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My Shopper’s Cobleskill Office FREEWill-BeTake One Closing at 12:30 pm on Fridays

Pennysaver

DELAWARE EDITION

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

INDEX ring SpHome

INDEX

SECTION A

Miscellaneous Reader Ads..............2–5 & 12

Improvement GROCERY Syron’s Market.........................3

Get Inspired

GUIDES Antiques & Collectibles..........24 Auctions...........................10–11 Automotive.......................22–23 out Computer Check Corner...................24 the special Employment.....................14–16 section inside Services Offered.................16 Farm & Country.....................10 Firewood................................24 Flea Markets & Commercial Sales..............19 For The Community.........16–17 Garage Sales.........................19 Good Times...........................18 Health & Fitness....................24 Home Improvement...............19 Tools...................................19 Lawn & Garden......................10 Pets & Animals......................19 Professional Connection.......................6–7 Antiques..............................2 Reader Ad Form......................8 Appliances/Furniture. ..........6 Real Estate............................13 Appliance Repair.................6 Auction................................2 Recreation.............................18 Automotive........................20 Hunters’ Headquarters.......18 Business Opportunities.......2 Tax & Finance........................24 Business Professionals.....18

COUPONS Carpet Cleaning..................6 Classified Coupon.............19 Money Saving Coupons......2 &4 Community Calendar.... 2-14

FEATURES Computers..........................2 Schoharie Directory.................9 Crossword. ..........................6 Crossword ..........4 Schoharie Office Answers. for the .Aging Dining & Entertainment..........9 (Experience).......................16 Family Health Care............. 4-5 Spring Car Care...............20–21 Farm....................................6 Weekly Puzzle.........................5 General................................2 Help Wanted............... 16-17

Home Heating.....................6 INSERTS Home Improvement............6 Price Chopper (fr) Horoscopes.......................17 Rite Aid (lc) Mobile Homes...................17 Great American Obituaries............................4 - Prattsville (lc) Pets.....................................6 Tops Market - Stamford (lc) Real Estate........................17 Recreation/Sports.............14 Hannaford (lc) Rentals..............................17 Valley Market (lc) Services...............................6 Save A Lot (lc) Spring Home 7-13 WalmartImprovement................. (lc) RailroadTrucks. Ave................................20 Supply (lc) Wanted................................2 Bassett Cancer Services (lc)

(lc) = limited circulation (fr) = full run

INSERTS

My Shopper Rite Aid* 2403 State Route 7,Big Suite M* 4 Price Chopper* East Side Village Mall, Tops* Tractor Supply* Cobleskill, NY 12043 Curtis Lumber* (518) 234-8215 •*limited FAX:distribution (518) 234-8520 classifieds@myshopperonline.com

94.3 FM WLRF-LP RADIO VESTAL Seventh-day Adventist Church

634 State Highway 205 Oneonta, NY 607-432-8354

Seventh-day Adventist Church

2861 County Route 10 Summit, NY 607-432-8354

Cruisin’ for a Cure Schoharie Saturday, April 27, 2019 • 11am-10pm K & M Fuels, Inc. 518-227-2093

See Inside For Details

Cobleskill

105 Kenyon Road, Cobleskill, NY

518-234-4919

• Fuel Oil • Kerosene • Off Road Diesel

Dish 9393 • Online TV 24/7

Vendors • Games Food • Music Performances Car• Fireplaces Show Stoves Luminary ceremony • Inserts at dusk

Oneonta

6524 State Hwy. 23, Oneonta, NY

607-434-3994

www.relayforlife.org/ DelawareCountyNY

For Info on entering the car show, www.tashearthandpatio.com SLOANSVILLE, NEW YORK call Beth O’Brien at 607-434-1319 R.L. ParsonsForms Inc, also available online on Facebook Heating Oil • Diesel Delaware County Fairgrounds - Walton, ••NY Delaware County, NY Kerosene • Propane Ad brought to you by Decker Advertising. Relay For Life • Heating & Air Conditioning

518-868-2126

See our money saving coupon inside!

See ad inside for details!

COBLESKILL

Sales & Service

See Us Inside in the

STONE PRODUCTS & DRIVEWAY REPAIR 4 Tons Delivered $85 8 Mile Radius of Howes Cave or Schoharie

SUPPLY WAGON RENTALS Tent Rentals See Inside for Details! Servicing all of Schoharie County

518-848-3231 558 Main St., Cobleskill Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials

SEE INSIDE FOR COUPON


2

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

ANTIQUES WANTED TO BUY - ANTIQUES

CLOCK REPAIR ANTIQUE CLOCK REpair by Rod Spangle,

and old things. One item

Unadilla, since 1984.

or entire estate. Call Carl

Reasonable and Guar-

Eklund 607-287-6258 or Steve & Hilary Eklund

anteed. By appointment.

607-435-1851. No obli-

607-369-7619.

gation. CB31AQdu

CB16AQd

www.countyshopperonline.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES LOCAL BREAD ROUTE for sale: Great business opportunity. 4 day work week. 95% financed. Excellent income. Call 607-865-8105 or 607434-8237. 17BOdu

COLLECTIBLES COLLECTIBLE HESS truck 1997, brand new in box, $25. 607-3263329. O16CLdu COLLECTIBLE HESS truck 1994, brand new in box, $25. 607-3263329. O16CLdu COLLECTIBLE HESS truck 1995, brand new in box, $25. 607-3263329. O16CLdu

COMPUTERS

McIntosh Auction Service

607-832-4829 or 4241 • Market 845-586-1088

ICO COMPUTER REPAIR. We sell & repair laptops & desktop computers, IPhones, and Mac computers. We even make house calls! Monday- Friday 10:005:30. Saturday 10-3. 247 Delaware Street, Walton, 607-865-5775. CB25CCd

GENERAL

HOSKING SALES LLC

– CERTIFIED ORGANIC MARKETING AGENCY Weekly Sales Every Monday 11:30 with Misc. & Small Animals followed by Dairy & Livestock Mon. April 15th – Sold 297 head, Cull ave. $.47 top cow $.59, Orgnaic cull dairy ave. $.80 top cow $.98, Bulls/Steers $.65, Bull calves top $1.65, heifer calves top $.35– top beef calves $2.50, Lambs 40#–70# $1.30 –$2.50, cull sheep $.42 – $1.20. Mon. April 22nd – Normal Monday Sale & Monthly Organic Day. Special: Certified Organic Dairy consisting of 30 milking age mostly fresh and balance due within 60 days mostly Holsteins. Also 10 Organic Milking age cows from overstocked Dairy. Another group of Certified Organic 12 really nice Fresh & springing Holstein young cows will be a peak production for pasture season. NOTE – the Grassfed Dairy will NOT be coming. Mon. April 29th – Normal Monday Sale & Our Spring Beef Turnout Sale – Call now to advertise your group. We are doing a Monday sale because of our sale schedule. We will start taking animals in on Sat. the 27th anything that needs to be preg. Checked we would like to have here by Sunday 11AM. 15 Wagyu – F1’s feeder cattle and 2 Reg. Wagyu bulls. 2 Maine–Anjou cows ready to breed, 1 yrlg steer, 2 Angus feeders from one farm. A group of 40 head from one farm – mostly preg. Brood cows due May – June. Expecting a large number of beef breed feeders and brood cows. Mon. May 6th – Normal Monday Sale & Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale Mon. May 13th – Normal Monday sale & Monthly Heifer Sale Mon. May 20th – Normal Monday Sale & Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale Mon. May 27th – Normal Monday sale & Monthly Organic Day Watch for 2019 Sales: Sat. Oct. 26th – Fall Premier All Breed Sale – 100 head of Registered All

Breed Cattle Sell **Trucking Assistance – Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Website. Call to advertise in any of these sales, it makes a difference. Watch website for any last minute updates.

Directions: Hosking Sales 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Like us on facebook

HOSKING SALES

Tom & Brenda Hosking: 607–847–8800; Cell: 607–972–1770 or 1771 Dan Hosking: 607–972–8773 LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW? GIVE US A CALL!

4 BLADE, 52” CEILING fan and light, $40. 607865-8733. O16Gdu HEAVY DUTY 30” X 72”, white folding table by Lancaster Tables and Seating. Good for flea markets. Never used. $35. 607-652-4018. O16Gdu LARGE NEW CAMPING duffle bag, $30. 607538-9486. O16Gdu

BT

AUCTION SERVICE

Brian Terry Auctions 2019 St. Hwy 357 Unadilla

I-88, Exit 11, East on 357, 1 mile on left

2019 Auction Dates May 5 & 19 June 2 September 1 & 15 October 6 & 20 Start Time 10:00am

Consignment details will be advertised the week prior to auction.

Due to large quantities of consignments already, please call ahead (607)829-5595 for availability of space. All items of no value will be turned away. Food shack & comfort facilities available. Brian Terry Patricia Terry 607-287-5242 607-829-5595 Auctionzip.com #47274

ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!!

Damtown Peddler Party Rentals

Tents, Tables, Chairs, Cold Plate Tap Systems, DJ Service, BBQ Trailer for Hire Fully Licensed Call for a Quote!

845-943-9463

B R O W N L E AT H E R jacket with liner, size medium, like new, never worn, $25. 607-5389486. O16Gdu VINTAGE METAL FIRST aid packet - U.S. Go, $15. 607-746-8219. O16Gdu

SCRAP METAL

SKIPPY’S SERVICES now does free pickup on any type of scrap metal including vehicles. We also sell mulch, top soil, crushed stone, sand; including light excavation. Call Skippy for more details. 607-746-8319. CB28Gd CLOTHING LOOKING drab as the weather? Revitalize with interesting trimmings, buckles, ribbons, bows, buttons. Create new spring looks, $10. 845-254-9955. O16Gdu PERFECT CONDITION fossil coyote skull. Conversation piece, educational, for amateur paleontologist, collector. Bonus - additional bones, $10. 845-254-9955. O16Gdu FIVE PIECE GARDEN tools, $20. 607-5389486. O16Gdu

FRUIT TREES

FIRST FROST through April is time to prune Fruit trees, blueberry plants, grapevines. All types of pruning. 58 years experience. Call BOB’S TREE SERVICE 607-746-3365. BTFGd JEWELRY BOX. INTERnational Silver Company. Brand new in box, $15. Call 607-865-8733. O16Gdu SUZE ORMAN FINANcial planner kit, $40. 607746-8219. O16Gdu MUSEUM QUALITY 2’x2’ tapestry. Transform an ordinary living room wall into a dramatic castle like setting. Great buy, $25. 845-254-9955. O16Gdu OVERNIGHT CARRIER. New, never used, $25. 607-538-9486. O16Gdu ONE PAIR JBL SPEAKers (large) plus stands, $450. Call Doug 607538-1422. 17Gdu BISSELL QUICK Steamer rug shampooer, needs belt, with booklet, $40. 607-746-8219. O16Gdu PHILIPS REFLECTOR infrared tanning bulb, 125 watt, 5” diameter, $10. 607-746-8219. O16Gdu

THE GOLDSMITH

41 CHESTNUT STREET, Oneonta, N.Y. Monday Friday 10:30 - 5:00 p.m. Handcrafted & estate jewelry. Buy, sell, make & repair jewelry. (We recycle scrap materials.) 607-865-5000. CB24Gdu

COUNTY SHOPPER

CALL FOR DELAWARE COUNTY ARTISTS & ARTISANS to participate in the

1st Annual Walton Art Walk

on Saturday, July 20th 2019, 10am-6pm. For more information & application call: West Branch Artists 607-865-7201 or email: caroline.fay@gmail.com. Submission Deadline: May 15th

WANTED GREENHOUSE WANTed, at least 15’ x 60’ or larger. 607-386-8639. OTFWTdu

COMMUNITY CALENDAR FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF EVENTS AND MEETINGS SEARCHABLE BY DATE, CATEGORY AND LOCATION GO TO WWW. COUNTYSHOPPERONLINE. COM AND CLICK ON CALENDAR.

• April 18 - Dog Mushing Talk

Karen Land, public speaker and Iditarod racer, will be here with her dog a gear to talk about dog mushing. Appropriate for all ages. 6:30 p.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5929.

• April 18 - Family Resource Network Support Group

Many Clearance Items & Roll-Backs. Floor Model Discounts &More

The MATTRESS BARN

2.5 Miles East of Belleayre Mountain on

Route 28, Pine Hill, NY

1-800-4-KATNAP 845-254-4578

out is HO Gauge. New Members are welcome to join. For more information call Don at 845-254-5311. 7 p.m. Margaretville-New Kingston Presbyterian Church. 87 Orchard Street, Margaretville NY.

• April 18 - Colchester Senior Citizens Club

Dish to pass luncheon. Program & meeting follows. 12 p.m. James S. Moore American Legion Hall. 1 Legion Lane, Downsville NY. For more information call 607-363-2208.

• April 18 - Delaware River Lodge #439

Call 607-434-1403 for information. 7:30 p.m. Masonic Lodge. Meredith Street, Delhi NY.

• April 18 - Delhi Food Bank

Located downstairs. Not open on holidays. 3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. United Ministry Church. 46 Church St., Delhi NY.

• April 18 - Delhi Seniors Social Club

For further information please contact Roberta at 607-4644012. Meets at noon. Delhi Senior Community Room. 7 Main St., Delhi NY.

This support group is for families of adults or children with OPWDD Eligibility. This month’s topic is Keeping Your Loved One Safe. Parents can call Karyn Kanzer at 607-4320001 or visit familyrn.org to register. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. New Hope Community Church Harby Center. 45 Stockton Ave., Walton NY.

• April 18 - Downsville Lions Club

• April 18 - Panel Discussion on Legalization of Marijuana in NY

Play games or put puzzles together. followed by a soup supper. 1:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church. 101 North St., Walton NY.

SUNY Delhi will be hosting a panel discussion on the effects of marijuana legalization in NY. The event is free and the public is welcome to attend. 12 p.m.-2 p.m. Okun Theatre, Farrell Hall, SUNY Delhi. 454 Delhi Dr., Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-4443.

• April 18 - Andes Senior Citizens Club

Dish to pass luncheon at noon. Program and meeting follows luncheon. Andes Firehouse. County Route 1/ Tremperskill Road, Andes NY.

• April 18 - Baby Storytime

This story time is for babies 0-15 months and their caregiver. Join us for nursery rhymes, simple stories, songs, and more! 11 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 18 - CANO Writers Salon

CANO Writers Salons take place on the 3rd Thursday of the month (Feb-Nov). Open mic from 7:30-8 p.m. All welcome to share original work up to 5 min. long. Family friendly, supportive group. Featured author at 8 p.m. Refreshments served. 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Wilber Mansion. 11 Ford Ave., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-2070.

• April 18 - Catskill Mountain Railroad Club

Meets in the basement. All modelers are welcome to attend. The model train lay

Lions club members are men and women who strive to make a difference in their local community as well as communities worldwide. New members welcome. 6 p.m. Downsville Diner. Main Street, Downsville NY.

• April 18 - Game Day

• April 18 - Mahjong Games

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Cannon Free Library. 40 Elm Street, Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-2662.

• April 18 - Preschool Story Time

Held in the children’s room of Fairview Public Library. We read stories and do a craft with the children during each session, along with other fun activities such as singing, some learning activities, and creating with Play-Doh. The child(ren) must be accompanied by an adult. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Fair view Public Library. 43 Walnut St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3791.

• April 18 - Preschool Storytime

Stories, songs, games and a craft on a fun theme. 10:30 a.m. Cannon Free Library. 40 Elm Street, Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-2662.

• April 18 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Don’t let your extra seeds go to waste! Bring them to the library and browse seeds donated by fellow gardeners. Self-serve seed swap at all Delaware County libraries. Andes Public Library, 242 Main St, Andes, 5-8 p.m.; Bovina Public Library, 33 Maple Ave, Bovina Center, 1-5 p.m.; Cannon Free Library, 40 Elm St., Delhi, 9:30 a.m.ñ7 p.m.; Skene Memorial Library 1017 main St., Fleischmanns, 1-5 p.m.;


COUNTY SHOPPER

www.countyshopperonline.com

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

3

to Labor Day and Thanksgiving to Christmas. Other times for special events or by prior arrangement. Free. GOHS History Center. 183 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-0960.

