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From the CO: NFAAS app Page 3

Get to know AIR 4.6 Pages 6 & 7

Around Town

July 30, 1942 WAVES — Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service — established

Page 10 NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND

VOLUME 70, NUMBER 30

Celebrating 70 years of community partnership

August 1, 2013

Keeping it professional Pax River workplaces inspected for offensive materials By Donna Cipolloni Tester staff writer By way of fleetwide message ALNAV 038/13, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus mandated inspection of all Department of Navy workplaces and common areas to ensure they are free from materials that create a degrading, hostile or offensive work environment. Following the guidelines of the June 7 directive, supervisory personnel Navywide had until July 12 to conduct inspections and report the results to SECNAV, including the amount and type of material found, the location where it was discovered, and how it was removed. Areas inspected around Naval Air Station Patuxent River included office buildings, hangars, ready rooms,

conference rooms, individual offices and cubicles, storage rooms, workshops, break rooms, bathrooms, common spaces and recreation areas. “Supervisors conducted a comprehensive visual inspection of their areas,” explained JP Thomasseau, deputy public works officer, describing the process that took place at Public Works, building 508. “Anything they could see when they walked into an office or cubicle — including screensavers — was open to inspection; and they went cube by cube, space by space.” Inspectors in the NAS Administration Building, building 409, did much the same thing. “The inspection here was conducted June 12 while people were at work,” said NAS Command Master Chief

William Lloyd-Owen. “They looked for anything that seemed inappropriate in plain sight; no drawers or computers were opened.” At Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1, the hangar was divided into four zones with two officers and two chief petty officers assigned to inspect each zone. “We removed a couple of unprofessional posters and a book,” said Command Master Chief Michelle Lewis. “We found some writing on the wall in the male head, and the slogan on the [Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor] posters was viewed as unprofessional, so we removed them.” Nothing overtly crude or pornographic was discovered anywhere across the installation and most of what was removed included question-

Recycling: A commitment to preserve By Frederick C. Fair Naval Air Station Patuxent River Public Affairs volunteer One sure method of preserving Mother Earth is to be an active user of the recycling options offered by many organizations. In some neighborhoods you’ll find conspicuous colored bins for recycling collection to include paper, plastics and more, while Naval Air Station Patuxent River offers indoor and outdoor storage bins and receptacles for reusable’s. At the Tester, we take recycling seriously. There are approximately 15,000 new issues of the Tester delivered to the base each week to more than 100 locations. So, what happens to the old Testers once they’re replaced every Thursday with its new edition? John Rives, publisher for Comprint Military Publications, is in charge of printing the Tester newspapers, and he has embraced a recycling program for the

able cartoons, office/political humor, magazines, photos, unsuitable calendars and an inappropriate remark on a status board, said Lloyd-Owen. Inspections will continue at least once per year, as directed by the ALNAV message, which also stated that all DON personnel shall be treated with dignity and respect, and that a command climate free of all forms of unlawful discrimination, including sexual harassment, is essential to maintaining high morale, good order, discipline and readiness. “More than anything else, it’s about awareness,” Thomasseau said. “It’s not supposed to be ‘let me scrub my office before the next inspection.’ The whole point is to raise awareness so people might think twice before hanging something up at all; or, if something does pop up, a supervisor will know they have

U.S. Navy photo by Donna Cipolloni

Photos and personal items displayed in workspaces by employees across Naval Air Station Patuxent River cannot be indecorous or offensive in nature. Anything questionable may be removed by supervisory personnel. the right to question it or pull it down and get a review to see whether or not it stays down.

“We need a professional workplace where no one feels uncomfortable,” he said.

