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Largo, Landover battle for new $645M hospital

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Out of the smoke, into the flame: Andrews firefighters train for danger

American Legion Post 275 gets first female commander

AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS, MD.

“727” remembered with peace concert and vigil

FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 | VOL. 2 NO. 29

New Deputy Wing Chaplain comes to JBA STORY AND PHOTO BY CHRIS BASHAM STAFF WRITER

PHOTO BY WILLIAM KIM

Event emcee Richard Liu, host of NBC Early Today, spoke of his uncles who fought in the Korean War as Chinese Americans. BY HANNAH KIM REMEMBER 727

Washington, D.C. –Despite an earlier downpour, several hundred people gathered July 27 near the reflecting pool in front of the Lincoln Memorial to attend the 6th Annual Armistice Day Peace Concert & Vigil, held on the 60th anniversary of the day the ceasefire agreement for the Korean War was signed in 1953. The evening event, hosted by Remember 727 in partnership with the Korean War Veterans Digital Memorial Foundation, was a more casual affair targeted to a younger audience in contrast to Saturday morning’s official ceremony, in which President Barack Obama spoke to recognize the 1.8 million American men and women who fought in the Korean War from 1950-1953. “As a Vietnam Veteran, I know firsthand the importance of honoring those who served our country and the Allied Forces. It hurts when your service is ignored,” Edward Chow, Jr., Secretary of the Maryland Department of Veteran Affairs, said. “While the Korean War may sometimes be called the ‘Forgotten War’, those three years of fighting certainly are not forgotten by those who were there and by the families who lost loved ones.” At exactly 7:27 p.m., candles were lit and followed by a minute of silence in memory of those who lost their lives in the war.

Performances included contemporary songs by members of Kollaboration D.C., and Pansori by Eunyoung Kim, and Arirang performance by Morning Star Korean Mission Choir & Praise dance. Special guests included former Philadelphia Eagle football player Dereck Faulkner, who founded Athletes for Vets, as well as veterans of the Korea War, Vietnam War and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Also featured was a massive photographic exhibition of the Korean War brought over through World Peace Freedom from South Korea, and a screening of “Heroes Remembered: Voices of Korean War Veterans” and ”Fading Away,” award-winning documentary by Christopher H. Lee. Speaking on behalf of the South Korean government was Korea Communications Commission Chairman Lee Kyung-jae, who echoed Professor Jongwoo Han’s sentiments as to why it is critical to preserve the stories and legacy of Korean War veterans. Han, president of Korean War Veterans Digital Memorial Foundation, held a conference for more than 50 descendants of Korean War veterans that week. The event was emceed by NBC Early Today anchor Richard Lui, whose uncles fought in the Korean War as Chinese Americans. The event highlighted the patriotism of 25,000 Japanese Americans and 20,000 Chinese Americans, 600,000 African Americans,

and 148,000 Hispanic Americans, as well as the involvement of 24 other nations that fought in the Korean War. As written in the program, the mission for the event was simple: “… to recognize 727’s significance and the sacrifices made on account of the Korean War, so as to reconcile the painful memories of war and division.” This year’s event was supported by US Department of Defense 60th Anniversary of Korean War Commemoration Committee, Republic of Korea Ministry of Patriots and Veterans Affairs 60th Anniversary Committee, Korean Cultural Center, Embassy of Republic of Korea, Korean Senior Citizens Association, Korean American Association of Greater Washington D.C., Advisory Council on Democratic and Peaceful Unification of Korea, KoreanAmerican Association of Virginia and Korean American Association of Maryland. In addition to the event, Congressmen Charles B. Rangel (DNY), John Conyers (D-MI), Sam Johnson (R-TX), and Howard Coble (R-NC), members of Congress who served during the Korean War, introduced a concurrent resolution to encourage the peace and reunification of the Korean Peninsula. Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA), a member of the Senate Foreign Affairs and Armed Services Committees, introduced a similar resolution in the Senate. The resolution is expected to pass in Congress this week.

In a culture where serving your grandmother’s potato salad counts as “honoring family tradition,” new Deputy Wing Chaplain Maj. Raphael Berdugo probably has us all beat: When he became an Orthodox Jewish rabbi in 1993, he followed an unbroken family tradition that can be traced back 15 generations. After service as a Judaica studies teacher for 10 years he joined the Air Force Reserves in 2000, and went to chaplain school the following year. Though he was strongly encouraged to enter active duty as a chaplain, his wife was entirely against the idea. “My wife said ‘no,’ but when God has a plan, God has a plan,” Berdugo said. “There is no such thing as coincidence.” He went on to teach at the prestigious Yeshiva of Flatbush in Brooklyn, N.Y. for four years, commuting from the family home in Lakewood, N.J. The daily, 90-minute drive each way “took a toll on me,” he said, so when he was offered a position managing a large Judaica store in Lakewood he gladly took the new job, even though it had not been his goal to become a store manager. A year later, after seeing the store succeed under his new management style, Berdugo lost his job. “A month before my oldest son’s bar mitzvah, I found myself unemployed,” Berdugo said. “I wasn’t sure what to do. In the Orthodox tradition, when in doubt, you consult a higher authority.” He turned to a respected rabbinical mentor in Israel, presenting what he saw as the range of his options. After a few days’ thought, the rabbi replied, “It is written for you: The military.” Armed with that confident vision, “I thought I’d be a shoe-in for active duty service,” Berdugo said. He was surprised to be turned down by the Air Force, but was eventually encouraged to resubmit his application package and entered the Air Force as a 1st Lieutenant in 2005. Sent to San Antonio as a geobachelor, Berdugo admits that the transition to military life was hard on his family at first. His family remained in New Jersey while Berdugo was stationed in San Antonio. “My wife could not deal with the separation. You hear these stories a lot in the military,” Ber-