• April 19 - Preschool Storytime

Stories, songs, dance and crafts for your child. A different theme each week. 10:30 a.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton. For more information call 607-865-5929.

CALENDAR

continued from page 2

• April 18 - Walton Lions Club

New members welcome. 6:30 p.m. Danny’s Restaurant. Gardiner Place, Walton NY.

• April 19 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Gardeners, swap your seeds and expand your garden. Andes, 1-5 p.m.; Delhi, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fleischmanns, 1-5 p.m.; Hancock, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Margaretville, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sidney, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Stamford, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Walton, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See Thursday’s entry for addresses.

A Clean Car... Is a Happy Car!

Franklin Free Library, 334 Main St., Franklin, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.; Louise Adelia Read Memorial Library, 104 Read Road, Hancock, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fairview Public Library, 42 Walnut St., Margaretville, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Roxbury Library Association, 53742 NY-30, Roxbury, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sidney Memorial Public Library, 8 River St., Sidney, 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Stamford Village Library, 117 Main St., Stamford, 1ñ7 p.m.; William B. Ogden Free Library, 42 Gardiner Place, Walton, 2-8 p.m.

• April 18 - Soup Supper

A nutritious meal free for members of the community. Handicap accessible. Dinners are not served on holidays. 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Walton. 101 North Street, Walton NY.

• April 18 - Teen Social and Study Group

By a teen for teens. A Young Adult study group focusing on socialization, studying, and creative idea sharing with possible monthly book discussions. Open to grades 6-9. 4 p.m. Stamford Village Library. 117 Main St., Stamford NY. For more information call 607-652-5001.

• April 18 - Thrift Shop

A place to shop for the whole family. 12 p.m.-4 p.m. Margaretville Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Shop. 743 Main St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3737.

• April 18 - Toddler Story Time

This story time is for toddlers 15 months to about age 3. Read a few books, sing songs and usually do a hands-on activity. 10 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 19 - What Montana Taught Me

SUNY Oneonta Senior Kyle Dudgeon spent last summer in remote areas of Montana surveying birds and photographing wildlife. Part of the Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society meeting. Refreshments will be served. 7:30 p.m. Elm Park United Methodist Church. 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta NY.

• April 19 - Lego Time

Join others as we have fun building with the library’s LEGO collection. Thanks to the Friends of the Libraries for purchasing them! All ages preschool through school age. 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 19 - Play & Learn

We will have hands-on activities including developmentally appropriate games, sensory materials, dramatic play items, and more. Drop in any time, for ages 0-6. 10 a.m.11:30 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 19 - Thrift Shop

A place to shop for the whole family. 12 p.m.-4 p.m. Margaretville Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Shop. 743 Main St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3737.

• April 19 - Andes Food Bank

3 p.m.-6 p.m. Citihope. 143 Main St., Andes NY. For more information call 845-676-3344.

• April 19 - Elijah’s Closet Thrift Store

Wheelchair lift & elevator available. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Congregational Church. 4 Mead Street, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-7935.

• April 19 - Friday Family Swim Night

SUNY Delhi Friday Family Swim Nights Special Enjoy a swim Friday evenings from 6-9 p.m. during the Spring Semester. SUNY Delhi Bonus Pool Hours during campus winter break, Feb. 25 -March 1, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Kunsela Pool, SUNY Delhi. 454 Delhi Dr., SUNY Delhi NY. For more information call 6077464263.

• April 19 - Greater Oneonta Historical Society History Center

Housed in the oldest brick building in downtown Oneonta. Local history exhibits and a permanent exhibit on the history of Oneonta. Open Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Fridays noon to 4 p.m. Expanded hours Memorial Day

Just In Case You Forgot... We do vinyl replacement windows & vinyl siding BOTSCH-ZUPO GENERAL CONSTRUCTION Call Tony For A FREE Estimate

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• April 19 - The Kirk Thrift Shoppe

Selling clothing, housewares, toys and more. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. First Presbyterian Church. 4 Clinton St., Delhi NY.

• April 20 - Community Easter Egg Hunt

Community wide Easter egg hunt in Stamford. This event is free and all are welcome. 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Robinson Terrace Rehabilitation Center. 28652 NY-23, Stamford NY.

• April 20 - Easter Egg Hunt

Held indoors and outdoors. Kids are broken up into three age groups and search for plastic eggs to redeem for prizes. Ages 2 and up. All are invited. 1 p.m. DeLancey United Presbyterian Church. 444 County Highway 2, DeLancey NY.

• April 20 - Easter Egg Hunt

Easter egg hunt, games, prizes, crafts and a visit from the Easter Bunny. Bring your own basket. 11 a.m. First Presbyterian Church. 4 Clinton St., Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-2155.

• April 20 - Easter Egg Hunt & BBQ

Ages 2-4 10-11 a.m.; Ages 5-7 11 a.m.-noon; Ages 8+ noon1 p.m.; barbecue 1-2 p.m. Sponsored by Delaware River Lodge 439 and Kappa Sigma Epsilon. Benefits the American Cancer Society. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Courthouse Square. Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 20 - Easter Egg Hunt & Fun

Come and search for hidden eggs, enjoy free face painting, snacks and desserts, activity tables, a coloring contest, a selfie/picture contest, prizes and bring your phones or cameras and take pictures with the Easter Bunny! 10 a.m. - Easter hunt by age group 0-5 & 6-10. 11am - Ages 11+ Selfie Scavenger Hunt Style - Find your items around the village of Walton. Great for groups or family fun. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. New Hope Community Church. 45 Stockton Ave., Walton NY.

• April 20 - Thrift Shop

A place to shop for the whole family. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Margaretville Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Shop. 743 Main St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3737.

• April 20 - Elijah’s Closet Thrift Store

Wheelchair lift & elevator available. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Congregational Church. 4 Mead Street, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-7935.

• April 20 - Greater Oneonta Historical Society History Center

Housed in the oldest brick building in downtown Oneonta. Local history exhibits and a permanent exhibit on the history of Oneonta. Open Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Fridays noon to 4 p.m. Expanded hours Memorial Day to Labor Day and Thanksgiving to Christmas. Other times for special events or by prior arrangement. Free. GOHS History Center. 183 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-0960.

• April 20 - The Kirk Thrift Shoppe

Selling clothing, housewares, toys and more. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. First Presbyterian Church. 4 Clinton St., Delhi NY.

• April 20 - Artists Over Easy

If you do art, like art, collect art, why not come and have one of the Tulip & Rose’s breakfasts and enjoy artsy company! 9 a.m. Tulip & Rose Cafe. 435 Main St., Franklin NY. For more information call 607-829-4040.

• April 20 - Book Club for Adults

This book club meets once a month for discussion and our book each month is chosen by our members. 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 20 - Coffee’s Ready

Weekly baked goodies and good conversation. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

Preservation Commission Meeting

Historic Preservation Commission, Town of Roxbury, Delaware County, New York, for the year 2019 will meet the third Saturday of January, April, July and October for their regular monthly meeting. 10 a.m. Roxbury Town Hall. 53690 State Highway 30, Roxbury NY. continued on page 5

• April 20 - Community Fires, Men’s Fires and Women’s Fires

Held adjacent to the Blue Deer Center in Margaretville. Our resident shamans and initiated Fire Keepers of the Sacred Fire Community, offer monthly community sacred fires usually held on the third Saturday of the month. All are welcome. For more information visit www.bluedeer.org/events. Blue Deer Center. 1155 County Route 6, Margaretville NY.

• April 20 - Historic

Home Sweet Home Begins at DNBD

• April 20 - Sidney Historical Association Museum

The museum houses newspapers, genealogy section, military items, old yearbooks, Bendix/Amphenol history and much more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sidney Town Hall. 44 Grand St., Sidney NY.

SPRING

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Thu., April 25

Certain restrictions apply. Please contact bank for details. Reimbursement of third party fees paid by DNBD is required if the loan is terminated prior to the three year anniversary of the loan funding.

SALE! 1-7pm

Fri., April 26 9am-5pm

Sat., April 27

9am-Noon (Bag Sale) The First United Methodist Church 101 NORTH ST., WALTON

No Early Birds 607-865-5765

THE DELAWARE NATIONAL BANK OF DELHI

www.dnbd.bank

124 Main Street, Delhi NY • 855-413-3544 42568 State Highway 28, Margaretville NY • 855-423-3544 2503 Prosser Hollow Road, Davenport NY • 855-433-3544 1058 Main Street, Hobart NY • 855-443-3544 Oneonta Loan Office, 265 Main Street, Oneonta NY • 855-403-3544 Sidney Loan Office, 276 State Highway 7, Sidney NY • 855-483-3544


FOR 4/18/2019 4

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

www.countyshopperonline.com

FAMILY

HEALTH

• April 18 - Free Fitness Class

Begins promptly at 5:15 p.m. Core de Force Live is more than a typical cardio class. It’s an empowering, corefocused workout, inspired by the highest-octane sport in the world - Mixed Martial Arts. Please: Clean sneakers only Bring water and a towel. A mat is recommended but not required. 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Hobart Activity Center. 8 Pine St., Hobart NY. For more information call 607-437-1495.

• April 18 - Learn To Meditate

HEALTH AND SUPPORT GROUPS • April 18 - 449 AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 18 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 18 - AA Meeting

Open Beginners Meeting. No smoking. 8 p.m. Christ Church. Gardiner Place, Walton NY.

• April 18 - AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 18 - AA Meeting

Open meeting, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 18 - Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group

A safe, confidential, supportive environment or community and a chance for participants to develop informal mutual support and social relationships. They also educate and inform participants about dementia and help participants develop methods and skills to solve problems. 2 p.m. Elm Park United Methodist Church. 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-547-1650.

• April 18 - Delhi AA Meeting

Open Big Book Meeting. 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 18 - Delhi AlAnon Meetings

Welcomes, supports & comforts persons whose lives have been affected by the alcohol/ drug abuse of a loved one. Alateen members welcome. Does not meet on holidays. 6 p.m. United Ministry Church. Church Street, Delhi NY.

Kathryn Pixley

ONEONTA – A memorial service for Kathryn Pixley, 76, who passed away on Jan. 9, 2019, is scheduled for 1 p.m., Saturday, April 20, at the Lutheran Church of the Atonement, 1 Center St., Oneonta, across from Hartwick College. Music and poetry, both central to Kathryn’s life, will be featured in the service. A reception in the church’s Fellowship Hall will follow the service.

Kathleen F. Howarth

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Kathleen F. Howarth, 92, formerly of Oneonta and the town of Meredith, passed away Feb. 6, 2019, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had resided since June 2017. A funeral mass will be offered at 11 a.m., Friday, May 3, at St. Mary’s Church in Oneonta. Burial will be in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Emmons, directly following mass. Friends and family are invited to a reception after the burial service from 2 to 5 p.m., the details for which will be announced at the service. Memorial contributions may be made in Kathleen’s name to Catholic Charities, 176 S. Main St. Oneonta, NY 13820, or a charity of one’s choice.

Don S. Lapidus

Publishers: Randy & Kim Shepard Production Manager: Ralph Schoonebeek

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - Don S. Lapidus, 75, recently of Torrington and New Haven, Conn., and previously of Oneonta, died

Join in an hour of mindfulness - awareness practice. Alternating periods of sitting and walking meditation. Ongoing instruction is available. Firsttimers are always welcome. Free. 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 18 - Live and Let Live AA Meeting

Closed meeting, discussion. No smoking. 8 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church. 14 Monument St., Deposit NY.

• April 18 - Margaretville New Beginners AA Meeting

Closed living sober meeting. No smoking allowed. 12 p.m. Advent Christian Church. 109 Maple St., Margaretville NY.

• April 18 - Nar-anon Family Group

Drug addiction is a family disease. Nar-anon is a support group operated by and for the families of addicts. We understand the struggles of those coping with the addictions of a loved one. We offer our help by listening, and by sharing our experiences, strengths and hopes. Central to our approach is respecting your anonymity. 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church. 12 Ford Ave., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-3291.

• April 18 - The Compassionate Friends

The grief support group will hold a sharing session for families who are struggling with grief after losing a child. Our meeting room is easily accessible from the Church Street entrance. Refreshments will be served. For more information about the Oneonta Region Chapter of TCF, visit www.tcfoneonta.org or call Kathryn and Al Davino at 607746-7396. The group does not meet in December. 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church. 66 Chestnut St., Oneonta NY.

• April 18 - WIC Outreach

Please call 607-746-1700 to find out if you are eligible for WIC benefits. A satellite office will be set up at the location listed below. The main office is located at 35430 State Hwy 10 Hamden, NY 13782, which is closed during outreach. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. First United Methodist Church. 107 Second St., Deposit NY.

March 20, 2019, following a brief illness.

Angeline M. Nielsen

ONEONTA – Angeline M. Nielsen, 92, of Oneonta, died Monday, March 25, 2019, at Chestnut Park Rehab and Nursing in Oneonta. Donations may be made to St. Mary’s Church, 39 Walnut St., Oneonta, NY 13820.

Lise Anne Berg

MARGARETVILLE – Lise Anne Berg, formerly of Lancaster, Mass., a native of Andes, died peacefully at Mountainside Residential Care Center in Margaretville on March 26, 2019 following a long illness. Donations in honor of Lise can be made to the Alzheimer’s Association or the Humane Society of the United States.

Carl D. Miller Jr.

JEFFERSON – Carl D. Miller Jr., 65, died Sunday, March 31, 2019, at his home in Jefferson, following a hard battle with cancer. A celebration of his life will be announced at a later date.

Blanche E. Powers

UNADILLA – Blanche E. Powers, 76, of Unadilla, died peacefully at home surrounded by her family on Sunday, March 31, 2019. Donations can be made to ALZ.org, or Alzheimer’s Association, PO Box 96011, Washington, D.C., 20090-6011, or by

CARE

• April 19 - Monkey See, Monkey Do

Exercise while seated in a chair, imitate the movements of Patti and get a great workout. 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 19 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 19 - All or Nothing AA Meeting

Open discussion, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 19 - Community Wellness & Social Services

Stop in for free Healthcare Advising, Weatherization, Farm Fresh Produce for SNAP recipients, Domestic Violence and Crime Victims Assistance, Dental Referrals, Pre-Diabetes Program. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Prattsville Arts Center. 14562 Main Street, Prattsville NY.

• April 19 - Delhi AA Group

Closed meeting, discussion group. Wheelchair accessible. No smoking allowed. 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 19 - Downsville - Al-Anon

Support for persons whose lives have been affected by the alcohol/drug abuse of a loved one. 6 p.m. Colchester Methodist Church. 15151 St Hwy 30, Downsville NY.

• April 19 - Lunch Bunch AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. No smoking. 1 p.m. St. Mary’s School Annex. 28 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 19 - Margaretville New Beginnings AA Group

Closed meeting, discussion group. Last Friday of the month is open with speakers. Wheelchair accessible, no smoking allowed. 7 p.m. Advent Christian Church. 109 Orchard Street, Margaretville NY.

• April 19 - NA Meeting

7:15 - 8:15 p.m. New Hope Community Church. Stockton Ave., Walton NY.

• April 19 - Parkinson’s Support Group

Does not meet in December. Contact: Doug and Dorothy Scott Fielder (607) 433-2727 Currie and Virginia Marr (607) 432-5434 dfielder@ stny.rr.com scottfielder@stny. rr.com cmarr@stny.rr.com. 1 p.m.-3 p.m. The Plains at Parish Homestead. 163 Heritage Circle, Oneonta NY.

• April 19 - Stamford Over Easy AA Step Group

Speaker with open discussion meeting. 7 p.m. United Methodist Church. 88 Main St., Stamford NY.

Obituaries

calling 1-800-272-3900.

Donald Paul Scott

DEPOSIT – Donald Paul Scott, 55, died unexpectedly on Tuesday, April 2, 2019. Memorial donations may be made to www.whitetailsunlimited.com or to a wildlife conservation charity of one’s choice.

Douglas C. Silvernail

ONEONTA – Douglas C. Silvernail, 78, of Oneonta, died Sunday, April 7, 2019, at Cooperstown Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation.

David Dean Erbe

SIDNEY – Baseball player, joke-teller and fisherman, David Dean Erbe, 74, died April 8, 2019 surrounded by his family.