Navy Supply Corps Foundation tees up for American Cancer Society

Courtesy photo by Christopher Grensted

Roughly 3 percent of Tester newspapers are recycled each week; 24,500 copies annually. Tester that he says “spans more than 10 years.” Once all outdated newspapers are collected, roughly 500 each week, they are brought back to Comprint’s Laural, Md., facility for recycling, Rives said. This amounts to approximately 24,500 copies recycled annually. Although this might

seem miniscule, Rives said it saves Comprint $100 per year on the Tester newspaper alone; Comprint is the publisher for all military newspapers within the region. Rives said he also appreciates the additional

See Recycle, Page 8

U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Gilberto Penserga

The Navy Supply Corps Foundation — Patuxent River Chapter presents a $4,000 donation to the American Cancer Society on July 19, proceeds from its 13th Annual Captain Edward Morgan Memorial Charity Golf Classic held at the Cedar Point Golf Course in May. Capt. Edward Morgan was a Supply Corps Officer stationed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River when he lost his battle to cancer 13 years ago. Since then, military officers, active duty and retired, have come together to pay tribute to their Shipmate and raise money to make a difference in his name. More than 100 players, 20 sponsors and hosts, joined Morgan’s wife, Glenda, his daughter, April, and others at this year’s event.


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This week’s best AE1 Beans graduates with honors Pax Pros of the Week are submitted to and selected by the naval air station’s Command Master Chief William Lloyd-Owen. The certificates serve as recognition for the individual’s “hard work and dedication” displayed on a daily basis.

Courtesy photos

Petty Officer 1st Class Gregory P. Bogosian, right, the naval air station command quarter deck; presented July 17. Bogosian is a gas turbine system technician (mechanical).

Marvie McCrimmon, Fleet and Family Readiness secretary; presented July 17.

By Donna Cipolloni Tester staff writer It was a long and arduous road, but Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class Cory Beans finally reached the end of the journey when he graduated with honors from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, July 26. September will mark Beans’ 10th year in the Navy and back in 2006, with aspirations of becoming a naval officer one day, he began the pursuit to further his education. “I started my college venture in San Diego attending a community college off and on between deployments from 2006 to 2010,” Beans explained. “After transferring to [Naval Air Station Patuxent River], I contacted Embry-Riddle to transfer the credits I’d accumulated and start their Bachelors of Science in Technical Management degree program.” Beans, who is assigned to Fleet Readiness Center MidAtlantic, was a Sailor by day and a student by night — and did his best to be a husband to his wife, Jessica, and a dad to their two boys, Aiden and Corbin, 5 and 2 years old respectively. However, as his wife explained, pursuing his degree while on active duty impacted the family in more ways than one, from financial sacrifices to the amount of personal time they could spend together. “It wasn’t always easy,” Jessica said. “His classes were in the evenings and often on Saturdays. Many nights after work he’d have to go straight upstairs to do schoolwork or go straight to class, and there were many conflicts with social events where he’d have to leave early or miss them. He’s the one who actually sacrificed the most.” Beans sees things differently. “Jessica has made this momentous achievement possible,” he said. “She picked up the slack in the household duties, parenting events and the everyday whirlwind when I was unable to assist due to academic commitments. And my boys had to give up valuable daddy time so that this could be done.” Beans is the first member of his family to have graduated college and Jessica knows his accomplishment will have an impact on their own family. “[Our sons] are old enough to understand what daddy has done,” she said. “They saw how hard he worked and I believe his dedication has instilled in them the importance of sacrificing for what you want to achieve. Their dad is their hero and I believe their seeing him in his cap and gown at such an impressionable age will be a powerful image for them.” When asked what advice he’d give other Sailors considering pursuing a degree, Beans said that while there may be sacrifice up front, in the end, a degree can only help you to grow personally and professionally, opening doors for

Courtesy photo

Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class Cory Beans holds 2-year-old Corbin while Aiden,5, flashes the thumbs-up after their dad graduated with honors from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University on July 26. Beans earned his degree after seven years of juggling evening classes, deployments and family. officer programs and earning points toward advancement. “The knowledge you’ll gain will be instrumental in your ability to lead your Sailors better and make you more of an asset to your command,” he said. “Also, when you decide to depart the military, your experience coupled with a college degree will be a very effective self-marketing tool and can open doors to great careers.” Now that he’s earned his degree — something he’d always wanted to do — Beans looks forward to some personal freedom. “I finally have time to spend with my family, which is very important to me,” he said. “My wife and boys mean the world to me and, as a family, we just accomplished one

