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portland state university | department of architecture

&

outside in


During Winter 2012, Portland State University, Professor of Architecture Sergio Palleroni and Distinguished Visiting Professor of Cross-Cultural Architecture, Teddy Cruz collaborated with 14 graduate architecture students on a studio partnering with Outside In, an organization that has changed the way teenage homelessness is addressed both in this region and nationwide. The partnership over the course of this year produced an effort to create new possible scenarios, or “briefs,� to address the problem of connecting homeless youth to housing and social services. In the spirit of the solutions showcased in Design with the 90%: Cities, the briefs expand our notions of housing and design engagement of this critical issue by addressing the problem at many scales, from the possibilities of temporary housing based on legal codes that also apply to food carts, to housing collaboratives that also provide neighborhood social services. The ideas that emerged ranged from the individual object to the system of delivery and its urban impact on our neighborhoods. All briefs are based on a deep reading of building code, legal possibilities, and economic incentives available to the agencies and organizations that offer housing and social services today, and were developed in collaboration with Outside In.


homelessness research


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10

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Department of Architecture


united states of america HOMELESS policy OF the federal government

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perception

who receives funding? Since so many groups are applying for federal funding, there aren’t enough resources to timely respond to the need - instead there is a lottery that is created where somewhat random groups are accepted and then reviewed to see if they actually qualify,

what is our response? Cities and programs vary so extensively that one generic blanket of a solution cannot be applied to all. We need specific and personal solutions.

How much do we give? While the groups that may have needed the funding the most weren’t even reviewed. Sometimes there is an abundance of housing vouchers, sometimes there is an extreme shortage.

Social perception - Stigmas, cultural responses, political views, etc can lead to a splitting of heads on different approaches to homelessness. Awareness / ignorance: Perhaps the biggest reason why there is a crisis is because people are ignorant of what homeless prevention, daily life and the recovery process from homelessness actually looks like. There is also a lack of awareness of how people and agencies are currently responding. Most might not even know there is a crisis!

Th an ho sh

Fe is fi ne res res

Lo fun sys is c wh ap see ha rev


ses, heads

eason norant he ly f how ng.

time

Scale

The effect of the process of funding appropriation and services: sometimes there is an abundance of housing vouchers sometimes there is an extreme shortage.

Opinion - Programs and policies are continuing to be applied (even if they haven’t proven effective) because people may believe they are the ‘right’ response.

Federal funding is not immediate - when funding is finally appointed, it lags behind pertinent needs and the related causes of the crisis. If the response is not immediate - they cannot properly respond with funding.

Actual - There are actual responses that have been show to be successful, though not always

Lotteries - the number of applicants for federal funding, outstrip the immediate abilities of the system to respond to the need. The lottery that is created to mitigate this seeks to filter between what these applicants. This leads to random applicantsbeing accepted and then reviewed to see if they actually qualify, and those that may have needed the funding, most weren’t even reviewed.


state 0f oregon HOMELESS policy OF the state & local governments

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What

what can be done differently?

With a constant reevaluation of funding and cutbacks the system is always adjusting resources according to how they are currently operating, their existing status, and what is at stake. Resources available on the state scale are typically in place to deal with the logistical

-Decentralize physical, mental and financial resources. -Connect all service/resource providers for better utilization of space, funding, and functionality. -Create a less homogeneous response with more specificity. -Increase the amount of people making resources available.

How At this scale, there is a homogeneous protocol for evaluating those services. Where the needs outweigh resources available and the workers available, the priority should be placed on a system where what is being evaluated is how Oregon collectively can best meet the need of her people. Instead a great disconnection and competition of services and resources between agencies is found.


trimet allows some agencies to make a disability diagnosis for honored citzen passes without a doctor’s visit.

A system of health insurance for those requiring insurance. Co-pay depends on pre-qualified level All youth under 18 qualify Application and lottery process Part of OHP - standard for low income

$4 billion spent in 2010

s.n.a.p.

food assistance program

Insurance for old age, survivors, people with disabilities, unemployed, needy families and children.