dugo said. The wing chaplain under whom Berdugo served recommended he leave the military. “He said, ‘Nothing is worth your marriage. Twenty years from now you will retire from the military and no one will remember what you did or said or who you are, but your family is with you forever,’” remembered Berdugo. He started filling out the paperwork to separate from the military. While waiting for just a final signature on that paperwork, Berdugo went about his duties. One morning while at prayer the wing chaplain walked into his office and said, “Stop your prayers; your prayers have been answered.” Berdugo was being sent to Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lakehurst, N.J., near home, family and a vibrant Jewish community. Four years later, when faced with a possible permanent change of station to Korea, Berdugo’s wife insisted that no matter where he might be ordered to go, he should remain in the military. Her change of heart enabled the family to succeed through five deployments over his career so far. Chaplain Berdugo is an Orthodox rabbi, belonging to a branch of Judaism which holds that the Torah’s commandments are just as applicable today as they were when first written. “We believe the Torah is timeless and eternal, for all generations, forever and ever,” said Berdugo. “We don’t believe the Torah is going to change in response to modern life, modern technology. God knew about the future of modern technology when he wrote it.” That commitment to the original requirements set forth in the

see CHAPLAIN, page 6

Policy changes ease enlisting with families COURTESY AIR FORCE PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Air Force announced changes to its accession policies July 30 to make entering the Air Force easier for prospective Airmen with families. The changes modified dependency and pregnancy policies for Airmen entering the Air Force, enabling Airmen with up to three children to enlist with a waiver and standardizing pregnancy policies across the accessioning sources. “It’s important for us to attract the highest caliber men and wom-

en to serve in today’s Air Force,” said Brig. Gen. Gina Grosso, Director of Force Management Policy. “These policy changes open our doors to more individuals who are highly qualified, but whose family obligations would have previously disqualified them.” The changes were driven when Air Force officials realized that pregnancy policies for Airmen entering the Air Force were not being uniformly applied across accessioning sources. “We discovered that the language in our pregnancy policy was too ambiguously written and

could be interpreted in multiple ways,” said Ms. Tina Strickland, Chief of Air Force Accessions and Training Division. “We wanted to make sure the policy was being applied consistently across the Air Force. Reviewing the policy also drove us to examine our other rules for Airmen entering the Air Force with families.” The pregnancy policy for both Officer Training School and Basic Military Training School now allows trainees to return to their accessioning program after their pregnancy, upon receiving medical clearance. Cadets in ROTC

can commission and proceed to follow-on training if cleared to do so by a medical authority or will be re-checked until they are medically cleared. Dependency policies were also changed to become more familyfriendly. All enlisted applicants with two or fewer family members under the age 18 who are incapable of self-care are eligible to enlist with an approved family care plan. The policy for officer training school was changed to allow single parents and parents with military spouses to access upon completion and approval of a dependent care plan. Ca-

dets with dependents may now sign contracts to join Air Force ROTC, regardless of the number of dependents, upon approval of a dependent care plan. A dependent care plan is not required for ROTC cadets who are married to civilian spouses. “Creating an atmosphere that supports our Airmen and their families is a priority for the Air Force,” said Grosso. “Our accessioning programs are the first exposure Airmen have to the Air Force, and it’s important that our accessions policies align with our priorities.”


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HOT TICKETS

Commentary:

Around Town August 2

Shark Week outdoor screening Downtown Silver Spring, 908 Ellsworth Drive Silver Spring, Md. 9 p.m. Bring your beach towels and chairs for an outdoor screening of Discovery Channel’s Return of Jaws. Come early for a 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Grupo Latin Continental live concert. For information visit www.downtownsilverspring.com.

August 2

Erin Driscoll performs Barbara Cook’s Songbook Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Avenue, Arlington, Va. 7 p.m. Hear soloist Erin Driscoll perform the songs of a Broadway legend. For information and tickets visit www.signature-theatre.org.

August 2

Celebrate James Wardrop’s 298th birthday Darnall’s Chance House Museum 14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive, Upper Marlboro, Md. noon Bring the kids (ages 10 and up) to learn about the first owner of Darnall’s Chance House, tour the museum and enjoy cupcakes and lemonade. For information visit www. pgparks.com.

August 5

U.S. Coast Guard Day at Nationals Park Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol Street S.E. Washington, D.C. 7:05 p.m. Support the Coasties and see the Nationals beat the Atlanta Braves. For information visit www.washington. nationals.mlb.com.

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Andrews Gazette is published by Comprint Military Publications, 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg, Md., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Air Force or any branch of the United States military. The appearance of advertising in these publications, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, martial status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non merit factor of the purchases, user or patron.

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People need people BY CHRIS BASHAM STAFF WRITER

Sometimes, when we least expect it, we find ourselves confronted by unreasoning, unrelenting need within our own souls. I think Geraldo Rivera had one of those moments, last week. He explained it this way on his syndicated radio show: “There I was, 2:30 in the morning on Sunday morning. You know, I do the show Saturday night, I did a great show on black-on-black crime and race relations and the Trayvon Martin fallout and federal charges ... and I get home and there’s no one to talk to, everyone’s asleep. And you just sit around, I had a drink and, you know, I had taken that picture