Slip, slop, slap and wrap: Sun safety keeps burns at bay By Patrick Gordon Naval District Washington Waterline writer Summer is well underway bringing more and more people outside to enjoy outdoor activities. Whether that means going to the beach, camping in the woods or working in the yard, safety must be kept in mind to keep injuries at a minimum. One threat that may be overlooked though looms all day: the sun. Clear skies and warm temperatures expected through the end of the week will bring a lot of people out to enjoy the weather, but precaution must be taken when dealing with the sun’s rays. “Slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, slap on a hat and wrap on sunglasses whenever you go outdoors,” cautioned Mindy Ashton, a registered nurse with the Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River’s health promotion and wellness department. And the younger one is taught these simple steps, the better, Ashton said. “One in five children will grow up to get skin cancer,” she added. “Don’t let your child be the one. Begin lifelong sun protection habits.” The U.S. Navy Safety Center has a number of resources available to help prevent over exposure to the sun. Among

them is the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) “Sun Wise” action plan for sun safety and education. According to Sun Wise, not only can overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun result in painful sunburn, “it can also lead to more serious health problems, premature aging of the skin, cataracts and other eye damage, and immune system suppression.” To avoid problems associated with sun overexposure, the Sun Wise action plan advises against staying in the sun for extended periods of time and to never use tanning beds due to their UV radiation risk. And, as Ashton said, slop on sunscreen to all exposed skin. Sun Wise recommends doing so 15 minutes before going outside and then reapplying every two hours and after swimming or sweating. Additionally, sunscreen should have a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 and provide broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. But, even with sunscreen applied, further protection should be taken such as wearing a shirt, hat and sunglasses when outdoors, Ashton said. Another important step is to become familiar with the UV index, according to Sun Wise. This provides important information on the strength of the sun’s harmful rays to help plan outdoor activities in ways that prevent sun over-

Courtesy photo

One in five children grow up to get skin cancer. Learning habits early on is key to sun safety. exposure; the higher the number, the greater the chance of sun damage. The UV Index forecast is issued daily by the National Weather Service and EPA. This is especially important for those with children, since children, especially infants, are at greater risk for overexposure to UV radiation. For more information on summer safety, visit http:// safetycenter.navy.mil/. Connie Hempel, Naval Air Station Patuxent River Public Affairs Office, contributed to this article.


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Job well done

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From the CO:

NFAAS tool enhances a ready Navy

Bravo Zulu awards are presented to naval air station employees who receive positive feedback and comments through the Interactive Customer Evaluation system for going above their normal duty.

By Capt. Ben Shevchuk Naval Air Station Patuxent River commanding officer

Courtesy photos

Melissa Daugherty, catering manager with the River’s Edge Catering and Conference Center.

Child Development Center staff.

Hurricane season is upon us and so is the heat! I hope everyone enjoys a safe summer while also preparing for any serious weather that may come to our area. To be a ready Navy, everyone needs to stay informed. ReadyNavy.gov is a helpful way for Sailors and their family to get information and be prepared before, during and after a disaster. The Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) is another valuable tool that leaders use to quickly account for their Sailors and families. In May, a hurricane exercise (HURREX) called Citadel Gale 13 was held throughout Naval District Washington to put our readiness to the test. It also looked at our commu-

nications and accountability system. The exercise revealed that access to NFAAS via a desktop work computer was sporadic and that not enough Sailors were aware of the NFAAS mobile app or NFAAS mobile website. We recognize that intermittent availability of NFAAS makes it a less than effective means of accountability and Navy leaders are working to resolve that issue. But, Sailors can still use the NFAAS mobile app and NFAAS mobile website as a means of helping with accountability even when NMCI is having problems. IPhone users can download the NFAAS app onto their mobile device from the Apple App Store. An app is being developed for other smartphones. All smartphone users, including those with iPhones, can access the NFAAS mobile website by going to https://navyfamily.navy.mil on their phone. The mobile website is a minimized ver-

The Navy’s accountably tool goes mobile. sion of NFAAS that is easier to view and navigate while using a mobile device. Thanks for taking time to carefully consider how to be ready and responsive when storms come to Southern Maryland or anywhere the Navy takes you.

Energy Saving Tip: Share the Air Keep air vents clean by ensuring furniture and other items are away from heating and cooling vents — both supply and return. Restricted airflow causes inefficient operation, reduced comfort, increased noise and decreased reliability of heating and cooling systems.

River’s Edge Catering and Conference Center staff.

