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A Transformative Destination for the 21st Century

The Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project Detroit Collaborative Design Center NTH Consultants, Ltd. Adi Shamir The Mannik & Smith Group, Inc. Urban Resource Alliance Zachary and Associates, Inc. Prepared for The Kresge Foundation & McCormack Baron Salazar

Executive Summary Consultant Names Here 29 July 2011


Executive Summary for The Kresge Foundation July 29, 2011 This document is a brief summary of our key findings regarding the Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project including design intentions, market strategy, schedules, funding, economic benefits and other aspects of the project including immediate next steps required to move the project forward. We explore three scales of development for the Bloody Run Creek Greenway Project: 1. The Master Plan (3500 acres) bridges the public Bloody Run Creek Greenway Project to the successful developments in the surrounding area while also creating new private development, such as renewable energy, food production including agriculture, multifamily and single family residential and loft housing, neighborhood and community activity centers including convenience and specialty retail, auto and medical related technology and research facilities, renovation and adaptive re-use of historic structures, and other complimentary uses that will service the community and act as a local and regional draw. The estimated overall project cost is $1 billion (2011) which could leverage about $3 billion in private development. This in turn brings significant economic benefit to Detroit through both temporary and permanent jobs, taxes, purchasing and rising land values. We propose that the Creek Greenway system be built over a period of 10 years with private development continuing in five phases, or zones, for approximately 15 years thereafter. 2. Phase 1 coincides with the Zone 1: Central/Eastern Market development zone (300 acres). The Phase 1 project provides the greatest visibility and impact to promote the overall project through the development of the Central Pond which is linked to Eastern Market, thereby tying these two areas together. Additionally, Central Pond extends to the Dequindre Cut through cascading ponds, and a dramatic waterfall feature then drops water into a canal within the Cut, discharging into the Detroit River. The work in this phase also includes separation of sewers, rehabilitation of existing historic bridges and construction of new bridges, as well as streetscaping of the major streets. The estimated cost of Phase 1 is $200 million that could be used to leverage up to $500 million in private development. 3. The Demonstration Project (30 acres) is a project within Phase I that integrates into ongoing work at the Eastern Market and the Dequindre Cut and will initiate the development. This Demonstration Project is further broken into two phases, identified as D1, a $15 million project, and D2. D1 includes the first cascading pond directly east of the Dequindre Cut, the waterfall feature into the Cut, the first segment of the canal in the Cut, and sewer separation of Division St. from Orleans to Gratiot. Acquisition and redevelopment of four warehouses located on the east and west sides of the Cut between Wilkins and Gratiot are also included in the Demonstration Project. The proposed Bloody Run Greenway Redevelopment Project is a transformative venture for the City of Detroit, and we hope that you are as excited by its potential as we are. Sincerely, Consultant Team Detroit Collaborative Design Center NTH Consultants, Ltd. Adi Shamir The Mannik & Smith Group, Inc. Urban Resource Alliance Zachary and Associates, Inc.


for 21st Century Detroit

A Transformative Destination The Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project has the opportunity to become a major ecological public landscape and transformative destination for the City of Detroit through daylighting the long-buried Creek. Located east of Detroit’s Central Business District and Midtown, the site is connected to major assets and districts through its interstate and non-motorized linkages, and its future connectivity to the Woodward Light Rail System. Further, the Greenway can play an important role in Detroit’s redevelopment strategy by serving as a catalyst for economic and physical development. In this context, the transformation of Bloody Run Creek will enrich the lives of all who visit and use the greenway, as well as enhance the attractiveness of Detroit for businesses, families, and individuals.

Introduction


Aerial view of Bloody Run Creek Greenway and surroundings


Project Boundary Mixed Use District Residential District Energy and Production District Linkages

HAMTRAMCK

HENRY FORD

I-75

M-10

E. GRAND BLVD.

WOODWARD

BOSTON EDISON

I-94 INDUSTRIAL U PARK/ RENAISSANCE S ZONE

GM ASSEMBLY

NORTH END

NEW CENTER CENTER R

GR

OT IO AT

I-9 94

TECH TOWN

I-94 FARNSWORTH O

WA AYNE E U UNIVE

KETTERING

WOODBRIDGE OODBRIDGE E MIDTOWN LOOP

GM

CADILLAC

GREEKTOWN

WEST RIVERFRONT RIVERFRO RO T RONT

DEQUINDRE CUT DE

ELMWOOD

ENTERTAINMENT N T DISTRICT RI

DOWNTOWN OW W WN

E. GRAND BLVD E D.

MT. ELLIOT

I-75

CORKTOWN

MEDICAL IC CENTER NT

Raiil ght Ra Woodward Light

NORTH CORKTOWN

The Site Formerly a community of dense housing and industrial job centers east of Downtown, Midtown, and the Cultural District, Detroit’s Near East Side today is one of the most vacant regions of the city. Despite its loss of population and industry, the area is still home to the rich cultural, natural, and community assets of Eastern Market, the Dequindre Cut, and the Riverfront as well as strong neighborhoods such as Lafayette Park, McDougall-Hunt, and Farnsworth. A lesser-known asset, the remnants of Bloody Run Creek, trickles through Elmwood Cemetery.

LA L AFAYETTE AFAYETTE E PARK

VILLAGES

RSON JEFFER

GOLD COAST

SON JEFFERS

EAST RIVERFRO ONT RIVERWALK

HARBOR TOWN WN

R

WINDSOR CBD

BELLE ISLE

Context Diagram

Introduction

At a size comparable to Belle Isle and New York’s Central Park, the Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project would afford a wide spectrum of uses, appealing to an broad range of users. Its large scale offers an extraordinary resource for people who are interested in outdoor recreation activities – kayaking, jogging, cycling, rollerblading, picnicking, golfing, horseback riding, fishing, boating, and gardening. The site also offers opportunities for farming, research, food production, energy creation, education, markets, and festivals as well as more traditional private land uses. The Bloody Run Creek development connects to and expands the proposed citywide greenway network.


One Simple Move Vacant Land E. GRAND BLVD.