Saturday morning and I was looking at it, just going through and I said ’you know, I gotta tweet this thing. I look pretty good for a 70-year-old.’” Granted, Rivera has been known more for his endless ego than his reporting for decades now. It’s no secret that Rivera thinks he’s great. I’m sure it’s no great leap for him to believe that the rest of us would appreciate the chance to see, well, a lot more of Geraldo than we’re used to on the news. When Ice-T posted his own blurry, shirtless selfie on Twitter a few days later, he seemed positively demure because he was wearing actual pants, and focusing more on how to work his camera than on his own abs. At 55, the rapper turned actor turned

husband of a woman who is famous mostly for not wearing nearly that much in her own photos, Ice-T is a grown, successful man who seems to know who he is and what he values. And yet there was something that made him need to beg for attention. More attention, not for the things he’s done to turn a thug life into a respectable career, but for the body he’s trying to keep bulked up and hard as a younger man’s. New York’s mayoral race is dominated, this time around, not by debates on the issues or even by the personalities of larger-than-life candidates. Does anyone even know who’s running against Anthony Weiner? I’m sure there’s a substantial por-

see COMMENTARY, page 8

Retiree Corner COURTESY OF THE RETIREE ACTIVITIES OFFICE

Taps for Senior Master Sgt. Neves

Retired Senior Master Sgt. John Neves, the face of Air Force retiree activities in the National Capital Area for more than 20 years, died July 21 at his home in Springfield, Va. He was 81. Sergeant Neves retired from active duty in 1976 with 26 years’ service, including tours in Vietnam, Germany and Greenland. He served as director of Retiree Activities Offices at Bolling, and later Andrews, before his second “retirement” in 2010. He continued to be an “active voice” at annual 11th Wing Retiree Appreciation Day events. He received the Air Force Volunteer Excellence Award, authorized by the Chief of Staff for sustained volunteer service. Col. John Moser, current director of wing RAOs, said this year’s Retiree Appreciation Day program will be dedicated to Sergeant Neves. Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Larry Spencer will keynote the event Saturday, October 26 at the Bolling Club.

Delta Dental changes

Effective October 1, all TRICARE

Retiree Dental Program beneficiaries will be required to pay their monthly premiums by an Electronic Funds Transfer or through military retired pay allotment. The ability to pay premiums by check or through an online bill pay system ends in September. Delta Dental sent letters to all participants in July with information on how to submit an EFT authorization online. Delta Dental of California will continue to manage the program through 2018. Enrollees in the enhanced program and overseas participants will see several changes in January: The annual maximum amount for each person will be increased to $1,300 Coverage will run from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31 Maximums and deductibles will re-start every Jan. 1 The annual maximum amount for dental accident coverage for each person will be increased to $1,200 The lifetime orthodontic maximum amount for each person will be increased to $1,750 A third cleaning will be added for children and adults with documented Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Also expected in January is a decrease in monthly premiums for participants in both the enhanced and

basic programs. For more information, visit www.tricare.mil/trdp.

ID card volume is high

Base Customer Support Elements are responsible for three main programs: ID Cards/DEERS updates, in-processing new members and Leaveweb. High customer frequency for these services has resulted in longer than usual wait times of 90 minutes to three hours at Joint Base Andrews. Customers in need of new or renewed ID cards or DEERS registration may wish to consider use of other military facilities in the National Capital Area. There are more than 15 installations and some offer appointments. For additional information, call 301-981-1776. The Retiree Activities Office is open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Visit the office in Building 1604 at California and Colorado Avenues or call us at 301981-2726. Our e-mail address is rao@ andrews.af.mil. Call the office before your visit to ensure a volunteer is on duty. The RAO has a website at www.andrews.af.mil; Under “Helpful Links” click on “Retirees Activity Office” for information on retiree subjects, including past copies of “Retiree Corner.”


Air Force Nurse Corps’ Birthday reminds us to praise our nurses BY MELANIE MOORE 79TH MEDICAL WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Air Force Nurse Corps celebrated their 64th Birthday July 1, 2013. The 79th Medical Wing has nurses located at the 779th Medical Group on Joint Base Andrews and the 579th Medical Group on Joint Base AnacostiaBolling. Additionally, there are 79 MDW nurses working across the National Capital Region including Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Md.; Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Va.; Fort George Meade, Md. and the Pentagon. The Nurse Corps consists entirely of commissioned officers. New members of the Air Force Nurse Corps are required to hold at minimum a Bachelor of Science in nursing degree prior to receiving a commission. Members of the Air Force Nurse Corps work in all aspects of Air Force Medicine and can serve as flight nurses in aeromedical evacuation missions, nurse practitioners and nurse anesthetists. On a typical day, Team Andrews medical staff provide a full

see NURSES, page 4

PUBLIC HEALTH TECHNICIAN 779TH AEROSPACE MEDICINE SQUADRON

U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTOS BY TECH. SGT. TAMMIE MOORE

779th Medical Operations Squadron civilian nurse Walter Cook and Capt. Denise Frederiksen, a 779th Medical Operations Squadron clinical nurse, in-process patients at the Emergent Care Center on Joint Base Andrews, Md.

Death notice: Senior Master Sgt. Christopher M. Johnson Death notice: Senior Master Sgt. Christopher M. Johnson Attention all personnel: Maj. George G. Eldridge regretfully announces the death of Senior Master Sgt. Christopher M. Johnson. Anyone having claims against or indebtedness to the estate of Senior Master Sgt. Christopher M. Johnson, contact Maj. George G. Eldridge, Summary Court Officer, at 240-857-5444.

No more redundant inspections: AF implements new inspection system SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Air Force recently implemented a new inspection system, aimed at giving more power to wing commanders. With the signing of Program Action Directive 13-01, Air Force inspection system Implementation Tiger Team transitions from the planning phase to the execution phase. The program, which was beta tested by United States Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa, aims at empowering wing commanders to run their wing’s inspection system. By doing this, each commander will be able to focus on improving mission effectiveness every day, balancing resources and risks without the wasteful peaks and valleys of preparing for inspections. The goal of the new system is to make inspections a non-event, part of the daily battle rhythm of continuous improvement. The new AFIS, “rebalances authority from functional staffs to commanders,” said Col. Robert Hyde, the Air Force Director of Inspections. “(It) enables commanders to focus on mission readiness,

Prepare for mosquitoes, ticks and wild animals BY SENIOR AIRMAN CHAD LONG

Capt. Maria Reyes, 779th Medical Group Surgeries Specialties Flight nurse manager, prepares to give a patient an injection at the Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic and Surgery Center.

