it gave him the opportunity to interact with speakers and network with people in attendance. Amorim, who graduated in 2015, works for a company in the automotive industry in a position that can be described as a “master collaborator,” which gives him the opportunity to interact with many areas of the company and push innovation to market challenges. He credits his experiences at DCMME, including the network and learning opportunities, with preparing him for his job, searching for new products and features, distinguishing the company he works for, and raising industry standards to consolidate the company’s leadership position. “Today I feel that I am a better professional and a leader in the company, stretching myself to new challenges, even if outside of my area of expertise,” he said. “I am

very grateful for DCMME and the people that made all of this possible during my time there.”

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Gaining Tools to Tackle Real-World Problems “I suddenly found DCMME.

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“Whether it’s realoptions in supply chain or how to beat the bullwhip effect, I constantly leverage the skills and lessons learned through DCMME.”

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decade ago, when Brent Horrocks walked out of Rawls Hall as a newly-minted MBA, he didn’t quite realize how much he would benefit from his studies in supply chain, manufacturing and finance. It was only after he rejoined the workforce fulltime that he gained a true appreciation for his learning through Krannert and DCMME. His first role after Krannert was in the Customer Fulfillment and Logistics Group at Intel. For the next 4 years, he worked to implement a supply chain that balanced customer needs and demands with supply chain costs. He relied heavily on the Newsvendor inventory model and Little’s Law that Professor Ananth Iyer taught to model the benefits and costs of providing more customer warehouses, consignment, and just-in-time delivery options to Intel’s customers. Armed with these tools, he created an analysis framework that helped everyone from purchasing to sales to engineering understand the tradeoffs between cost and service level for each unique scenario. “This framework helped guide the investments to areas where the greatest supply chain benefit for the lowest cost could be realized,” he said. In his next role, working in Intel’s nascent memory group, he relied on the manufacturing portion of his education at Krannert and

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

myself in a world where the major product was largely a commodity, factories cost billions of dollars and a single ‘tool’ can be upwards of $300 million or more,” he said. He and other

Krannert students were required to read “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt, a book that “suddenly came to life as chasing factory constraints became the new norm,” Horrocks said. The tools he learned at Krannert allowed him to speak knowledgably to engineers and factory planners. “I understood the basic concepts of yield, theory of constraints, and throughput time, and was able to communicate how changes to those variables impact a company’s bottom line,” he said. Leveraging this knowledge, factory investments were optimized, sunk capital costs were avoided, and the business has grown to twice the size it was when he joined it. Despite having left the formal classroom a decade ago, Horrocks still refers back to his Krannert experiences to help him tackle new problems in an everchanging business environment.

“I keep my notes and case studies handy so I can refer to them at any time I need to,” he said.

“Whether it’s real-options in supply chain or how to beat the bullwhip effect, I constantly leverage the skills and lessons learned through DCMME.”


Brent Horrocks MBA 2006

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GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTS: Gustavo Amorim, Akshit Bajpai, Brian Bobo, Toni Bosley, Daniel Brown, Maude Cauley, Wayne Chan, Ryan Chan, Chelsea Chen, Saurabh Choudhury, Gisela Condado, Mirant Desai, Jennifer Evemeyer, Tony Fisher, Matt Foust, Ivan Francisco, John Gant, Diane Gonzalez, Yeshvanth Gowda, Byron Gully, Taylor Haws, Brent Horrocks, Geoffrey Inget, Peter Jacobson, Matt Jung, Humphrey Kanyoke, Jennifer Kevlin, Kristine Kim, Roman Kita, Stephanie Kruse, Chien-Chun Kuo, Yipin Lu, Pablo Martinez, Ryan McCombs, David McDairmant, Joey Meisberger, David Meyer, Arun Mohan, Deepika Mokkarala, Lukas Morawski, Arjjodev Mukherjee, Heather Owens, James Perkins, Srikanth Radhakrishna, Scott Rumpf, Jessica Rush, Vijay Sachdeva, Ghazi Saleem, Bernadine Sierra, Alan Siu, Dane Snyder, Surnaik Srivastava, Andrejs Strateicuks, Daniel Terayanont, Brandon Titelbaum, Viren Tulsian, Jennifer Tvedt, Mark Vymyslicky, Rasheeda Washington, Mark Wolfred, Bin Xu TVS INDIA INTERNS: Ventura Aguirre Suarez, Rizwan Ahmad, Olusegun Ajuwon, Ana Alfaro, Sheldon Anderson, Anupam Bansal, Adrian Boeh, Lukas Brenner, William Budds, Chris Calas, Susan Campbell, Ryan Case, Ai-Lin Chang, Amy Chang, Mun Chong, Yashi DAI, Tatsuhiko Daigo, Marita Dautel, Christian Driemel, Brittany Edwards, Siham Erragh, Yating Fang, Brad Feuling, Jakub Ficner, Zach Frazier, Shree Frazier, Emily Frey, Isra Gadri, Andrew Gerber, Aditya Ghamande, Aaron Gilbert, Stefanie Gonciar, Nathan Gross, Bret Hanson, Doug Hanson, Mike Hanson, William Harbert, Monica Harvey, Patrick Haslanger, Nick Haywood, Dennis Hernandez, Ya-Chi Hsiao, Yafeng Hu, Jade Huang, Hyuna Im, Peter Jacobson, Brad Johnson, Miguel Juraidini, Aimee Kappes-Armstrong, Marc Kelly, Eric Kennedy, Monique Kenney, Kongpon Kijnum, Daniel Kim, Kristine Kim, Dmitry Kokorin, Ratna Kondra, Pranav Koushik, Amit Kumar, David Lahm, Deron Leslie, Ying Li, Yonghua Li, Xiaochang Li, Shawn Li, Hannah Little, Yunyang Liu, Yipin Lu, Sanchez Luis, Roger Ly, Sharanya Madhavan, Man-Hay Mak, Cristina-Debora Manea, Benjamin Marshall, Bastian Martin, Pablo Martinez, Peter Mast, David McDairmant, Shane McGuire, Gabriel Melchor, Justine Mikals, Yohan Min, Venkata Mujje, Katie Mullen, Adam Myers, Alphonso Myers, Sarinah Narciso, Rebecca Obikunle, Yoko Okubo, Jesus Ortega, Austin Owens, Heather Owens, Robert Perchard, Julia Phillips, Casper Plump, James Poindexter, Mason Preusser, Manigandan Ramesh, Christian Rasche, Christina Rasquinha, Michael Reddy, Marvin Rodriguez, Beatrice Roesler, Janette Rush, Jonathan Ryan, Mohammad Saoud, Kirthana Sathyamurthy, Zach Schmid, Daniel Schwartz, Courtney Schwartz, Shaunak Shaunak, Mark Shelton, Matthias Siebert, Spencer Slaton, David Smith, Mark Sobers, Zenita Subba, Anuradha Surya, George Symons, Zachari Tahiru, Sheng Tajg, Sarah Tanoury, Kamesh Thalor, Shea Thomas, Jennifer Tvedt, Kent Van Horn, Malina Vasile, Sriram Vasu, Gaurav Vijayvargiya, Sokolin Viktorov, Yisha Wang, Masaki Watanabe, Shaun Waymire, Pantanat Wayuparb, Tiffany Wendler, Jessica Werner, Francis Wong, Ernest Wong, Xinxin Xi, Kuldeep Yadav, Akihiro Yamada, Koji Yamada, Daisuke Yano, Hengqiu Ye, Lauren Young STUDENT PROJECTS: Kofo Adafin, Shikhar Agarwal, Gustavo Amorim, Yatin Anand, Aniesh Aravin, Saurabh Arora, Serhan Aydin, Akshit Bajpai, Ivan Banchs, Rushabh Banthia, Sushant Bhat, Brian Bobo, Matt Bobrowski, Toni Bosley, Daniel Brown, Maude Cauley, Ryan Chan, Wayne Chan, Paroon Chanda, Chelsea Chen, Saurabh Choudhury, Gisela Condado, Manita Dagar, Kailas Dandegaval, Yuvaraj Dayanand, Mirant Desai, Pekham Dey, Tim Dona, Jennifer Evemeyer, Xinlan Fang, Tony Fisher, Matt Foust, Ivan Francisco, Scott Frederick, Leo Fu, Isra Gadri, John Gant, Bin Gao, Sai Gao, Christina Garcia, Pedro Gerum, Diane Gonzalez, Priyanka Govindraj, Yeshvanth Gowda, Findley Griffiths, Byron Gully, Taylor Haws, Brent Horrocks, Brad Husted, Geoffrey Inget, Peter Jacobson, Nitin Jain, Juan Jose, Shounak Joshi, Matt Jung, Ganesh Kak, Humphrey Kanyoke, Jennifer Kevlin, Kristine Kim, Roman Kita, Stephanie Kruse, Satwik Kulkarni, Chien-Chun Kuo, Joshua Kwak, Alvaro Ledesma, Ji Lei, Yang Liu, Yipin Lu, Jennifer Lu, Brian Maeng, Pablo Martinez, Pete Mast, Stephen Masters, Tasha Matthews, Ryan McCombs, David McDairmant, Tanmay Mehra, Joey Meisberger, David Meyer, Randall Miao, Justin Mikals, Vibhav Mishra, Arun Mohan, Deepika Mokkarala, Lukas Morawski, Brady Moss, Arjjodev Mukherjee, Heather Owens, Ricardo Paez, Abhishek Panditrao, James Perkins, Srikanth Radhakrishna, Arun Radhakrishnan, Julian Railey, Rajagopalan, Angelica Rodriquez, Ana Romero, Debdeep Roy, Scott Rumpf, Jessica Rush, Vijay Sachdeva, Ghazi Saleem, Varun Selvaraj, Yanbing Shi, Bernadine Sierra, Gerald Sims, Sayan Sinha, Alan Siu, Dane Snyder, Xiangyang Song, Surnaik Srivastava, Andrejs Strateicuks, Yoshitake Tajima, Daniel Terayanont, Brandon Titelbaum, Viren Tulsian, Jennifer Tvedt, Mark Vymyslicky, Linjie Wang, Rasheeda Washington, David Windmiller, Mark Wolfred, Dan Worthing, Dongfang Wu, Odien Xu, Bin Xu, Koji Yamada, Xianghong Yang, Pengyu Zhai, Christine Zhang, Meng Zhang, Qi Zhang STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS: Tina Achterhof, Laura Adams, Seoungpil Ahn, Mike Allen, Jo Allen, Micahel Allen, John Allenson, Barabar Allen-Werner, John Alleson, Anthony Amni, Bradley Anen, Ryan Applegate, Kirandeep Atwall, Nicolas Auchaibeskafi, Serhan Aydin, Kristen Bailey, Carrie Baker, Lama Barhoush, Nathan Barrett, Matthew Bartlett, David Bean, Cody Bearden, Pamela Beninga, Katherine Biehl, Morgan Biesecker, Mark Billings, Ryan Bingham, Jeff Birdsley, Jason Bokina, Toni Bosley, Paul Bottoms, Holly Bougher, Robert Bray, Yuliya Brody, Ian Brown, Brian Brown, Gregory Brown, Tara Brown, David Bryant, Jason Bucher, Cara Budreau, Skylar Buffington, Travis Burghardt, David Burkholder, Scott Butler, Francois Callait, Marius Calmet, Felipe Camacho, Chad Campbell, Jaime Canavate, Dan Carney, Rho Cauley, Paroon Chadha, Ron Chauby, Ryan