News Briefs On base:

Services Change in Hours During Furlough

The following services are altered beginning July 8 and running through Sept. 30, unless otherwise noted. Commissary: Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Drill Hall Indoor Pool: Closed when Outdoor Pool is open. Indoor Pool reopens Sept. 3. Gate 1 Pass Office: Closed until further notice. HAZMAT: 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. weekdays. Gate 3: Open 5:30-8:30 a.m. for inbound and outbound traffic weekdays. Closed in the afternoon, weekends and holidays. Personal Property, building 588, 1st floor: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays; closed on Fridays. Personnel Support Activity services: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; CAC/ID card service hours will not change. Pharmacy refills: Requests made before 3 p.m. are ready in five business days; requests made after 3 p.m. are ready in six working days. Working days are Monday through Friday, except holidays. All prescriptions not picked up after 14 days are discarded. Refill requests can be made online at www.bethesda.med.navy.mil/refill, or by phone at 800377-1723. Supply Warehouse shipping and receiving, building 665: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays Eddie’s eateries in buildings 2185, 2187, 2805 and 2118: Closed on Fridays River’s Edge dining room daily lunch program, Midway Bar and the River’s Edge Bald Eagle Pub: Closed on Fridays

Limited services at clinic, pharmacy

Aug. 2 The pharmacy, lab and radiology will close at noon Friday. The rest of clinic is open, but there will be reduced availability.

Clinic ‘Tweets’

Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River is now on Twitter. Stay up to date on closures and changes by following: #nhcpaxriver.

Navy Exchange Hours

The Navy Exchange (NEX) is not affected by the furlough. NEX hours are: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays and holidays.

Windmills Training Postponed

Naval Air Systems Command’s national training in support of employees with disabilities, known as the Windmills Training Program, has been postponed because of the impact of furlough on attendance. The training at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, originally scheduled for July 30 to Aug. 1, has been deferred to Oct. 29-31. Employees will receive more information with details and registration instructions at a later date. Call the NAVAIR Wounded Warrior Program at 800-7879804 or NAVAIRWoundedWarrior@navy.mil.

Where’s Gnorman?

Somewhere in this issue we’ve hidden Gnorman the gnome. Be the first to call in his location and receive one Center Stage Theater movie ticket; good for any Center

Stage movie. The same person cannot win more than once a month. Calls are only accepted between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Fridays. Call the Tester staff at 301-342-4163. Last week’s winner was Esperanza Guzman.

5K/10K run for LEAD Scholarships

Aug. 10, 8 a.m. Cedar Point Golf Club This is event is held by Leadership Southern Maryland, in cooperation with Women in Defense Chesapeake Bay Chapter. Proceeds benefit the WID and LSM’s LEAD Youth Leadership Scholarship funds. Preregistration is available online at www. active.com/event_detail.cfm?event_id=2094890. Registration is available on race day beginning at 6:30 a.m.

CAC/ID Card office at PSD closed

Aug. 22 and 23 CAC/ID card services on these dates will still be available at Gate 2.

2013 Women’s Equality Day Luncheon

Aug. 27, 11:30 a.m. River’s Edge Catering and Conference Center This year’s theme is “Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics,” and the luncheon features guest speaker Veronica Villalobos, the director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Office of Personnel Management. Tickets are $20 prior to Aug. 9, and $25 after Aug. 9. Contact: Lottie Briscoe, 301-342-7075; Jeannie Facemire, 301-342-0090; Laura Martin, 301-995-4018; Margelyn Massey, 301-757-6451; Debi Therrien, 301-995-2806.


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Thursday, August 1, 2013

PMA-231 earns environmental safety award

FFSC launches monthly ‘Money Talks Corner’

The Environment, Safety and Occupational Health (ESOH) team belonging to the E-2/C-2 Airborne Tactical Data System Program Office (PMA-231) accepted their second Environmental Award via video teleconference from the Chief of Naval Operations on July 11. The team was awarded for its development of several pollution-preventing and energy-conserving initiatives, including a lighting management program, building automation, water conservation program and several material substitutions.