Qualify by income Directly deposited on a pre-paid card

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on Oreg es of n Servic ganizatio id A n r l Lega n-profit o esentatio r o p n e r ome s c e is a in id rov low that p cases to t Oregon. il u on civ througho ts clien

Can only be used on certain items at certain stores

$1,189,269,261 spent in 2011

spent in 2011

Provides public transportation in the Portland Metropolitan Area

medicaid

$41.5 million

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trimet

SOCIAL SECURITY

Case Management The coordination of sevices on behalf of a party.*

*long waitlists, hard to qualify, not readily available


city of portland 26 16

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1. aging & disable services 421 sw oak st. 2. alano club of portland 909 nw 24th ave. 3. all angels 1704 ne 43rd ave. 4. all saints episcopal church 4033 se woodstock blvd. 5. anawim 3733 n williams ave. 6. avel gordley 621 sw alder st. 7. better people 4310 ne mlk jr. blvd. 8. bible training center 2724 n. ainsworth st. 9. blanchett house 340 nw glisan st. 10. bradley angel 5432 n albina ave. 11. cascadia addiction treatment 2415 se 43rd ave. 12. cascade aids project 208 sw 5th ave. suite 800 13. cascadia behavior health care (royal palms) 310 nw flanders st. 14. cascadia behavior health care (garlington center) 3034 ne mlk jr. blvd. 15. cascadia urgent walk-in 2415 se 43rd ave. 16. celebrate recovery ministry 8501 n chautauqua blvd 17. central city concern 726 w burnside st. 18. central portland vocational rehab 3945 se powell st. 19. change point 1572 ne burnside st. 20. children’s community clinic 27 ne killingsworth st. 21. city team ministries 526 se grand ave. 22. coda drug treatment 1027 e burnside st. 23. coalition of community clinics 619 sw 11th ave. 24. depaul industries 4950 ne mlk jr. blvd. 25. dept of community justice 421 sw 5th ave. 26. dept. of human services -food stamps 50 southwest 2nd ave. 27. dinner and a movie 909 sw 11th ave. 28. disabilities rights oregon 620 sw 5th ave. # 500 29. downtown womens center 511 sw 10th ave. # 905 30. dual diagnosis anonymous 521 sw 11th ave. # 200 31. easter seals 3715 se cesar chavez blvd. 32. easter seals (seniors) 5757 sw macadam ave. 33. empowerment initiative 3941 se hawthrone st. 26

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34. episcopal church 147 northwest 19th ave. 35. fair housing council of oregon 506 sw 6th ave. # 1111 36. fairhaven recovery home 20 sw 97th ave. 37. family winter shelter 12505 ne halsey st. 38. first baptist church 909 sw 11th ave. 39. fish emergency services 1335 se hawthorne blvd. 40. francis center 6535 se 82nd ave. 41. friendly house 1715 nw 26th ave. 42. goodwill 43. goose hollow family shelter 1838 sw jefferson st. 44. grace memorial episcopal church 1535 ne 17th ave. 45. harry’s mother 738 ne davis st. 46. home forward 135 sw ash st., # 200 47. homeless vet reintigration project 2 sw 2nd ave. 48. hooper detox 20 ne mlk jr. blvd. 49. housing transitions 2740 se powell blvd., #6 50. impact nw 10055 e burnside st. 51. inact volunteers of america 727 ne 24th ave. 52. iron tribe 53. jewish family services 1130 sw morrison st. 54. job corp. 1130 sw morrison st., # 407 55. josiah iii clinic 5018 ne 15th ave. 56. julia west house 522 sw 13th ave. 57. legacy clinic at good samaritan 1200 nw 23nd ave. 58. lewis & clark legal clinic 310 sw 4th ave. 59. life works nw 506 sw 6th avenue # 905 60. miracles club 4200 ne mlk jr. blvd. 61. mult. county call center 62. mult. county ceneral intake 421 sw 5th ave 63. native american rehab -nara 1631 sw columbia st. 64. new avenues for youth 820 sw oak st. 66. north by northeast community health center 3030 ne mlk jr. blvd. 67. nw portland ministries 1808 nw irving st. 68. o’bryant square sw 9th ave. at washington st. 69. old town clinic 727 w burnside st.