Open Space E E. GRAND BL BLVD. BLVD LVD LVD

Viewing vacant land and buildings as open space. I-75

MT. ELLIOT

MT. ELLIOT

I-75

I-94

I-94

I-94

I-94 PALMER

GR

PALMER

T IO AT

GR

WARREN

WARREN

WARREN

CANFIELD

CANFIELD

CANFIELD

CANFIELD

MACK

MACK

MACK

MACK

WILKINS

CHARLEVOIX

WILKINS

CHARLEVOIX

VERNOR

VERNOR

I-375

I-375 KERCHEVAL

T IO AT

LAFAYETTE

LAFAYETTE

JEFFERSON

DETROIT RIVER

Map 1 illustrates vacant properties as gray

DETROIT RIVER

Map 2 iIlustrates vacant properties as green

E. GRAND BLVD.

N

T IO AT

MT. ELLIOT

ERSO

GR

CHENE

JEFF

KERCHEVAL

I-375

JEFFERSON

E. GRAND BLVD.

MT. ELLIOT

CHENE

LAFAYETTE

LAFAYETTE

I-375

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Historical Significance Bloody Run Creek was originally known as Rivieres Parent by the French until in 1763 a major battle between the British Army and native Americans led by the famous Chief Pontiac resulted in the death of a number of British Soldiers. On that day Parent’s Creek ran red with blood and the name “Bloody Run Creek” was adopted by the local inhabitants.

Early 19th Century Map of Detroit

The original alignment of Bloody Run Creek extended from its outlet in the Detroit River near the west end of Belle Isle generally north-northwest past current I-94 where it branched out, and along the French ribbon farms that were positioned to take advantage of the waterfront access. As the City of Detroit grew in the second half of the 19th century, and the science of sanitary engineering developed, much of the surfaces within the watershed were paved and the surrounding area sewered. As the construction of sewers increased, the Bloody Run Creek was used to divert sewer overflows during severe storm events, which led to health issues and the accumulation of debris. In 1880, coinciding with massive cholera outbreaks throughout the area, the City of Detroit decided to bury the creek through a process of installing 5-foot diameter sewers and culverts and filling over the creek. The creek was completely filled by the 20th Century, except the section through Elmwood Cemetery, where the Creek is still visible.

Historical Underpinnings

Historic Image of Bloody Run Creek at Elmwood Cemetery Source: Burton Historical Library


In 1880, coinciding with massive cholera outbreaks throughout the area, the City of Detroit decided to bury the creek through a process of installing 5-foot diameter sewers and culverts and filling over the creek. The creek was completely filled by the 20th Century, except the section through Elmwood Cemetery, where the Creek is still visible today.

Historic Image of Bloody Run Creek Source: Burton Historical Library

1825 Map of Detroit


Historic Map of Detroit French ribbon farms Source: 1935 clarification of a 1749 French Map. Clements Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (Map Division 6-N-3).

Rediscovering Bloody Run Creek Over the years several schemes have proposed the daylighting of Bloody Run Creek. In 1993, Schervish Vogel Merz proposed to the then new Mayor Dennis Archer that a state park be developed that opens the creek as an incentive for new development. Although well received, the scope of the project—3000 acres—was beyond the city’s ability to contemplate. In 1995, Stephen Vogel and the Detroit Collaborative Design Center at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture presented “Unearthing Detroit” that proposed the daylighting of Bloody Run Creek as part of the exhibition Empowering the City: New Directions in Urban Architecture. Further, the city-sponsored Community Reinvestment Strategy in 1997 illustrated the daylighting of Bloody Run Creek as a part of the long term strategy for the lower east side. No process of implementation of this strategy has ever been put forward until now.

Historical Underpinnings


E. GRAND BLVD.

MT. ELLIOT

I-75

I-94

I-94

PALMER

1846 Creek

GR

T IO AT

WARREN

WARREN

CANFIELD

CANFIELD

1890 Creek

MACK MACK

19th Century map of Detroit’s creeks and streams

CHARLEVOIX

VERNOR

I-375 KERCHEVAL

GR

T IO AT

LAFAYETTE

MT. ELLIOT

CHENE

LAFAYETTE

JEFFERSON

DETROIT RIVER

Historic creek alignments

E. GRAND BLVD.

I-375

Pontiac’s Tree: Tradition says that an old whitewood tree, standing on the south side of Jefferson Avenue just beyond Adair Street, was witness to the battle of Bloody Run Creek, and the tree for many years was called “The Pontiac Tree” after Chief Pontiac.

WILKINS

JEFF

ERSO

N


Detroit has the opportunity to redefine the 21st Century city. The Vision Detroit is in a unique position of crisis and opportunity. It is at a turning point in history based on its economic and physical reality. Detroit has the opportunity to create a new 21st Century city centered on the quality of life for all of its citizens and catalyzed by the transformative Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project. The Bloody Run Creek Greenway is envisioned as a new kind of public ecological landscape: a productive landscape that offers a generous and beautiful largescale public landscape for recreation, culture, education, and ecology, creating a unique place of interaction with the creek and the land. As a productive landscape, the Greenway will provide jobs and become a model for sustainable design and management practices.

Project Vision


ST. AUBIN

E. GRAND BLVD.

MT. ELLIOT

Reservoir

I-75

Poletown Ponds + Bird Sanctuary

Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant (General Motors)

I-94

I-94

Headwaters

Incinerator

Upper Woods

Trinity Cemetery

FERRY

Green Energy Corridor

Landfill Park Productive Gardens

WARREN

Nurseries (TO MIDTOWN LOOP)

Woods & Water

PALMER

Packard Canal

Farnsworth Neigborhood GR

T IO AT

WARREN

Fitness Loop Eco-Park

CANFIELD

CANFIELD

Faygo

Gratiot Parkway Green Energy Corridor

Pepsi

Botanical Gardens MACK

Central Pond Cascading Ponds

McDougallHunt

WILKINS

Waterfall

Eastern Market

MACK

CHARLEVOIX

Linear Park VERNOR

Lower Woods

I-375 KERCHEVAL

Farmscape

Dequindre Cut Greenway Rapids Run Lafayette Park

LAFAYETTE

MT. ELLIOT

McDOUGALL

CHENE

LAFAYETTE

E. GRAND BLVD.

I-375

G

OT TI RA

JEFF

ERSO

N

Promenade

JEFFERSON Mt. Elliot Park

Wetlands Tricentennial State Park

UAW Chene Park

DETROIT RIVER

Riverwalk


Project Boundary Mixed Use District Residential District Energy and Production District Linkages

HAMTRAMCK

HENRY FORD

I-75

M-10

E. GRAND BLVD.

WOODWARD

BOSTON EDISON

The Vision & Guiding Principles Core principles have been established that will guide the design, planning, and implementation of The Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project. The Guiding Principles for the project include the following:

I-94 INDUSTRIAL U PARK/ RENAISSANCE S ZONE

GM ASSEMBLY PLANT

NORTH END

NEW CENTER CENTER R

GR

I-9 94

TECH TOWN

1.