Commentary by Jim Walsh Fleet and Family Support Center Personal Financial Manager

Courtesy photo

U.S. Navy photo by Curtis Cook

Proven quality with NAWCAD certification

William Houser, left, representing the registrar of Bureau Veritas, presents Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s Aircraft and Prototype Systems Division Head Chad Miller with the aerospace standard AS9100C certification during a ceremony at the Naval Air Station Patuxent River beach house July 16. The certification provides customers with quality management assurance and allows the division to be on level with industry.

U.S. Navy photo by Gary Younger

Meritorious Service Plaque for Pierce

Bill Pierce, left, receives a plaque containing a Meritorious Civilian Service award from Todd Balazs, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Logistics and Industrial Operations (AIR-6.0) deputy assistant commander, during a presentation July 16. Pierce is the director of NAVAIR’s Maintenance and Supply Integration Division (AIR-6.7).

lies work towards managing finances, resolve financial problems and reach long-term goals: getting an education, buying a home, planning for retirement. Reduce money-related stress and overcome the financial challenges of military life. Make an appointment with a counselor by calling 301-342-5442.

Playgroup at Glenn Forest Community Center Thursdays, 10-11 a.m.

Military Spouse 101 (refresher) All classes are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Classes are open to active-duty, retired and reserve military. Call 301-342-4911 for more information on classes, programs and to register. Registration for classes is necessary.

Aug. 1, 11-11:30 a.m. Held every first Thursday of the month, this informal gathering offers discussions on life as a new spouse, a spouse new to the Pax area, and an opportunity to meet other spouses to form that all-important network of support. Call 301-342-4911 for meeting location.

Financial Counseling Services

Sponsor Training

The Personal Financial Educator at FFSC can help fami-

This month is the first of the Fleet and Family Support Center’s (FFSC) monthly “Money Talks Corner,” an outlet where anonymous readers from around the installation can get answers to various financial questions. While subjects can include credit, debt, home ownership, money management, retirement, estate planning and more, questions selected for response will be those that are most helpful and relative to the largest group of people. About me I have been the Personal Financial Manager at the FFSC since October 2011, helping service members, their families and retirees. I provide education, counseling, information and referrals to military personnel, their families and commands to increase personal, family and operational readiness. A primary means of providing this is to train, educate and support Command Financial Specialists (CFS) in each command. They in turn serve as the command’s principal advisor on policies and matters related to personal financial issues. My educational background includes a Master in Finance with a concentration in Personal Financial Planning. I have completed the course work and testing for Certified Financial Planner and have met the requirements for Accredited Financial Counselor. During the last 10 years of my 26 year Navy career, I served as the Command Special Assistant for Personal Finance to commanding officers. What’s your question? The article is scheduled to run the last Tester issue of each month. Submit questions to james.walsh1.ctr@navy. mil and include “Money Talks Question” in the subject line. This training is for active-duty service members who have been assigned to “sponser” another active-duty service member slated to arrive at this duty location.

Command Financial Specialist Training

Aug. 5-9, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. CFS training provides financial education and training for individuals to provide counseling and information referral at the command level. To qualify for CFS training, candidates must be an E-6 or higher, highly motivated and financially stable. Trained individuals represent their command and provide education at the command level. Free class; local orders are not required.

Wild Side of Pax

Aug. 6, 8-11 a.m. For kids 8 to 98! Come see the best-kept secrets on Pax

See FFSC, Page 5

Aug. 5, 9-10 p.m.

Naval Air Station Patuxent River • tester@dcmilitary.com • www.facebook.com/NASPaxRiver The name Tester is a registered mark in the state of Maryland. This paper is published by Comprint, Inc., 9030 Comprint Ct., Gaithersburg, Md. 20877, (301) 948-1520, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval District Washington. This commercial enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the Tester are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication,

Capt. Ben Shevchuk

Commanding Officer

Capt. Heidi Fleming Executive Officer

Cmd. Master Chief William Lloyd-Owen

Command Master Chief

including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or Southern Maryland Newspapers and Printing of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected.

Connie Hempel

Public Affairs Officer

Donna Cipolloni Staff Writer

Breton Helsel and Deirdre Parry

Copy/layout editors

Editorial content is edited, prepared, and provided by the Public Affairs Office. News copy should be submitted by Friday to be considered for the following week’s edition. All material is edited for accuracy, brevity, clarity, and conformity to regulations. To inquire about news copy, call 301-342-4163 or fax the Tester at 301-8639296.