70. operation nightwatch 1432 sw 13th ave 71. oregon perscription drug program p.o. box 10054, portland or 97210 72. oregon safenet 73. our house 2727 se alder st. 74. outside-in 1132 sw 13th ave. 75. oxford house of oregon 76. p:ear 338 nw 6th 77. partnership for perscription drugs 9450 sw barnes rd. 78. pivot 209 sw 4th ave. 79. planned parenthood 3727 ne mlk jr. blvd. 80. portland adventist 11020 ne halsey st. 81. portland habituation center nw 522 sw 13th ave. 82. portland police sunshine division 687 n thompson st. 83. portland rescue mission 111 w burnside st. 84. providence addiction treatment center 9450 sw barnes rd. 85. quest 2901 e burnside st. 86. raphael house of portland 2057 nw overton st. 87. red cross severe weather 1302 ankeny st 88. road warriors 89. rosehaven 627 nw 18th ave 90. safes 91. salvation adult rehab 6855 ne 82nd ave. 92. salvation harbor lights mens shelter sw 2nd and ankeny st. 93. sanctatity of hope 94. shepards door 13207 ne halsey fork st. 95. sisters of the road café 133 nw 6th ave. 96. snow cap 17805 se stark st. 97. st. andre bassett 601 w. burnside st. 98. st. francis dining hall 330 se 11th ave. 99. st. john epis church 2036 se jefferson ave. 100. st. michael the arc angel 424 sw mill st. 101. st. peter & pauls church 8147 se pine st.

102. st. philips 120 ne knott st. 103. st. stephens 1432 sw 13th ave. 104. state of oregon employment services 241 sw edgeway drive 105. street light/porch light 1635 sw alder st. 106. street roots 211 nw davis st. 107. sunnyside methodist church 3520 se yamhill st. 108. teen challenge 3121 ne sandy blvd. 109. transision projects 9370 sw greenburg rd. 110. treatment service nw 9370 sw greenberg rd. 111. union gospal mission 3 nw 3rd ave. 112. university of western states chropratic college 221 w burnside st. 113. urs club 17200 se stark st. 114. v.e.t.s. emergency transition shelter 30 sw 2nd ave. 115. voz workers’ rights education project 240 ne mlkjr. blvd. 116. veterans admin cap 3710 sw us vet. hosp. rd 117. victory outreach 16022 sw stark st. 118. volunteers of america residential -mens 2318 ne mlk jr. blvd. 119. volunteers of america residential -womens undisclosed 120. wallace medical 727 w burnside st. 121. west health clinic 426 sw stark st., 5th floor 122. william temple house 2023 sw hoyt st. 123. women’s winter shelter 1111 sw main st. 124. yolanda house 601 SW 2nd Ave # 110


city of portland home again

y ! 10-year plan

“This plan (Home Again: 10-year Plan to End Homelessness) emphasizes immediate housing for chronically homeless people and a commitment to accountability for all homeless system partners. We want a system that tackles the problem of homelessness with housing and services that work, and we want those services delivered in the most coordinated, efficient manner possible.� - Mayor Vera Katz 2004 There have arisen major issues pertaining the need for new paradigms in Portland’s plan including a generic blanket planning that is being applied everywhere - this is not strategic, not innovative. Additionally, an intelligent reorganization of protocols, new visualization methods, and more effective political representation would further improve this plan.


the current voucher system is inefficient - so much so that it creates detterrants. the current system should increase economic opportunities and entrepreneurship. HOME AGAIN CONCENTRATES IT’S EFFORTS AND RESOURCES PRIMARILY DOWNTOWN AND FAILS TO ENGAGE THE LARGER POPULATION OF PORTLAND. Pa

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Move Peo

10-year plan

knowing the facts about how we currently respond to homelessness will help us respond better.

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PREVENTION, RAPID RE-HOUSING AND PERMANENT SOLUTIONS NEED TO BE LOOKED AT HOLISTICALLY AS A TRANSITIONAL RESPONSE.

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housing first cannot be looked at alone as a solution to the housing problem.


city of portland services offered by agencies

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who There are 180 agencies serving the homeless population in Portland’s metropolitan area. Services range from shelters to case management or feeds. Despite the large amount of resources providers, many are concentrated downtown and rarely coordinate their services.

where There are multiple service providers in Portland that offer a variety of services including recovery programs, feeds and healthcare. Many providers are general contributors to the support of the homeless population, but only 10% of providers cater specifically to youth.


PERCENT OF SERVICES OFFERED BY AGENCIES

35% recovery 27% feeds 27% heathcare 18% shelters 15% housing 14% clothes 12%

employment 10% youth


outside in serving homeless youth who “We help homeless youth and other marginalized people move towards improved health and self-sufficiency.” -Outside In

What can be improved? -Still responding to rigid protocols through funding. -Partake in an inventive role as developers of housing. -Understanding the importance of the transitional process in prevention, rapid re-housing and permanent solutions. -Have an outward approach ensures ability to visualize responses to better provide resources. -Housing must be effective and efficient without the institutional feel.