The Project will be a bold, visionary, and transformative project that will catalyze the City’s redevelopment efforts.

AU A UTO TECH EC C RESEARCH ARCH RCH & D DESIGN N

I-94

FARNSWORTH FAR A WO O

WA AYNE E STATE E U UNIVE ER RSITY Y

WOODBRIDGE OODBRIDGE E

The Project will connect and strengthen the fabric of the community through its accessibility, inclusiveness, and connections to the city.

KETTERING

WARREN

F FOREST ANFIELD CANFIELD

GR

T IO AT

MAC MACK

GREEKTOWN

WEST RIVERFRONT RIVERFRO RO T RONT

GM

LA L AFAYETTE AFAYETTE E PARK

CADILLAC

ELMWOOD

ENTERTAINMENT N T DISTRICT RI

E. GRAND BLVD E D.

R OR NO NO RN VERNOR VERN VERNO

DOWNTOWN OW WN

The Project will generate jobs.

MCDOUGALL M C HUNT

E EASTERN ERN N MARKET KE

MT. ELLIOT

I-75

CORKTOWN

NS WILKINS

DEQUINDRE CUT DE

4.

MEDICAL IC CENTER NT

Raiil ght Ra Woodward Light

3.

MEDICAL DI RESEARCH/ RESEARCH A H/ TECH. EC

MIDTOWN OW O MIDTOWN LOOP

NORTH CORKTOWN

The Project will champion environmental sustainability through its utilization of innovative green technologies.

CULTURAL U CENTER T

I-75

2.

T IO AT

ELMWOOD CEMETERY

VILLAGES

RSON JEFFER

ETTE YE LAYFAYE

GOLD COAST COAS

RSON JEFFERS

EAST ST RIVERFRO ONT ONT RW LK RIVERWA

HARBOR TOWN WN

R

The Project will set new standards for landscape,

5. environmental, and architectural design.

WINDSOR CBD

BELLE ISLE

Context and Linkages Analysis Diagram


A catalyst for future development and dynamic quality of life.


Hydrologic Concept

Collect

In order to collect the storm water runoff from the entire site, the current storm water is separated from the sanitary sewer system through a new storm sewer. The existing storm sewer connections to the combined sewer are removed or abandoned in place.

Clean The ponds improve water quality by filtering solids from the flow. Plantings near the ponds act as wetlands and filter out other items from the run-off before it reaches the creek.

Store In order to help maintain a consistent flow throughout the proposed creek between rain events, storage or holding ponds and reservoirs are required. Flows are held in these areas through the use of dams and weirs.

Clean The ponds improve water quality by filtering solids from the flow. Plantings near the ponds act as wetlands and filter out other items from the run-off before it reaches the creek.

Daylighting Given the current social and economic challenges within urban areas, a popular and effective method of decreasing municipal sewer treatment costs while improving the environment and the beauty of a city is the process of daylighting former natural drainage features such as creeks and streams. Daylighting is a term describing projects whose goal is to uncover and/ or re-establish previously existing creeks, rivers, ponds, and lakes that have been eliminated in the modern era. The idea is to re-establish the waterways either along their old channel or in new alignments.

Release After the ponds and native plantings filter the storm water, clean water is released into the creek. This process reduces the amount of storm runoff reaching the Detroit Wastewater treatment plant.

Sanitary Sewer

Local Storm Sewer

Retention Pond

Bloody Run Creek Channel


Aditional Sewer SeparationTo North

Hydrologic Concept

pment AREA 4

E. GRAND BLVD.

Contours (5’ Intervals) Primary Roads I-75

Surface Drainage Local Storm Sewer

+40

AREA 2

MT. ELLIOT

* See NTH Consultants, LTD’s Drainage Area Diagram for Extent of Area 4 Watershed

AREA 3

* H.P.

Collector Pipe I-94

I-94

+40

Collector to Roads/Creek PALMER

Supplemental Water Source

2A

Water Discharge Valve Creek/Retention Pond Sewer Separation Area

3A

k urce

Leg 2

Leg 1A

WARREN

GR

T IO AT

WARREN

Headwater Zones Landscape Coverage High Point (H.P.)

From Forest Ave. and Pennsylvania St. FOREST

2B

CANFIELD

CANFIELD 630’

Spot Elevation Note:

+30

Dominant Soil Texture: Morain Fine

3B MACK MACK 620’

WILKINS

CHARLEVOIX

2C

Leg 1B

VERNOR

620’

Leg 3

I-375

KERCHEVAL

615’

3C

0’

61

5’

60

G

OT TI RA

LAFAYETTE 600’

’ 600

+20 595’ 590’

JEFFERSON

585’

+0 +0 DETROIT RIVER

580’

E. GRAND BLVD.

MT. ELLIOT

McDOUGALL

+17

CHENE

ST. AUBIN

RIVARD

LAFAYETTE

2D

I-375

By uncovering Bloody Run Creek, Detroit can reduce the strain on its sewer system through a reduction in runoff collection and transport to the City of Detroit Wastewater Treatment Plant by 3 billion gallons per year. This in turn reduces the cost of water treatment due to a decreased quantity of storm water collected. Further, by exposing the water to air, sunlight, vegetation, and exposed soils, the water quality can be improved through natural filtration of pollutants. Such bioremediation provides an environmentally friendly and aesthetically pleasing asset for existing residents while creating an amenity for new residents and businesses. In addition to the benefits of the water feature itself, the physical process of daylighting creates local jobs through uncovering and maintaining the restored waterway as well as reducing future maintenance costs, as it is much cheaper and easier to perform maintenance and repairs to a creek or stream than an underground sewer.