Peter B. Hager

MASONVILLE – Peter B. Hager died peacefully on the morning of April 8, 2019. Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m., Thursday, April 25, at C.H. Landers Funeral Chapel, 21 Main St., Sidney. A memorial service followed by a luncheon will be held at 1 p.m., Friday, April 26, at the Masonville Federated Church. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Pete’s name to the Future Farmers of America or local SPCA.

Ruth B. Traynham

WALTON – Ruth B. Traynham, 88, of Walton died peacefully on Monday, April 8, 2019 at Chestnut Park Rehabilitation

COUNTY SHOPPER

FAMILY

HEALTH

• April 19 - Winners Circle AA Group

Open meeting discussion group. No smoking allowed. 7 p.m. Father Rausch Memorial Hall. 346 West Main Street, Hancock NY.

• April 20 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 20 - AA Seeking Serenity Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 20 - Bridge AA Group

9 a.m. Hamden Presbyterian Church. 35790 Route 10, Hamden NY.

• April 20 - Community Exercise Walk

Anyone interested should meet at the Village Pavilion in Margaretville Saturdays at 9 a.m. Information: 845-5863555. Village Pavilion.

• April 20 - Little Delaware AA Group

Speakers Meeting. 6 p.m. Saint James Church. 55 Lake Delaware Drive, Delhi NY.

• April 20 - Multiple Sclerosis Support Group

Multiple Sclerosis support group meets the 3rd Sat. of each month. Please contact 607-433-1169 for details.

• April 20 - Saturday Night Speakers AA Meeting

Open meeting with speakers. 6:30 p.m. St. James’ Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 20 - Survivors of Suicide Loss

Contact Donna L ange at 607-435-3112. 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Lutheran Atonement Church. 1 Center St., Oneonta NY.

CARE

• April 22 - 449 AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 22 - Monkey See, Monkey Do

Exercise while seated in a chair, imitate the movements of Patti and get a great workout. 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 22 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 22 - All or Nothing AA Meeting

Open discussion, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 22 - Bovina AA Group

Big Book open discussion. 7 p.m. Bovina United Presbyterian Church. 5177 Bovina Rd, Bovina Center NY.

• April 22 - Just for Today NA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 7 p.m. DVH Hospital, Ambulatory Waiting Room. 1 Titus Place, Walton NY.

• April 22 - Let’s Be Sensible

Our goal is to learn how to lose weight the healthy way. Join our team for group support, nutritional information and learning to strive for healthy living. Meets every Mon. from 5 - 6 p.m. For information call Leo Hart at 607-865-6233. Riverside Alliance Church. Stockton Ave., Walton NY.

• April 21 - AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 7 p.m. Andes Presbyterian Church. 70 Delaware Ave., Andes NY.

• April 21 - Covered Bridge AA Group

6 p.m. Buck Hill Farms. 185 Fuller Road, Jefferson NY.

• April 21 - Downsville AA Group

Open AA Meeting. 7 p.m. Colchester Community Church. 15151 State Highway 30, Downsville NY.

• April 21 - Live and Let Live AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. No smoking. 2 p.m. The Lord’s Table. 18 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 21 - One Great Hour of Sharing AA Group

Open discussion group. 11 a.m. Hobart Presbyterian Church. 5 Maple Ave., Hobart NY.

• April 21 - Oneonta Sunday Night AA Meeting

Closed discussion meeting. No smoking. 8 p.m. Elm Park United Methodist Church. 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta NY.

& Nursing Center in Oneonta. A graveside service to celebrate Ruth’s life well be held on Monday, May 20, 2019 at 1 p.m. at Walton Cemetery. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

Burnell C. Cobane

WALTON – Burnell C. Cobane of Walton died peacefully on Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at The New York State Veteran’s Home of Oxford.

Claudia A. Peterson

WALTON – Claudia A. Peterson, 81, of Walton died peacefully on Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at her home surrounded by her loving family. Memorial donations may be made to the Heart of the Catskills Humane Society, 46610 NY-10, Delhi, NY 13753.

Robert Lee Foote

DAVENPORT – Robert Lee Foote, 74, lifelong area resident of Davenport, died early Wednesday morning, April 10, 2019 at his home following a short illness. Graveside funeral services with full military honors will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 1, at Davenport Cemetery, Davenport Center.

Owen G. Merwin

EAST MEREDITH – Owen G. Merwin died unexpectedly on April 10, 2019, while surrounded by loved ones. Friends and relatives are invited to call on the family from noon to 1 p.m., Friday, April 19,

at MacArthur Funeral Home, 15 Buntline Drive, Stamford. Graveside services and burial in Stamford Cemetery will follow at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the East Meredith Fire Department or Baptist Church of West Davenport.

Mariette “Mimi” Uhorchak

SIDNEY – Mariette “Mimi” Uhorchak, 89, a life-long resident of Sidney, died peacefully Wednesday, April 11, 2019, in her home, surrounded by her loving family. Donations may be made to the First Congregational Church, 1 Bridge Street, Sidney, NY 13838.

Alice Mary “Nanny” Hanley

WALTON – Alice Mary “Nanny” Hanley, 96, of Walton died peacefully on Friday, April 12, 2019 at her home surrounded by her loving family. Memorial donations may be made to Catskill Area Hospice, 297 River Street Service Road, Suite 1, Oneonta, NY 13820.

Audrey T. Johnson

CLOVESVILLE – Audrey T. Johnson, 87, of Old Rt. 28 died Saturday, April 13, 2019 at the Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla. A Service to Celebrate the Life of Audrey will be held at the E. B. Gormley Funeral Home 87 Main St. Phoenicia, at a date to be announced.


www.countyshopperonline.com

COUNTY SHOPPER

FAMILY

HEALTH

CARE

• FOR AA DISTRICT 8 SCHEDULES: • http://district8.aahmbny.org/meetings/ find-a-meeting-by-location/ • April 22 - Morning Reflections AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. Wheelchair accessible. No smoking. 7:30 a.m. St. James’ Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 22 - Nicotine Anonymous

Front meeting room. Call Ed (845-332-7803) for any additional information. 7 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 22 - Night Live and Let Live AA Meeting

Closed meeting, Step discussion. 8 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church. 14 Monument St., Deposit NY.

• April 22 - Overeaters Anonymous

For more info, call Barb at 607-432-6217 or visit www. OA.org. OA is not a diet or weigh-in club, no dues or fees are collected. OA welcomes everyone experiencing problems with food. 7 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 22 - Stamford Over Easy AA Step Group

Open step meeting. 7 p.m. United Methodist Church. 88 Main St., Stamford NY.

• April 22 - Walton AA Group

Closed and open discussion meetings. No smoking. 8 p.m. St. John’s Catholic Church. 17 Benton Ave., Walton NY.

• April 22 - Walton Nar-Anon Meeting

If there is a drug problem in your home, Nar-Anon may be able to help. Nar-Anon offers support for the family and friends who have been affected by the drug abuse of a loved one. Al-Anon and Alateen members welcome. Does not meet on holidays. 7 p.m.-8 p.m. New Hope Community Church. 45 Stocton Ave., Walton NY.

CALENDAR

continued from page 3

• April 20 - Open Rec

Catskill Mountain arts and crafts for sale, pre-owned treasures, refreshments, hot coffee, and family hang-out time. Play a game of pool, ping-pong, do arts and crafts or chat with friends. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 20 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Trade in your partially used seed packets, and pick up new varieties to grow your garden. Andes, 10 a.m.noon; Bovina, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Fleischmanns, 10 a.m.2 p.m.; Franklin, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Hancock, noon-4 p.m.; Margaretville, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Roxbury, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sidney, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Stamford, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Walton, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See Thursday’s entry for addresses.

• April 20 - Sidney Historical Association

All are invited. 1 p.m. Sidney Town Hall. 44 Grand St., Sidney NY.

• April 20 - Walton Historical Society

Featuring local historical exhibits, presented by the Walton Historical Society. Reopens in March 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Eells House. 9 Townsend St., Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5895.

• April 20 - Wiltwyck Quilters Guild

The meetings start at 10 a.m. (9:30 a.m. coffee time) Grace Community Church. 160 Seremma Ct., Lake Katrine NY.

• April 21 - Sunday Piecemakers

Block of the month swap, classes, tips and programs. New members and guests welcome. Does not meet in December. If interested in joining a quilt guild call 607865-8183. 1:30 p.m. Trout Creek Community Church. County Route 27, Trout Creek NY.

• April 23 - Senior Citizen Health Fair

SUNY Delhi nursing students will provide free information for seniors on exercise, nutrition, safety, and chronic diseases. Blood pressure checks and healthy snacks will also be provided. The event is free and open to the public. For more information contact Melissa Ackerly 607746-4367 or ackerlmj@delhi. edu. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Office for the Aging. 97 Main St, Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-4367.

• April 23 - 449 AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 23 - AA Meeting

Open meeting, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 23 - Al-Anon

6 p.m. Andes Presbyterian Church. 70 Delaware Ave., Andes NY.

• April 23 - Big Book Step Study AA Group

Big Book open step meeting. 5:30 p.m. The Turning Point. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 23 - Co-Dependents Anonymous

Twelve step fellowship. 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 23 - Delhi AA Meeting

Closed Step Meeting. 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 23 - Downsville AA Group

Open discussion meeting. 7 p.m. Colchester Community Church. Main Street, Downsville NY.

• April 21 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Bring in seeds you don’t need, and swap them for seeds you’d like to try. Start your seeds indoors to get a head start on the growing season. 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River St., Sidney NY.

• April 21 - Sunday Fundays

Games and crafts with Francesca. Free. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 21 - Trap Shoot

Weather permitting. Contact Bill Decker at 845-687-0288. 10 a.m. Phoenicia Fish & Game Club. 5419 State Route 28, Phoenicia NY.

• April 22 - Family Resource Network Support Group

This support group is for families of adults or children with OPWDD Eligibility. This month’s topic is Keeping Your Loved One Safe. Parents can call Karyn Kanzer at 607-4320001 or visit familyrn.org to register. 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Elm Park United Methodist Church. 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta NY.

• April 22 - Lego Time

Join others as we have fun building with the library’s LEGO collection. Thanks to the Friends of the Libraries for purchasing them! All ages preschool through school age. 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 22 - Play & Learn

We will have hands-on activities including developmentally appropriate games, sensory materials, dramatic play items, and more. Drop in any time, for ages 0-6. 10 a.m.11:30 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 22 - Delhi Food Bank

Located downstairs. 1 p.m.-3 p.m. United Ministry Church. 46 Church St., Delhi NY.

FAMILY

HEALTH

• April 23 - Franklin AA Group

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

CARE

FAMILY

HEALTH

5

CARE

QUALITY, COMFORT, DIGNITY...PRODUCTS FOR YOUR LIFE!

Big Book open meeting. 6 p.m. Franklin Railroad & Community Museum. 574 Main St., Franklin NY.

• April 23 - Monkey See, Monkey Do

Exercise while seated in a chair, imitate the movements of Patti and get a great workout. 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

Everyone Should Enjoy the Great Outdoors! Price Chopper Plaza Oneonta NY Locally Owned & Operated

• April 23 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 23 - One Great Hour of Sharing AA Group

Open discussion group. 12 p.m. Hobart Presbyterian Church. 5 Maple Ave., Hobart NY.

• April 23 - Oneonta Community Health Center

Free Primar y Health Care for uninsured adults. Call for appointment 607-433-0300. 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Social Security Office. 31 Main Street, Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-3260.

• April 23 - Roxbury AA Meeting

First Tuesday of the month is a Step meeting, second Tuesday through the rest of month is a closed speaker meeting. No smoking allowed. 7 p.m. Jay Gould Memorial Reformed Church. Main Street, Roxbury NY.

• April 23 - Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group

A safe, confidential, supportive environment or community and a chance for participants to develop informal mutual support and social relationships. They also educate and inform participants about dementia and help participants develop methods and skills to solve problems. 2 p.m. Sidney Civic Center. 21 Liberty St., Sidney

• April 22 - Food Bank

9:30 a.m. Sidney United Methodist Church. 12 Liberty St., Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1347.

• April 22 - Helping Hands of New York

Helping Hands is a non profit charitable organization of food collection & distribution for our community. The food is distributed to individual families, the elderly, homeless and disabled. Anyone in need of help or wish to volunteer or donate to Helping Hands please call 845-688-9825. 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Phoenicia Fire Company. 100 State Route 214, Phoenicia NY.

Call Today!

607-643-0257

NY. For more information call 607-547-1650.

munity Church. County Route 10, Meridale NY.

For more information call 845-246-2429.

• April 23 - WIC Outreach

• April 24 - Lunch Bunch AA Meeting

• April 25 - 449 AA Meeting

Closed discussion meeting. No smoking. 1 p.m. St. Mary’s School Annex. 28 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Main St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 24 - Overeaters Anonymous

• April 25 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Please call 607-746-1700 to find out if you are eligible for WIC benefits. A satellite office will be set up at the location listed below. The main office is located at 35430 State Hwy 10 Hamden, NY 13782, which is closed during outreach. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sidney Sherwood Landing. Community Room, 3 Landing Drive, Sidney NY.

• April 24 - AA Meeting

Open meeting, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 24 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 24 - One Great Hour of Sharing AA Group

Open discussion group. 12 p.m. Hobart Presbyterian Church. 5 Maple Ave., Hobart NY.

• April 24 - AA Meetings

Open or closed meetings, beginner’s discussion and discussion group with speaker last Wednesday. No smoking allowed, wheelchair accessible. 7 p.m. Meridale Com-

For more info, call Cindy at 607-432-0595 or visit www. OA.org. OA is not a diet or weigh-in club, no dues or fees are collected. OA welcomes everyone experiencing problems with food. 12 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 24 - National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI)

• April 25 - AA Meeting

Meets fourth Wednesday of each month alternating between Delhi and Walton. For concerned families and friends of people who suffer from psychiatric illnesses, most commonly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. For more information call Rina Riba, President, 607-326-4797.

• April 24 - Ulster County Lyme Disease Support Group

• April 25 - AA Meeting

Open Beginners Meeting. No smoking. 8 p.m. Christ Church. Gardiner Place, Walton NY. Open discussion meeting. 12 p.m. Turning Point House. 22 Elm St., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-267-4435.

• April 25 - AA Meeting

Open meeting, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 25 - Delhi AA Meeting

Open Big Book Meeting. 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. Main Street, Delhi NY.

A chance to network with other Lyme disease patients and families. 6:30 p.m. Hudson Valley Sudbury School. 84 Zena Road, Kingston NY.

• April 25 - Delhi AlAnon Meetings

607-988-2667. 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Oneonta Sportsmen’s Club. 251 Rod and Gun Club Rd, Oneonta NY.

month’s topic is Keeping Your

• April 23 - Home School Meet Up

• April 23 - Family Resource Network Support Group

0001 or visit familyrn.org to

This support group is for families of adults or children with OPWDD Eligibility. This

Loved One Safe. Parents can call Karyn Kanzer at 607-432register. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. United Ministry. 1 Church St., Delhi

Welcomes, supports & comforts persons whose lives have

continued on page 6

Come meet other home school families. Open rec., public computers, study space and a kitchen. 11 a.m.1 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine continued on page 14

NY.

• April 22 - Ouleout Valley Post 1689

Holds its monthly meetings the 4th Monday of ever y month, 6 p.m. at the American Legion Hall in Franklin. 607-988-7095.

• April 22 - Plum Crazy Quilters

LAST CHANCE

Bring a quilting project and visit with others. Please call Ellen Adams, 607-363-7414 for more information. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Plum Crazy B & B. 2860 Harvard Rd., East Branch NY.

...This offer ends April 30, 2019

• April 22 - Roxbury Quilters

New members welcome. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Roxbury Library. 53742 NY-30, Roxbury NY.

• April 22 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Andes, 1-6 p.m.; Roxbury, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sidney, 9 a.m.8:30 p.m., Stamford, noon-5 p.m. See Thursday’s entry for addresses.

• April 22 - Stitch Witches of Andes

Anyone interested in quilting, felting or any fabric project is welcome. 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Andes Public Library. Main Street, Andes NY. For more information call 845-676-3200.