BY STAFF SGT. DAVID SALANITRI

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not inspection readiness.” As the Air Force continues to be shaped leaner, the importance of eliminating waste and increasing efficiency is at an all-time high. As the new AFIS is implemented and evolves, senior Air Force leaders are confident the program will reduce man hours significantly. “I believe the return on a manpower investment to help the wing commander identify, report, analyze and fix problems is at least 10 to 1,” said Lt. Gen. Stephen Mueller, the secretary of the Air Force Inspector General. “I’m convinced the efforts we’re making together to strengthen command, reduce and prioritize our guidance and reduce wasteful preparation for external inspections will be a catalyst for mission capability and cultural changes that will benefit every Airman, our Air Force and our nation. I don’t say that lightly.” Under the previous legacy system, major commands would send their inspector general along with dozens of function inspection teams to inspect how ready and compliant that unit was. “The legacy system of 100 (plus) inspections, no matter how

well organized or consolidated, still resulted in several unhealthy outcomes,” Hyde said. “The worst of which is wasted effort to prepare for inspections at the expense of mission readiness.” Under the new AFIS, “the MAJCOM commander says to the wing commander ‘You inspect your unit and tell me how ready, compliant and sure your unit is,’” Hyde said. “Help me see the big problems, how you are fixing them and where you need my help. Over the two-year (Unit Effectiveness Inspection) cycle, I’ll have my IG verifying how your wing is doing. My IG will inspect your own inspection program, validate and verify your reports, and help you see how to become more effective. If I find your reports are not accurate I will ensure we find and fix the root cause of the inaccuracy. My staff will engage you as a result of the info you provide.’” As wings begin to adapt to this new culture, senior leaders are confident their main objective of strengthening the Air Force will be achieved. “Our ultimate goal is to strengthen and improve the force,” Mueller said.

Families spend a lot of summer time outdoors, where exposure to mosquitoes, ticks and wild animals increases their risk for disease. The Public Health office offers the following tips to protect your family: West Nile virus usually spreads to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. Many people who are bitten by an infected mosquito will not get sick, but approximately 1 in 5 people who are infected will develop a fever and other symptoms. Less than one percent of infected people develop a serious, sometimes fatal, neurologic disease. Symptoms usually begin with fever and headache, but can lead to coma and even death. Protective measures are key in preventing WNV disease and other mosquito-spread viruses: Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors. Wear protective clothing from dusk to dawn and apply insect repellent containing at least 30 percent concentration of DEET. Install or repair screens on windows and doors in your home to keep mosquitoes outside. Use your air conditioner if you have one. Air conditioning helps keep mosquitoes away due to the lower temperature. Avoid or remove areas with standing water. Containers outside of your house that collect rain water are potential breeding sites. Turn these items over so water cannot collect in them. Ticks also spread disease, especially in heavily wooded and grassy areas. Lyme disease is spread through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. The blacklegged tick, commonly called a deer tick, spreads the disease in the northeastern and mid-Atlantic United States. These ticks are very small and very hard to notice once they are on your body. Lyme disease causes fever, headache and a “bull’s-eye” type rash that develops around the site of the bite. If you experience these symptoms, immediately report to your nearest ER or to your Primary Care provider. Left untreated, Lyme disease can cause serious infection that can spread to your joints, heart and nervous system. Other tick species can cause disease in humans. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is spread through the bite of infected American dog ticks, Rocky Mountain wood ticks, and brown dog ticks. Symptoms include fever, headache, abdominal pain, vomiting and muscle pain. RMSF can

be severe or even fatal if it is not treated during the first few days of symptoms. In general, anyone who experiences fever, flu-like symptoms or a rash after a tick bite should seek medical care promptly. To prevent insect bites: Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass. Apply DEET on exposed skin and permethrin on clothing. If exposed to a high-risk area, once you return home, perform a full body check in front of a fulllength mirror and examine children and pets. If you find a tick attached, remove it using fine-tipped tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure to remove the tick. Do not twist or jerk; this can cause the mouth parts to break off in the skin. Once the tick is removed, clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub or soap and water. Bring removed ticks to JBA Public Health, building 1075, to be sent off for testing. Our risk of encountering wild animals increases as we hike, walk pets or camp. The risk of rabies is very low in the United States. Most rabies cases reported each year occur in wild animals such as raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. The rabies virus is most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. Rabies is 100 percent preventable with vaccination, but without treatment it is fatal. Initial symptoms of rabies are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, fatigue or generalized weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and can include anxiety, confusion, hallucinations, agitation, slight or partial paralysis and difficulty swallowing. Death usually follows within days after these symptoms. Early detection and treatment are key to preventing rabies: Keep pets’ vaccinations up to date. Report any stray animals found on base to Security Forces. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, regardless of the severity, immediately clean the wound with soap and water and then report to your nearest emergency room for proper treatment. Prevention is always better than getting sick. For more information call Joint Base Andrews Public Health office at 240-8575498 or visit www.CDC.gov.

CAPTION THIS Send your silly captions for this week’s photo to cbasham@dcmilitary.com. The funniest ones will be used in a future edition of The Andrews Gazette.


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Largo, Landover battle for new $645M hospital BY JAMIE ANFENSON-COMEAU THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

Landover Mall and a site near Largo Town Center are the two properties left in the running for a new $645 million hospital, according to the Dimensions Healthcare System Board of Directors. The site selection for the new 280-bed hospital is expected to be made by the end of August, with construction expected to begin in 2017, said Dimensions Healthcare System spokeswoman Erika Murray. Prince George’s County officials have long sought a new medical center as older facilities suffered from outdated equipment and financial challenges caused by a large number of uninsured patients. Dimensions currently operates Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly, Laurel Regional Hospital, the Bowie Health Campus and Glenridge Medical Center. The Largo site consists of 70 acres of land owned by Oak Brook, Ill.-based Retail Properties of America Inc., and several adjoining properties under private ownership, and is adjacent to the Boulevard at Capitol Cen-

tre shopping center and the Largo Metro station. The Landover Mall property consists of 80 acres, owned by Rockville-based Lerner Enterprises. The mall closed in 2002 and demolition was completed in 2007, although retailer Sears continues to operate at the site. The Landover site was under consideration for a new hospital in 2005, but funding was not available at that time, according to media reports. Both sites are within short access to Interstate 495. The Landover site is approximately two miles away from the Largo Metrorail station. There is bus service at the Landover site, but no direct service from the site to the Largo Metro station. David Iannucci, economic policy adviser to County Executive Rushern Baker III (D), said both sites would be strong economic drivers, and the county government would be pleased with a hospital at either location. “We have two sites that have excellent characteristics,” Iannucci said. “The Largo site is in central Prince George’s County and it has great transportation access. It has the potential to