JEFF

ERSO

N


Productive Landscapes Several estimates suggest that there are 40 square miles of undesignated open space (i.e. vacant land and buildings) within the city limits of Detroit. To be conservative, let us use 30 square miles and divide that into 800,000 inhabitants. These numbers reveal a potential for 1,045 square feet of open, green space per Detroiter. This suggests that Detroit has the potential to be the greenest city in the United States through the creation of productive landscapes: spaces that engage the public through the production of ideas, social exchange, products and services, and jobs. An example of a productive landscape is the Steel Winds Wind Farm in the suburb of Lackawanna, New York. Steel Winds returned the former Bethlehem Steel Factory to productive use by incorporating a wind farm and public park into the facility. Here energy is made; jobs are created; and people have a place to recreate.

Green Energy Corridor


What if innovative ecological technologies and practices formed new landscapes of production?

Key Plan

Detroit River to I-94: 3 miles with a 40 ft. grade change


What if Gratiot became a public heritage parkway and welcoming entry into the City?

Key Plan

Pocket Forest

Gratiot Parkway

Fishing

Creek Cascade at Gratiot Crossing

Water Trail Cascade Underpass

Public Plaza


What if native species filtered water to the Detroit River?

A recreational and cultural circuit.


What if phytoremediation gardens regenerated the site? Key Plan

Basketball Court

Solar Field

Vista Point

Fitness Green at Farnsworth Neighborhood

Vegetated Stream Bank

Kayaking

Phytoremediation

Stormwater Separation


A meandering neighborhood asset.


What if abandoned buildings became ecological destinations?

Key Plan

Ramp to Garden Roof

Theatre at Packard Canal

Viewing Platform

Boardwalk

Canal

Screen


What if bike trails highlighted the City’s historic landmarks?

History, Ecology and Recreation Combined.


Key Plan

Boardwalk

Wetlands at Chene Street

Winds Turbines

Wetlands Habitat


What if wetlands and urban life were combined?

Boardwalk

Park Drive

Picnic Shelter with Solar Harvesting

Sledding Hill


What if a neighborhood took part in producing its own energy, food, and culture?

Winds Turbines

Key Plan

Nursery and Research Fields at Perrien Park

Agricultural Production

Irrigation


Irrigation/Drainage Channel

Market Pavilion

Tree Nursery

The daylit creek as part of the irrigation system.


Summary of Overall Creek and Greenway Development Costs Item

#/Unit

Cost

1. Natural Features Construction Creek Creek Tributary Ponds Landscape Trails Professional Fees 2. Thoroughfare Streetscape Features 3. Special Landscape Features 4. Raw Water Connection to DWSD System 5. Renewable Energy Options Allowance 6. Land Assembly Public Property Private Property

— 37,100 L.F. 18,600 L.F. 45 EA 820 AC 43,400 L.F. — 84500 — 19,500 L.F. — — —

— $306,250,000 $27,900,000 $13,500,000 $242,000,000 $18,340,000 $145,915,000 $63,375,000 $40,000,000 $8,775,000 $100,000,000 — N/A $52,000,000

Total Cost

1,018,055,000

Master Plan Implementation Significant resources will be required to design, construct, and maintain the Bloody Run Creek Greenway. Thus, it is proposed that the project be divided into five phases, at approximately $200 million each, and built over a period of ten years. A recommended implementation schedule is indicated in the following chart. The creek will be implemented over ten years and private development is assumed to continue another fifteen years. As the foundation of the project, the creek development, shown as a blue bar, is the critical path of the schedule.

Implementation Strategy: Master Plan


Master Plan Implementation Schedule 25 Years Development

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Zone 1 - Central/Eastern Market • Pre-Construction/ Land Aquisition • D-1 Creek & Public Infrastructure • D-2 Creek & Public Infrastructure • Remaining Creek & Public Infrastructure • Other Public Infrastructure/ Landscape Features • Private Development • Non-Profit Development

y

p

j

I-94 St. Stanislaus Roman Catholic Church

Energy & Production

Incinerator 63 acres

Residential

Cultural C Center/ ente e CCS S

Mixed Use

Renewable Energy/ Culture/ Recreation/ Housing 212 acres

PALMER

Lutheran 3. Cemetery

3

St. Hyacinth Roman Catholic Church

Energy & Production

T IO

AT

GR

WARREN

4.

RecoveryPark/ Recovery R y Park Energy/ AR) (SHAR) Food Systems 180 acres

Mixed Use

FRBC

Mi Midtown M Midtow wn

Medical/Tech Research & Design Plymouth Education 115 acres 6.

To Midtown Loop

es

Center

5. Residential

Existing Housing 77 acres

CANFIELD

ion

Medical M C Center

St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church

Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

CANFIELD

Energy & Production 7.

Campbell Elementary School

Energy & Production

Pepsi 30 acres

8.

Douglass

Academy Hub 260 acres

MACK

Mixed Use

9.

Mixed Use

Eastern Market Food Systems/ Retail/ Housing 148 acres

WILKINS

St. Josephs Catholic Church St. John & St. Luke United Church of Christ

13.

New Harmony Baptist

CHARLEVOIX

Mixed Use KERCHEVAL

16.

Residential

14.

Whitney Young Middle School

E. GRAND BLVD.

Infill Housing/ Historic Rehab. 104 acres Calvary Baptist

Detroit Academy of Arts & Science

MLK High School

MT. ELLIOT

CHENE

18. 17.

15.

Residential

Elmwood 403 acres

Friends School

LAFAYETTE

Elmwood d Canal Eco-Living/ Food Systems/ Cemetery Adaptive Re-use Capuchin Monastery 154 acres Existing Creek

McDOUGALL

Lafayette Park 183 acres

Chene h ne e Cori Coridor C ridor idor dor d

I-375

Woodward Academy

Bunche Elementary School

Christ Church Detroit Globe Building Rivard Park

Milliken Park

Retail/ Entertainment/ Housing Tricentennial State Park Chene Park 196 acres Easst Riverf E iv verffro on o n Stroh River Place nt

5

UAW-GM

Harbortown

24.