• April 22 - Weekly Sporterifle Team Practice

Join the Oneonta Sporterifle Team today to practice weekly and compete in the NYS Sporterifle League (https://sporterifle.com/), or just come by and have fun! For more information, contact Walt and Peg Kunkler at

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6

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

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COUNTY SHOPPER

• H O M E I M P R OV E M E N T • H O M E I M P R OV E M E N T • H O M E I M P R OV E M E N T •

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continued from page 5

been affected by the alcohol/ drug abuse of a loved one. Alateen members welcome. Does not meet on holidays. 6 p.m. United Ministry Church. Church Street, Delhi NY.

• April 25 - Free Fitness Class

Begins promptly at 5:15 p.m. Core de Force Live is more than a typical cardio class. It’s an empowering, corefocused workout, inspired by the highest-octane sport in the world - Mixed Martial Arts. Please: Clean sneakers only Bring water and a towel. A mat is recommended but not required. 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Hobart Activity Center. 8 Pine St., Hobart NY. For more information call 607-437-1495.

• April 25 - Learn To Meditate

Join in an hour of mindfulness - awareness practice. Alternating periods of sitting and walking meditation. Ongoing instruction is available. Firsttimers are always welcome. Free. 5 p.m.-6 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 25 - Live and Let Live AA Meeting

Closed meeting, discussion. No smoking. 8 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church. 14 Monument St., Deposit NY.

• April 25 - Margaretville New Beginners AA Meeting

Closed living sober meeting. No smoking allowed. 12 p.m. Advent Christian Church. 109 Maple St., Margaretville NY.

• April 25 - Nar-anon Family Group

Drug addiction is a family disease. Nar-anon is a support group operated by and for the families of addicts. We understand the struggles of those coping with the addictions of a loved one. We offer our help by listening, and by sharing our experiences, strengths and hopes. Central to our approach is respecting your anonymity. 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church. 12 Ford Ave., Oneonta NY. For more information call 607-432-3291.

• April 25 - Support Group for Dealing with Diabetes

Speakers every month. For more information call Sharon Wheeler 607-432-7052. Meets the third Thursday in November. 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Elm Park United Methodist Church. 401 Chestnut St., Room 5, Oneonta NY.

• April 25 - WIC Outreach

Please call 607-746-1700 to find out if you are eligible for WIC benefits. A satellite office will be set up at the location listed below. The main office is located at 35430 State Hwy 10 Hamden, NY 13782, which is closed during outreach. 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sidney Sherwood Landing. Community Room, 3 Landing Drive, Sidney NY.

• April 26 - Rabies Vaccination Clinic

For dogs, cats and ferrets 3 months or older. Pets must be confined. If you want your pet to get his/her three-year shot, you must bring proof of a previous vaccine. Call Delaware County Public Health at 607-832-5200 with questions. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Stamford Town Garage. 60187 State Highway 10, Hobart NY.

• April 26 - Monkey See, Monkey Do

Exercise while seated in a chair, imitate the movements Pantone Pantone Grey 10Cand 124 C a great workofCoolPatti get out. 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 26 - Morning Reflections AA Group

Handicapped accessible. 7:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church. 305 Main St., Oneonta NY.

• April 26 - All or Nothing AA Meeting

Open discussion, newcomers welcome. Handicapped accessible. 12 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. 134 1/2 Main St., Delhi NY.

• April 26 - Community Wellness & Social Services

Stop in for free Healthcare Advising, Weatherization, Farm Fresh Produce for SNAP recipients, Domestic Violence and Crime Victims Assistance, Dental Referrals, Pre-Diabetes Program. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Prattsville Arts Center. 14562 Main Street, Prattsville NY.

• April 26 - Delhi AA Group

Closed meeting, discussion group. Wheelchair accessible. No smoking allowed. 7 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church. Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 26 - Downsville - Al-Anon

Support for persons whose lives have been affected by the alcohol/drug abuse of a loved one. 6 p.m. Colchester Methodist Church. 15151 St Hwy 30, Downsville NY.

• April 26 - Lunch Bunch AA Meeting

Open discussion meeting. No smoking. 1 p.m. St. Mary’s School Annex. 28 Elm St., Oneonta NY.

• April 26 - Margaretville New Beginnings AA Group

Closed meeting, discussion group. Last Friday of the month is open with speakers. Wheelchair accessible, no smoking allowed. 7 p.m. Advent Christian Church. 109 Orchard Street, Margaretville NY.

FARM

QUALITY MEAT RABbits, boer cross meat goats, chickens, eggs, Lion Head pet bunnies and assorted Guinea pigs. RABBIT TRACKS FARM. 607-278-5576. CB22FAdu THIS MONTH’S SPEcial: Purchase a bag of Gallagher fence insulators and receive a spring loaded gate handle free! Call the POWER FENCE STORE, Walton, 607865-8598. CB18FAd

PETS LAURENS AND Oneonta area. Pet Sitter services now available by the Delhi Critter Sitter--607-267-4238. Melissa is indisposed for the next few months. Nancy will cover the Delhi area. DelhiCritterSitter@hotmail.com or phone 607267-4238. CB17Pd

BELLASPAW DOG GROOMING. NEW grooming Facility! AKC salon safety certified, 19 years experience. Schedule an appointment today - 1 Howell Street WALTON- 607204-2133. CB27Pd OPT TO ADOPT FROM your local Animal Shelter. Delhi Shelter, 607-7463080; Sidney Shelter, 607-563-7780 and Cooperstown Shelter, 607547-8111. OTFPdu

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FENCES NEED TUNING UP? WE REplace posts, hang gates, tighten wires, remove brush from fences. High tensile, woven wire, barb, fencing installed. Free estimates. Fully insured. Hebbard Fence, LLC Franklin, NY  607829-8664. CB22FAdu

APPLIANCE REPAIR HENRY’S AFFORDABLE APPLIANCE REPAIR. Walton Repair/replace/ remove/install washers, dryers, water heaters, dishwashers, faucets, handyman services too! Free estimates. Call Henry 845-706-2360. Working for you, works for us. CB28ARd

APPLIANCE REPAIR. Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Stoves, Air Conditioners, Water Tanks. 7 Days a Week! 40 years factory trained service. Money back guarantee. Call DOUG 607-6374394. B16ARdu

APPLIANCES / FURNITURE PHYSICIANS METAL examination table, white base, black vinyl top. $74. 607-652-7583, leave message. O16Zdu DOUBLE BED, METAL frame, $35. 607-7467466. O16Zdu GLASS TOP ELECTRIC range for sale. Four burner, bake or broil oven, good working order, $125. Call 845-6763589. S17Zdu S I N G L E S I Z E M ATtress. Good condition, $50. Call 607-8658733. O16Zdu GE REFRIGERATOR, 16 cu. ft.? No lower drawers, $40. 607-746-7466. O16Zdu ALUMINUM FOLDING table with carrying handle for easy transport. Great for flea market, tailgate setup, expanded dining capacity, $10. 845-254-9955. O16Zdu T W I N B E D , M E TA L frame, $30. 607-7467466. O16Zdu

CARPET CLEANING BRING YOUR CARPET back to life! Professional carpet, rug & furniture cleaning. Specializing in stain removal. Honest, friendly, reliable service. 25 years experience. Residential & commercial. Vlad’s Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning, 607363-9713. CB18CNdu

HOME HEATING STOCK UP FOR NEXT year’s heating season! Cut and split, green, seasoned and custom lengths. Delivery available. Call for pricing. Your year round firewood company is BRUSH HOLLOW FIREWOOD. Call 607-538-9514. CB20HHdu

HOME IMPROVEMENT

TWO MAKITA HALF inch drills, 1 Makita Sawsall, 1 ceramic tile APPLIANCE PARTS water saw, 1 brand new, FOR THE DO-IT-YOUR- never used rotary saw. selfer. Have model or Cheap. Call 845-586part number ready! Re- 1382. 16HIdu pair service also available. RALPH’S APPLI- WATER HEATER - NATANCES, 607-432-0007. ural gas, 40 gallon, 36,000 BTU, $75. Call CB17ARd 607-865-8733. O16HIdu

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COUNTY SHOPPER

The right tools for the job can be the difference between an interminable landscaping project and one that goes smoothly and efficiently. Aspiring landscapers probably have a few shovels and rakes hanging in their garages and sheds for basic landscaping work. But while such tools are effective for certain projects, when it comes to churning soil for garden beds or digging holes for outdoor structures, additional tools come in handy. It may be well worth a trip to a nearby home center to purchase or rent one of these tools ideal for breaking ground.

Rototiller

A rototiller, sometimes called just a “tiller,” is a powered garden tool designed to loosen soil prior to planting. A rototiller also can help aerate soil during the growing season. Because they reduce the need for manual spade digging or hoeing, tillers can be useful landscaping tools, particularly for homeowners who want to work efficiently. Rototillers will break through tough soil and any plant roots. They come in a variety of sizes, and it’s best to match the tool to the size of the job. Many homeowners can get by with smaller, less powerful models, especially if the tiller is only necessary at the beginning of planting season. Professional landscapers or those with large swatches of property may benefit from larger models.

of the process of installing deck footings, fencing posts or other structures. Augers come in a variety of sizes, and homeowners can choose how much power they prefer. Augers can be heavy and cumbersome, and many do-it-yourselfers will find that one-person augers are more than adequate for their projects. Augers dig deep holes, so it is always smart to have the property surveyed prior to use. This way pipes, gas lines, buried electrical lines, and any other obstructions are clearly identified prior to drilling.

Cultivator

Cultivators are similar to tillers in that they loosen soil. Cultivators are effective during the growth

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period of plants, when they can be used to aerate the soil and remove weeds. Cultivators come in handheld versions and push models, and some are even motorized. Cultivators get close to plants to remove weeds without disturbing the plant. They also are used to stir in compost or fertilizer. While many people think cultivators and tillers are the same, that is not the case. The former is less powerful and will mix the soil or stir up the top layer, while the latter can break up moderately hard ground and loosen firm soil. When using any tools around the garden, wear the proper protection. This includes devices to protect hearing when power tools

are in use as well as gloves and safety goggles. Tillers, augers and cultivators have the potential to toss soil and rocks into the air, so make sure others keep their distance while work is in progress.

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Gardeners eager to revitalize their lawns and gardens may spend hundreds of dollars on tools and products designed to improve soil and growing conditions. Although many of these items can be advantageous, gardeners also may want to look to nature’s best garden helpers: earthworms. It is believed that nearly 3,000 different types of earthworms inhabit the planet. Worms have been around for hundreds of millions of years. Worms can be seen as bait dangling on fishing lines or as meals for redbreasted robins. But these subterranean dwellers play

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Auger

Augers, both mechanical and manual, are essentially large drill bits that help move materials from one location to another. Augers are typically used to cut holes in landscapes, and they are good for posthole drilling, which is part

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

their biggest role beneath the soil. Earthworms move through dirt as they search for food. The worms consume particles in the soil, helping to recycle materials like dead leaves, plant parts, decaying animals, and feces. Through their travels, worms also serve to aerate the soil. Worms bring the subsoil closer to the surface and mix it with the topsoil. Earthworms’ castings also help naturally fertilize the areas in which they reside. The slimy mucus that worms leave behind contains nitrogen, which also helps to amend the soil. The University of Illinois

Extension says most earthworms found, particularly in North America, can only grow so long, even though some worms seem like they stretch forever underneath the ground. Depending on the type of worm and how many segments it has, as well as its age and ability to get nutritious foods, worms typically reach only a few inches in length, offers National Geographic. There are some anomalies, however. The Oregon giant earthworm is one of the largest earthworms found in North America, growing to more than three feet in length. That worm is very rare, however. In 2016, a 16-inch-long earthworm was discovered in England and became part of the collection at the Natural History Museum in London. Some Australian and South American earthworms are known to grow much larger. Worms need the correct mix of oxygen, moisture and favorable temperatures to survive. If they do not have these components, they will seek them out elsewhere. Because of the many benefits earthworms provide, they can be a boon to landscapes.

607-967-4877 • www.metalroofingandmetalsiding.com


COUNTY SHOPPER

Honeybees are humble insects that benefit the environment in various ways. Unfortunately, many people lump bees in with wasps and other seemingly “harmful” insects and do whatever is necessary to remove them from their properties. But it’s important to be mindful of the beneficial roles bees play and to take steps to maintain healthy habitats so they can thrive. Bees are one of the most important pollinators of flowers, crops and fruit trees. These small insects can make or break entire food supplies. They also pollinate clover and alfalfa that provide feed for cattle. Some experts place the economic value of bees at roughly $15 billion per year. A consortium of universities and research laboratories that reported to The White House in 2015 found that beekeepers lost 42.1 percent of their colonies between 2014 and 2015. Bee populations continue to decline. According to the conservation organization Save the Bees, recent surveys suggest close to a 99 percent loss in bees over the last 150 years, primarily due to increasing agricultural intensification. To combat this sharp decline in bee populations, people from all walks of life can do their part to help bees thrive

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Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

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once again. And by helping bees, individuals also may indirectly help other beneficial pollinating insects, such as butterflies.

Be aware of the landscape

Not all bees build the wax or paper structures associated with traditional beehives. Those hives may not be readily visible even for bees that do build them. Woodnesting bees can nest in twigs or dead trees. Bees may nest underground or use the burrows abandoned by small rodents. Before excavating or disturbing more remote areas of the yard, check to see if it is a habitat for bees. Leave some natural areas of the landscape untouched and do not remove twigs, mounds of dirt and native flowers to attract more bees.

Plant native flowers and flowering trees

Offer bees plenty of flowering choices so they’ll be happy to come investigate. Native flowers are best because they will be most familiar. Try to plant an array that will flower at different times of the year. Simple flowers will offer more readily available access to pollen than hybrid or exotic varieties bred to produce mounding petals.

Leave swatches of natural lawn

Instead of properties featuring an entire manicured lawn, set aside an area that is encouraged to overgrow with dandelions and clovers, which are good nectar sources for many bees.

Support local beekeepers

If you find a honey bee swarm on your property, contact a local beekeeper who may be able to safely collect and relocate that swarm so it will produce honey and provide the additional benefits associated with healthy bees. People can also support beekeepers’ work by purchasing local honey. Not only does it keep jobs in the area, but some research also suggests that consuming local honey can help reduce seasonal allergies. WebMD says the practice is based on immunotherapy. Local honey contains traces of local pollen that may be responsible for seasonal allergies. Repeated exposure to small doses of this pollen might help bodies develop natural immunities. Bees can be quite beneficial to have around, and it can be an enjoyable venture to customize landscapes to support the propagation of wild bees.

Dogs love spending time outdoors. Dog owners with yards know that dogs benefit greatly from some exercise in the backyard. While that time might be great for dogs, it can take its toll on lawns. Dog urine and feces can adversely affect the look and health of a lush green lawn. Nitrogen is essential to healthy soil, but only at certain levels. When those levels are exceeded, the result can be lawn damage. According to The Spruce Pets, an advisory site that offers practical tips and training advices to pet owners, this is what happens when pets frequently urinate on grass. Urine is naturally high in nitrogen, so when pets urinate on lawns, the grass might turn yellow or brown due to the excess nitrogen content. Nitrogen also is present in lawn fertilizers, further exacerbating the problem for pet owners who fertilize their lawns. In addition to urine damage, dogs can trample frosted grass, contributing to problems that may not become evident until spring, and get into areas like gardens where they wreak additional havoc. Pet owners who want to let their dogs run free in the yard but don’t want damaged grass may be tempted to put their pooches in diapers or confine them to crates when letting them outside. But such an approach isn’t necessary. In fact, some simple strategies can be highly effective at preventing dog-related lawn damage.

• Speak with a landscaper about planting new grass. Certain types of grass, such as Bermuda grass, can withstand dog damage better than others. Local climate will dictate which types of grass are likely to thrive in a given area, so speak with a professional landscaper about the viability of planting new grass. • Install fencing. Pet owners with expansive yards can install fencing that allows dogs to spend time exercising outdoors without granting them access to the entire property. Large dogs will need more room than small ones, but try to build fenced-in areas that allow dogs to run freely and get the exercise they need to stay healthy. • Work with a dog trainer. Dog trainers might be able to work with dogs so they only urinate in certain areas of the yard, greatly reducing the damage they can cause to a lawn. Trainers also might help curb digging and clawing behaviors that can damage lawns as well as gardens. • Consider hardscaping. Hardscaping might be most effective for pet owners with small properties. Hardscaping does not include grass and can add visual appeal to a property while saving pet owners the headaches of dealing with dog-related lawn damage. Dogs need time outdoors, and homeowners can take various steps to protect their lawns from dog-related damage.