FOURTH FLOOR THIRD FLOOR SECOND FLOOR T S S W M A I N FIRST FLOOR BASEMENT

IN G TE MP OR AR Y LIV IN DE PE ND AN T IN G UN ITS Y LIV IN G 15 HO US TE OR AR OO M UN ITS SH AR ED TO MP 5 BE DR SP LIT IN (3 ) AN D CO OR DIN AT STAF F OF FIC ES LO BB Y LIN G CO UN SE TH ER SP AC E GR OU P GANE ED LE EX CH AN GE CL IN IC/ MO VA L TATT OO REUR AC UP UN CT E

S W 1 3 t h AV E

ION

DO G KE NN EL

organization of services outside in’s building


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framework

The rethinking of shelter through its social idiosyncrasies: Crisis Question: How can social structures and character logics be organized in a reaction to housing?

How may social structures, characters and logics be organized in relation to housing? spatial organizers

diversity of typologies

“housing is not like home”

ADU Accessory Dwelling Unit

Recovery

Mixed - Use Housing Commercial Multi - Unit

detours to housing

Health Care

Vocational Training

housing as

SHELTER AND IT’S SOCIAL INTERFACE

Sanctuary Social Change Education Work / Employment Development


activities

actions

o

social frameworks

roles

Outside In as Developer

Volunteerism

Case Worker as Property Manager

Sweat Equity

Homeowner as Sponsor

Case Worker Social Action

Landowner as Ambassador

Vocational Desire

Agency as Coordinator

Training

Homeless Person as Neighbor Financier as Enabler

age

foster kids

mentors

Sexual Minority

gender

familial


framework POLITICAL ECONOMY OF RECOVERY Can recovery and rehabilitation be instruments to rethink current policies and economics of urban development? Can existing modes of funding be exploited to generate alternatives? Ordinance - exploit, generate, alter, suggest, identify Recovery should have a role in tweaking existing funding, codes, etc.

Can recovery and rehabilitation be instruments to rethink current policies and economics of urban development? zoning, building codes, regulation

infill

ecodistricts

ADU

Mixed use hybrid

Temporary/ flexible

adaptive reuse

Transportation/ accessibility

split lots


funding streams

stakeholders

public

private

TIF

Philanthropy Donations / Endowment

HUD Capital Incentive Section 8, Section 3

Developer

Land owner

Philanthropy

Home Owner

Government

Non-profit

Policy Maker

Homeless

Community Land Trust

Tax Incentives Exemptions Grants


framework MATERIAL PRACTICES & VISUALIZATION OF REHAB Can the assembly of building systems and their layering resonate in the transformation of behavior? How will environmental systems enable sustainability in the similar tandem of a new sense of well-being? How can adaptive re-use involve homeless youth in the community? Rehab of buildings influenced by rehab process.

New modes of assembly, labor as therapy, and alternative systems of participation. labor as therapy

building components

in and out relationships

spatial qualities

process of constructions

Spatialization therapy


therapy and adaptive reuse

environment rehabilitation

Building Rehabilitation is Influences by the Process of Human Recovery

temporal and permanent

environmental urbanism and community well being

material process

bioswale systems

Co-dependance of Existing and New Temporal Processes of Alteration Lightness and Permanency Efficiency of Energy Retrofitting

ecosystems

natural resources

urban recovery


design schemes


small scale big change

001 housing campus

002 queer publication house

003 rooftop rehab

004

social infrastructure through asset development

005

housing evolution

006

rebuilding housing to rebuild youth

007

some assembly required

008

blooming home

009


001 Design Scheme

THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS A SITE OF PRODUCTION.