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


student involvement THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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student involvement

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS CONT’D: Chen, David Chipman, Janna Clark, Wyatt Clarke, Melissa Coe, Carmen Collieraz, Debra Connell, Heath Crawford, John Curtright, Susan Dalton, Katie DeLeon, Trisha Delsart, Francisco Diaz, Jay Dieckmann, Andrew Dobosz, Jeffrey Dodd, Esen Dogan, Ezequiel Doiny, Barb Doster, Eric Dulin, Meredith Durham, Brad Durst, Stacy Edwards, Christopher Ellison, Stacy Elward, Tara Emery, Lydia Eutsey, Jason Evans, Xin Fang, Gail Farnsley, Derek Fetzer, Edward Fetzer, Cassandra Fetzer, Melissa FitzSimons, Eric Foley, Eric Friend, Ricardo Garza-Paez, John Gerhart, Christopher Ghazi, Kathryn Goddrich, Shashank Goenk, Karen Goldman, Fabian Gomez, Jose Gonzalez, Jim Gordon, James Gotshall, Andy Graham, Sean Gray, Michelle Gross, Jason Gustafson, Ravi Haldipur, Matthew Hall, Matthew Hall, James Harrigan, Earl Hart, Steve Havel, Mike Haynes, Robert Heeter, Jason Heman, Brian Hemmerly, Tricia Henderson, Brad Henderson, Edwin Hendriadi, Chip Hickman, Michael Higgins, Anne Hoesley, Jerrad Hollis, Laura Holmes, Jong Hong, Scott Hornback, Brent Horrocks, Ryan Howard, Maria Iancu, Vijay Inbasagaran, Arunkumar Iyer, Linda Jankov, Paul John, Ashish Johri, Mike Jones, Brent Jump, Danielle Kalajian, Brian Kehrer, Marc Kelly, Stevem Kenny, Adrienne Kerr, Thomas Keslin, John Kiersma, Laura Kightlinger, Paul Kinyon, Corey Klausing, Carrie Klockow, Grace Klose, Nathan Knestrick, Christopher Knicker, David Koch, J Koning, Scott Kowalski, Zachary Krieg, Sean Lamborne, Alvaro Ledesma, Kuan-Hsien Lee, Jeff LeGassick, Peter Li, Susan Li, Maria Llamas, Candy Lockette, Alejandro Londono, Peter Low, Tim Luce, Tim Luce, Chris Luchtefeld, Colin MacAlpine, Dennis Maier, Peter Malecha, Brad Manbeck, Sean Maroney, Noel Marsden, Jan Martin, Grady Martin, James Mathis, Benjamin Matthies, Matthew Maudlin, Jennifer Mayronne, Victor Mazzuferri, Taryn McNally, Caitlin McPherson, Elizabeth Menozzi, Jeff Meredith, Michelle Metcalf, Brian Meyer, Holly Miller, Linda Miller, Jeff Miller, Bryan Mitchell, Ravi Mody, Ilyas Mohammed, Juan Mondul, Giselle Montenegro, James Moody, Carlos Morales, Carlos Morales, David Morstadt, Matthew Mowery, Lisa Mrzlack, Matthew Murphy, Mike Musleh, Christine Naab, Jeffrey Nagel, Curtis Neel, Howard Nelson, Kok Ngan, Amy Nicely, Bradley Norris, David Orr, Jaime Ortiz, Brittany Painter, Edwin Park, Will Parrish, Bradena Payne, Shane Pearson, Jim Pelikan, Zach Peterson, Merideth Pierson, Varun Poddar, Varun Poddar, John Porco, Tory Powell, Mike Price, Naveen Pruthi, Victor Pulido, Hector Pulido, Cindy Qui, Michael Reddy, Anthony Rekeweg, Andrew Ring, Jaime Robertson, Traci Rombalski, Charles Romine, Kaitlin Rosinski, Kendal Ross, J Roush, Jonathan Rundle, Jennifer Ryan, Jorge Salazar, Steven Salim, Renish Sanghavi, Mehmet Satoglu, David Scheitlin, David Scheitlin, Trevor Schick, Matthew Schriefer, Stuart Schultz, Brett Schwab, Dan Senff, Jay Shah, Neil Shah, Bernadeen Sierra, Elvin Simpson, Tiffany Small, Benia Smith, Ward Snearly, Lindaway Soelistio, David Springer, Katherine Stine, Arthur Stowe, Leslie Strezo, Leslie Strezo, Tumetius Sugianto, Melissa Swiatek, Fidel Tamayo, Naoki Tani, Alejandro Tapia, Will Thomas, Kurtis Threlkeld, Neema Thundathil, Shad Tidler, Judd Trayling, Maurice Trentel, Joseph Turk, Tim Valiant, Timothy Valiant, Timothy Valiant, Paul Vanderspek, Enrique Vasquez, Charles Vendley, Joe Vertenten, Mark Vymyslicky, James Wagner, Rasheeda Washington, Marisa Watkins, Anne Wayman, Matthew Weirich, Andrew Weisman, Betsy Weissinger, Matthew Welke, Matthew Welke, Mark Wheaton, John Williams, Dan Worthing, Molly Wrenn, Rene Yamin, Brenda Yi, Steve Yoo, Gregory Young, Yekaterina Zelikman, Jia Zhang, Mike Ziegele, Jeremy Zu STUDENT GSCM & MTM OPTION CERTIFICATE RECIPIENTS: Spencer Abrams, Mary Abrokwa Dei-Awuku, Gustavo A. Acosta, Beal Adam, Scott Adams, John Ade, Sundeep Adivishnu, Emmanuel Adu-Asante, Sharad Agarwal, Shikhar Agarwal, Ayush Agarwal, Mayank Aggarwal, Tarun Aggarwal, Ventura Aguirre, Saurabh Ahluwalia, Fraz Ahmed, Nadim Ahmed, Seoungpil Ahn, Hirotaka Aiura, Olusegun Ajuwon, Muhammed Alhusami, Selina Alibaruho, Othman Alkharraz, Amy Allen, Amber Allen, Alejandro Almeida, Collins Amankwaah, Radhesh Amin, Anthony Amni, Gustavo Amorim, Sean Anderson , Shutaro Ando, Manek Anklesaria, Jason Annis, Aaron Anspaugh, Randall Anzalone Jr., Aniesh Aravind, Nicole Arcamgel, Su Areewronges, Javier Arguello, Saurabh Arora, Emre Arseven, Ignatius Arthur Rajvir Singh, Shana Ashby-Jobes, Deepak asoori, Serhan Aydin, Kerem Aytek, Afief Baasir, Michael Babbitt, Michelle Bacon, Sung Jin Bae, Jordan Baines, Akshit Bajpai, Kelly Baker, Serkan Bakisgan, Ivan Banchs, Stephen Banks, Anupam Bansal, Rahul Barge, Lama Barhoush, Scott Barnes, Daniel Barrera Matera, Brandon Barrett, Matthew Bartlett, Iniobong Bassey, Patrick Baumann, David Bean, Ricardo Beaumont, Dianne Beever, Gabriel Bellido, Steven Bench, Egel Ben-Marvin, Jeremy Bennington, John Bennion, Carlos Bermudez, Marie Bernadac, Mohit Bhandari, Abhijit Bharadwaj, Vishwas Bharadwaj G, Arjun Bhargava, Paarth Bhonsle, Brian Bielke, Kira Bilecky, Joonhwa Bin, Arjun Bindingnavalle Sampathkumar, William Birch, Mark Bischoff, Matthew Black, Brian Bobo, Michael Bolen, Erin Boley, Sameer Borwankar, Nicole Boscia, Toni Bosley, Adam Boyce, Patrick Boyle, Douglas Branson, Lukas Brenner, Christopher Brothers, Daniel Brown, James Bryan, II, Lee Bush, Nikhil Butala, Scott Butler, Adam Byers, Christopher Calas, Francois Callait, Christian Calle Madrid, Jaime Canavate, Jose Capito, Luis Carnero, Dan A. Carney, Jr., Royce Carvalho, Javier Casasnovas, Ryan Case, Cam Castelein, Maude Cauley, Kyle Cavins, Paroon Chadha, Twinky Chai, Sarah Chaille, Prudhvi Challagundla, Kin Chan, Ryan Chan, Ryan Chan, Shivaramakrishnan Chandrashekher, Amy Chang, Chun Chang, Yun-Ching Chang, Tanyarat Charatchwen, Ron Chauby, Vikram Chauhan, Megan