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Kitchens are the most popular rooms in many homes. Even though The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states the average person spends just 68 minutes each weekday consuming food, and around 37 minutes preparing meals, the kitchen is not just a spot for food. It also is a gathering place for conversation, homework and family time. In recognition that so much time is spent in this heart of the home, many people are embracing some of the more popular trends concerning kitchen layouts to maximize the comfort and efficiency of these rooms.

Communal zones

Maintaining plant life on a property won’t cost homeowners a lot of money, but such an effort can add substantial curb appeal to a home. Curb appeal can go a long way toward making a home more attractive to its inhabitants as well as prospective buyers once the house is put on the market. Improving curb appeal is a goal for many homeowners, and while many projects aimed at making homes more aesthetically appealing can be costly, there are ways for cost-conscious homeowners to improve their properties without breaking the bank. • Put your green thumb to use. A well-maintained landscape can dramatically improve a home’s curb appeal. Pay attention to the plants, shrubs and trees throughout your property, watering them during periods of little rainfall and trimming them when necessary so your lawn does not look like an overgrown, neglected suburban jungle. Professional landscaping services can help you maintain your property, but even if your budget does not allow for such an expense, you can still make sure your landscape adds to your home’s appeal by keeping a watchful eye on the property and addressing any issues that arise. Maintain your lawn through the colder months of the year as well, making sure no one walks on the grass when frost has settled, as doing so can produce dead spots throughout the lawn. • Redo your front door. While their eyes may initially be drawn to a well-manicured lawn, prospective buyers will eventually find their way to the front door. If your door is especially old, consider replacing it. If your budget does not allow for such an expense, you can still give your home’s front entrance an entirely new look by installing some inexpensive molding around the door before giving the door a fresh coat of paint. Molding around the front door can make an entrance more impressive, while a new coat of paint can make a home feel warmer and more vibrant. • Plant flowers. Another inexpensive way to make a home more appealing is to plant some colorful flowers around the property. Line walkways with flowers native to your region, as such plants will last longer than exotic alternatives that may not be capable of adapting to the local climate. In addition to lining walkways, hang window boxes filled with colorful flowers or plants outside naked windows. Doing so can make windows seem larger and add some color to your home’s exterior. Another creative way to make use of colorful flowers is to place a few planters at the foot of your driveway and painting the numbers of your address on the planters. This can be both effortless and inexpensive, but it can instantly make a home more inviting to prospective buyers. • Spotlight certain parts of your property. Many homeowners focus on improving the curb appeal of their property during the daytime hours, but you can take steps to make a home more appealing at night as well. Solar spotlights placed around trees and other attractive features in your yard can shed light on those areas of your property you’re most proud of, even after the sun has gone down. Solar spotlights won’t add to your energy bill, as they are powered by the sun, and they can make certain accents on your property stand out at night. Improving curb appeal may sound like a significant undertaking, but there are many ways budgetconscious homeowners can make their home’s exterior more appealing without going broke.

Unlike the days of yore when the kitchen was utilitarian, today’s home floor plans make kitchens a fo-

cal point of a home. Food preparation also is no longer a solitary task. Thanks to larger kitchen footprints and multiple zones set up for meal creation, a greater number of people can hang out in the kitchen and help with meals. You’ll find multiple sinks, large islands and more counter space are key components of modern kitchen layouts.

Dining nooks

Kitchen designs are bringing back banquette seating in a cozy nook. This design is a practical use of space, and can fit in large and small kitchens alike. It also can give a kitchen a high-end look, as built-in banquettes can highlight a bay window or seem custom-made for the space. Banquette seating can fit a number of people

comfortably and provides a sensible and casual dining spot solution.

Family table

The trend experts at Southern Living magazine indicate that formal dining and living rooms are now used infrequently. As a result, kitchens have evolved to accommodate meal prep and dining. A large family table in the center of the room brings people into the kitchen to get more involved with food, according to San Francisco designer David Kensington.

Counter culture

Taking a page out of a favorite corner diner or bar, kitchens are increasingly outfitted with a large island flanked by chic counter stools, according to the design pros at Domino. Family members can pull up a stool and grab a quick snack. It’s also a great place for friends to engage in conversation while a host or hostess prepares cocktails and appetizers for an evening soirée.

Work zone

Many families like to have an area of the kitchen set up as a tech zone where kids can do their homework and even parents can do some work, such as paying bills. Setting aside an area of counter space as a small desk area can be a great idea. Such areas also help parents keep a watchful eye on children while they’re surfing the internet. Kitchens are the hub of the household, and modern design trends cater to a growing need for a multipurpose space.

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COUNTY SHOPPER

The groundwater table plays a role in home construction, foundation stability and home comfort. Because the groundwater table is so significant, it behooves homeowners to understand how it works. National Geographic defines a water table as the boundary between water-saturated ground and unsaturated ground. Well beneath the ground, at various depths depending on geography, topography and weather conditions, pockets of water, called aquifers, exist. The water table marks the boundary between that available water and the dry surface. Ground water is impacted by precipitation, irrigation and ground cover. It also may be affected by land use and tides. The water table can fluctuate with the seasons and from year to year because it is af-

fected by climatic variations, as well as how much water may be drawn from underground, advises Encyclopedia Britannica. The water table where one person lives may be several inches or feet below the surface of the ground and follow the topography of the land. For others, it may be much higher, even coming above the surface of the soil. The water table as well as local soil conditions and drainage can impact homes and their foundations. If soil drains efficiently and there is a relatively low water table, it may not be problematic. However, if soil is dense and absorbent and the water table is high, the ground around a home may swell and become saturated. This can exert significant pressure against the foundation walls, states Rytech, a water damage and mold rehabilitation company.

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In areas where a local water table rises near the surface, water can push against the underside of the foundation in a condition known as “hydrostatic pressure.” This may cause water to infiltrate through the bottom of the foundation — even permeating solid concrete over time. If hydrostatic pressure is severe, it could lift certain portions of the foundation out of the ground, but this is very unlikely. But it could cause shifting of foundation walls and structures like fencing and decks. Even if ground water does not cause foundation cracking or shifting, it could lead to humidity issues, resulting in rust, bacteria and mold. Wood structures in a home may be compromised by a high level of humidity. The home improvement resource Angie’s List says certain steps may need to be taken to protect against damage from a water table and abundant ground water. Basement and foundation waterproofing professionals can help homeowners develop a plan to mitigate water damage. This can include grading changes and the installation of drains and pumps to move water away from the house. Special paints and sealants also can protect the foundation. Ground water can be a hindrance when it affects the home, but homeowners who learn about it can be in a position to confront any ground water issues.

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

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If not properly addressed, ground water can affect an existing foundation and the ability to build successfully.

When tending to their lawns, homeowners are advised to pay attention to areas that may feature standing water. According to the World Health Organization, standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes, which can breed in great numbers in pools of water. Mosquitoes are known to carry diseases like malaria, West Nile virus and Zika. Furthermore, mosquitoes that bite pets can transmit heartworms, a serious problem if gone it goes undiscovered. Standing water also can be a haven for bacteria, mold and parasites that are dangerous to human health. If standing, stagnant water is a problem in your yard, remediation is necessary. Directing downspouts away from the house can remediate standing water. Changing the grading of soil so that low spots are elevated is another way to reduce instances of standing water. This may be a project that requires the assistance of a drainage professional. In addition, homeowners can remove standing water from empty flower pots, pool covers, bird baths, and more to reduce the likelihood that mosquitoes will appear on their properties.

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COUNTY SHOPPER

Soft, spongy lawns may be indicative of various problems underfoot that occur relatively sight unseen. Barring a septic system backup or considerable flooding, insects or animals may be to blame. In many areas, burrowing wildlife can wreak havoc on landscapes. Identifying which critter is causing the damage helps homeowners develop the most effective solutions to issues involving wildlife.

are typically dug between five to eight inches below the surface of the soil, according to the home and garden resource site Hunker. The tunnels are only about 1.5 inches in diameter and one may see small molehills of excavated soil in areas around the yard. Mole tunnels can be followed through the yard thanks to the appearance of elevated ridges on the surface of the soil.

Moles

Even though their name is similar, voles look nothing like moles. They are also known by the name meadow mice and look more like mice than they do moles or gophers. Voles are small as well and primarily feed on foliage and plant roots. It can take a trained eye to differentiate between holes created by moles and voles, but foliage eaten around an entry or exit hole suggests the presence of voles. Unlike moles, voles don’t create soil masses on the surfaces of landscapes, which can make recognizing infesta-

Moles will spend much of their lives underground, rarely coming up to the surface. They spend their days digging long tunnels from their dens in search of grubs, earthworms and tuber plants all year long. Moles can be gray, black, brown, or gold and will be between six and eight inches in length. Their wide front feet are designed for excavating, and moles have very small eyes and angular snouts. Many times moles are to blame for zig-zagging lines across a yard. Channels

Voles

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

11

tions more difficult.

Groundhogs, gophers, prairie dogs

Groundhogs, gophers and prairie dogs also are burrowing rodents. These rodents are larger than moles and voles. Groundhogs, also known as woodchucks, are the largest of the group, followed by prairie dogs and gophers. Prairie dogs tend to be more social than groundhogs and gophers and may be seen congregating together. Gophers tend to stay below ground and will pull food into their burrows, says the Floridabased A Wildlife Whisperer. Groundhogs often stretch their subterranean tunnels to dens, which they may like to set up under backyard sheds or other protected areas. Groundhogs’ size and desire to forage and eat their fill above-ground often make them easy to spot. Once the animal doing the burrowing has been identified, homeowners

Several types of burrowing animals can disturb landscapes. can begin removing food sources and altering conditions to make their yards less critter-friendly. In the instance of moles, using a grub-killer can diminish their numbers. Wire mesh fences buried underground can deter digging into garden beds. Homeowners who are vigilant about disrupting burrows and tunnels may encourage rodents to relocate. If burrowing wildlife prove problematic, homeowners can work with professional exterminators to assess the situation.

S

Few things elicit fear in the minds of homeowners like termites. Termites are voracious and can turn wood to pulp wherever they take up residence. Termites have felled massive trees, but they also can bore through the wood in homes, wreaking havoc as they go. Ants and termites can look similar, so homeowners who suspect they have a termite infestation should learn to distinguish one from the other. A close look at termites can make it easy to identify them. Unlike ants, termites have no “waist;” their bodies are more rectangular. A termite also has straight, beaded antenna, while an ant’s antennae are bent or elbowed. Termite wings are equal in size, uniform in shape and much longer than their bodies. Ants have a reddish hue, while termites are creamy white. Prevention is always preferable to having to treat termites after they are established. Termite Web, a site devoted to termite information, states that treating home foundations and surrounding soil with termite spray is often the best course of action to stop subterranean termites from taking hold. If termites are already present, drilling into the floor surrounding the building and using a termiticide may be necessary. Baiting termites outside with wood that is tainted with slow-acting insecticide can eliminate an entire colony in one to four months. Termite control methods may need to be repeated. A multi-pronged approach using different chemicals may be necessary to kill existing insects and repel further infestations. Trial and error can help homeowners rid their spaces of termites so that they can repair damaged wood and ensure structures are sound.

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Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

Thick grass is often a hallmark of a healthy lawn. If grass begins to thin, homeowners may feel as though all the time and effort they spent tending to their lawns was for naught. Thinning grass can be caused by any number of things. And while it might take a little effort to address, thinning grass can be treated if homeowners correctly identify that cause of the problem.

Leaf spot

The Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

notes that leaf spot diseases affect both cool- and warm-season turfgrasses. Various fungi can cause leaf spot. Symptoms and the timing of the appearance of leaf spot will vary depending on which fungi is causing the problem. For example, bipolaris sorokiniana, which affects grasses in warm, wet summer months, produces small spots that are dark purple to black. Dreschslera poae is another fungi that causes leaf spot, and it also produces dark purple to black spots. However, it tends to appear in the spring when

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the weather is cool and moist. Understanding the different fungi and when they typically strike can help homeowners identify what is causing their grass to thin. In such situations, professional landscapers can be invaluable resources as well.

Stripe smut

The University of Maryland Extension notes that stripe smut primarily poses a threat to Kentucky bluegrass that is older than three years. Pale green streaks that run parallel to the veins in the leaves and leaf sheaths are symp-

tomatic of stripe smut, which tends to be noticed in spring and fall, when weather is cool. As the disease progresses, stripes turn black or a silvery gray, causing the leaf blade to shred and curl. After the blades have shred, they turn brown and die. The grass thins because stripe smut makes it vulnerable to problems like drought.

Ascochyta leaf blight

Lawns suffering from ascochyta leaf blight will become straw-colored. According to the lawn care and pesticide experts at Ortho®, when a lawn is affected by ascochyta leaf blight, its healthy grass blades will be mixed in with diseased grass blades. Most prevalent in the spring, this disease can affect grass at any time during the growing season. That’s because the ascochyta fungi invade leaf blades through wounds, such as those that can result from mowing. Ortho® notes that dull lawn mowers can contribute to the disease, which might disappear on its own and can even return after it’s seemingly been cured. Various issues can cause grass blades to thin. Working with a landscape professional is a great way to combat such issues before they compromise the look of a lawn.

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Despite their diminutive stature, ticks are a big concern for people, particularly those with pets. As the weather warms, ticks are out looking for a host to climb on and get a blood meal. Ticks are a significant concern because they can be infected with bacteria, viruses or parasites, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, and babesiosis are just a few of the many tick-borne diseases. These pathogens can be passed to humans and pets via the bite of infected ticks. In 2018, at least one variety of disease-transmitting tick had been found in all of the lower 48 states, according to the CDC. In addition, researchers at Cornell University identified 26 species of ticks along the East Coast alone. Preventing tick bites has never been more important. The process starts right in one’s own backyard. According to Consumer Reports and the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, controlling wildlife that enters one’s yard can help keep tick numbers down. Open access means animals can enter and so can ticks. Fencing and pest management solutions may help.

Other ideas include landscaping techniques that can reduce tick populations: • Remove leaf litter from the yard. • Clear tall grasses and brush around homes and at the edges of the lawn. Mow regularly to keep the lawn short. • Create a barrier between wooded areas and the yard if it abuts a forested area. According to Consumer Reports, a threefoot-wide path of wood chips or gravel can prevent tick migration by creating a physical barrier that’s dry and sometimes too hot for ticks to tolerate. Such a barrier also serves as a visual reminder to anyone in your household to be especially careful if they step beyond the perimeter. • Bag grass clippings, which can serve as habitats for ticks. • Remove old furniture, trash and other debris that can give ticks places to hide. • Remember to use a tick-repellent product when venturing into wooded areas. Flea and tick products also are available for pets; consult with a vet. Ticks are problematic, but various measures can help control tick populations in a yard.

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Cronauer/Brower Who hasn’t, at one point in their lives, lamented a lack of space and organization at home? A lifetime’s worth of items have to be kept somewhere, and without the right organizational strategy, clutter can quickly take over. The home improvement site Home Therapy says that, when square footage is limited, tapping vertical walls is the fastest way to maximize and multiply the space available. Hooks, rods, shelving, built-ins … the sky is the limit when it comes to finding additional storage and adding a bit of personality to tight quarters. Even homes that may have adequate space can benefit from vertical solutions. Here are some ideas to put vertical and other less-utilized areas to work for you. 1. Hang wire or plastic file organizers on the inside of kitchen cabinets to easily store cookie sheets,

trays and cutting boards. 2. Save on counter or cabinet space with hanging spice racks. These can be hung directly on walls or on the inside of cabinet doors. 3. Stack all the stuff you can, including washers and dryers, beds (with storage drawers underneath) and even stacking nesting tables. 4. Choose furniture that is tall rather than wide. This can mean swapping out a dresser in a bedroom for an armoire or vertical chest of drawers. 5. Canvas bags hung on a towel bar on a wall can keep dirty clothes wrangled until it’s time to wash them. This also eliminates clothes hampers on the floor. 6. Add a second rod or shelving to the inside of closets to create more space for clothing and other items. 7. Take kitchen cabinets all the way to the

ceiling. Store lesser used items on the uppermost shelves and the items you use each on the most accessible shelves. 8. Install a shelf over the entryway to a room to utilize this seldom-used space. Shelves also can be custom cut and placed in oddly shaped areas, such as in attic rooms under the eaves or on slanted walls. 9. Dowels or curtain rods and some fabric can be used to fabricate slings to hold books or magazines. 10. Invest in some magnetic boards that can hold keys or notes by the front door or store knives on a kitchen wall. 11. Install two towel bars parallel to one another on the wall of a bathroom. These can hold extra toilet tissue or rolled hand towels. 12. Use rope plant hangers to store potatoes or onions near prep areas.