DESIGNING AN ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL PROCESS NON-pROFIT AS DEVELOPER

NEW CATEGORIES OF ZONING

RESIDENTS ARCHITECT OWNERS

STANDARD R5 5,000 SQ FT LOT

DESIGN

FACILITATING PERMIT PROCESS

MEDIATING FUNDING

The total building coverage limit for all structures on a 5,000 sq ft lot in an R5 zone is 2,250 sq ft

RESIDENTS OWNERS

CITY

initial small scale (<200 sq ft) and as temporary moveable structures ensures pods a low financial commitment and minimal permit fees

This means that 45% of an R5 lot can be built upon

PERMITS NPO evolving from social service provider into developer of affordable housing

PRODUCTION PROCESS

resdients co-own units with NPO through limited equity coopertives

FUNDING NON-PROFIT

small scale, big change

200 sq ft Section 8 vouchers are utilized to pay for “rent” and construction of units

200 sq ft

45% 180 sq ft

PLAY

PIXELATING THE LARGE WITH THE SMALL 43RD

96 sq ft

LIVE

128 sq ft

192(x2)

45% is redistributed reimagining the scale of the neighborhood 41ST

x

NPO acquires an underutilized infill lot through a community land trust or tax liability transfer

A FLEXIBLE FRAME OF 4 X 8 PREFAB PANELS

units can be added to & devloped incrementally over time with extra income residents generate (i.e. Ted adds a music studio over his living pod)

BELMONT

32 sq ft EASE OF TRANSPORT ON A FLATBED TRUCK

96 sq ft 128 + 64

when residents wish to move, the 1/3 of income that’s been put aside in savings can buy their pod and take it with them

1 house = 1 lot

32 sq ft 96 sq ft

5 ft

5 ft

LIGHTWEIGHT AND EASY TO ASSEMBLE ON SITE

200 (x2) instead of building one large homogeneous building, the lot is fragmented into many micro-units

5 ft zoning setback

CONFLICT: LOTS ARE STATIC AND ZONING PREVENTS A DEVELOPER FROM FRAGEMENTING THE LOT TO ADDRESS DENSE, URBAN FARIC, AND FLEXIBILITY

THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS A SITE OF PRODUCTION: Gardens/Urban Agriculture

Utilizing Natural Resources

Entrepreneurial Businesses

A loophole in the Accessory Structure code, allows the pods to act as “detached bedrooms” which can vary in size and avoid the costs and restrictions of ADU construction but unlike ADUs that can be rented, the structures are owned UNITS UNDER 200 SQ FT

housing is more than units it is about cultural and economic support systems Educational Workshops

Music Education & Performance

Community Events Block Parties

Incremental Additions

Blurring Boundaries

Sports: Dance, Yoga, etc.

Accessibility

Collective Kitchen Cooking Workshops

Generating Connectivity

LIVE /WORK FOR YOUTH ARTISTS Charlie and Anna, brother and sister, have a living pod to which they later added a second pod on top where they now have a photography and film editing suite.

LIVE UNIT FOR YOUTH ARTIST Stacey, an aspiring writer, and her cat Wolfe live in their cozy book-filled pod. Stacey loves the gardening workshops and has added a trellis for growing tomatoes.

MENTOR IN RESIDENCE Betty is a cooking mentor, she

2'

4’

Redevelopment of under-utilized lots to conduct a large-scale experiment in small-scale urban development to create the home as mini-city, as microeconomy, as social space. Envisioning a new kind of neighborhood, and reimagining coexistence on a small scale. The lot is traditionally static. To satisfy necessary urban density need but still allow for flexibility, the lot can be fragmented and reconceptualized as a microeconomic system serving as something that is more than just shelter, but as sites of production. That is allowed to grow incrementally over time. Where the void is more than open space but is stitched with collective programming that supports informal economies and social organization and where every resident has their own microhouse to call their own.


SITE STRATEGY

002

UTILIZING THE STEEL BUILDING AS A FRAMEWORK

Do

Design Scheme 1

Warehouse Row Warehouse Row

5

2

3

Alternative Rotation Alternate Rotation

Offset Offset

6

7 Program Layers

REBUILDING HOMES, COMMUNITIES AND LIVES

4

Agrigate

8

Internal Shift(Creating


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This plan seeks to integrate transitional homeless into our communities and strives to correct the separation, isolation, and stigmatization of large-scale housing schemes. Design will be specific to accommodate the individual needs of its inhabitants, creating an environment that speaks to the individual in support of their wellbeing and growth. It will also utilize the under-appreciated assets of our community through sweat-equity to increasing urban density while maintaining neighborhood scale generate low-cost housing, characterbuilding experience, personal investment, and a sense of belonging. The plan seeks an initial investment through charitable contributions but sustains the investment by saving sweat-equity and taking advantage of community resources.