Commercial advertising may be placed with the publisher by calling 301-862-2111.

Frederick C. Fair Volunteer

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Thursday, August 1, 2013

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will hang out afterwards to help you style your own Zumba T-shirt. Bring a T-shirt and scissors. Zumba classes can be purchased at the Fitness and Sports Office in the Drill Hall.

Outdoor Film Fest at NRC Solomons

For all MWR news, visit www.cnic.navy. mil/Patuxent and click on Fleet and Family Readiness. Rassieur Youth Center - 301-342-1694 Energy Zone - 301-995-3869 NRC Solomons - 410-286-8365 Intramural Sports - 301-757-3943 Customized Creations - 301-342-3569

School Age Care Registration

Registration must be done at the Rassieur Youth Center, call 301-342-4498 for more information. Registration schedule: Aug. 2 and 5, current SAC patrons and new military, Aug. 8, new DOD civilians, and Aug. 12, new contractors.

Zumba T-shirt Workshop

Aug. 3 After the 10 a.m. Zumba class, instructors

FFSC

Continued from 4 River. Meet at FFSC and caravan to the Natural Resource Center to see and hear about the base wild life from the experts.

Interviewing Techniques

Aug. 6, 1-4 p.m. Prepare for your upcoming job interview by practicing personal presentation skills such as answering common interview questions, writing follow-up and thank-you letters, and negotiating job offers.

Welcome to Pax

Aug. 7, 9-11 a.m. Take a windshield tour of the NAS Patuxent River complex and attend a class jampacked with information about the base and surrounding communities. A local information packet is provided.

Differences between Saving and Investing (brown bag)

Aug. 7, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This single session introduces the basic guidelines and terminology to enable participants to save and invest wisely. Explore various investment options and learn which instrument best suits you and your individual goals.

Smooth Move — Home or Abroad

Aug. 8, 9-10 a.m. This class is designed for those moving anywhere in the U.S. or overseas. Receive expert information about travel and pay, household goods shipments, stress management, budgeting for your move, housing concerns, moving with kids, cultural adaptation, plus specific overseas information.

Stress Management

Aug. 9, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Stress is a part of life. In this class you will understand how your beliefs and thought process has an impact on how you deal with stress. Participants will walk away with specific actions to manage stress that they can incorporate into their life immediately.

Aug. 5-8, 9 p.m. “The Wacky World of Dr. Seuss:” The Grinch, Cat in the Hat, Horton Hears a Who and The Lorax; four nights of movies on outdoor screen at Lighthouse Park. Each series features a different theme.

2013 Intramural Flag Football League Organizational Meeting

Aug. 5, 1 p.m., Bowling Center Intramural programs are open to activeduty and retired military, fitness and sports members, and family members. Kick off for the season is the week of Sept. 2

Card Making Basics

Aug. 8, 5-7 p.m. Discover card making in this hands-on class. Class includes card design, materials and complexity. Beginners thru advanced crafters are welcome and encouraged. Cost is $10 plus a $5 material fee; all supplies are included for making four full cards. Register at Customized Creations.

Return and Reunion

Aug. 13, 1-4 p.m. This class is designed to facilitate a smooth transition for military personnel from the combat environment to family, community and workplace. Spouses are encouraged to attend.

Thursday, August 1 6:30 p.m. White House Down Policeman John Cale has been denied his dream job with the Secret Service of protecting President. He takes his daughter on a tour of the White House, when the complex is overtaken by a heavily armed paramilitary group. Now, with the nation’s government falling into chaos, it’s up to Cale to save the president, his daughter, and the country. Rated: PG-13 (2 hr, 17 min) Friday, August 2 6:30 p.m. World War Z (3D) United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the globe in a race against time to stop a zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatening to decimate humanity itself. Rated: PG-13 (1 hr, 55 min)

Marriage is a Work of Heart

Aug. 14, 4-5:30 p.m. The goal of this class is to provide couples with new ideas and tools to help them continue to build together the marriage they envisioned. Join us and practice Speaker Listener Technique to enhance communication even on the toughest issues.

Ten Steps to a Federal Job

Aug. 14, 1-4 p.m. Learn how to navigate the federal job system. 137-page training guide is provided.