Cheek, Guneet Singh Cheema, Philip Chen, Fuping Chen, Manchia Chen, Weizhong Chen, Wei-Shao Chen, Amy Cheng, Dennis Cheng, THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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STUDENT GSCM & MTM OPTION CERTIFICATE RECIPIENTS CONT’D: Kan Cheng, Chien Wen Cheng, Monica Chiang, Harikrishnan Chidambaram, Saketh Chinni, Joonhwan Chnag, Hyunmin Cho, Seong Cho, JongHo Choi, Ping (Ruby) Chou, Tzu-Chien Chou, Saurabh Choudhury, Philip Chu, John Chuang, Poornanand Chundi, Charles Whon Chung, Jaekyun Chung, Meng-Wen Chung, William Ciaravino III, Alison Clary, Zachary Clay, Carmen Collier, Gisela Condado, Milagros Contreras, Michael Corcuera, Maurice Cormier, Brad Cottrell , Joshua Cox, Duard Crandall, Benjamin Crockett, Jared Crum, James Cruse, Derek Csaszar, Michael Culpepper, Donna Cumberland, John Curtright, Theodore Daniels, Amalia Daratsos, Marcus Darrington, Bayu Daryanto, Arnab Das, Gaurav Dasgupta, Anoop Datar, Prasenjit Datta, John Davisson, Juan De La Torre, Ludovico Deamicis, Derrick Deardorff, Nazim Deen, Aman Deep, Dennis Delgado, Suyash Deshpande, Francois Diaz, Francisco Javier Diaz, Cecilia Diaz, Esen Dogan, Jeffrey Doll, John Dreuth, Eric Dulin, Joel Dunten, Lorraine Dupersoy, Amanda Dyson, Dawn Edwards, John Eld, Rich Ellison, Melodi Emanuel, Michael Engelbrecht, Jaime Escobar, Jerry Ewell, Dorine Faddoul, Rewat Singh Fageria, Mona Fahimi, Xin Lance Fang, Gail Farnsley, Randall Fees, Tiebin Feng, Liang Feng, Ricardo Ferreira, Derek M. Fetzer, Edward Fetzer, Cassandra Fetzer, Rafeal Fillmore, Matthew Fischer, Joseph Fischer, Brian Fish, Anthony Fisher, John Flint, Felipe Flores, David Franco, Scott Frederick, Eric Fredrickson, Julio Freire, Aleksey Fridman, Corey Friedman, Erik Friend, Stephen Frolik, Scott Fryer, Xiaosi Fu, Junhao Fu, Brian J Fuerst, Matthew Fyffe, Victor Gabriel, Isra Gadri, See Ee Gan, Venkatar Ganapathy, Sumit Gangwani, Lu Gao, Carlos Garcia, Joseph Garrott, Helen Garst, Ricardo Garza-Paez, Donald Gene Stocks, Brandon Gene Sturm, Brandon Germer, Andrew Glassman, Tae Go, Hitesh Goel, Ayush Goel, Samarth Gogia, Timothy Gold, Fabian Gomez, Diane Gonzalez, Miguel GonzalezCapiello, Charles Gooding, John Goodrich, James Gordon, James Gotshall, Priyanka Govindraj, Faruk Gozoglu, Nicholas Grady, Ismael Granadillo, Peter Greco, Findley Griffiths, Alexander Grigoryev, Nathan Gross, Nicandro Guerra Salinas, Byron Gully, Jr., Vikesh Gumpalli, Asela Gunasekera, Yang Guo, Priya Gupta, Hamon Gupta, Kriti Gupta, David Guzman, Brendan Hackett, Scott Haeger , Jessica Hagen, Ravi Haldipur, Derek Hall, Dylan Haney, Douglas Hanson, Bret Hanson, Benjamin Harpenau, Catina Hart, Mark Hartigan, Justin Hartman, Patrick Haslanger, Douglas Haubold, Jacob C. Haury, Stephen Havel, Eric Hayes, Nicholas Haywood, Zheng He, Zhikai He, Annemarie Heise, Anthony Heleine, Diana Henao, Natasha Henry, Jonathan Henry, Steven Hentges, Dennis Hernandez, Christopher Hiatt, Brandon Hicks, Takahiro Higuchi, Brock Hileman, Erica Hill, Brittany Hill, Andrew Hiller, David Hinko, Jeffrey Hinman, William Hinson, Tatsuya Hisano, Cheng-Hung Ho, Katrina Hoagland, Justin Hodapp, Edward Hollingsworth, Kristin Holtz, Kurtis Homan, Jong Woo Hong, Christopher T. Hoover, Brian Hoover, Tzu-hao Horng, Brent Horrocks, Norihiko Hosokawa, Alex Housten, David Otto Howarth, Yu-Ta Hsieh, Wie-An Hsu, Kevin Hsueh, Chia-Yen Huang, Choong Hur, Brad Husted, Amanda Huwaldt, Tatsuki Ibuki, Masahisa Iida, Geoffrey Inget, Russell Isaac, Curt Martin Isenbarger, Arunkumar Iyer, Anika Jackson, Peter Jacobson, Melissa Jaffee, Aashima Jain, Ashwini Jain, Ali Jalal, Linda Jankov, Kevlin Jennifer P., Jordan Jensen, Bo Jin, Lixin Jin, ChunTaik Jo, Glen Mishal John Kennady, Stephanie Johnsen, Brad Johnson, Aaron Johnson, Ashish Johri, Mike Jones, Layne Jones, Andrew Jones, Randall Jones, Julia Jones, Thomas Joseph, Upendra Joshi, Rajpaul Judge, Inho Jung, Anas Kaakeh, Jigar Kadakia, Warat Kaewpijit, Hitesh Kamra, Thomas J. Kappock, Kristina Karl, Bihag Karnani, Meeta Kasan, Arnold Kasemsarn, Abhay Kashyap, Jibran Kassamali, Jirasee Kasuwan, Justin Katz, Shipra Kaul, Tsukasa Kawabe, Eric Kennedy, Stephen Kerber, Adrienne Kerr, Kevin Kerr, Abhishek Kesarwani, Jennifer Kevlin, Prateek Khanna, Rajeeta Khanse, Jayme Khoo, Kongpon Kijnum, Gyu-Chul Kim, Eugene Kim, Hae Kim, Youngjun Kim, Dohyung Kim, Paul Kinyon, Paul S. Kinyon, Amy Kirkland, Roman Kita, Sarah Kmetz, Jimiel Knighton, Ya Ko, David Koch, Masaroni Koide, Raghuram Koka, Saideep Kolar, Sarah Komen, Ratna B Kondra, Winyoo Kongkavitool, J Todd Koning, Edward Koopmann, Ankit Koppikar, Vikram Kothandaraman, Alex Kovach, Naoshi Kozu, Randall Krueger, Brian Krum, Stephanie Kruse, Raghaven Kulkarni, Anshuman Kumar, Amit Kumar, Satish Kunchakuri, Hui-chih Kuo, Vikram Kurkal, Jeonghyun Kwak, Minseok Kwon, Nikolaus Ladisch, Harish Lakshman, Sean Lamborne, Eric Lamkin, Zhen Lan, Javier Landazuribar, Nattaporn Laotaveerungsawad, Joseph Larson, Matt Larson, Krassimira Lazarova, Tiago Leal, Preston Leavitt, Alvaro Ledesma, Raymond Lee, Zhuo-Hang (Adam) Lee, Changho Lee, Hojun Lee, Ichun Lee, Susan Lee, Wonjae Lee, Kuan-Chang Lee, Tien-Hsiang Lee, Elsie Lee, Hyungrok Lee, Daniel Lefco, Mohamad Legowo, Preston Lehman, Jiangbo Lei, Ryan Leidigh, Fernando Leite, Philip D. Lemperle, Andrea Lenterna, Gilberto Leon, Deron Leslie, Brian Lewis, Zhuo Long Li, Wen Li, Siming Li, Yen-Ti Li, Wei-Ting Lien, Chia-yu Lin, Tingyang Lin, Solomon Lin, Zhuojie Liu, Yang Liu, Yunyang Liu, Jin Lixin, Maria G. Llamas, Alvaro Llorente, Yun Long, Luis Lopez, Griselda Lopez, Wan-Ling Lu, Pei-Ling Lu, Yipin Lu, Hua Lu, Jennifer Lu, Douglas Lubbers, Gerardo Lucena, Fernando Lucio, Steven Lund, Wei Luo, Chun Luo, Wenying Luo, Roger Ly, Jiaqi Ma, Colin M. MacAlpine, Michael Macearchern, Martin Madden, Gokulkannan Madhusundararaju, Andres Magana, Vineet Mahajan, Deepti Mahapatra, Kamin Mahoney, Dennis B. Maier, Peter Malecha, Ulka Malekar, Lucas Manganaro, Matthew Mangum, Juan Mantilla, Lauren Marcus, Kimberly Maresh, Jeffrey Marker, Sean Maroney, Ronald Maronic, Edel Marrero, Noel Marsden, Brandis