The same plant hangers can wrangle stuffed animals and small toys in kids’ rooms. Utilizing vertical areas in a home is a great way to increase storage capacity and keep rooms more organized.

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Raising backyard chickens has been a growing phenomenon for several years. Many cities have passed laws legalizing backyard chickens, encouraging many to raise chickens as a rewarding hobby. One of the biggest benefits to raising backyard chickens is that their eggs are fresher and often tastier than store-bought varieties. Hens can lay one egg per day. Multiply that egg per hen, and breakfast is always available. Another benefit to chickens is they produce a natural fertilizer that can be used in gardens. “The Old Farmer’s Almanac” says chicken manure can be composted, aged and eventually added to the garden. In about six months, a person will accumulate about one cubic foot of manure per chicken. Egg shells and other compostable material can be added to create an even richer formula. Chickens also can help control bugs around the yard, offers the experts at Tractor Supply Company. Before investing in backyard chickens, people should determine if chickens will fit with their lifestyle. Costs and care are a big consideration. Each chick will cost any-

where between $3 to $5 a bird. Then there’s feed to consider. The most expensive item will likely be the coop. The experts at The Happy Chicken Coop, a resource for raising chickens and starting coops, says handy men and women can build homemade coops, but ready-made ones will cost a few hundred dollars. The coop will need to offer around four square feet of space per chicken (or what’s recommended for the breed). Despite being seemingly independent birds, chickens need people to be active caregivers. They require feed and water daily. The chickens will need a caregiver while you vacation. People who are frequently away from home should reconsider chickens. Chickens also are prone to worms, parasites and lice. They need to have rear feathers trimmed to stay clean and sanitary, and they will require an area where they can “dust” and self-groom. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises not to cuddle and kiss chickens like pets because they can carry salmonella. Not every coop is completely varmintproof, and some chickens may succumb to predators. Squeamish or sentimental

folks may find chickens aren’t the right fit. Chickens require commitment and care that many people can provide. It is essential to do one’s homework to ensure that backyard chickens are a sound investment.

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14

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

CALENDAR

continued from page 5

Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 23 - Kids Club

For kids ages 5 and up who are interested in joining us for games, crafts, Minecraft, and more. New members are always welcome. This club meets in the Public Computing Center. 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River St., Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 23 - Knitting and Crocheting Group

All ages and skill levels welcome. Instruction available. 4 p.m.-5 p.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5979.

• April 23 - Mahjong Group

Beginners welcome. 12 p.m.-3 p.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5929.

• April 23 - Preschool Story Time

This is for the 3-5 year olds and an adult. We sing a few songs, read several books on a theme and then make a craft that relates to the theme. 10 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 23 - Scrabble and Other Board Games

Drop in for a fun, non (well, not very) competitive evening of games. Bring snacks to share. 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-5469.

• April 23 - Seed Swap at County Libraries

Swap out your extra garden seeds for varieties donated by fellow gardeners. Andes, 1-6 p.m.; Bovina, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Delhi, 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fleischmanns, 1-5 p.m.; Franklin, 9 a.m.-noon, 1-5 & 7-9 p.m.; Hancock, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Margaretville, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sidney, 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m.;

Stamford, 1-7 p.m.; Walton, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See Thursday’s entry for addresses.

• April 23 - StamfordHarpersfield Senior Club

11 a.m. Hobart Community Center. Cornell Avenue, Hobart NY. For more information call 607-652-7619.

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For more information call 845-688-7811.

• April 24 - Colchester Community Food Bank

For residents of the town of Colchester. 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Colchester Community United Methodist Church. Main Street, Downsville NY.

• April 24 - Color Me Calm

• April 23 - Toddler Rhyme Time

Stories, songs, and playtime for the tiniest tots and their caregivers. 10:30 a.m. Cannon Free Librar y. 40 Elm Street, Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-2662.

• April 23 - Together Tuesdays

Join Janice as she brings story, craft a play to Tuesday mornings. Kids birth through preschool are welcome to join our friendly gang of local parents. Plus, our wandering kid minstrel Jeff Bailey will stop by some Tuesdays and bring music. 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Phoenicia Library. 48 Main Street, Phoenicia NY.

• April 23 - Walton Emergency Food Bank

Other times call 607-865-4390. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Walton United Presbyterian Church. Corner of North & East Streets, Walton NY.

• April 23 - Delhi Rotary Club

We are a dedicated group of local men and women who enjoy fellowship and provide service to our community. Everyone is invited to attend. Meets second and fourth Tuesday at 6:15 p.m. Cross Roads Cafe. 80 Main Street, Delhi NY.

• April 23 - Preschool Tablet Time

This program is for children ages 2-5. We’ll have fun playing on our iPads and on educational websites for children. 11 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 24 - Art Hour

New art projects every week, for ages 3 to 103! 4:30 p.m.5:30 p.m. Phoenicia Library. 48 Main Street, Phoenicia NY.

COUNTY SHOPPER CROSSWORD

Teens and adults are invited to drop by the library’s coloring corner for some artistic, meditational relaxation. 4 p.m.-6 p.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5929.

• April 24 - Franklin Rotary Meeting

New members are welcome and encouraged. For more information contact 607-8293446. 6 p.m. Franklin Methodist Church. 465 Main Street, Franklin NY.

• April 24 - Hand Needlework Group

We welcome all who knit, crochet, quilt, do needlepoint, tatting, crewel, embroidery, etc., of all levels, including those who would like to learn. We will offer help and encouragement while you work on your own projects. 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Stamford Village Library. 117 Main St., Stamford NY. For more information call 607-652-5001.

• April 24 - Knitting Group

Sit around the table and knit with friends. Share your skills. 10 a.m. Cannon Free Library. 40 Elm Street, Delhi NY. For more information call 607-746-2662.

• April 24 - Lego Time

Join others as we have fun building with the library’s LEGO collection. Thanks to the Friends of the Libraries for purchasing them! All ages preschool through school age. 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 24 - Our Place in Walton

Come join us for games, refreshments and making new friends or bring a friend with you. Bring your own lunch. Get out of the house and have some fun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. United Presbyterian Church. corner of North and East Streets, Walton NY.

• April 24 - Our Place Social Center

Offering a variety of activities. No fee. Everyone welcome. 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Saint James Church. 55 Lake Delaware Drive, Delhi NY. For more information call 845-676-4425, 607-832-4401.

• April 24 - Pine Hill Social Circle

• April 24 - Story Hour

Librarian and early childhood music specialist “Miss Pam” hosts a story and music hour. 11 a.m. Andes Public Library. 242 Main St., Andes NY. For more information call 845-676-3333.

• April 24 - Thrift Shop

A place to shop for the whole family. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Margaretville Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Shop. 743 Main St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3737.

• April 24 - Tri-Town Dance and Social Club

Dish to pass dinner, followed by dancing to DJ or live band. 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Sidney VFW. 133 West Main St., Sidney NY.

• April 24 - Weekly Pistol Team Practice

Join the Oneonta Pistol Team today to practice weekly and compete in the Central Empire State Rifle & Pistol League (http://www.cesrpl.org/), or just come by and have fun! For more information, contact Grant LaBarr (glabarr@stny. rr.com) or Scott May (hemiawd@gmail.com). 5:30 p.m.7 p.m. Oneonta Sportsmen’s Club. 251 Rod and Gun Club Rd, Oneonta NY.

• April 24 - Car Seat Safety Checks

Learn how to correctly install your child’s safety or booster seat. Call WIC at 607-746-1700 for an appointment. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Delaware Opportunities. 35430 State Hwy 10, Hamden NY.

• April 24 - Greater Franklin Area Chamber of Commerce

Generally meets on the last Wednesday of each month. 7 p.m. Rich Farm House. 574 Main Street, Franklin NY. For more information call 607-386-1369.

• April 24 - Hamden Senior Citizens Club

Meets for covered dish lunch, meeting and speaker. Bring a dish to pass and table service. Beverages furnished. 12 p.m. Hamden Town Hall. corner of Route 10 and Covert Hollow, Hamden NY. For more information call 607-746-6578.

• April 24 - Knitting Classes/Group

All ages and abilities welcome. Class taught by Tina Harp of Mountain Yarns. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Morton Memorial Library. 22 Elm St., Pine Hill NY. For more information call 845-254-4222.

• April 24 - Play & Learn

1. Tenor 5. Panthers’ signal caller 8. Systems, doctrines, theories 12. Rulers 14. Indonesian coastal town 15. Type of cuisine 16. Kids 18. Single Lens Reflex 19. Extra seed-covering 20. Force out 21. Feline 22. __ & Stitch 23. Semantic relations 26. A larval frog or toad 30. Sport for speedsters 31. One who is learning 32. Request 33. Famed WWII conference 34. Relieved 39. English broadcaster 42. Car signal 44. Grass part 46. Trivially 47. Serve as a warning 49. Centers of activity 50. An electrically charged atom 51. Small swelling of cells 56. Irritates 57. “__ your i’s, cross your t’s” 58. Removed 59. “Death in the Family” author 60. When you hope to arrive 61. German district 62. Turner and Kennedy 63. Midway between south and southeast 64. Emerald Isle

CLUES DOWN

1. Mathematical optimization search method 2. Country along the Arabian peninsula 3. Pointed parts of pens 4. Lake __, one of the Great 5. Peruvian region 6. State capital of Georgia 7. Those killed for their beliefs 8. Typeface 9. Shrill cry 10. Sends via the Postal Service 11. Holds grain 13. Occurring at a fitting time 17. Vogue 24. Born of 25. Get the job done 26. Teletype (Computers) 27. Small southern constellation 28. Decaliters 29. Area near the concert stage 35. Social insect living in organized colonies 36. Winter activity 37. Snakelike fish 38. Not wet 40. In addition to 41. In league 42. Barrels per day (abbr.) 43. Monetary unit 44. Marked 45. Emerges 47. Shape by heating 48. Early Slavic society 49. Italian automaker 52. Racing legend Earnhardt 53. A type of name 54. __ Strauss, jeans maker 55. Famed garden

CROSSWORD ANSWERS ON PAGE

4

We will have hands-on activities including developmentally appropriate games, sensory materials, dramatic play items, and more. Drop in any time, for ages 0-6. 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 24 - Prayer Service

Community welcome. 6:30 p.m. Walton Lighthouse Assembly. 596 Co. Rt. 21, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-6152.

• April 24 - Sidney Historical Association Museum

The museum houses newspapers, genealogy section, military items, old yearbooks, Bendix/Amphenol history and much more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sidney Town Hall. 44 Grand St., Sidney NY.

• April 24 - Socialization for Seniors

Exercise, cards, games for those adults who want to spend time with other seniors. Morning refreshments provided, but bring your own lunch. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Walton United Presbyterian Church. Corner North and East Streets, Walton NY.

• April 24 - Stamford Rotary Club

We are a group of community members, both men and women, who meet for service to the community and fellowship. New members are welcome and encouraged.

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For more information call 607-652-3311. 6 p.m. Mama Maria’s Restaurant. Route 23, Harpersfield NY.

Bring your knitting or other crafts or just come by for a visit. Coffee and home baked goodies, an old-fashioned catch up with your friends and neighbors. 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Pine Hill Community Center. 287 Main Street, Pine Hill NY.

CLUES ACROSS

SINCE 1966

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• April 24 - Shandaken Senior Citizens Club

Come meet new friends and have a fun afternoon. Meeting at 1, refreshments and bingo follow. 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Phoenicia Methodist Church. 29 Church St., Phoenicia NY. For more information call 845-688-5578.

• April 24 - Sit & Knit

Drop in to join local fiber enthusiasts for an evening of camaraderie and knitting or crocheting at the Fairview Public Library. 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Fairview Public Library. 43 Walnut St., Margaretville NY. For more information call 845-586-3791.

• April 24 - Ukulele Meet & Play

6:30 p.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place, Walton NY. For more information call 607-865-5929.

• April 25 - Alma Lynch Poetry Day

Read an original poem or read one of your favorite poems. Sign up to read at the library. 11 a.m. William B. Ogden Library. 42 Gardiner Place,

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• April 25 - Delaware County Shields

We are active and retired police officers. If you are missing the guys, join us. Great camaraderie. We meet once a month at a different restaurant. First meal is on us. Check us out. Drop a note to DCS, P.O. Box 81, Walton, NY 13856 or call Phil Seiden, President 607-865-4688.

• April 25 - Baby Storytime

This story time is for babies 0-15 months and their caregiver. Join us for nursery rhymes, simple stories, songs, and more! 11 a.m. Sidney Memorial Public Library. 8 River Street, Sidney NY. For more information call 607-563-1200.

• April 25 - Catskill Mountain Railroad Club

Meets in the basement. All modelers are welcome to attend. The model train lay out is HO Gauge. New Members are welcome to join. For more information call Don at 845-254-5311. 7 p.m. Margaretville-New Kingston


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Bring The Family To Our House For Easter! Sunday Brunch Served From 10 am-2 pm Brunch Buffet Includes A Large Selection Of Both Breakfast & Dinner Items

• A bottomless bowl of shrimp • Hand carved ham, roast beef & turkey • chicken & biscuits, Swedish meatballs • Seafood Alfredo• Wide assortment of salads • Omelets made to order • Eggs Benedict • Scrambled eggs • Bacon, sausage & French toast sticks, homemade waffles • Assorted pastries & croissants, hash browns, fresh fruit • A large selection of homemade desserts • Complimentary Champagne or Mimosa • Unlimited coffee, tea, milk & juice

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

110 Main Street Andes, NY

845-676-3980

Serving Lunch and dinner 7 dayS

Sunday Brunch 10am - 4:30pm

4/21 - EASTER BRUNCH, NOON TO 4PM $24 per person, $12 kids under 12 2 great holiday courses Reservations suggested Regular dinner service until 9pm WWW.ANDESHOTEL.COM ON & OFF PREMISE CATERING EAT FREE ON YOUR BDAY FREE POOL SUN & MON

$18.95 per person, Children 10 & under $9.50, 3 & under FREE Dinner Available from 1 pm - 8 pm along with the following specials:

• Baked Ham • Prime Rib • Rack of Lamb • Stuffed Salmon SHRIMP SALAD BAR INCLUDED WITH ALL DINNERS.

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED Main St., Downsville

607-363-7814

OPEN HOUSE

80TH BIRTHDAY Celebration for

Freda Sander April 20 • 3pm-6pm E. Meredith Fire Hall Refreshments Served Share A Memory, Bring A Card, But Gifts Are Not Necessary!

JOIN US FOR A

PANCAKE BREAKFAST

To benefit Fire Dept. member Bill McIntosh. To help with medical expenses.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 8AM - 1PM

BLOOMVILLE FIRE STATION Scotch Hill Road

ALL YOU CAN EAT By donation

FRI., APR. 26 @ 9PM 4 GUN RIDGE SAT., MAY 4 - SPRING-TIME WINE & TAPAS TASTING IN THE SPEAKEASY @6PM Join us as we sample some tasty Spanish varietals along with our take on some Tapas classics. $50 per person inclusive of tax & gratuity, limited seats available. Reservations suggested. FRI., MAY 17 @ 9PM TALKING MACHINE EAT FREE ON YOUR BDAY. FRI. 3PM-6PM HAPPY HOUR

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Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

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HELP

HELP

WA N T E D

WA N T E D

COUNTY SHOPPER

HELP

WA N T E D

Come work with Otsego Land Trust as our Brookwood Point

GARDEN INTERN

and dabble among the flowers this summer! The intern will be primarily responsible for caring for the property’s gardens; and also assist in trail management, general site monitoring, event coordination, interfacing with local organizations, and other tasks as needed. Must have experience in horticulture/ landscaping and enjoy being outside for long periods of time.