Transition Assistance Program (retiree)

Aug. 19-27 TGPS is a joint venture by the FFSC and the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs, it is a must attend workshop where topics include skills assessment, resume writing, interview techniques, salary negotiations, financial considerations, and overview of veterans benefits, etc. Class runs 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. Seating is limited. Please see your Career Counselor to sign up.

Suicide Awareness/Prevention

Aug. 20, 3-4 p.m. This program is designed to raise awareness about the issues surrounding suicide. Learn to identify the warning signs, how to respond to a suicidal person and information on how to access local resources.

Is REDUX Retirement worth it? (brown bag)

Aug. 21, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Are you eligible for CBS/REDUX? If you have 14½ to 15 years in uniform, you typically need to make a decision. This class can help you with that choice. Explore options, look at some basic results for specific situations, and highlight important considerations.

01040545

9 p.m., The Heat FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn is an investigator with a reputation for excellence and arrogance. Shannon Mullins, one of Boston P.D.’s “finest,” uses her gut instinct and street smarts to catch elusive criminals. When these two wildly incompatible law officers join forces to bring down a drug lord, they become the last thing anyone expected: buddies. Rated: R (1 hr, 57 min) Saturday, August 3 4 p.m., Planes (3D) Free Sneak Preview There is a $1 fee for the 3D glasses, or bring your own glasses to avoid the fee. No camera phones, camcorders or other recording devices permitted. First come, first serve. Admittance begins at 3 p.m. Rated: PG, 80 min. 6:30 p.m. World War Z (3D)

9 p.m. The Heat Sunday, August 4 2 p.m., Despicable Me (3D) 4:30 p.m. White House Down Monday and Tuesday No Movies Wednesday, August 7 4 p.m. The Croods Free Movie Matinee 6:30 p.m. World War Z (3D)


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Thursday, August 1, 2013

7

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8

Tester

RECYCLE

Continued from 1 benefits recycling the newspapers brings, such as helping with “environmental concerns.” As a publisher, multiplying the number of newspapers that Comprint prints could amount to substantial savings, not including the space saved from dumping at landfills, he said. Rives said Comprint also meets the Maryland Department of Environment’s mandate of printing on 40 percent content paper use; the Tester is printed on 40 percent recycled stock. “We are working smart to improve the environment while ensuring good business practices,” he said. At Pax, customers can join in the recycling efforts with paper, plastic and more by utilizing any of the four sites available for recyclables: across from the Navy Exchange on Cuddihy Road, parking lot of building 407, Shaw Road just south of the circle, and adjacent to the recycling center off of Tate Road. Each site has a trailer with sections for paper, aluminum and steel cans, glass and plastic bottles; a cardboard dumpster and a newspaper dumpster.

Thursday, August 1, 2013

All satellite sites are available 24/7. The Base Recycling Center off of Whalen Road in building 604 is open from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. weekdays. Bulk metal items are only accepted after the customer has certified that it is scrap and can be turned in for recycling. All items that contain oils, coolants or gases must have documentation showing they have been properly drained/purged before they can be turned in as scrap. No bulk items are permitted at the sites nor should any material be left on the ground. So far this year, the Base Recycling Center has averaged 71.2 tons of recyclables per month. These items have included office paper, cardboard, newspaper, plastic bottles, aluminum cans, glass bottles, steel cans, toner cartridges and scrap metals. The center provides weekly recycling services for 195 buildings located through the installation, Webster Outlying Field and Navy Recreation Center Solomons. New military employees assigned to Pax are briefed during their in-processing by representatives of the Recycling Center on a monthly basis on the recycling options on base. So, the question at the Tester is: “To recycle or not?” Well, the answer is an emphatic — yes!

St. Nicolas Chapel Schedule Catholic Services Mass: Sundays at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Weekdays at 11:35 a.m. Continuing Catholic Development (CCD): Sundays from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Protestant Services Worship: Sundays at 11 a.m. Bible studies: Men’s study, Sundays at 6 p.m. Ladies’ study, Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m.