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


student involvement THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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student involvement

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


STUDENT GSCM & MTM OPTION CERTIFICATE RECIPIENTS CONT’D: Marshall, Pablo Martinez, David Massey, Peter Mast, Mayuko Matsumoto, Tasha Matthews, Tasha R. Matthews, Ryan McCombs, Robert Mckinney, Andrew McMillin, Joseph Meade, Raudel Medina, Tanmay Mehra, Shreyas Mehta, Joseph Meisberger, Arun Meka, Luis Mendez, Bret Mercer, Bret T. Mercer, Jeffrey Meredith, David Meyer, Justine Mikals, Jeffrey Miller, Linda Miller, Abhishek Mishra, Priyadrshini Misra, Toshiya Mitsuhashi, Hideto Mitsuoka, Saad Mohammad, Ilyas Mohammed, Ilyas A. Mohammed, Nikhil Mohan, Jesus Molina, David Momper, Juan Mondul, Hansel Monroy, Jaime Moore, Carlos Morales, Lucas Morawski, Kevin Morrisroe, Erin Moulesong, Ismail Muhammad, Sudhakar Reddy Mukkala, Andrei Munteanu, Aishwarya Murali, Tushar Mutatkar, Rachel Myers, Laxmir Nair, Deepti Nair, Shuhei Nakazawa, Ki Cheol Nam, Garima Namdeo, Anisha Nanda, Bishan Nandy, Sudavee Nantavipavong, Vaibhav Narain, Hamzah Nassif, Indhujha Natarajan, Madhumathy Natesan Ramamurthy, Ogochi Nedosa, Matthew Neiman, Case Newberry, Nga Nguyen, Scott Nickerson, Jacob Nielson, Michael Niemeyer, Anthony Niese, Delia Noblecilla, Bradley Norris, Jonathan Okos, Olubusayo Oladapo, David Orr, David E. Orr, Jaime Ortiz, Amadin Osagiede, Blake Osborn, Heather Owens, William Owens, Michael Owusu, Heather Padget, Ricardo Paez, Susmit Pal, Nikhil Pallavali, Dheeraj Pandey, Anubhooti Pareek, Sung-Ho Park, Minwoo Park, Alex Parker, Jose Carlos Parra-Morzan, Will Parrish, Erik Parronchi, Elizabeth Pascarelli, Jennifer Pascon, Sino Paul, Somak Paul, Sutapa Paul, Bradena Payne, Shane Pearson, Anna Peckhart, James Pelikan, Robert Perchard, Enrique Pereira, Maria Perez, James Perkins, T. Joshua Pett, Kramer M. Phalen, Raghavendra Phasalkar, Julia Phillips, Roshan Picardo, Deepak Pillai, Marcus Piper, Ollie Poindexter, John Porco, Giovanna Povis, Deepali Pratap, Chris Prendergast, Robert Michael Preyss, Naveen Pruthi, Mauricio Puente, Victor Pulido, Victor J. Pulido, Hector Pulido, Tingting Qiu, Wenxin Qui, Srikanth Radhakrishna, Andrei Radulescu, Kousthub Raghavan, Jayashree Raghuraman, Asad Raja, Shankar Rajagopalan, Rohan Rajapurkar, Nakul Rakpanya, Arkajit Rakshit, Aravind Ramamoorthy, Manigandan Ramesh, Abhinandan Rangappa Lakshmana, Ashok Rao, Kavvya Rao, David Ratzer, Pankaj Raut, Monica Ravi, Brandon Reed, Sheana Reigle, James Reisert, Ryan Rendino, Susana Maria Restrepo, Micaela Ridge, Gary Riley, Daehak Rim, Derk Rimstidt, Sarah Robertson, Joel Roche, Braulio Rodrigues, Arturo Rodriguez, Marielisa Rodriguez, Igor Rodriguez-Ayala, Alberto Rodriquez, Ana Romero, Kelly Rose, Patrick Rose, Erin Roszczyk, Ronaldo Rotua, Forrest Roush, Paul Rowe, Debdeep Roy, Brent Ruddy, Scott E. Rumpf, Jonathan Ryan, Vijay Sachdeva, Avik Saha, Vineet Sahni, Samir Sahoo, Mohit M. Sahu, Yuji Sakakibara, Jorge Salazar, Ghazi Saleem, Sarath Sambandam, Enia Sampaio, Arjun Sampathkumar, Gini-Denise Sanchez, Hermosillo, Bajaj Sanket, Jesus Santoyo Ortega, Trevor Schick, Ross Schindler, Alexander Schmidt, Abby Schneider, Daniel Schwartz, John Scott, Richard Seagreaves, Robert Sebesta, Rohan Sehgal, Dilek Sen, Michael Seo, Seung Seok, Seung Han Seok, Jim Serstad, Lakshminarayanan Seshan, Apurva Sethi, Steve Shade, Steven A. Shade, Malay Shah, Neal Shah, Bushan Shah, McGuire Shane, Anurag Shankar, Ashutosh Shankar, Virendra Sharma, Koshika Sharma, Tarun Sharma, Raunak Sharma, Maia Shaw, Mark Shelton, Rex Shen, Qing Sheng, Roland Shepherd, Crystal Shi, Li-Kang Shih, Euijoon Shim, Yongsuk Shin, Hyunsoo Shin, Tomohiro Shiokawa, Scott Sichmeller, Sean Simoes, Rashmi Singh, Manminder Singh, Mohnish K Singh, Sayan Sinha, Alan Siu, Sankar Sivagaminathan, Lamis Sleiman, Tiffany Small, Adam Kirk Smiley, Scott Smith, Benia Smith, Colby Smith, David Smith, Dane Snyder, Hery Sofiaji, Freddy Solis, Freddy Solis Novelo, Jong Son, Zhi Song, Kyu Suek Song, Holger Spiewak, Veronica Spriggs, David Springer, Sripad Srinivasan, Ruchir Srivastava, Surnaik Srivastava, Tara Stadele, Alexander Sterdjevich, Alexander N. Sterdjevich, Patrick Steven, Brian Stewart, Prentice Stovall, Arthur Stowe, Andrejs Strateicuks, Jennifer Stump, Suchit Subhas, Shiva Subramanian, Santhosh Sukumar, Botao Sun, Yuwa Sun, Alan Swanson, Carrie Swats, Zachari Tahiru, Akira Takahashi, Fidel Tamayo, Seng Tan, Hiroaki Tanaka, Naoki Tani, Sandy Lukito Tanudirjo, Alejandro J. Tapia, Otsu Tatsuya, Ricardo Taviera, Melissa Taw, Julio Tay Wo Chong Portocarrero, Mei-Lin Teng, Izzettin Tepekoylu, Daniel Terayanont, Noriyasu Tezuka, Anurag Thakur, Kamlesh Thalor, Tommy Thigpen, Teresa Thigpen, Rolince Thomas, Ashwin Thomas, Amanda Thompson, Nattanich Thongkraisaen, Michael Tian, Brandon Titelbaum, Stephanie Rinna Tiu, Adrian Tolman, Sashi Tondapu, Benjamin Toney, Silas Tora, Steven Tracht, Eric Tracy, Renaldo Trancoso, Bien Trinh, Anil Tripathi, Gagan Tripathi, Viren Tulsian, Jared Turner, Bryant Tutterow, Jennifer Tvedt, Pallavi Tyagi, Masahiko Uchiyama, Steve Um, John C Upshaw, Ian Upton, Sergio Uribe, James Vaca, Sanjeev Vaid, Paul Vanderspek, Monique Vann, Monique Cherisse Vann, Marshall VanNahmen, Bharat Varshney, Krisli Vasili, Enrique A. Vasquez, Rui Vaz, Cherukuri VDS Chowdary, Amilcar Velasco Casco, Mauricio Velloso, Arjun Venkataraman, Naresh Venkatasubra, Arunachalam Venky Arun, Joseph Vertenten, Christian Vetterli, Derika Vidale, Saurabh Vijayvergia, Tim Viles, Parwaz Virk, Shruti Vishwakarma, Selvam Viswanatha, John VLK, Dennis Wagner, Afza Wajid, Cecily Walden, Jason Wallace, Hang Wang, Ruoyu Wang, Tao Tao Wang, Yu-Ting Wang, Lijun Wang, Xue Wang, Zheng Wang, Rasheeda Washington, Masaki Watanabe, John Waters, Justin Waters, Pantanat Wayuparb, Justine Weatherman, Ying-Chi Wen, Tiffany Wendler, Wang Wenkui, William Wenz, Barbara Werner, Barbara R. A. Werner, Jonathan Westwood, Robert Whitney, Wenz William, Spencer Williams, Stephanie