FILE PHOTO/THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

The parking lot at Landover Mall is shown in 2005, empty except for a few cars at Sears. The majority of the mall has been torn down, and the location of the former mall is now under consideration for a hospital.

come up with a number of configurations to serve the community. It has the potential to become a development hub with a health care focus.” Iannucci said the Landover site is in an area with the potential for mixed-use or townhouse development, and is served by the necessary infrastructure. David Harrington, president of the Prince George’s County

Chamber of Commerce, said both sites hold great potential for encouraging economic growth. “We look forward to the business development that will be spurred by a hospital on either site,” Harrington said. The hospital construction is being funded through state and county government, as well as Dimensions and the University of Maryland Medical System.

Landover resident Mary Samuelson, who moved to the area in 1966, said she would be in favor of a new hospital at the site of the old mall. “They need to do something over there. It’s a mess, and that wouldn’t be a bad idea,” Samuelson said. This story originally appeared in the July 30, 2013 edition of The Prince George’s Gazette.

NURSES, from page 4 range of primary care services and offer a full spectrum of medical and surgical sub-specialties to better serve military beneficiaries. The Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic and Surgery Center professionals maintain medical readiness for worldwide contingencies with 1,356 Airmen and civilians operating in four locations throughout the National Capital Region. They provide health service support to Joint Base Andrews, primary health care to 30,000 enrolled beneficiaries, and specialty health care to over 600,000 Department of Defense beneficiaries in the National Capital Region.

779th Medical Support Squadron diabetes nurse Angela Wright and 779 MDG disease manager Capt. Geralyn Bielecki discuss fat and muscle as it relates to weight loss in the Group Lifestyle Balance Class. Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic and Surgery Center offers classes Monday through Thursday, mornings and afternoons. To participate and schedule nutritional classes call 240-857-4762.

779th Medical Group general surgeon Dr. Darrell Carpenter and 779 MDG Surgeries Specialties Flight nurse manager Capt. Maria Reyes discuss patient care at Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic and Surgery Center.

LGB group launches on JBA The Andrews Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual support group will meet for the first time 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Aug. 7 at the Airmen and Family Readiness Center. For information contact Capt. Jordan Simonson at jordan.simonson@afncr.af.mil.

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Prince George’s cities brace for Purple Line disruptions BY JAMIE ANFENSON-COMEAU THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

The Purple Line light rail system is expected to displace more than 100 Prince George’s families and businesses residing in its path, as well as cause traffic and access problems during its five-year construction, Maryland Transit Administration officials told members of the Four Cities Coalition. The Four Cities Coalition, a meeting of officials from New Carrollton, Greenbelt, Berwyn Heights and College Park, met July 24 to discuss regional concerns and hear from MTA officials about the Purple Line, the proposed 16-mile light rail from Bethesda to New Carrollton. Michael Madden, MTA Purple Line Project Manager, said the agency will work to minimize any inconvenience caused by the construction, expected to begin in 2015. “It will be disruptive, but our outreach team is gearing up to develop a plan,” Madden said. Madden said approximately 60 businesses and 50 residences will be displaced by the Purple Line. “We have begun to go in and interview those tenants, those property owners, and find out what information they need,” Madden said. “They will eventually be assigned a relocation counselor to help them through the relocation process.” According to information provided by MTA, the agency will offer negotiated settlements for the properties based on their fair market values and will provide relocation assistance through the MTA’s Relocation Assistance Program, but if an agreement cannot be reached, the state has the authority under Maryland law to acquire the property

COURTESY MARYLAND TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION

An artist’s rendering of the proposed raised platform station in Riverdale Park on Kenilworth Avenue.

through eminent domain proceedings. Madden said there are also “slivers of property,” such as a stretch along University Boulevard, that will need to be acquired to widen the roadway. Madden said business outreach team members have been speaking to businesses regarding the disruption likely to be caused by construction. “We will work with the contractor very closely to make sure we maintain access, both pedestrian access and vehicle access,” Madden said. Berwyn Heights Mayor Cheye Calvo, chairman of the Four Cities Coalition, expressed concern about adding the Purple

Another meet-and-greet with the Prince George’s school system CEO BY JAMIE ANFENSON-COMEAU THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

A third and final meet-and-greet session with the new CEO of Prince George’s County Public Schools, Kevin Maxwell, is scheduled for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 13 at DuVal High School, 9880 Good Luck Road in Lanham. The event will provide an opportunity for parents, business leaders and other community members to speak with the new school system leader, who officially takes office Aug. 1. Light refreshments will be served, according to a news release from the school system. “Dr. Maxwell’s return to Prince George’s County Public Schools is an important step

forward for this county,” school board chairman Segun Eubanks said in a statement. “He brings the type of energy, expertise and innovation that we need to move our schools forward. I encourage the community to come out and meet Dr. Maxwell to wish him well and share your thoughts on how to take our schools from good to great.” The first meet-and-greet was held at Crossland High School in Temple Hills on July 10 and was attended by more than 300 people. A second meet-and-greet was scheduled for July 23 at G. James Gholson Middle School in Landover. This story originally appeared in the July 25, 2013 edition of The Prince George’s Gazette and was updated July 29, 2013 to reflect scheduling changes to the meetand-greet.