Development Zones

Zone 4 - Southeast • Pre-Construction/ Land Aquisition • Creek & Public Infrastructure • Other Public Infrastructure/ Landscape Features • Private Development • Non-Profit Development

23.

Renewable Energy/

Mtt. El M Ellllio lio ottt Recreation 43 acres Parrrk Par k

2,000’

nter

LAFAYETTE

ON JEFFERS

Energy & Production Mixed Use

JEFFERSON

19.

MACK

Zone 3 - Northeast • Pre-Construction/ Land Aquisition • Creek & Public Infrastructure • Other Public Infrastructure/ Landscape Features • Private Development • Non-Profit Development

Berry Elementary School

VERNOR

Residential

T IO

4

6.

12.

11.

AT

Infill Housing/ Heidelberg Project Arts Village 205 acres

Miller Middle School

10.

GR

Residential

Infill-Housing/ Historic Rehab. 188 acres

Residential

y wa

rk Pa s se e U cr d 5a ixe 15 M

1

Dequindre Cut Historic Trinity Lutheran Church

Pulford St. Elementary

Central Pond

Eastern Mkt Expansion/ Edison Public School Eco-Housing Academy 84 acres

Old Conrail onrail Li Line

Sacred Heart Rectory

Renewable Energy/ Food Systems/ Adaptive Re-use 195 acres

1. Faygo

Mixed Use

2.

Zone 2 - Northwest • Pre-Construction/ Land Aquisition • Creek & Public Infrastructure • Other Public Infrastructure/ Landscape Features • Private Development • Non-Profit Development

Residential

2.

Historic Rehab./ Infill Housing 98 acres

Eco-Housing 134 acres

2

DPS 75 acres

WARREN

I-94

Mixed Use

Mixed Use

Auto/Tech Research & Design 284 acres

Detroit Academy of 1. Arts & Sciences Medbury Campus

in

MT. ELLIOT

GM Assembly Plant G

I-75

s

ST. AUBIN

E. GRAND BLVD.

Belle Isle

Zone 5 - Riverfront • Pre-Construction/ Land Aquisition • Creek & Public Infrastructure • Other Public Infrastructure/ Landscape Features • Private Development • Non-Profit Development

2025

2030

2035


Phase 1 Creek Engineering and Construction Costs Design & Engineering Elements

Phase 1 Cost

Creek Dequindre Cut Sewer Separation Landscape Bridges Streetscape Trails Public Amenities/Landscape Features Energy Transportation Land Assembly Professional Fees/Pre-Development Subtotal

$13,325,000 $18,260,000 $42,314,000 $12,947,500 $7,500,000 $44,924,000 $3,547,500 $8,400,000 $11,475,000 $13,130,000 $5,550,000 $36,274,600 $217,647,600 $209,463,600

k Mac

kins

Wil

ra

tio t

Eastern Market

Dequindre Cut

G

Total

Central Pond

Phase I Implementation Phase 1 is built around Eastern Market and the many activities and projects that are underway or proposed in the market area. The Bloody Run Creek Greenway is a natural complement to this activity and therefore Phase I builds upon the strength of the Eastern Market. Phase I project scope

Implementation Strategy: Phase I


Phase 1 Implementation Schedule 10 Years Zone 1

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022

Pre-Developement • Master Planning/ Design • Market & Economic Feas. • Funding • Land Aquisition Creek • Demonstration Project 1 • Demonstration Project 2 • Central Pond • Fresh Water Supply • Dequindre Cut Channel • Sewer Separation Public Infrastructure • Landscape • Streetscape • Bridges • Trails • Public Amenities • Energy • Transportation Private Development • Dequindre Cut Bldgs. • Gratiot Bldgs. • Market Garden Housing • Hub Mixed Use Dev. Non-Profit Development • Dequindre Cut • Greening of Det. Gardens • Midtown Loop • Eastern Market Projects • Eastern Market Sheds

View of Central Pond looking towards Downtown


Demonstration Project (D1 & D2) Creek Engineering and Construction Costs

1

2 Exg. Parking

M

1. Private Development/Adaptive Reuse 2. Private Development/Adaptive Reuse 3. Private Development/Adaptive Reuse 4. Private Development/Adaptive Reuse A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O.

Market Pond at Dequindre Cut Waterfall Creek Channel (Gratiot to Wilkins) Division Sewer Separation (Orleans to St. Aubin) Landscape at Dequindre Cut (Gratiot to Wilkins) Landscape at Market Pond Landscape Clean-up at adjacent properties Bridge Rehabilitations Division St. Streetscape (Orleans to St. Aubin) St. Aubin Streetscape & Entry (Gratiot to Division) Trails at Market Pond Trails at Dequindre Cut (Gratiot to Wilkins) Geothermal Field at Dequindre Cut Solar Lighting and Signalization Bike Corrals & Racks (Multiple Locations)

3 F ed Alfr

L

4

A B

Future Development Site

D

G

H

i n isio Div

N

Exg. Parking ng

K

J

I

t

$17,790,000

H

tio

$15,421,200

Total

kins

Wil

ra

$1,000,000 $1,000,000 $6,950,000 $500,000 — $4,755,000 $345,000 — $25,000 $250,000 — $2,965,000 $17,790,000

G

$1,000,000 $4,860,000 $1,800,000 $2,072,500 — $2,436,000 $127,500 — $500,000 $55,000 — $2,570,200 $15,421,200

n

Creek Dequindre Cut Sewer Separation Landscape Bridges Streetscape Trails Public Amenities/Landscape Features Energy Transportation Land Assembly Professional Fees Subtotal

i ub .A

D2 Cost

St

D1 Cost

s an rle O

Design & Engineering Elements

G C

G

E O

Ade

laid

H

e

der

Win

D1 Project scope

Demonstration Project Implementation In order to launch the project, test its feasibility, and excite the stakeholders it is proposed that a small demonstration project be built. The Demonstration Project is broken down into two phases, identified as DI, a $15 million project shown above, and D2.