Williams, Travis Wilson, TC Wingrove, Derek Wolfe, Mark Wolfred, Kungsik Won, Ching Yuen (Tina) Wong, Francis Wong, THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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STUDENT GSCM & MTM OPTION CERTIFICATE RECIPIENTS CONT’D: Christopher Wong, Nicole Wood, Dan Worthing, I-Hsien Wu, Jianqing Wu, I-chuan Wu, Dongfang Wu, Ruoxin Wu, Leah Wyman, Xi Xinxin, Wei Xiong, Jeremy Jinghuai Xu, Kuldeep Yadav, Robert Yahn, Toshihiko Yamada, Rene A. Yamin, Seok Yang, Henry C. Yang, Wei Yang, Najib Yang, Daisuke Yano, Ozkan Yavuz, Hengqiu Ye, Po-Chien Yen, Peter Yeomans, Li Ying, Steve Yoo, Kenichiro Yoshida, Hristian Yovchev, Minjia Yu, Cong Yuan, Jee Yeun Yun, Sun Yuwa, Resit Zara, Yachao Zhan, Mark Zhan Peng Lip, Jianghua Zhang, Lu Zhang, Zhaofeng Zhang, Yaping Zhang, Jinghan Zhang, Zhongning Zhang, Jian Zhao, Jing Zhao, Justin Zheng, Han Zheng, Zhao Zhong, Yaowei Zhou, Shane Zindel, Stan Zywicki INDUSTRY PARTNERS & SPONSORS: ALCOA Foundation, Arthur Anderson & Co., Caterpillar, Deloitte & Touche, Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Ford Motor Company, GE Foundation, General Motors, Ingersoll-Rand Company, Owens-Illinois, Michael D. McDaniel, R. R. Donnelley & Sons, ROI Systems, AlliedSignal, Eastman Kodak Company, AlliedSignal, Allison Transmission, American Axle & Manufacturing, Ameritech, Amway, Andersen Consulting, ArcelorMittal, Arthur Andersen & Company, Ball-Foster, Batesville, Boeing, Caterpillar Inc., Chevron, Chrysler Corporation, Conexus Indiana, Crowe Chizek and Company, Cummins Inc., Delphi Automotive Systems, Discovery Park, Duke Energy, Eaton Corporation, EDS, Electronic Data Systems, Eli Lilly & Co., Ensign-Bickford Industries, Ernst & Young, Fairfield Manufacturing, Ford Motor Company, GenCorp, General Motors, Genpact, Greater Kokomo, Hillenbrand Industries, J. Michael Ertel, Honeywell, IBM, Indiana InternNet, Ingersoll-Rand, Inland Steel Company, John A. Hillenbrand Foundation, John Deere, Katz, Sapper & Miller, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Leo S. Royl, Lewis B. Cullman Venture Enterprises, Motorola, Owens Corning, Owens-Brockway, Philip Morris USA, Purdue Ciber, Roger Stewart, Roger Williams, Roger Willis, ROI Systems, Rolls-Royce Corporation, Saint-Gobain Containers, Sears, SPS Technologies Foundation, Terex, TRW, Unilever, United Technologies Corporation, USC Marshall, Verallia, Wabtec Corporation, Walmart, Westinghouse Air Brake Company (WABCO), Xerox COMPANY SCHOLARSHIPS: American Axle & Manfacturing, Arcelor Mittal, Boeing, Cardinal Health, Caterpillar, Chevron, Crowe Horwath, DCMME, Delphi Manufacturing, EBA&D, Ensign Bickford, ET Weiler, GM, John Deere, Joseph Turk, Kimberly Clark, Maple Leaf Farms, Michael & Joann Allen, Philip Morris , Rolls Royce, Saint-Gobain Containers, Sears Holdings , TRW , US Steel, Wabtec Corporation COMPANY PROJECTS: AERO Industries, Allegion, American Axle & Manufacturing, At-A-Glance, BallFoster Glass Container Co., Batesville-Hillenbrand, Cantilever Technologies, Caterpillar, Chao Center, Chromcraft & OFS, Coast Guard, Coleman Cable, Company, Conexus, Cummins, Eli Lilly, EU Project, Evonik, Excel Industries , Fairfield Manufacturing, FarbiForm, GM, Grassy Creek Clinic, Honeywell, Indiana Business Modernization & Technology Corporation, INDOT, Ingersoll-Rand, INMac, Intel, John Deere, JRDS, Katz, Sapper & Miller CPA, Kimberly Clark, Kokomo, KSM, Landis & Gyr , Medrad, OFS, Owens Corning, Owens-Brockway, Pharma Economics, Philip Morris USA, Premier Auto Detailing, Rare Earth, Rolls-Royce, Ryerson Tull, Saint Gobain, Siemens, Subaru-Isuzu Automative, Summit Brands, Supplier Diversity, TEREX, The Chao Center, Thomson Consumer Electronics, Topy Top (Peru), US Coast Guard, Verallia, Wabash Center, Wabtec, WIRED, Wood Equipment, Zojila INDUSTRY CONFERENCE SPEAKERS: Roy Abell, Director of Quality TRW Inc. ; Charlene Adair, Vice President Rath & Strong; Paul Adler, Associate Professor of Management Organization University of Southern California; Steve Akard, Director of International Devt Indiana Economic Development Corporation; Doug Allgood, Director- Information Technology Services Great Lakes Chemical Corp.; Brion Amour, Patent Attorney Bose McKinney & Evans; Sean Anderson, Senior Procurement Manager IBM; Kent Anderson, Vice President of Business Development Indiana Economic Development Corp.; Jean-Marc Andral, General Manager General Electric Medical Systems; Craig Andrews, Director of Continuous Improvement ConAgra Foods; Kellie Antes, Supervisor, Supply Chain Planning Amway; Eyal Barash, Barash Law LLC, Endocyte, Inc. ; Sharlin Barfield, Manager, Environmental Compliance Supply Chain Management John Deere; Gary Bear, Supply Chain Planning CAT; Steven Beering, President Purdue Univeristy; Chris Berger, Professor Purdue Univeristy; Owen Bieber, President International Union; Margaret Bishop, Business consultant; Joe Blackburn, Professor Vanderbilt University; Steve Blaco, VP Operations Excellence Eaton Corporation; Chip Blatchley, Professor Purdue University; Monica Booker, Ford Motor Company; Jim Bradley, Director Ameritech Corportation; Tom Brady, Assistant Director CMME; Jerry Bronkema, Supervisor, Supply Chain Planning Amway; Kenneth Brousseau, President and Co-Founder Decision Dynamics Co.; Jim Brown, Chairman of the Local Shop Committee Detroit Diesel; Scott Brown, Partner KSM; James Brown, President Bremen Castings, Inc; Tom Brush, Professor Purdue University; Mark Burgess, Chief Information Officer Boeing Phantom Works; Morgan Burke, Athletic Director Purdue Univeristy; Ken Burns, Vice President- Business Services Purdue Univeristy; Mark Burton, Strategic Sourcing Manager John Deere; Matthew Caddell, Director of Programs Aero Engine Controls; Mike Campion, Professor Purdue University; John Cassidy, Corporate Director United Technologies Corporation; Karen Caswelch, Chief Executive Officer Akoya Inc; Charles Champion, Division Manager Eastman Kodak Company; Alok Chaturvedi, Professor Purdue Univeristy; Jim Churchman, Vice-President Supply Chain Site Operations and