Health care moves when you PCS BY HEALTH NET FEDERAL SERVICES

From the temporary journey of vacation to the long-term adjustment of a permanent change of station, summer is a time for being on the move. If a PCS within the United States is in your near future, you may have questions about how this change affects your TRICARE coverage. Health Net Federal Services, LLC, the managed care support contractor for the TRICARE North Region, offers the following tips to beneficiaries preparing to move to help ensure their transition is a smooth one: Contact DEERS. Call the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System at 1-800-538-9552 or log in to http://www. dmdc.osd.mil to confirm your family’s demographic information is up to date. Keep your old primary care manager’s contact information. Many service members go on vacation before reporting to their new duty station. In this case, TRICARE Prime beneficiaries‘ old primary care manager is still responsible for coordinating any nonemergent medical care. Get your medical and dental records before you move. If your new doctor has a

question about your health history, you’ll have these available to better coordinate your care. This also saves time. “It can take two months or more to get your records if you’ve already moved,” TRICARE education specialist Terry Goodyear said. “You want to have these at-the-ready for when the time comes.” Determine which TRICARE plan options are available. Your TRICARE plan options may change based on your new location. Visit www.tricare.mil/welcome/planfinder to find out what plans are available in your new area. Transfer your TRICARE Prime enrollment if changing regions. If you are moving to a new TRICARE region (north, south, west), do not dis-enroll until you arrive at your new location. Once there, reach out to your new regional contractor to transfer enrollment. Your local TRICARE Service Center can assist you with your enrollment transfer. “Remembering that enrollment changes between regions are not automatic will save you a lot of headaches,” TRICARE Service Center site administrator Sabrina Luttrell said.

Line along state Route 193, particularly along the intersection with Riggs Road in Chillum. Madden said the Purple Line will run on the two middle lanes, which will be converted to light rail, turning the six-lane highway into a four-lane highway. “Riggs Road around [MD] 193 has to be one of the worst intersections in the county,” Calvo said. “The turn lanes are totally inadequate.” Madden said the MTA is working with the State Highway Administration to develop a plan for intersection improvements. The entire project is expected to cost

$2.2 billion, with funding from state and federal sources, Madden said. The MTA is also pursuing a private partnership to gain additional funding, Madden said. College Park Councilman Patrick Wojahn (Dist. 1) expressed concern that the project might not all the way through if the project is not fully funded. Madden said that construction may begin a portion at a time, “but the goal has always been for the entire 16 miles to be operational.” This story originally appeared in the July 24, 2013 edition of The Prince George’s Gazette.

JBA Buzz

What about Bradley Manning? “I didn’t know (he was acquitted on some charges). They caught him redhanded with all those secrets. That’s weird. He gave all those secrets to foreign governments; that sounds like helping Tommy Bullfield the enemy, to me.” Homeless

“If I knew exactly what he leaked, I’d have more of an opinion.”

Karen Butler Brunswick, Ga.

“I think he was wrong. I think he was wrong, and I’m an ex-Navy man, so you know why I feel that way.”

Robert Berry Mitchellville, Md.

“He’s the Daniel Ellsberg of the 21st century. The treatment they gave Bradley Manning was harsh, it was cruel, and I just think that with the time he spent in jail they should let him go with time served. What he did with Wikileaks was warranted. The Darryl Caine Washington, D.C. government lies all the time. Obama, when he campaigned, talked about Bush, but when he got into office he did all the same things. They’re all hypocrites.”

Operation Homefront offers free school supplies Operation Homefront offers free school supplies Children of deployed, wounded and active duty service members E-1 through E-6 and National Guardsmen and Reservists on Title 32 orders E-1 through E-6 can register to receive a free backpack stuffed with school supplies. Families from Joint Base Andrews should register at www.operationhomefront.net/dcmetro/ eventregistrationform to be put on the list to receive the supplies, donated by people throughout the D.C. metropolitan area, to be distributed 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 15, 2013, at a location just outside Joint Base Andrews. Only military dependent children who are registered ahead of time online will receive the backpacks. Registered families will receive a confirmation email telling them where to go to pick up their school supplies.


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Andrews Gazette

Anatomy and art collide at NMHM’s “Anatomy of Sports” BY MELISSA BRACHFELD

JBA Intramural Softball Standings through July 29 JBA Intramural Softball Standings through July 29 National League Monday/Wednesday

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE

Play a sport? Stay off the sidelines by learning how your body works at the National Museum of Health and Medicine’s second Anatomy of Sports program. The free event will be held 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 on NMHM’s front lawn. Attendees will learn about key muscle groups to improve performance while preventing injuries. Participants will watch as medical illustrators paint on the bodies of athletes in order to show the key muscles and bone structures used to play their sports. While that is happening, physical therapists will explain how those muscles and bones allow the athlete to run, jump, throw and otherwise compete. They will also discuss common sports injuries and ways they can be prevented. The final activity will be an anatomical art demonstration that will illustrate how a horse and rider’s bodies must work together to achieve maximum performance. This year, former NFL linebacker Chris Draft, who played for the Washington Redskins and the Buffalo Bills, will take part in Anatomy of Sports. Draft will represent the Chris Draft Family Foundation, a nonprofit organization that works to help families lead healthier lives through exercise and wellness efforts. Other participating athletes will include a swimmer, cyclist, volleyball player, and more. Andrea Schierkolk, NMHM’s public programs manager, said the Museum is looking forward to presenting Anatomy of Sports for a second year. “We are excited to host this unique opportunity for visitors to

Friday, August 2, 2013

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TOTAL GAMES

WIN %

89 APS

12

4

16

75%

1st HELI

10

4

14

71%

89 COMM

10

6

16

63%

FRC MA

10

6

16

63%

11 LRS

8

6

14

57%

NGB

9

7

16

56%

NCWDG

9

9

18

50%

VR-53

7

9

16

44%

779 ASF

3

15

18

17%

779 AMS

0

12

12

0%

American League Tuesday/Thursday TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TOTAL GAMES

WIN %

AFDW

9

2

11

82%

811 SFS

12

4

16

75%

113th WING 10

4

14

71%

779 MDG

7

3

10

70%

11 CES

8

4

12

67%

11 SFG

5

7

12

42%

744 COMM 4

7

11

36%

89 MXG

4

10

14

29%

NCMS

2

12

14

14%

PAG

1

9

10

10%

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE

A medical illustrator paints the muscles and bones a swimmer uses on to a former competitive swimmer’s shoulder, arm, back and neck at the National Museum of Health and Medicine’s 2012 Anatomy of Sports program.