003 Design Scheme

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queer publication house

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queer publication house

ATRIUM Vertical stitch

BED ROOM

COMMUNITY HEARTH & CAFE

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PRINTING & PUBLISHING

ic

LIVING ROOM

ists, and Pub Art lis

N KITCHE DINING

EDITORS OFFICE & WORKSPACE

live

PUBLICATION

HOUSE

work

40% of the homeless youth population identify as a sexual minority (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender). The term ‘Queer’ has been reclaimed as an umbrella to define this diverse yet resilient community. Can the combination of a home and a place of work reveal and nurture an outlet of creative storytelling through the power of publication? A publication by Queer youth, for consumption by the larger Queer community, brings to the table awareness, focus on issues, and links the unlinked toward a bright boisterous common vision. A publication house creates a unique opportunity to rethink home. A place to live and work in a nurturing community for a publication giving queer youth a creative voice alongside training in the skills required to produce a print publication.


004 Design Scheme

Day Shelter Mentor Offices

Gallery / Rental Space

Outdoor Day Center

PV Array

Connection Skywalk

Work Space

Reforming the industrial horizon for youth recovery

Housing Units

Community Market

Community Garden


Rooftop rehab

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Opportunities for homeless youth: Provide the skills and training to establish a foundation built on knowledge and accomplishments Densify the urban core: To utilize the existing infrastructure and restore urban commerce and tax revenue Transform city codes: To create incentives and opportunities within the city center for a discerning urban generation Change development protocol: Utilizing forgotten assets to preserve the urban boundaries and reestablish existing structures


005 Design Scheme

building social architecture through asset development


social architecture / asset development

community

medical consultant

outside in

therapy & Counceling

asset corp education & Employment

youth

legal aide

government

All resources working together to support an efficient and effective continuum of care. Resource specificity happening inside of a specific community by an asset corps that lives in the neighborhood. Community-sufficiency becomes the ultimate goal of neighborhoods that strive to socially and economically sustain themselves. In communitydemocracy, ultimate freedom becomes an identity not only dependent on what an individual can and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do and ultimate responsibility coming from the accountability neighbors that can hold each other up to, as they live life and become more intimately responsible for each other. Breaking out of the institutional and the generic blanket of solutions and into specific and personalized (or neighborhoodized) prevention and recovery.


006 Design Scheme

Green Wall Solar Collection

Bioswale

Permeable Alleyway

layering the residential fabric

Tree Filter Box

Garden Plots


housing evolution A scale-based housing evolution model grows from a single unit to a block to a neighborhood to an ecodistrict. Evaluating existing models and through experimentation of alternative housing scales, the exploration of solutions can reach a more tactile approach to the scale of housing. Understanding existing social housing models, established and amended building codes, and economic structure to develop a variety of strategies for the insertion of progressive low-income housing. A new residential spine facilitates growth within the underutilized areas of the neighborhood. Bioswales, permeable alleys, green walls, solar arrays, and community garden plots are all introduced into the neighborhood and are catalysts for new growth and community development.


007 Design Scheme

Ground Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

a new housing approach for transitional youth

4th Floor

5th Floor


Rebuilding housing to rebuild youth We must recognize all buildings and all transitional youth as a product of their own time. We must recognize and respect the changes that have taken place over time. We must treat and not destroy the sensitively distinctive features of youth. By engaging homeless youth in the process of transforming new environments out of old worn buildings, they too will feel the transformative effects upon their lives. More so, the rebuilding of architecture and its structure, foundation, cladding, finishing, and inhabitation; is the rebuilding of a life. Architecture rehabilitation is strongly connected both physically and conceptually to the rehabilitation of youth. Architecture rehabilitation provides transformational habitats for youth to live, learn, work, and recover.


008 Design Scheme

v

WHO: URBAN PORTLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HO individual reduced opportunity to transition

group promoting rehabilitation and leverage through peer group living

model: group living / micro-community while the homeless youth value the acceptance of their peers more than the institutional rigidity of services, a capitalization upon this intrinsic value could be manipulated for a positive environment and for positive transitioning. participating in a live-work community provides immediate support and sense of family, tools and skills for working, and a newfound sense of independence through community reintegration and contribution.

a prefabricated strategy for a social alternative HOW: KIT OF PARTS


PV panels butterfly roof typ. assembly

some assembly required

trusses typ. scaffold prefab wall panels, typ. stud frame assembly

OMELESS YOUTH WHO / HOW:

centralized around the downtown Portland area, where primary resources are located, transitionary homeless youth are faced with a strict reality of class divide from their working-class counterparts.