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student continued & industry engagement THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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industry engagement

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


INDUSTRY CONFERENCE SPEAKERS CONT’D: Logistics Advocate Health Care ; Charles Clowdis, Managing Director HIS Global Insight; Ron Cloyd, Director New Product Introduction Rolls-Royce; Thomas Cochran, Manager Bethlehem Steel Corporation; Douglas Comer, Professor Computer Science, Purdue University; John Cone, Motorola; Jeb Conrad, President Greater Kokomo Economic Development Alliance; Mike Cooper, Professor Purdue University; Bruce Corner, Group Vice President Walker Research; Robert Corrigan, Vice President and President of Systems Technology Division IBM; Michael Crossk, Senior Value Stream Engineer AAM; Cara Curtland, Strategic Planning & Modeling HP; Bryston Cutter, Recruiting AIT The Dauch Center has been excellent in bringing knowledge and awareness to supply Manager Laboratories; chain and logistics. As the state’s initiative for logistics, we are appreciative of this Richard Dauch, awareness to students and we hope it will lead to an increase in student choosing Chairman, CEO, supply chain as a future career. President American Axle & --(David Holt, VP Operations & Business Devt, Conexus Indiana) Manufacturing; Annetta Davis, Program Manager Enerdel; Alan Degner, Commissioner Indiana Department of Workforce Development; Stacey DelVecchio , Additive Manufacturing Product Manager CAT; Julie DeWane, VP Global Supply Chain GE; Tomás Díaz, Chief Scientist & Exec. Director Purdue Discovery Park; Lia Douglas, Sr. Strategic Solutions Manager FedEx; Kevin Doyle, Environmental Manager Arcelor Mittal; Patrick Duparcq, Visiting Professor Purdue University; John Dyer, Manager, Mfg & Technology Ingersoll-Rand Corp; Tom Easterday, Executive VP Subaru of Indiana Automotive; Chip Edgington, Executive Vice President of Operations FB Brands; Cindy Emrich, Professor Purdue University; Bill Ensign, Associate Senior Procurement Agent Evonik; Cynthia Fanning, Master Black Belt GE ; Cindy Farrer, VP of Operations Allegion; Tim Fiore, Senior VP, Supply Chian Mgmt Terex Corporation; Don Foley, Direcot of Advanced Manufacturing & Logistics IEDC; Gordon Forward, President and CEO Chaparral Steel; Jan Fransoo, Purdue University; Gregory Frederickson, Oshkosch Corporation; Jonathan Freeman, Director Global Logistics Delphi; David Futa, Owner Break Rubber; Ignacio Garcia, VP Global Purchasing & Manufacturing Support Cummins; Rado Gazo, Professor Purdue University; Don Gentry, Dean School of Technology; Richard Germain, Professor University of Germany; John Gerrard, Division Manager Talent Acquisition Arcelor Mittal; Bob Glinke, Caterpillar; Gary Glinow, Ernst & Young; Robert Goehler, Corporate Director of Manufacturing IngersollRand Corp; Chris Gordon, Lead Parter - Supply Chain Management Wipro Consulting Services; Hank Grant, DirectorOperation Research and Production Systems The National Science Foundation; Stephen Green, Professor Purdue Univeristy; Edward Gresser, Director of Policy Planning, Acting Assistant USTR for Economics and Policy; Jason Gustafson, Commodity Manager IR Security & Safety Ingersoll-Rand ; Michael Haluska, Consultant ADI Corporation; Stephen Hamilton, Strategic Consultant Hewlett-Packard Co.; Larry Hanson, Director - Manufacturing Functional Excellence Cummins; Donnie Haye, VP, Smarter Supply Chain Analytics and Acquisitions IBM; Mario Hegewald, Director of Global Logistics Eaton Corporation; Grant Hellwarth, Pricewaterhouse Cooper; Russell Hillenburg, President Woven Metal Products Inc. ; David Holt, VP Operations & Business Devt Conexus IN; Jordan Howell, Supply Chain Planner Amway; Katherine Hudson, Vice President/ General Manager Professional Printing and Publishing Imaging Eastman Kodak Co.; Eduardo Huerta-Mercado, CEO Value Chain Consulting and Technology ; David Hummels, Dean and Professor of Economics Purdue University; Leroy Hunk, President/COO Harvard Industries; Gretchen Imlay, Director- Organization and Technology Levi Stauss & Co. ; Ananth Iyer, Professor Purdue University; David Janes, Electrical & Computer Engineering Purdue University; Arthur Jasen, President B. Walter & Co; Jeff Jeffrey, President & CEO IRMCO; Brian Jellison, President Von Duprin, Inc. ; Rick Johns, Kaizen Coordinator WABCO; Lou Jones, Business Measurements and System Manager Caterpiller, Inc.; Matthus Joshua, Executive Director & Global Lead Electrical Systems GM ; Karthik Kannan, Professor Purdue University; Paul Karon, Managing Partner The Entrada Group; William Kassling, Chairman of the Board Wabtec Corporation; Tom Kent, Director External Manufacturing Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Thomas Klier, Senior Economist Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Emmanuel Kodzi, GSCMI Center Researcher Purdue University; Gary Koehler, Professor Purdue Univeristy; Kurt Kovacic, IBM PLM Solutions Global Strategy Leader ; Venu Kovaichelvan, VP Human Resources TVS Motor Company; Cathie Kozik, Corporate VP for Information Motorola; Richard Kruse, Vice President of Manufacturing and Quality Assitance NCR Corporation; Scott Lake, Global Manager; Supplier Development and Risk, Agriculture and Turf Division at Deere & Company Deere & Company; Cherri Langenfeld, Manager U.S. Department of Energy; Russell Leslie, Account Executive EDS; Lee Lewellen, Vice President Central Indiana Corporate Partnership; Abby Lilly, Operational Purchasing Executive Rolls-Royce; Heather Loebner, Executive Director Arcelor Mittal; Daniel Louks, Engine Support Engineer, INDYCAR Indy Car; Adam Lowry, Method Products Inc; THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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INDUSTRY CONFERENCE SPEAKERS CONT’D: Gerald Lynch, Professor Purdue University; Greg Magnusen, Sr. Director, Global Supply Chain Eli Lilly and Company; Jan-Anders Manson, Professor Purdue University; Joseph Markun, Director, Global Quality, Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, Global Facilities Planning and Real Estate CAT; Sean Maroney, VP Product Supply Coca-Cola; Jim Marrow, plant manager Detroit Diesel; Chad Martin, Purdue University; Eric Matteson, Plant Leader, Lafayette Engine Facility GE Aviation; Thomas Mays, Senior Vice President NCR Corporation; Dennis McClain, Vice President of Coporate Quality Furnas Electric; Tina McConnell, Associate Director of Devt Purdue Univeristy; John McConnell, Professor Purdue University; Scott McConnell, Senior VP Supply Chain Genpact; Colin McCready, Manager- Global Data Warehouse Xerox; Sean McCreave, Manager, Business Support and Analytics FedEx; Mike McDaniel, VP & General Manager Owens-Brockway Closure & Specialty Products; Tom McDuffee, Vice President Human Resources Saint-Gobain ; Allison McFadden, Director, Strategy and Business Development, Integrated Supply Chain IBM; David McKinnis, Associate Vice Provost & Director Technical Assistance Program Purdue University; Kevin McNamara, Professor and Director of the Center for Rural Development, Dept of Ag Economics Purdue University; Sue Mecklenburg, VP, Sustainable Procurement Services Sustaining Coffee Communities; Ryan Menke, Senior VP Supply Chain OFS Brands, Inc; Elizabeth Menozzi, Supply Chain Manager Twitter; Joshua Merrill, Global Molecule Supply Chain Manager Dow Agro Sciences; Karl-Heinz Mertins, Director of Technologies & Operations John Deere; Rich Meyer, Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center Purdue University; Roger Miller, Eli Lilly & Company; Craig Miller, Professor - Computer Graphics Technology, College of Technology Purdue University; Michael Molnar, Director of Environmental Policy Cummins; Kae Moore, Director of Devt Purdue Univeristy; Jesse Moore, Director – Supplier Diversity Development Purdue University; Israel Moreno-Barcelo, GM CEMEX; Herbert Moskowitz, Director CMME; William Mow, Chairman and Chied Exectutive Officer Bugle Boy Industries; William Muzzillo, Manufacturing Manager GM; Alexander Nazarov, Chief Engineer - COE Cummins Inc.; Bob Nida , VP - Organizational Development Wabash National; Jim Norman, Product Marketing Manager Red Pepper Software; Pam Norman, Executive Director Indiana INTERNnet; Phillip O’Keefe, Director – Procurement Services Purdue University; Jim O’Dell, VP Ingersoll-Rand; Will Phillips, VP Technology, INDYCAR Indy Car; Brandon Pitcher, Chief Sustainability Officer 5 Kingdoms Development; Patricia Polastri, Reshoring Initiative; David Pollard, Managing Director at FedEx Customer Solutions FedEx; Lowell Puls, Operations Manager Eaton Corporation; Allan Rae, Senior Executive American Axle & Manufacturing; Jenette Ramos, VP Supply Chain Boeing; Colonel Randall, Vice Director of the 448th Supply Chain Management Wing, Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma US Air Force; Larry Rands, Vice President Space and RF Technology Iridium, Inc. ; Colin Roche, Co-Founders Pacific Writing Instruments; Ed Rounsaville, General Manager GencoATC-Becton Dickinson Site; Tomas Diaz de la Rubia, Chief Scientist & Exec. Director, Purdue Discovery Park; Theodosia Rush, Executive Director – Global Supply Chain Planning and Logistics Cummins; Doug Sabel, Director of Procurement Krannert’s DCMME program provides relevant and critical education to the Purdue University; next generation of manufacturing and supply chain leaders. As a manufacturer of Perter Santori, Partner security products, Allegion needs creative problem solvers who are comfortable Ernst & Young, Inc. ; Donald Sawyer, Vice with technology. DCMME has enriched our company with a multitude of learning President BNR, Inc.; opportunities, including conferences, events and student interactions. We Brett Schmidli, Eli congratulate the DCMME on their 30th anniversary! Lilly & Company; --(Cindy Farrer, VP Global Supply Management, Allegion) Eric Schmidt, Manager - Global Procurement Amway; Tom Schmitt, Chief Solution Oficer Federal Express; John Schneider, Assistant Vice President for Industry Research Purdue University; Karen Schultz, Business Developer Walco Tool; Leroy Schwarz, Professor Purdue Univeristy; Patsy Sebben, Manager John Deere; John Segall, Vice Chairman of Coporate Planning and Development GTE; Stephen Segebarth, Senior VP-Government Relations Sait Gobain; Richard Sepeta, Plant Manager Delphi Electronic Systems; Randal Sergesketter, Senior Vice President, Engineering, Manufacturing and Supply Management, Worldwide Construction & Forestry Division John Deere; Laura Sheets, Business Relations Manager Duke Energy; John Sheridan, Senior Editor Industry Week; Scott Singer, Director of Global Supply Chain Mgmt United Technologies Corporation; Rob Sinkhorn, Kimball International; Roy Smith, Vice President/Executive Producer MCC Corportaion; Becky Smith, Director, Global Procurement, Beauty, Personal Care, Home Care, Durables Amway; Gary Smith, LEC Supply Chain Manager CAT; Dustin Smith, Senior Vice President & General Manager, Commercial Trailer Products Wabash National Corporation; Mark Sneeringer, Manager, Consumer Technology GE; John Sofia, V.P. Engineering & Product Development American Axle &