AFCU names new CEO BY LINDA GARBOCZI

learn about anatomy in a dynamic and visual way,” Schierkolk said. Participants will include the University of Maryland’s Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science as well as medical illustrators representing the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators and the Association of Medical Illustrators.

Anatomy of Sports is open to the public and no RSVP is required. NMHM is located at 2500 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20910. For more information, call 301-319-3303. Information about NMHM, including directions and parking, can be found at http:// www.medicalmuseum.mil.

Out of the smoke, into the flame: Andrews firefighters train for danger

BY AIRMAN 1ST CLASS JOSHUA R. M. DEWBERRY 11TH WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Beads of sweat trickle from every fireman’s brow. The air is heavy with smoke, ash and embers and walls are bathed in flames. Containing the chaos and getting everyone out alive is the main priority. This is not a nightmare; it is the reality of every fireman here at Andrews who enters a burning building. Team Andrews firemen alternate 24-hour shifts, on-and-off duty, seven days a week. Undergoing U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO BY AIRMAN 1ST CLASS JOSHUA R. M. DEWBERRY constant and intense training, like rappelling down the sides of build- Airman 1st Class Jim Chavez, 11th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, ings, connecting couplings to sup- practices operating the water hose as part of his training July 24, 2013 ply the truck and breaking through at Joint Base Andrews, Md. structures with an ax keep these responders sharp and ready. Emergencies can break out anyimportant as physical. Starting on “We have to be proficient at evthe lowest level of the fire, firemen time, so preparation is essential. erything we train for,” said Airman must choose a path to follow along Continuous training allows respon1st Class Jim Chavez, 11th Civil the inside of the burning building sive reactions to become second naEngineer Squadron firefighter. and stick to it until they get back ture in the event of a real emergency. “We’re really critical of our perfor“We expose ourselves to electrimance because attention to detail to the point of entry. cal hazards, the danger of ceiling If willingly running into a fireis crucial. We take great pride in cave-ins, smoke inhalation, severe and smoke-kissed room is not what we do.” This attention to detail is born dangerous enough, the burden of burns or even death,” said Dupuis. Along with training, Dupuis from repetitive drills donning fire hauling extra gear and equipment emphasized the importance of from one floor to the next could protection gear, loading the fire truck and operating in and around wear down anyone not primed for working together, comparing the 11th CES to a football team. Evsuch a task. a fire. eryone has their own position and Being fit-to-fight takes on a “Our Airmen train for search and rescue, smoke operations and new meaning when time is of the needs to know where everyone else is. The team must work together to handling fire safety equipment,” essence. “If we get a call on base, we usu- execute each mission successfully, said Tech. Sgt. Roger Dupuis, 11th CES Fire Department assistant ally have to be on the truck and at he said. The courageous determination of chief of training. “We’re trained to the scene within three minutes,” make sure we contain the situa- said Chavez. “Since everything we Team Andrews firemen in the face do needs to be quick, our training of danger helps keep a bad situation methodically.” When operating in a dangerous focuses heavily on timed drills. tion from spinning out of control in environment like a burning build- Every day incorporates different order to secure the safety and peace of mind of the Andrews family. ing, mental preparation is just as training; there’s no room for error.”

ANDREWS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Suitland, MD (August 1, 2013) – Andrews Federal Credit Union has announced the selection of Jim Hayes as their new chief executive officer. Hayes served as interim CEO of the $900 million, 105,000-member credit union since last September. “With his extensive experience and proven dedication to Andrews Federal Credit Union, Jim will be a strong leader as the credit union continues to grow and reach out to more members within the communities we serve,” said Gen. Frank Cardile, the credit union’s board chairman. “I appreciate the confidence the Board of Directors has given me to lead the credit union,” said Hayes. “I

CHAPLAIN, from page 1 books of Moses has sometimes earned some Orthodox Jews a reputation for using their religion as an excuse to avoid certain stringent requirements made by the U.S. military. Berdugo has found, however, that legitimate religious conviction is not a roadblock for an observant Orthodox active duty service member. “If you come in with a positive, can-do attitude, if the only thing that is restricting you is your religion, they’ll bend over backwards to accommodate it,” said Berdugo. “If you use your religion as an excuse, people will see right through that and you’ll lose their respect.” Having lived in Ireland, England, France and America as a civilian, Berdugo said that Jewish faith and meaning is universal, although the details of traditions can be tied to local culture. Pronunciation of Hebrew words, traditional foods served on special holy days and the appearance of items found in the synagogue

believe that with our talented and committed staff, Andrews Federal Credit Union is on a strong strategic path to increase member value. We’ll continue to enhance services and expand product lines to serve the growing needs of our global membership.”

may change from region to region, but the words and teachings are unifyingly Jewish. Serving as a chaplain on deployment has shown Berdugo that same unity of faith. “I’m Orthodox, but I am able to take care of the needs of the entire congregation. When I have a service there’s no difference between Orthodox, Reformed or Conservative. We are one family. The unity moves me to tears, sometimes,” said Berdugo. “In America, it is harder, because there are other congregations available off base.” Chaplain Berdugo is launching a weekly lunchand-learn session starting Wednesday, Aug. 7. Each week, interested people of all faiths are welcome to meet at 11:45 a.m. in Chapel One to study the Torah portion of the week. Because all Jewish high holy days are in September this year, the group will discuss preparations for the holy days during the Aug. 28 lunch-andlearn. For information contact Chaplain Berdugo at raphael. berdugo@afncr.af.mil or 301981-2109.