01040485


Thursday, August 1, 2013

Tester

8/08/13. 1033624

01040238

9


Tester

10

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Around Town St. Mary’s County events:

Federal Civilian Employment Representation: n n n n

Proposed Disciplinary Actions Performance Improvement Plans EEO/Discrimination Complaints U.S. MSPB Representations

Get More from Google

All Saints Episcopal Church’s 68th Annual Summer Supper

Saturday, 3-7 p.m. Parish Hall, 100 Lower Marlboro Road, Sunderland Menu includes homemade crab cakes, ham, chicken and more. Home-baked goodies and handmade crafts are also available. Proceeds benefit community and church ministries. Cost is $20, ages 13 and older; $10, ages 6 to 12; free, 5 years and under. For information phone 410-257-6306.

“We’ll Fight for Your Rights!” Call 301-645-9103 to schedule a consultation

10665 Stanhaven Place, Suite #3101, White Plains, Maryland 20695

eBooks for Smartphones

Monday, 2 p.m. Leonardtown library Adults will learn how to download free library eBooks onto their Smartphones. Free event, but registration is required. Call 301475-2846 or visit www.stmalib.org.

Waiting for Wings

Monday, 11 a.m. Lexington Park library All ages can come and celebrate the library’s new Butterfly Garden and Active Learning Center with a storytime, craft and butterfly release.

Wednesday, 2-3:30 p.m. Lexington Park library Teens can discover the world of Google docs, apps and more. Free event, but registration is required. Call 301-863-8188 or visit www.stmalib.org.

Calvert County events: World War II USO Remembrance

Friday, 6-9 p.m. Solomons Riverwalk USO Night commemorates what civilians did for the troops during World War II. Come and swing to big band sounds of the era. There will be a wreath-laying ceremony. This event is free. Visit www.circleofangels. org for information.

In Concert: Bad Company with Paul Rodgers

Friday, 7:30 p.m.; doors open at 6 p.m. Calvert Marine Museum Tickets are $47 and $57 and can be purchased by calling 800-787-9454, in person at Prince Frederick Ford/Dodge (cash or check only), or on the Calvert Marine Museum website at www.calvertmarinemuseum.com.

Maker’s Market

Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. Leonardtown library Children can leave their stuffed animal for a sleepover after storytime. When they pick their stuffed animals up the next day, they can watch a slide show of its overnight adventures. Free.

Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center, 13480 Dowell Road, Dowell Maker’s Market is the place to find handmade, homemade or homegrown products including crafts, hanging baskets, organic skincare products, farm fresh produce, cut flowers, baked goods, batik and fleece clothing, handmade soaps and candles, herbal teas, ornaments, folk art, handmade gifts and more. Delight in the local treasures to be found.

As of July 26

VQ-4 Liberty

2-6 1-8

Tuesday/Thursday A Division Hardwood Salty Dogs A/O TC-7 Loaded Balls

4-0 3-1 1-2 1-4 0-4

Tuesday/Thursday B Division Sons of Pitches It’s Not Cricket Aviators Scared Hitless Village Idiots

5-1 4-1 3-3 1-4 1-5

Storytime and Stuffed Animal Sleepover

Scoreboard

Intramural Softball League

Monday/Wednesday A Division River Dawgs Dirty Dogs Boozin’ Ballers Chiefs Moe’s Tavern Drunken Clams

8-1 6-3 5-4 3-5 2-6 2-7

Monday/Wednesday B Division PPE Warlocks Softballs of Steel VX-1

7-1 7-1 5-4 3-5

50185 Hays Beach Road • Scotland $1,500,000 Dreaming of living in God’s Country? You can!

1009627

For more information on this unique property listing please contact Addie McBride, 301-481-6767.

1038980

Nestled in a safe secure area on 100+ acres in St. Mary’s county, this estate has everything you can imagine from the horse barns and stables to waterfront. Located on a protected Creek inlet from the Chesapeake Bay with an abundance of crabs and oysters. Property was built in 2010, with the aristocrat in mind with luxury in everything, (4 bedroom 5 baths) yet with the survival mentality of home generators, emergency water supplies, food, and hunting geese, deer, turkeys, rabbits, etc. Property has a natural beauty of flat open fields, not usually found in Maryland. MLS# SM8141671


Thursday, August 1, 2013

Tester

11


12

01040264

Tester

Thursday, August 1, 2013


Tester 080113