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industry engagement THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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industry engagement

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INDUSTRY CONFERENCE SPEAKERS CONT’D: Manufacturing; Alexandra Sokel, Supply Chain Analyst, Corporate Planning Allocations Arcellor Mittal; James Solberg, Director of Engineering Research Center Industrial Engineering; Eugene Spafford, Director CERIAS; Dan Spellman, VP Logistics Development & Supply Chain Management Caterpiallar; Venu Srinivasan, CEO TVS Motor Company; Craig Stariha, Director Philip Morris, USA; Dave Stevenson, Design Engineer Caterpiller, Inc.; Roger Stewart, Professor Krannert School Of Management ; Marc Stoken, General Manager – Raw Materials, North America USS (United Steel Corp); William Strauss, Senior Economist & Economic Advisor Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Bill Strauss, Senior Economist and Economic Advisor Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Srisu Subrahmanyam, Vice President, Global Engineering Ingram Micro; Charlene Sulivan, Professor Purdue Univeristy; John Sullivan, Director and Professor of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering Purdue University; Doug Sunkel, Director of Americas Parts Distribution Cummins; Richard Sussman, GM ArcelorMittal; Jen Tang, Professor Purdue University; Richard Teerlink, President Harley Davidson Inc; Jeffrey Tew, GM Enterprise Systems Lab; Joe Tiller, Head Football Coach Purdue University; Graham Toft, Thomas P. Miller & Associates; Bill Tulski, IBM; Arthur Tweet, Xerox; Matthew VanHoosier, Director Supply Chain Evonik; Roy Vasher, Former Executive Toyota Motor Company; Gus Vassiliades, Director IMB Corportae; Dwayne Walker, Director Worldwide Solutions Providers Marketing & Sales, Microsoft; Peter Walters, VP of Purchasing & Distribution Saint-Gobain ; Jim Ward, Professor Purdue Univeristy; James Ward, Professor Purdue University; Thomas Ward, VP Integrated Supply Chain Air Products; Denny Warner, Vice President Customer Operations Rolls-Royce; Tenney Way, Procurement Manager Bectel; Dennis Weidenaar, Dean Krannert School Of Management ; Willian Weiss, Chairman and Chief Exectutive Officer Ameritech Corportation; Ed Weston, Director Great Lakes WIND Network; William Wiggenhorn, President/ Corporate Vice President of Coporate Quality Motorola Inc. ; David Williard, Manager of Production Planning Evonik; John Wilson, Senior Staff Officer-National Research Council National Academy of Sciences; Jane Wilson, Managing Director Berkshire Partners; Carolyn Woo, Professor Krannert School Of Management ; Henry Yang, Dean Schools of Engineering; Brent Yeagy, Group President, Commercial Trailer Products Wabash National Corp; Alex Zelikovsky, COO Baker Street Solutions LLC; Robert Zokoe, Manager Materials & Logistics American Axle & Manufacturin INDUSTRY CONFERENCE AFFILIATES: 3M, A to Z Sheet Metal Inc., Accuburn Inc., Advanced Cutting Systems, Advocate Health Care, Aero Industries, Affect Partners LLC, AGCO Corporation, AIMMS Technology, AIT Bioscience, Alcoa Inc., ALLEGIENT LLC, Allegion, PLC, Allied Precision Machine Inc., Allison Transmission, Altex Inc, Amaco, Amazon, Amber Road , American Axle & Manufacturing, American Transport Group, LLC, American Woodmark Corporation, Amica Mutual Insurance Company, Amway Corporation, Antra Inc., APICS, Apple, Aptuit, ArcelorMittal, Arconic, Ardagh Group, Ardagh Group, Ariel Corporation, Artisan Machine & Break Rubber Technologies, Associated Materials, AT Kearney, Author Solutions, B. Walter & Co., Inc., Backhaul Direct, Bane-Welker Equipment, Bank of America, Banneker Industries, Inc, Batesville A Hildenbrand

Congratulations to DCMME on 30 successful years of promoting education, research and engagement at Purdue and beyond. Discovery Park has established a strong partnership with the Dauch Center and we have collaborated on a number of matters related to advanced manufacturing principles and the management of emerging technologies. Their interdisciplinary work in those areas has been very complementary to our own. I had the honor of speaking at the 2015 DCMME Fall Meeting and have been thrilled to work with such an important organization here on campus. Boiler Up! --(Tomas Diaz de la Rubia, Chief Scientist & Exec. Director, Purdue Discovery Park) Industry, Bechtel Global Corporation, Bell Machine Co., Beulah,Inc, Bingham McHale LLP, BioConvergence LLC, Biomet, Inc, BNSF Railway, Boeing, Brake Supply Co. ., BRAQ Aerospace LLC , Braun Corporation, Bremen Castings, Bridgestone, Business Technology Consulting, Business Transformation KAR Auction Services, Inc., Cameron Subsea Systems, Cardinal Ethanol LLC, Cardinal Health, Cargill, Carlisle & Company, Inc., Carmel Engineering Inc., Cartesian Corp, Caterpillar, Inc., CGN Global, Chase Bank, Chevron Corporation, Cives Steel Co., Clark Truck Equipment Co., CloudOne, CNH America LLC, Coca-Cola, Cognizant Technology Solutions, Colfax Corporation, Columbus Learning Center, ConAgra Foods, Conexus Indiana, Contract Services Group, Controls and Data Services, Cornerstone OnDemand, Coyote Logistics, CPM Holdings, CR Bard, Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., CSCMP (Council of Supply Chain Management Professsionals), CSX, Cummins Inc., Cushman & Wakefield/Summit, Custom Machine Shop, CVS/Pharmacy, Danaher Corporation, Dekker Vacuum Technologies, Inc., Deliotte, Dell, Delphi Corporation, DICOR CORPORATION, INC., DISH Network, LLC, Dow AgroSciences, DPC Delphi Products, Duke Energy, Dunham Rubber & Belting Corp, Dwyer Instruments Inc. , Dyna-Fab, Dyna-Fab Corp, Eaton THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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industry engagement & faculty