HELP CDL Drivers WANTED

WANTED PT/FT

Apply at

BLOOMVILLE DISPOSAL SERVICE 51971 St. Hwy. 10, Bloomville or Call

ST. PETER’S EPISCOpal Church, Hobart, MECHANIC WANTED IN New York is looking for Davenport, full time posi- an organ, piano player for Sundays. Contact tion, pay based on expeFather Darius Mojallali at rience. Please contact 607-746-3437. B16HWd Don at 607-434-5212. FARM HAND, FULL OR 17HWd part time. General SIDNEY HEAD START grounds upkeep and Lead Teacher. Minimum barn chores. Tractor and of Bachelor’s degree in equipment experience, early childhood and 2 references required. Call years’ experience teach- Rosemary Farm, 607ing young children. NYS 538-1200. 16HWdu driver’s license, personal LEAD CARPENTER AND vehicle required; mileage skilled laborer needed for reimbursed. 35 hours busy contracting busiper week. Salary range ness. Driver’s license & own transportation. Call $17.89 - $21.34 per hour. STEADFAST TIMBERApplications accepted WORKS at 607-746through April 23, 2019 at 3634. B18HWd Delaware Opportunities HORSE BARN HAND. Inc., 35430 State High- Full or part time. Feed, way 10, Hamden, NY water, muck. No riding. 13782. Equal Employ- Experience and referment Opportunity MF/ ences required. Call F/ Disability/ Protected Rosemary Farm, 607Veteran Status. B16HWd 538-1200. 16HWdu

HELP WANTED

Log Homes of the Catskills

• All phases of construction • Must have own transportation & Basic Tools Call for more information

(607) 538-1160

607-746-2788

YOUTH EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ~ The Delaware County Youth Bureau employs up to 38 youth throughout Delaware County every summer through the Youth Bureau’s Summer Youth Employment Program. There are 2 positions available to youth ages 14 – 21 in each of the following Towns: Andes, Bovina, Colchester, Davenport, Delhi, Deposit, Franklin, Hamden, Hancock, Harpersfield, Kortright, Masonville, Meredith, Middletown, Roxbury, Sidney, Stamford, Tompkins, and Walton. Youth should contact their Town Supervisor’s office for information on what positions are available and to apply. For more information please call your Town office directly or the Delaware County Youth Bureau at 607832-5310. B16HWd

HOLMBERG ORchards, Inc in Gales Ferry, CT is hiring 4 temporary Farmworker, Laborer & Crop workers from 5/20/2019 to 10/31/2019: 40 hrs/week. Workers will manually plant, cultivate, and harvest fruits & vegetables shall be picked into buckets. For fruits, most of the time this is done while standing on ladders or on moving platform. Harvested fruits and vegetables shall be transferred by hand into bins/box. Use of hand tools such as shovels, trowels hoes, tampers, pruning shears, scissors and knives. Duties may include tilling soil and fertilizer application; transplant, weeding thinning or pruning crops; mowing/trimming invasive grass & brush within orchard, application of pesticides; cleaning, sorting grading, packing, and loading harvest products, repair trellis and fences along with other general related orchard work. 3 months verifiable experience in fruit tree harvesting & vegetable work

This is a paid, educational internship position. Please visit OtsegoLandTrust.org for a full job description. Resumés may be sent to marcie@otsegolandtrust.org or to Otsego Land Trust PO Box 173, Cooperstown, NY 13326.

required. Workers must be able to lift 70 pounds, be able to communicate with line of sight and have good balance and experience working from ladders and or moving platforms. $13.25/ hr. (prevailing wage). Guarantee of 3/4 of the workdays. All work tools, supplies, and equipment furnished without cost to the worker. Free housing is provided to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the workday. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be provided or paid by the employer, with payment to be made no later than completion of 50% of the work contract. Send Resume or contact: New York State Department of Labor, Division of Immigrant Policies and Affairs, Foreign

Labor Certification Unit, 290 Main Street, Suite 213, Buffalo, NY 14202 or your nearest State Workforce Agency and reference JO#221589 16HWd

continued on page 17

Immediate Part-time Help Wanted Delhi, New York

GRAPHIC ARTIST Decker Advertising, Inc. is accepting resumes for a parttime graphic designer whose duties will include ad design and pagination. Must have graphics degree or 2 years experience with InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator. Web design experience a plus. Looking for individual who is hard working, reliable, efficient, and a team player. Must be good with details, self-starter, responsible, punctual and excellent quality control work. Must possess creative skills. Our 50-year-old company publishes two weekly newspapers and quarterly seasonal magazines; markets promotional products, commercial printing and graphic design. Hours: Monday 9-5 Tuesday 8:30-6, or later Friday 9-5 if needed Please email RESUME with employment history, duties, skills and qualifications, educational history, your goals for this position and any experience that is applicable to r.shepard@dckr.com with “GRAPHIC DESIGN JOB” in the subject line. · Rate of pay based on experience. · Decker Advertising Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to inclusion and diversity.

97 Main St., Suite #5, Delhi, NY 607-746-2178


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ARIES – MAR 21/APR 20

LIBRA – SEPT 23/OCT 23

HELP WANTED continued from page 16

DEVELOPMENTAL DISabilities Aide. Seeking energetic, caring, selfstarter to support developmentally disabled individuals in Delaware & Chenango Counties. Part time positions available with full time status potential. Flexible schedule. High school diploma or GED required. Must have clean NYS driver’s license with no moving violations within last two years. Personal vehicle required; mileage reimbursed. $11.10 per hour. Applications accepted through April 23, 2019 at Delaware Opportunities Inc., 35430 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY 13782. EOE. B16HWu D AV E N P O RT H E A D Start Custodian. 10 hours per week.  Salary range $11.10 per hour. Applications accepted through April 23, 2019 at Delaware Opportunities Inc., 35430 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY 13782. Equal Employment Opportunity MF/ F/ Disability/ Protected Veteran Status. B16HWd DRIVERS NEEDED, full and part time, clean CDL Class A required, for more information call 607-746-3111, leave message. X17HWdu PERSON NEEDED FOR general maintenance and lawn care, Walton. For details call Tom 607865-4336 or 607-4351899. X16HWd PARTS/SERVICE MANager wanted at River Valley New Holland, State Highway 10,Hamden, NY. Stop in or call 607865-8180. 16HWd

NATIONALS

You may realize a long-term goal over the next few days, Aries. The sense of accomplishment can inspire you to try new things and set new goals.

TAURUS – APR 21/MAY 21

It can be challenging to balance private and public life, Taurus. Make a concerted effort to be open, but don’t overshare information, either. Work with others, if necessary.

GEMINI – MAY 22/JUN 21

Gemini, you want to have momentum, but something trips you up and slows you down considerably. You have to find a work-around if you want to be happy.

Libra, the longer you let your needs go unaddressed, the more the pressure and stress will mount. Find a way to put yourself first this week.

SCORPIO – OCT 24/NOV 22

Your sense of security and routine is put to the test with a new visitor to your household, Scorpio. This visitor may require a few concessions on your part.

SAGITTARIUS – NOV 23/DEC 21

Sagittarius, try your best to breeze through interruptions at work this week. Your projects are all on schedule, and you want to keep them going forward.

CANCER – JUN 22/JUL 22

CAPRICORN – DEC 22/JAN 20

LEO – JUL 23/AUG 23

AQUARIUS – JAN 21/FEB 18

Older, unresolved issues may bubble up this week and grab at your attention, Cancer. Seek out close companions who may be able to guide you through.

Your attention may be drawn to the material things in your life right now, Capricorn. It is okay to focus on the niceties surrounding you once in a while.

Leo, consistency at work starts to shine through in your career status and progress at the company. Competition seems to fall away, and you take a leadership role.

Make some changes at home so that living spaces reflect your personality and desire for comfort and coziness, Aquarius. It can make for more harmonious living.

Showcase your talents to people unfamiliar with what you can do, Virgo. This renewed enthusiasm may inspire you and others going forward.

You may be at a loss for words because distractions keep pulling you in different directions, Pisces. Stay the course the best you can.

VIRGO – AUG 24/SEPT 22

PISCES – FEB 19/MAR 20

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E STAT E

Week of April 18 to April 24, 2019

REAL

17

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MOBILE HOMES IMMACULATE FURnished 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 70’x14’ with 7’x22’ living, dining room bump out, new roof, furnace, refrigerator, dishwasher, much more. Must be moved to your land or park. $12,000. 607-6522704. 18MHdu

REAL ESTATE 5 ACRES. TOWN ROAD, utilities, spring, timber, views, $11,900. Call 607-652-3387 for more details. B17REdu SPRING SPECIAL: 44 acres, stream, pond, 2 barns and large new 3,000 sq. ft. Morton barn. 3 bedroom renovated colonial, fireplace, wood floors, beautiful views, set back off road. Was $299,000; Now $249,900. Also, 5.7 acres, beautiful forests, views, spring, town road, utilities, state land. Only $14,900. 607-6523387. B17REdu INTERSTATE HOMES: Manufactured & Modular Home Sales & Installation serving NY & PA. 27 years experience. View our display models at 2543 State Route 7, Harpursville, NY 13787. 607-693-1632. Web or Facebook @Interstatehomes.net. BTFREdu FOR SALE: 6 BEDROOM farmhouse, Hobart. 2 car garage, 2 fireplaces. On 1.2 acres, commercial usage okay. $73,900. Terms. Call owner now! 607-652-3387. B17REdu

RENTALS STAMFORD AREA EFficiency apartment for one working person. Heat, utilities included. No pets, no smoking. $550/month plus security. 607-652-4712 or 518-239-6238. BTFFRdu WALTON LARGE 3 BEDroom first floor private entrance apartment. Newly renovated, $795 plus security, heat included, no pets, no smoking. Call Sue 607386-2085. B19FRdu WALTON UNIQUE 3-4 bedroom apartment. First floor, private entrance. $750 plus security. Heat included. No pets or smoking. Call Michelle 607-287-7878. B18FRdu

DELHI VILLAGE LOVELY 2 bedroom apartment. Center of village, spacious living room, beautiful hardwood floors, full kitchen, full bath/shower. Includes heat, wifi, water/sewer, garbage pickup, off street parking and security cameras. Call Tom 607-434-0739. continued on page 18 16FRd

Welcome Home... To this well cared for 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home located conveniently just outside the village of Delhi. The heart of the home, the kitchen has plenty of counter space and cupboards. Large dining room is just the right size for all your family gatherings. Relax in the cozy living room with barn style doors that lead into the office/den. A nice size bedroom and updated half bath round out the first floor. The second floor consists of a large Master bedroom suite, an additional two good sized bedrooms and another full bath. Full basement could be finished for additional living space. Mudroom with laundry, oversized attached garage, plus 1 bedroom cottage that can be used as an income producer or maybe a mother-in-law unit. The large back yard has a nice patio area off the dining room, raised garden beds and plenty of room to play and roam. A must see property! L# 120659 Asking $209,000.

MOUNTAINVIEW ESTATES- A NICE PLACE TO LIVE! All apartments have appliances, ample storage and patio/balcony. Also on-site laundry, playground, on-site parking, and full time maintenance staff. Call or stop in for application. Mountainview Terrace, Walton, NY. 607-8654278, NYS Relay 711, Monday & Wednesday 8AM – 4:00 PM. EHO/ HCAF. BTFFRdu WALTON, WONDERful, large one-bedroom first-floor apartment. Totally renovated, new cabinets and appliances, tiled bathroom, small office/dressing room, washer/dryer, fully insulated, front and rear porches, quiet and comfortable. Locally owned and maintained. No smoking, no pets, no drugs. First/last/security. $725/mo. plus utilities. 607-434-0511. B17FRd S T U D E N T R E N TA L : 2br, 2nd Floor apartment. Quiet house! Available Fall & Spring semesters. Call Mary @ Frank Lumia Real Estate for more details. 607-746-6029. BTFFRdu HAMDEN COTTAGE, for rent, one bedroom only, one bath, washer/ dryer, stove, refrigerator. Off street parking. $525 month rent plus utilities. First month, last month, damage deposit and references required. One year lease. 607-7463436. 17FRd STUDENT APARTMENT on Elm St., Delhi for group of 3. Three bedrooms, kitchen, bath, private entrance, wifi. 607-746-7603. S17FRd COMFORTABLE FURnished room for rent in Hobart, NY. It includes a small refrigerator, microwave and coffee maker plus access to full kitchen and washer/ dryer. The rent includes all furniture, utilities + cable and wifi. Shared bathrooms. Off street parking. $450 month or $112/ week. Call 607538-9788. WA17FRdu

ONE BEDROOM APARTment. No pets or smoking. Off road parking. 3 miles from Delhi village. $440 plus utilities. 607-746-7466. Available now. B16FRd FOR RENT: 5 MILES from Delhi 1-bedroom upstairs apartment. $460 per month inc. garbage, snow removal, lawn maintenance. Security & references required. Available May 15th. No pets. Call 607434-7565. X16FRd HOUSE FOR RENT main street Andes, 3 b e d ro o m , a v a i l a b l e June. 520-709-6043 18FRd STUDENT ROOMS available for rent 18 Clinton Street, Delhi, NY $2,800 per semester - includes utilities. For more information call Jenny at 718-386-9684 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. For a walk through call Roger at 860-9086188. Contact: Jenny at 718-386-9684 (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM) or John at: 607-746-7097 (3:00 PM - 9:00 PM). BTFFRdu WESTBROOK APARTMENTS, A NICE PLACE TO LIVE. Subsidy Available. We offer plenty of storage, appliances, pantries, ample parking, full-time maintenance staff, on-site laundry. We allow one small pet with pet deposit. Stop in for an application. WESTBROOK APARTMENTS, 141 East Street, Walton, NY 13856. 607-8658762, NYS Relay 711, Tues and Thurs 8:00 AM4:00 PM, EHO, HCA BTFFRdu WALTON - 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, total 5 room house duplex with off street parking, no pets. $675 plus utilities. Water & garbage included. 1st month’s, security, credit and references checked. 631-902-2413. 16FRd WALTON BEAUTIFUL one bedroom apartment, $599 plus security, plus utilities, first floor private entrance with portico, fireplace, parquet floors. No smoking or pets. Call Michelle 607-287-7878. B19FRdu


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COUNTY SHOPPER

NATIONALS continued from page 17

Services Held for MurderSuicide Victims Page 11 VOLUME 135 — WHOLE 7140

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Walton Firefighters Smother Townsend Street Fire Page 10 WWW.THE-REPORTER.NET

On Patrol: Unadilla Teen Is Honorary Deputy Sheriff for the Day nervous - you bet,” he said. By Rosie Cunningham The opportunity began with a letter. Karleen DuMond, owner DELHI - Less than a half hour and trainer at the Golden Gait after Unadilla’s Jonathan Jack- Farm in Masonville, has known son was sworn in as an honor- Jackson for two years, ever since ary Deputy Sheriff for the day by he became a rider in her theraDelaware County Sheriff Craig peutic riding program. DuMond, he made his first arSee On Patrol page 7 rest. It was a busy day for Jackson, a 15 year-old who is on the autistic spectrum and has Asperger syndrome (AS). AS is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. However, Jackson had no problem vocalizing how he Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter felt about the deputy Jonathan Jackson was all smiles after he arsheriff experience. “I am excited and rested his suspect.

Body Recovered from Del Co Plane Crash Near Cannonsville Reservoir By Lillian Browne

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2018

$1.00

Mic Drop

Walton Radio Personality Retires After 47 Years By Lillian Browne WALTON - The key to good communication, according to long-time Walton radio personality Ron Galley, is to be a good listener. More importantly, he said, “If you have nothing to say - say nothing.” He is a man of few words, allowing his guests to shine with well-thought out questions and an encouraging smile. People want to talk to him. He’s become a trusted voice of the community with an uncountable number of fans. Host of WDLA Big Kat County’s 92.1 FM radio station, with a studio located on Delaware Street in Walton, Galley’s voice has become synonymous with Walton Warrior High School football games. His knowledge of the game is surpassed only by his experience in anticipating upcoming plays. He can easily recite statistics from specific games, players - their numbers and positions, coaches’ favored plays, the weather during the game, and the pulse of the fans. After all, he is the sport’s biggest fan. After 47 years in radio, Galley announced his plans to retire on Nov. 9. His last day at WDLA will be on Nov. 15. He will miss the excitement, the unexpected nature of not knowing what someone is going to say and the ever-changing nature of the profession. One thing that has not changed since he entered the studio in 1971, is his work ethic, his values and his respect for people. The key to his longevity in the profession, he said, is his passion for the work. “It’s addictive.” When he began his radio career, he planned to stay for five years. He got comfortable, he

Lillian Browne/The Reporter

WDLA radio personality Ron Galley will finish his 47-year career as a morning show radio host mid-November. said, but he didn’t get rich. There is not a lot of money to be made as a program host in small, local radio. In addition to his on-air job, he works for The Arc of Delaware County, as a custodian at the United Presbyterian Church in Walton and as a freelance writer. Complaints from Galley are non-existent. He is a devote parishioner, deeply grounded in his faith; which, he said, has been a guiding force in his life. There have been innovations

in technology and equipment that have changed the way Galley delivers the news, does interviews and brings his audience their morning radio programing on weekday mornings. Gone are the days of playing music on turntables - there used to be three in the studio - with vinyl records. In order to play music on the radio he had to learn the art of queuing to avoid the arch-enemy of radio - “dead air.”