Implementation Strategy: Demonstration Project


Demonstration Project Implementation Schedule - D1 & D2 5 Years Task

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

D1 Development Schedule Pre-development • Planning • Land Acquisition • Funding Pre-construction • Survey, Borings, Environmental Assessment • Schematic Design & Engineering • Construction Management • Construction Documents • Permitting • Contractor Bidding & Negotiations

The Demonstration Project includes a pond/water feature that flows into the Dequindre Cut as a waterfall and follows the new bike/pedestrian path for a block and a half to Gratiot Avenue. Eventually the creek will follow the Dequindre Cut to the Detroit River and provide the first outlet for Bloody Run Creek. Water in this phase is provided by raw, untreated water from the Detroit River through intercepting a water pipe at Forest Avenue which runs through the Bloody Run Creek area.

Construction • Cleanup & Demolition • Creek Construction • Sewer Separation • Streetscapes • Trails & Transportation • Landscaping • Energy

D2 Development Schedule Pre-development • Planning • Land Acquisition • Funding

Pre-construction • Survey, Borings, Environmental Assessment • Schematic Design & Engineering • Construction Management • Construction Documents • Permitting • Contractor Bidding & Negotiations Construction • Cleanup & Demolition • Creek Construction • Sewer Separation • Streetscapes • Trails & Transportation • Landscaping • Energy

View of Cascading Ponds and connection to Dequindre Cut


Excavation of creek channel

Cost Estimate The Cost Estimate for the overall Creek Greenway development and the construction of associated landscape areas (Legs 1A-3, as illustrated on the opposite page) is estimated at $1,018,055,000 and is shown in the following charts. The costs are in 2011 dollars and include design and engineering fees.

Cost Estimate


Summary for Creeks and Ponds within Creek Corridor Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly De bly Plant Plan (General Moto ors)

Leg

Components

Quantity

1a

Creek Ponds Tributaries Creek Ponds Tributaries Creek Ponds Tributaries Creek Ponds Tributaries Raw Water Connection

9300 L.F. 20 7200 L.F. 11000 L.F. 9 4200 L.F. 8400 L.F. 12 3600 L.F. 8400 L.F. 4 3600 L.F. 1

1b

2

3

Cost $77,190,000 $6,104,000 $11,124,000 $91,300,000 $2,746,800 $6, 489,000 $69,720,000 $3,662,400 $5,562,000 $68,040,000 $1,220,800 $5,562,000 $8,240,000

I-9 94

PALMER ER

Fa Farn arrn nswor ns nsworth w rth Neigbor Neigborhood

Leg 1a

Leg 2

McDougallg gal Huntt

Leg 3

Leg 1b

UAW

Total

DETROIT RIV VER

$442,000,000 Key Map

Summary of Overall Creek and Greenway Development Costs Item

#/Unit

1. Natural Features Construction Creek Creek Tributary Ponds Landscape Trails Professional Fees 2. Thoroughfare Streetscape Features 3. Special Landscape Features 4. Raw Water Connection to DWSD System 5. Renewable Energy Options Allowance 6. Land Assembly Public Property Private Property

— 37,100 L.F. 18,600 L.F. 45 EA 820 AC 43,400 L.F. — 84500 — 19,500 L.F. — — — —

Total Cost

Cost — $306,250,000 $27,900,000 $13,500,000 $242,000,000 $18,340,000 $145,915,000 $63,375,000 $40,000,000 $8,775,000 $100,000,000 — N/A $52,000,000 $1,018,055,000

OT IO ATI AT RA GR

WARR WARREN REN RE


Market and Land Use Strategy The market strategy for the Bloody Run Creek project entails looking at national trends in various employment sectors throughout the country and speciďŹ cally in the State of Michigan. These trends combined with the local market outlook and the surrounding context in which the Bloody Run Creek area is situated and will all factor into the creation of a market for private development attracted to the Bloody Run Creek development. These trends led to the site strategy map at the right that illustrates a possible land use scenario for the Bloody Run development. In addition to renewal energy and food production systems that are inherent to the concept of Bloody Run there is proposed Medical Center and General Motors Volt Assembly Plant related research, technology and manufacturing facilities, ecohousing development, retail development, and the infill and revitalization of existing viable neighborhoods such as McDougall-Hunt and Farnsworth. The adjoining chart also illustrates the private development program and costs (exclusive of renewable energy and food production systems). These proposed uses, like the greenway itself, has not been vetted with the community since the 1997 Community Reinvestment Strategy process. A robust community participation process is required to re-test these assumptions before the project moves forward.

Site Strategy: Market and Land Use


Site S

y

p

j ST. AUBIN

E. GRAND BLVD.

Key: Creek Underground Drain

St. Stanislaus Roman Catholic Church

Incinerator 63 acres

Residential

Cultural C Center/ ente e CCS S

Mixed Use

2

DPS 75 acres

WARREN

Major Road

Renewable Energy/ Culture/ Recreation/ Housing 212 acres

Green Space Asset Buildings PALMER

Residential

Residential

2.

Historic Rehab./ Infill Housing 98 acres

Eco-Housing 134 acres

Primary Road

Secondary Road

Mixed Use

Mixed Use

I-94 Energy & Production

I-94

Auto/Tech Research & Design 284 acres

Detroit Academy of 1. Arts & Sciences Medbury Campus

n

MT. ELLIOT

GM Assembly Plant G

I-75

s

Lutheran 3. Cemetery

Mixed Use

3

St. Hyacinth Roman Catholic Church

Energy & Production

T IO AT

Energy & Production

GR

WARREN

4.

Mi Midtown M Midtow wn

Medical/Tech Research & Design 115 acres

To Midtown Loop

5.

Residential

es

Plymouth Education Center

Existing Housing 77 acres

CANFIELD

on

RecoveryPark/ Recovery R y Park Energy/ (SHAR) AR) Food Systems 180 acres

Mixed Use

FRBC

Medical M C Center

6.

St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church

Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

CANFIELD

Energy & Production 7.