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INDUSTRY CONFERENCE AFFILIATES CONT’D: Corporation, Elanco, Eli Lilly & Company, Emerson, Emirates, Endocyte Inc., Enhanced Technology Services, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Entrada Group, Envista, Eon Reality, Inc., ESHA Inc, Estes Design and Manufacturing, Inc., Eureka Ranch International, Evonik Corporation, Exacq Technologies inc, Excel Tool & Engineering, ExperienceWorks, Fairfield Manufacturing, FBG Consulting, FedEx, Ferguson, a Wolseley Company, Fineline Printing Group, Finish Line INC., Firestone building products, FLNA - Frankfort Core, Focus Hope, Ford Motor Company, Foreign Targets , Fort Wayne Metals, Franciscan St. Elizabeth Hospital, French Knot, Full Beauty Brands, GAIN Systems, Garmong Construction, Garrity Tool Company, Gartner, Gartner Research, Gaylor Electric, Inc, GE, Genco, General Mills, General Motors, Genpact, Girtz Industries Inc., GKN Freight Services, Globe Manufacturing Inc, Goodwill Industries, Google, Great Lakes WIND Netork, Greater Kokomo Economic Development Alliance, Greater Lafayette Chamber of Commerce, Hallstar, Harrison Steel Castings Co., HBM Holdings, Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, Henriott Group, Heritage Product Inc., Hewitt Molding, Inc., Hewlett-Packard Company , Hill-Rom, Hobbico, Honeywell International, Hormel Foods Corporation, HP, Huntingburg Airport (Dubois County), IBM, ICG Commerce, INDesign, LLC, Indiana Economic Development Corporation, Indiana State (INDOT), Indiana Steel Fabricating Inc., INDYCAR,Verizon IndyCar Series, Infelction Point, INC, Ingersoll Rand, Ingram Micro Mobility, Insight Global, Inc., InVentrek Technology Park, Jack Gray Transport, Inc., Jacobson Companies, Inc., John Deere & Company, Johnson & Johnson, Johnson Controls Corp (WI), JRDS, JSI, JTEKT Corp, Kappa Search, Inc., Katz, Sapper & Miller, Kellog Company, KEM KREST CORP., Keyence Corporation of America, Kimberly Clark Corporation, Kirby Risk Corporation, Kohl’s Department Stores, Inc., Lafayette Quality Products Inc., Lafayette Steel & Aluminum, Lafayette Wire Products Inc., LaGrange County Economic Development Corporation, Laketronics, Land O Lakes, LC Problem-Solving Academy Inc, LEAD Management Consulting, LeanCPI, Lenex Steel Company, LEP Special Fasteners Inc., Letv Sports , Liberty Mutual Insurance, Lippert Components Inc, Llamasoft, inc, LMC Workholding , Lockheed Martin, Logan Stampings Inc., Lushin, Inc, Maplehurst Bakeries LLC, MasterBrand Cabinets, Inc, MatterFab, Mavpak, McKinney Corp, Meijer, Meritor, MESH SYSTEMS LLC, Microsoft, Mier Products, Inc, MRP Inc., Myers Spring Co., Myers Steel Fabricating, MyWay Logistics LLC, National Oilwell Varco, Navistar, NCR Corporation, NeoGrid, Nestle USA Inc. , NetSuite, NHK Seating of America Inc., Nor1, Northrop Grumman Corporation, Northside Machine & Tool Inc., Northwest Mutual Financial Network, Nucor Steel, Oerlikon Fairfield, Olayan Group, Oliver Wight Americas, OPSVeda, Oscar Winski Company, Inc, Oshkosh Corporation, OTIS Elevator Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Partners for Workforce Solutions, Peerless Pattern & Machine Co., Peoples Brewery , PepsiCo, Performance Master Coil , Perrigo, Personix, Pfizer Inc , Phillips 66, Plymouth Tube Co., POLARIS LABORATORIES LLC, POOLCORP, Pratt & Whitney, Praxis Life Sciences, LyoGo LLC, PRCD, Procter & Gamble, Project 44, PTI Machining Inc., Pyromation, Inc, Quaker Foods and Snacks, Ramsey Pyrotechnics, Inc, Rapid Ratings International, Raybestos Products Co., Raytheon Company , Rees, Inc., Roche Diagnostics , Rockwell Automation, Rolls Royce, RPV Consulting, LLC, SAS , Schneider Logistics, Schneider National, Inc., Scholle Corporation, Sears Holdings, Seel Jackson Consulting;LLC, Shell Oil Company, Shorr Packaging Corp., Shuttleworth, Inc. , Small Parts Inc., Snyder & Lehnen Sheet Metal, Softeon, Sommer Metalcraft Corp., Southwire Co., St Jude Medical, Starbucks, Stratosphere Quality, Stryker Corporation, Subaru Of Indiana Automotive, Summit Brands, SunOpta, SUNY Plattsburgh, SUS Cast Products, System Concepts & Consulting, Inc., T & L Sharpening Inc., TASC, Tate & Lyle CAPEX, The Clorox Company, The Kelly Group, The Phoenix Group, The Procter & Gamble Company, Thomas P. Miller and Associates, Thor Industries, Inc. , Thyssenkrupp Materials, TMF, Total Quality Logistics, Toyota, Transportation Devt Group LLC, TransWorks, Tri-Esco Inc. John Wolff, TriMedx, Tronox, TRW Automotive, Tube Fabrication Industries, TVS Motor, U.S. Coast Guards, U.S. Steel Corporation, Unilever, Union Pacific Railroad, United Airlines, United States Steel Corporation, UPS, US Air Force, USTR for Economics & Policy, Valley Tool & Stamping Inc., Value Chain Consulting & Technology, VanTech, Verallia, Vicksmetal, Viskase, Wabash center, Wabash National, WALCO Tool & Engineering, Walgreens, WESCO, West Monroe Partners, Whallon Machinery Inc, Whallon Machinery Inc., Whirlpool Corporation, Wistron Mobile Solutions, Woven Metal Products, Inc, XPO Logistics Supply Chain, ZF Services North America, LLC, Zojila FACULTY AFFILIATES: Brad Alge, Kemal Altinkemer, Adem Atmaz, Mark Bagnoli, Gemma Berenguer, Arnab Bisi, Tom Brady, Tom Brush, John Burr, Suresh Chand, Wan Chiu, Rick Cosier, Amy David, Prabuddha De, Roy Dejoie, Vinayak Deshpunde, Brian Dineen, Ben Dunford, Steve Dunlop, Annabelle Feng, Ted Goodman, Huseyin Gulen, Dan Hirleman, Michael Hoech, Yu Hu , David Hummels, Ananth Iyer, Julia Kalish, Manu Kalwani, Karthik Kannan, Sang-Phil Kim, Emmanuel Kodzi, Deanna Kolar, Ellen Kossek, Michael Kregar, Jia Li, Yanjun Li, Mengshi Lu, Fabrice Lumineau, Jill Lynn, Jesse Moore, Herb Moskowitz, Seoung Pil, Mary Pilotte, Cara Putman, Karthik Ramani, Bill Robinson, Yaroslav Rosokha, Stefano Rossi, Miguel Sarzosa, Steve Shade, George Shanthikumar, Pengyi Shi, Svenja Sommer, John Sullivan, John Sutherland, Jen Tang, Mohit Tawarmalani THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

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...

“AS ALWAYS, DESPITE ADVERSITY AND HARD TIMES, I CONTINUE TO BELIEVE IN THE FUTURE...FOR U.S. MANUFACTURING AND FOR OUR COUNTRY”

T H E A M E R I CAN DR EAM

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E is THE GREATEST DREAM THE N WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. We have some MOUNTAINS to climb, some

OCEANS to navigate, and some VALLEYS to get through, but we will survive and prosper.

It will sustain us and the future generations for a long time to come. ...GOD BLESS AMERICA!” -Richard E. Dauch, “American Drive”

Melvin Durai: Writer Katie Kronberg: Style Editor and Writer Heidi Allwes: Graphic Designer; Project Director

THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

Thank you to all of our contributing center graduate assistants, industry, faculty, and staff.

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current DCMME staff

ANANTH IYER DIRECTOR, DCMME

aiyer@purdue.edu

STEVEN DUNLOP MANAGING DIRECTOR, DCMME

dunlops@purdue.edu

HEIDI ALLWES CENTER COORDINATOR

hallwes@purdue.edu

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THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

a special thanks to: Heidi Allwes, graphic designer, project director Melvin Durai, contributing writer Katie Kronberg, copy editor


THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME


THIRTY YEARS OF DCMME

Dcmme 30years  

For thirty years the DCMME Center (Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises ) has been the focal point within the Kranne...

Dcmme 30years  

For thirty years the DCMME Center (Dauch Center for the Management of Manufacturing Enterprises ) has been the focal point within the Kranne...

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