TOMPKINS - An explosion that shook the homes on Wakeman Brook Road See Mic Drop page 4 in Walton near the Cannonsville Reservoir alerted area residents to a twin encan Legion Post and Veterans of as the Treaty of Versailles, was gine plane crash on By Lillian Browne Foreign Wars, stood at attention signed the following year, Cetta steep, heavily woodwith the color guard, as Kent told the crowd. WALTON - Crisp weather and Terchunian, pastor at Walton’s ed, vacant New York The Walton Central School clear blue skies provided the United Methodist Church, gave Marching Band provided patriotCity (DEP) ownedbackdrop for Walton’s Veterans’ an invocation. land near Readburn ic ensembles with a somber playDay Parade and ceremony on Road near the borRetired National Guard Lieu- ing of “Taps” by trumpet player Monday, Nov. 12. ders of the towns tenant Colonel Guard Joe Cetta Tommy Maguire, following the Lillian Browne/The Reporter The parade kicked-off at Gar- performed commander duties three-volley salute. of Hancock, Tompkins and Walton in DEP Spokesman Adam Bosch released de- diner Place, traveling along for the parade and ceremonies Also participating in the paDelaware County on tails of a twin-engine plane crash on Friday, Bridge Street to stop at the for- outlining the adoption of Armi- rade were Boy Scout Troop 45 Friday, Nov. 9 at ap- Nov. 9 near the Cannonsville Reservoir in mer Walton Armory and Memo- stice Day, which coincides with and Pack 45, as well as members Delaware County at the DEP Beerston Bar- rial where members of Walton’s proximately 3 p.m. Veterans Day, with the cessation of Walton Daisies, Brownies and American Legion Color Guard of World War I on Nov. 11, 1918. A Girl Scouts and the Walton Fire A distress call was racks on Saturday, Nov. 10 at noon. gave a The three-volley salute as part formal peace agreement, known Department’s Ladies Auxiliary.13 issued by 14, the 2018 pilot, Reporter November who has been identified as Dan- Buffalo to Teeterboro, N.J., min- of the day’s celebration. See Walton Honors Veterans More Photos page 7 Members of Walton’s Ameriiel Drew, age 65 of Buffalo, who utes before the crash. had filed an FAA flight plan from Members of rescue and recovery crews on the scene said it was likely that the pilot was redirected to the White Birch landing strip off Sands Creek Road in Hancock, not far from the crash site, following the distress call. A former New York State Department of Environmental Conservation “fire-spotter” that manned the Rock Rift Fire Tower when it was operational, who resides on By Rosie Cunningham Readburn Road, heard the DELHI - “It was their best finish low-flying plane and saw at the New York State Championwhat appeared to be smoke coming from the wing of the ship since 1981,” said Delaware plane. Within moments of Academy Cross Country Coach spotting the plane, the witSkip Baxter. The DA squad represented See Body Recovered page 10 Section IV in the New York state championship meet on Saturday, Nov. 10 at Sunken Meadow State Park in Long Island. According to Baxter 38 athletes - 19 boys and 19 Lillian Browne/The Reporter girls represented the Bulldogs. Walton Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion Post members participated in the Veterans Day “This weekend went exceptionparade on Nov. 12 which wound its way from Gardiner Place to Bridge Street, to Stockton Avenue. ally well,” he said. “The girls team finished third on a tough, muddy and hilly course. It was their best finish at the NY State Championships since 1981. Sienna Dorr was a NY State All-Star for the second consecutive year, finishing 15th individually. The boys also finished third as a team, which was their best final placing in the history of Delhi Cross Country, which stretches back to the 1940s.” DA had two boys earn NY State All-Star status - Jonathon Hadley (17th) and Diego Aguirre (20th). “We were all very happy with the results from the meet, and with only two seniors among those who ran this weekend, we are looking forward to getting back to the State Championships next season.” Top local finishers at the NYS Class-D Championship meet: 10 - Kelsey Young (Deposit/ Hancock): 20:01.4 15 - Sienna Dorr (DA): 20:37. 4 30 - Autumn Dorr (DA): 21:28.9 35 - Cella Schnabel (DA) 46 - Jillian Lees (DA): 22:27.5 Top local boy finishers: 14 - Aidan Cutting (Unatego): 27:41.2 17 - Jonathan Hadley (DA): 17:49 20 - Diego Aguirre (DA): Diego Aguirre 27 - Ty Saleman (DA): 18:09.2 Jonathan Hadley, of Delaware Academy finished with a Sienna Dorr, of Delaware Academy finished with a time of 20:37. time of 17:49 on Saturday.

Walton Honors Veterans

Sports Reporter

Serving

Delaware County Academy Cross Country Team Legs it Out at Delaware and the State Championship Surrounding Areas Since 1881 ———— Delaware County’s Leading News Source

B-G Volleyball Sweeps, Wins Class D Regional Final By Rosie Cunningham TIOGA – Bainbridge-Guilford has been unbeatable all season long, winning set after set this season. The Section IV champions swept Bishop Grimes (25-9, 25-12, 25-18) to win the Class D regional final at Tioga. According to B-G coach Tam Selfridge, she couldn’t be more proud of the performance of her squad. “I thought we had a really great game on Saturday, said Selfridge. “Our energy level was high and our level of play was high. While we struggled some with serving, especially in the first game, overall we played well.” According to Selfridge, there were numerous standouts in the win. Erica Selfridge tallied three aces, seven assists and an impressive match-high, 12 kills. “Her hits were on fire,” said Selfridge. “Defensively, we were pretty well rounded but Alexis Carr seemed to stand out in the back court.” Abigail Selfridge contributed five aces, 15 assists, five kills, and one block, while Zamira Caldwell had an ace and six

kills, respectively. Last year the volleyball team earned B-G their first state championship. The win advances the Bobcats to next weekend’s state championship play. “We travel to Glens Falls next weekend,” said Coach Selfridge. “Pool Play begins Saturday Nov. 17 at 8:30 a.m. top two finishers in pool play return to the arena on Sunday, Nov. 18 for the state championship match at 10 a.m. This win was important in preparing us for this coming weekend.” The B-G coach discussed how the team is preparing for the upcoming competition. “Today I had one-on-one sessions with anyone who wanted to,” she said. “While not mandatory, most everyone signed up for a time slot. They are all a little nervous for next weekend and eager to perfect things they might be struggling with. Tomorrow we travel to Owego to scrimmage. They won the Class B state tournament last year when we won Class D. They are always a good team and are headed to Glens Falls too so we’re excited to play against them tomorrow.”

Afton Field Hockey Falls to Nine-Time State Champs in Semis By Rosie Cunningham BUFFALO - Afton field hockey fell to Lakeland on Saturday in the New York State Class-B Semifinals. Lakeland is the nine-time defending state champion and the Crimson Knights held their own. Last week, Afton defeated

Holland Patent in the state quarterfinals 1-0 to advance to the semifinals in Buffalo against Lakeland. Eight minutes into the contest, Lakeland got on the board as Cara O’Shea scored for the Hornets. Afton didn’t have a lot of scoring opportunities, however, they were holding their own on defense

against the scrappy Lakeland team. With seven minutes left before the break, O’Shea scored again as she knocked in a loose ball during a scrum in front of the net. Afton could not net a goal despite their efforts and as the game came to a close, so did the Crimson Knight’s season.

2018 Midstate Athletic Conference Volleyball All-Stars First Team Abigail Selfridge, Erica Selfridge - Bainbridge Guilford Allison Beckwith, Kelsey Drewniak - Oxford Erin Kelly - Unadilla Valley Emma Walley - Walton Jessica Davis - Delaware Academy Madison Rivera - Unatego

Trinity Crawson - Deposit/ Hancock Sophi Gove - Harpursville/ Afton Amber Rogers - Sidney Mackenzie Rios - Greene Second Team Zamira Caldwell, Alexis Carr Bainbridge Guilford Jessie Howe, Andrea Dempsey - Oxford

Jenna Hitt - Unadilla Valley Hailey Gardner - Walton Hannah Baxter - DA Carly Hill - Unatego Abby Chase - Deposit/Hancock Mallory Carman - Harpursville/Afton Ale Johnson - Sidney Jullanna Ayres - Greene Honorable Mention

Marissa Cuozzo, Makenzie Drown, Makenna Clark - Bainbridge Guilford Allison Paster, Lilie Horton Oxford Erin Brooks - Unadilla Valley Jamie Klein, Tianna Gladstone, Alyssa McNeil, Molly McClenon, Kielie Dones - Walton Veronica Armstrong - DA Alyssa Blanco, Allie Hayle, Al-

exa Hurlburt - Unatego Haleigh Nugent - Deposit/ Hancock Liv Harris-Morris - Harpursville/Afton Kaitlyn Brown - Sidney Valerie

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READER ADVISORY: the National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it’s illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. 800 numbers may or may not reach Canada. ZTFNLdu

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A large crowd of Watershed officials, state and federal agency representatives and regional partners celebrated National Water Week by attending the Catskill Watershed Corporation’s (CWC) Annual Meeting of CWC Member Towns on April 2. Attendees included US EPA Region 2 Administrator Pete Lopez, Phil Rumsey and Carly Norton of the Governor’s Southern Tier regional office; Patrick Palmer and colleagues of the NYS Department of Health, and NYC Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Vincent Sapienza. They joined CWC Board and staff for a review of 2018 accomplishments, and to welcome the newest Board member, Chris Mathews, Supervisor of the Town of Neversink, who was elected by fellow Sullivan County Watershed Town Supervisors. Outgoing Sullivan County representative Mark McCarthy, a member of the Board since 2014, was lauded for his service to the organization. Re-elected to four-year terms on the Board were Innes Kasanof of Halcott, Greene County, and Rich Parete of Marbletown, Ulster County. The 2018 Annual Report was released at the meeting and can be viewed at cwconline.org (Documents). A link to a video summary of the year’s actions can be found on the Releases page of the website. To get a paper copy of the annual report, call 845586-1400, or email scosta@ cwconline.org. Among the highlights of the report: • 202 failed septic systems were replaced, with permanent residents reimbursed 100 percent of eligible costs, part-time residents 60 percent. Two classes for septic designers and contractors were offered in 2018. • 308 septic systems installed since 1995 were pumped and inspected; CWC covered half the cost for each maintenance visit.

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• Community Wastewater Management Projects in Shandaken, West Conesville, Halcottsville and Claryville advanced towards implementation. Two others, New Kingston and Shokan, are in the study phase. • Several residential and commercial fuel tanks were anchored under the Flood Hazard Mitigation Implementation Program. Funds were also awarded under this program to investigate options for flood proofing 19 homes, municipal buildings, businesses and institutions. • The CWC reimbursed 11 property owners the cost of required stormwater controls. These ranged from the massive Hunter North ski expansion, to a small minigolf range in Bovina. Five previously funded projects received operation and maintenance support. • Four low-interest loans were approved for businesses in Watershed Towns through the CWC’s Catskill Fund for the Future. These included the Walton Big M, Fruition Chocolate in Shokan and the Catskill Revitalization Corp. for its Delaware & Ulster Railroad. Other economic development initiatives included collaborative efforts to enhance tourism and outdoor recreation in the Catskills, such as the Reservoir Boating Program, which drew 1,660 kayaks and canoes to four NYC reservoirs in 2018. • 38 Watershed Education Grants were awarded to schools and non-profit organizations in the Catskill-Delaware Watershed and in New York City. The September groundbreaking for a new building to house both CWC and NYC DEP staff was a highlight of 2018. Project coordinator John Mathiesen and Paul Bedford, Keystone Associates Partner in Charge of the project, updated the gathering on construction progress to date. Images and details of the project can be found on the CWC website. The building is going up on County Route 38 near Arkville and is expected to be completed in time to host the 2019 CWC Annual Meeting.

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Folk Art in Stone Exhibit Reception at Erpf Gallery

The creative response of folk artists to Catskills natural resources results in a wide variety of artistic works. Catskills bluestone, as a resource, is no exception. TheCatskills Folk Connection and the Catskill Center opened an exhibit of two extraordinary folk carvers in stone with an artists’ reception at the Erpf Center 43355 NY Route 28 in Arkville Saturday. Mark Swanberry, Fulton, and Richard McCormack, Schoharie, discussed their works. Each will have brought to the exhibit examples of bluestone carving, including works that combine stone with other media such as copper or the artist’s own acrylic landscape paintings. “It’s a contemporary legend that folk artists are not sophisticated and don’t know the value of what they create,” says Catskills Folk Connection’s folklorist, Ginny Scheer. “These two artists know their bluestone resource. They know how to fabricate items that fulfill their artistic vision and they know how to market their work.” The result is an exhibit that gathers carved stone objects, large and small, where you can see them together, perhaps for the first time, and learn about the stone carving process from the artists. The exhibit remains open for public viewing through June 7. The Erpf Gallery is located at 43355 State Route 28 in Arkville, and is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information visit www.catskillsfolkconnection.blogspot.com or contact Ginny Scheer, Folklorist, at vscheer@juno.com or 607326-4206.

Cornell University’s 2019 Animal Crackers Youth Horse and Poultry Program Taking Registrations

Ithaca, NY - The Cornell University Department of Animal Science is pleased to announce Animal Crackers 2019 “Horse Feathers – We All Flock Together” on Saturday, May 4, at Cornell University. The up-coming program will incorporate both horse and poultry topics for youth ages 9-12 or those with a beginner level knowledge of the species. All youth, 4-H and non4-H, are invited to participate. Adult chaperones are also invited to attend to make Horse Feathers a family affair! Registration begins at 9 a.m. in the Morrison Hall Lobby, followed by a welcoming ceremony at 9:30 a.m. Bring your own lunch to the Livestock Pavilion for a Stick Horse and Egg/Spoon Race at 11:45 a.m. Closing ceremonies will take place from 2:40 p.m. to 3:10 p.m. in the auditorium. Full scheduled details can be found here: http://4h.ansci. cornell.edu/events-2/animalcrackers/schedule/. Interesting, educational, hands-on activities are being planned to make Horse Feathers a memorable teaching event. Participants will have the opportunity to learn horse or poultry care, biology, or management while having fun. There will also be some lunch time activities, some special guests and more! Are you ready for an egg and

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spoon race with stick horses? Cost of the program will be $15/youth and registration for the event will be done through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension Office http://cce.cornell.edu/ localoffices. Ulster County residents should contact Matt Helffrich in the Kingston [ulster.cce.cornell.edu]CCEUC office at (845) 340- 3990 ext. 340 or mdh268@cornell.edu. More information is posted on the Animal Crackers website: http://4h.ansci.cornell.edu/ events-2/animal-crackers/. Mark your calendars for one the most exciting animal science programs of 2019! Need to reser ve hotel rooms? Reserve before April 19 to get a group discount at the Clarion Inn by the Triphammer Mall: http://4h. ansci.cornell.edu/events-2/ animal-crackers/animalcrackers-lodging/. Friendly reminder: Plan to wear clean clothes and shoes that were not worn for morning farm chores, for biosecurity purposes. Disposable booties will be provided upon request. For information about Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County’s community programs and events go to ulster.cce.cornell.edu/. Stay connected to CCEUC-friend us on Facebook, and follow us on Instagram. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County provides equal program and employment opportunities. Please contact our office at 845-3403990 if you have any special needs.

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