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Andrews Gazette

Friday, August 2, 2013

American Legion Post 275 gets its first female commander BY AMBER LARKINS

THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

Chante Brown, 42, remembers when she first realized her then stay-at-home mother, Cassandra Belfield, was ambitious. “I was 8 or 9,” said Brown of Capitol Heights. “She just said to me one day, ‘I’m going to join the Army’.” On Sunday, Cassandra Belfield, 65, of Bowie, became the first woman to be sworn in as commander at Maryland American Legion Post 275 in Glenarden. She has been a member of the post since 2009. John McGee, a member of the American Legion Post for 25 years, said there are no requirements regarding how long someone must be a member before they can run for office. But, he said, “it’s usually people that’s been there awhile.” Nadine Seeney, the post’s historian, said she was the first woman ever elected to an office within the Glenarden post’s executive committee in 2011, when she became the post’s service officer. The 50-year-old organization is dedicated to volunteering in the community and helping veterans, said Seeney, who lives in Washington, D.C. Belfield said she plans to meet with the executive committee before deciding exactly what needs to be changed, but she said she will continue focusing on increasing membership to the nearly 1,000 member post and organizing volunteer events to help the community and veterans. She said she ran for the position because she wanted to help the community and other veterans, and thought her strengths were in her ability to lead. Four other women were sworn into officer positions for the ninemember executive committee after May 31 elections, Seeney said. Three women served on the executive committee for the 2012 to 2013 year.

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PHOTO BY BILL RYAN/THE PRINCE GEORGE’S GAZETTE

Cassandra Belfield of Bowie, the incoming commander for American Legion Post 275, greets current Commander Stanley Shaw, of Greenbelt, Vice Commander of Department of Maryland Patricia McCoy, of St. Leonard, and Prince George’s Commander George Schaab of Laurel before the installation ceremony in Lanham on Sunday.

“It’s a good change for the post because women have a tendency to be more focused multi-taskers,” Seeney said. “[Belfield] is a strong woman; I think she’ll be a good commander.” Belfield served in the Army from 1978 to 1982 and is a federal government retiree and a mother of two, a grandmother of 10 and a great-grandmother of two. In addition to her Post 275 duties, Belfield is president of the Lake Arbor Social Seniors group.

She said she joined the American Legion in 2009 after visiting it with a friend. “I went there and it was great fellowship with people similar to me,” Belfield said. “I decided I wanted to get involved in the American Legion other than just going there to visit.” She became the first female vice commander of the post in 2011, a stint that encouraged Howell Leftwich, a member and former vice commander of Ameri-

can Legion Post 275, to push her to run for commander. “The time was right. Her position as first vice commander showed me she had leadership qualities,” Leftwich said. Belfield said she has been inspired by comrades at other posts, some of whom have volunteered with the legion for 20 to 30 years. “To see their commitment — it just makes you want to be just like them,” said Belfield, who added that she volunteered with one man in his 90s who has

been handing out toiletries at the Veteran’s Affairs Hospital every Wednesday for more than 30 years. “The people in the organization — they sort of like charge me up when I see them doing things and I listen to what they’ve done, because I’m new,” Belfield said. “I’m the new kid on the block.” This story originally appeared in the July 30, 2013 edition of The Prince George’s Gazette.


8

Andrews Gazette

AFDO MovesHistory AIR FORCE DECLASSIFICATION OFFICE

Team Andrews Air Force Declassification Office completed a first-ever move of more than 370 federal record center boxes June 25 to the National Archives at College Park, Md. The boxes hold valuable historical documents of research and development case files from the late 1950s to the early 1980s. “It never ceases to amaze me just what my team can get accomplished.” said Dennis Day AFDO director. “Retired Army Master Sgt. George Gordon is the AFDO logistics mastermind behind the move.” Along with his crew, augmented by Staff Sgt. Darryl Donaldson and Senior Airman Elijah Bell of the 779th Medical Group, Gordon worked tirelessly organizing pallets for a smooth pick-up by the National Archives, Day said. “We usually review records from the Washington National Records Center, Suitland, at our office and return them to the depository,” said Gordon. “The first permanent withdraw of historical records done here for declassification and submission to the National Archives for permanent retention went successfully.”

The Burch Law Firm, LLC

COMMENTARY, from page 2 tion of the New York voting public who will be happy to vote for “whichever candidate is wearing clothes.” Weiner, and Eliot Spitzer, and so many other powerful, successful, wealthy people at the top of their careers, surrounded by a world they seem to dominate, just aren’t satisfied to be who they are. They’re not happy being with the people in their lives, or more importantly being with the people they are on the inside. It looks like they’re desperate to grasp their old image of themselves, instead of being justifiably proud of the things they’ve accomplished, the lessons they have learned, and the people they’ve influenced with more than just a little skeevy swagger. Modern life is fast. The days are long. It’s hard to make time for lunch with a friend, or an evening in the yard with the family. We’re all running around with our hair on fire, trying to accomplish the tasks before us, trying to make our mark on the world, trying to be loved, and wanted, and appreciated. But if you don’t have time to look into the eyes of people who know and care for you; if you can’t trust that they’ll be looking back at you with an honest, caring connection; if it’s 2:30 a.m. and you’ve had a drink and you’ve got no one to talk to, what do you do? Everyone makes errors in judgment, and the ease of modern communication has the potential to magnify those errors, even for people who ought to be savvy enough, experienced enough, confident enough and, yes, old enough to know better. Slow down: when you look for love and validation, maybe the first place you look shouldn’t be in the bathroom mirror.

Worship Guide

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Friday, August 2, 2013

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Friday, August 2, 2013

Andrews Gazette

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Andrews Gazette

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Andrews, DCMilitary

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