Campbell Elementary School

Energy & Production

Pepsi 30 acres

1. Faygo

Douglass Academy

Hub 260 acres

MACK

Mixed Use

9.

Mixed Use

Eastern Market Food Systems/ Retail/ Housing 148 acres

WILKINS

y wa rk Pa s se cre U d 5a ixe 15 M

1

Residential

Infill Housing/ Heidelberg Project Arts Village 205 acres

4

6.

Bunche Elementary School

New Harmony Baptist

13.

Berry Elementary School

CHARLEVOIX

Elmwood d Canal Eco-Living/ Food Systems/ Cemetery Adaptive Re-use Capuchin Monastery 154 acres Existing Creek 15.

Residential

Elmwood 403 acres

Residential

E. GRAND BLVD.

Infill Housing/ Historic Rehab. 104 acres

Whitney Young Middle School Calvary Baptist

Friends School

Detroit Academy of Arts & Science

MLK High School

MT. ELLIOT

CHENE

18. 17.

KERCHEVAL

16.

14.

McDOUGALL

I-375

Lafayette Park 183 acres

Chene h ne e Cori Coridor C ridor idor dor d

St. Josephs Catholic Church St. John & St. Luke United Church of Christ

LAFAYETTE

Mixed Use

JEFFERSON Christ Church Detroit Globe Building Rivard Park

Milliken Park

Retail/ Entertainment/ Housing Tricentennial State Park Chene Park 196 acres Easst Riverf E iv verffro on o n Stroh River Place nt

2,000’

Master Plan Development Zones

5

UAW-GM

Harbortown

LAFAYETTE

SON JEFFER

Energy & Production

19.

MACK

Mixed Use

12.

Residential

Woodward Academy

Infill-Housing/ Historic Rehab. 188 acres

VERNOR

11.

G

Residential

Miller Middle School

10.

T TIO RA

Central Pond

Eastern Mkt Expansion/ Edison Public School Eco-Housing Academy 84 acres

Dequindre Cut Historic Trinity Lutheran Church

Pulford St. Elementary

Old Conrail onrail Li Line

Sacred Heart Rectory

Renewable Energy/ Food Systems/ Adaptive Re-use 195 acres

Mixed Use

2.

8.

Master Plan Development Program and Costs

Renewable Energy/

Mtt. Ellio M Elllio ottt Recreation 43 acres Parrrk Par k

23.

Zone

Net Acreage

Building Area

Total Cost

2 2, 3 3 1 1

5 —

115 284 212 148 84 260 100 100 155 154 31 123 196 50 50 814 Acres

1,380,000 SF 2,500,000 SF 1,000,000 — 1,008,000 — 1,000,000 1,000,000 600,000 1,000,000 200,000 800,000 1,500,000 500 1,500,000 13,980,000 SF

$345,000,000 $625,000,000 $250,000,000 — $201,600,000 — $234,000,000 $312,000,000 $90,000,000 — $40,000,000 $120,000,000 — $150,000,000 $300,000,000 $2,667,600,000

Residential Eco-Living Farnsworth Infill/Historic Rehab McDougall-Hunt Infill/Historic Rehab Grand Blvd. Infill/Historic Rehab (North) Grand Blvd. Infill/Historic Rehab (South) Subtotal

2, 3 3 4 4 4 —

134 98 205 188 104 1,392 Acres

320,000 235,000 492,000 451,000 249,000 1,747,000 SF

Grand Total

2,450 Acres

15,727,000 SF

Private Development Mixed Use Medical/Tech/R&D Auto/Tech/R&D Packard Renewable Energy/Rec. Eastern Market Food Systems Eastern Market Expansion Village Hub 50% Residential 50% Retail Gratiot Corridor Canal Eco-Living/Food Systems 20% Retail 80% Residential East Riverfront Mid-Rise Housing Adaptive Reuse Subtotal

1, 3, 4 4

$48,000,000 $35,250,000 $73,800,000 $67,650,000 $37,350,000 $262,050,000 $2,929,650,000


Expansion of existing economic opportunities

Economic Impact The economic impact of the construction of a public infrastructure project such as the Bloody Run Creek Greenway is significant. The chart on the following page outlines part of the impact of this investment. As can be seen, over 5000 construction jobs will be generated by the public project, and the subsequent tax revenue for both the city and the state exceeds $37 million dollars. It is proposed that $1 billion in public investment yields approximately $3 billion in private investment even at the low densities suggested by the site strategy. Likewise, almost 16,000 permanent jobs with their resultant financial impact will be created.

Economic Impact


Summary of Public Economic Impact

Summary of Private Economic Impact

Economic Impact

Master Plan

Phase 1

Demonstration Project (D1 & D2)

Economic Impact

Master Plan

Phase 1

Demonstration Project (D1 & D2)

Bloody Run Creek Greenway Construction Acres Construction Jobs Construction Payroll Construction Material Purchased

$1,000,000,000 800 Acres 5,000 $400,000,000 $250,000,000

$200,000,000 50 Acres 1,000 $80,000,000 $50,000,000

$36,0000 20 Acres 525 $42,000,000 $15,000,000

Bloody Run Private Investment Acres Construction Jobs Permanent Jobs Total Construction Payroll Total Permanent Payroll

$3,000,000,000 1,200 Acres 15,000 16,000 $1,200,000,000 $640,000,000

$475,000,000 80 Acres 2,500 7,000 $200,000,000 $275,000,000

$60,000,000 30 Acres 525 560 $42,000,000 $22,000,000

Tax Revenues Detroit Income Tax Michigan Income Tax Michigan Sales Tax

$7,200,000 $15,000,000 $15,000,000

$1,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,000,000

$400,000 $700,000 $1,200,000

Tax Revenues Detroit Income Tax from Construction Michigan Income Tax from Construction Michigan Sales Tax

$22,000,000 $45,000,000 $45,000,000

$2,500,000 $8,000,000 $8.500,000

$400,000 $700,000 $1,200,000

Other Public Benefits Reduction of 3 Billion Gallons Reduction of Maintenance Costs Renewable Energy Expenditures in Community Recreational Uses - Revenue Agricultural Uses

Other Private Benefits New Corporate and Individual Income Tax from New Business and Permanent Jobs Renewable Energy Systems/ Sustainable Practice reduction of costs Urban Farming uses in underutilized parcels and economic stimulant for food processing Agricultural Uses

It is proposed that $1 billion in public investment yields approximately $3 billion in private investment.


Leveraging public and private funding sources

Funding It is envisioned that the primary funding sources for the Bloody Run Creek Greenway project will come from the following sources: • National Foundations • Federal programs including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Housing and Urban Development • Tax Increment Financing The matrix on the adjoining page indicates which components of the project will most likely fit with which funding source. Initial discussions with federal agencies indicate general enthusiasm for the project. Making applications to these agencies will be one of the next steps action item.

Funding


Funding Matrix DEPARTMENTS/AGENCIES Federal Housing & Urban Development Environmental Protection Agency National Trust U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Federal Highway Administration U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Economic Development Administration U.S. Department of Energy State Michigan Department of Transportation Michigan State Housing Development Authority Michigan Department of Natural Resources Michigan Economic Development Corporation Local – City of Detroit Detroit Department of Transportation Detroit Water and Sewerage Department Detroit Economic Growth Corporation Economic Development Corporation of the City of Detroit Foundations and other Private Firms National Foundations DTE Energy Invest Detroit PROGRAMS/INCENTIVES Federal New Markets Tax Credits Low Income Housing Tax Credits Federal Historic Tax Credits Federal Geothermal Tax Credits State State Assistance Fund Local HOME Community Development Block Grant Program Section 108 Loan Program Tax Increment Financing Commercial Rehabilitation Exemption Obsolete Property Rehabilitation Exemption Neighborhood Enterprise Zone Wayne County TURBO Program Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) DTE Programs

Planning/ Predevelopment

Aquisition & Relocation

Public Infrastructure - Land

Public Infrastructure - Water

Alternative Energy

Private Development


View of expanded woods and greenway connection to Midtown

Organization A project of this size and scope requires an organization to oversee it’s development. It is proposed that this organization be an alliance of public and private stakeholders including the City of Detroit and private entities that have a strong stake in the project including corporations such as General Motors, community representatives such as the McDougallHunt neighborhood and non-profits such as the Eastern Market Corporation. A diagram of the proposed organization is shown on the following page.

Organization


City of Detroit

Community/ Public Interest

Bloody Run Development Alliance Executive Project Director McCormack Baron Salazar

Detroit Collaborative Design Center

Corporate/ Private Interests

Legal Counsel

Project Management Team Project Manager

Design & Engineering

Construction Management

Energy & Environment

Marketing & Finance

Urban Resource Alliance, NTH Consultants, Ltd., The Mannik & Smith Group, Inc., Zachary and Associates

Real Estate Development


Aerial view showing current neighborhood properties

Land Assembly Land assembly is key to any project, especially one of this scale. Every attempt has been made to route the creek through vacant land or unoccupied buildings. Where occupied residential buildings exist in the creek path, it is either rerouted or, if required and with the owner’s permission, the residence is moved into a viable block or neighborhood within the project area. About 40% of all vacant property is publicly-owned. A summary of property required for acquisition is shown in the following charts. The estimated costs for assembling the parcels is based on recent history in the city and are conservative costs.

Land Assembly


I-9 94

Leg 1a

Leg 2

Leg 3

Leg 1b

Master Plan Key Map

Master Plan Land Assembly Costs GALL

Water and Greenway Boundary Phase 1 Creek Alignment

ST. JOSEPH

MACK

Vacant Parcels ELMWOOD

MITCHELL

JOSEPH CAMPAU

WATSON

Detroit Public School Sites

Cost

Leg 1A Leg 1B Leg 2 Leg 3

384 Parcels 205 Parcels 319 Parcels 64 Parcels

499 Parcels 281 Parcels 435 Parcels 55 Parcels

— — — —

972 Parcels

1,270 Parcels

$52,650,000

OT

I AT

GR

Phase I Land Assembly Costs

WILKINS

Privately Owned Vacant Commercial Structures

Area

Publicly Owned

Privately Owned

Cost

Phase 1

80 Parcels

144 Parcels

$7,200,000

80 Parcels

144 Parcels

$7,200,000

BREWSTER

Privately Owned Houses Good Condition ALFRED

Privately Owned Houses Fair Condition

Source: Data Driven Detroit, 2010 Wayne State University Capstone Team, 2010

Privately Owned

ERSKINE

Parcels w/ Structures

Privately Owned Houses Demo Condition

GRANDY

SCOTT

Publicly Owned

PIERCE

Source: SEMCOG, 2008

Privately Owned Houses Poor Condition

CHENE

Detroit Recreation Department Properties

DUBOIS

Publicly Owned Vacant Properties

ST. AUBIN

DEQUINDRE

ORLEANS

RIOPELLE

RUSSELL

Privately Owned Vacant Properties

HALE

Area

DIVISION

ADELAIDE VERNOR

ANTIETAM

Phase 1 Property Ownership Map

Demonstration Project Land Assembly Costs Area

Publicly Owned

Privately Owned

Cost

D1 D2

2 Parcels 2 Parcels

0 Parcels 17 Parcels

NA $850,000

4 Parcels

17 Parcels

$850,000


Next Steps There is a comprehensive list of next steps that are found in the working notebook. In general, however, the immediate focus should be on constructing the Demonstration Project (DI and D2). The following steps are necessary to build D1: • Engage a community process to confirm consensus on the overall concept as well as the Demonstration Project. • Secure City of Detroit approval to proceed with D1 and to make the city owned land available for the project. • Secure planning and construction funding. • Finalize the design and engineering of D1 and related planning. • Perform all required engineering testing, surveys and approvals for the project including geo-technical and environmental testing. • Meet with building owners of potential adaptive reuse projects and determine interest in potential redevelopment. • Determine construction delivery process.

Next Steps


Demonstration Project (D1 & D2)

Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project  

The Bloody Run Creek Greenway Redevelopment Project, a greenway and development plan for daylighting a creek on Detroit's East Side, has the...

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