a group of homeless youth who are utilizing Outside - In’s services on some level are placed into a program to reintegrate back into the community through prefabricated housing. Outside-In utilizes existing Section 8 Housing Voucher funding to buy bare materials such as wood for the main deck, helical piers, photovoltaic panels, scaffolding (if not donated) and other essentials.

cup-lock construction scaffold

the homeless youth are then presented with the opportunity to build their own micro-community, where they can structure working units to complement dwelling units. They attract neighborhood members by offering simple services such as bicycle repair, a café, and a food cart - which all provide them with job skills, team oriented development, and community participation.

exploded: 2 x 4 floor boards typ. floor assembly

if needed, and the vacant site they are occupying becomes used, the structure can be dismantled quickly and moved to another location -- providing flexible housing that can grow or shrink to accommodate for the need of housing Portland’s homeless youth.

helical pier footing system

free rail zone, portland

by locating the prefabricated housing strategy within walking distance of TriMet’s Free Rail Zone, homeless youth are able to utilize resources within the city, and access the urban fabric in its entirety - leveling the class disparity, and establishing a greater degree of independence along the transition into stable living. therefore, mass transit provides access, while vacant lots with ephemeral structures built through direct involvement act as a formulaic approach to provide a sense of ownership, value investment, and stage for successful transition.

The abundance of construction scaffolding presents an opportunity for ephemeral micro-communities to be built upon vacant lots within urban Portland. The kit of parts that could be used would supplement Portland’s service infrastructure by utilizing existing funding streams, such as portions of Section 8 housing vouchers, which could promote for a net-zero micro-community, relying solely upon the existence of said community and the familial living structure for leveraging the group’s members. By utilizing prefabricated stud frame panels to complement cup-lock construction scaffolding, homeless youth can take part in building their own community through construction, maintenance, and community involvement.


009

Work/Live Addition

Expand Home

Design Scheme enclosure enclosure

communal/kitchen space interior hearth

enclosure

tic

exterior hearth

bedroom

bath Live/Work Space

art studio bedroom bedroom

bedroom

s

nts

ground floor ground floor ground floor

reate n Home| Create Arts Home| Focus Create ArtsHome| Focus CreateArts Home| Focus Arts Focus

on

Expand Home Expand HomeExpand Home Expand Home Resident of Exhibition

Resident of finance

Organization

hen munal e

kitchen Deck art studio

th

bath

Deck art studio art studio

communal/kitchen space communal/kitchen space communal/kitchen communal/kitchen space space studio art studioart studio art studio art art studio interior hearth interior exterior hearth hearth interior exteriorhearth hearthinteriorexterior hearth hearth exterior hearth

bath

bath

bath

loor Plan

exhibition space

exhibition space

bedroom

Live/Work Space

Live/Work Space

Live/Work Space

art studio

Create Family/Communal Space

exhibition space bedroom

bedroom

Resident of Chores Resident of Volunteering

Live/Work Space

exhibition space bedroom

Resident of Planning

bath

om

m ice

Resident of Records

Work/LiveWork/Live Addition Addition Work/Live Work/Live Addition Addition

bedroom

Main Circulation Way

Section

Path building social architecture through assetEntry development Connection to Community

art studio

bedroom art studio

bedroom

art studio

Plans and leads monthly meetingsbedroom Locates important volunteering events Organizes chores and activities Curates art gallery Administers finances Hold records of the house

bedroom bedroom bedroom

bedroom


Music

Arts

Focus

Education Resident of

Records blooming home

Work Force

Create Home

Resident of Exhibition

Resident of finance

Create Family/Communal Space

Main Circulation Way In 2009,Organization 40 percent of youth entering Path Multnomah County Homeless Entry Resident of Connection to Comm Resident of Planning Youth ContinuumChores indicated foster Resident of care experience. The majority Volunteering Site: Brooklyn Neighborhood Create of Home foster youth are often notably Maintain Home other available houses in safe Create Family/Communal Space under for the task of living Plans andprepared leads monthly meetings neighborhoods that can provide homes Locates important volunteering eventsOxford house Hearth independently. The for all foster youth in Multnomah County. Organizes chores and activities model is successful Curates art gallery in creating a Administers finances communal environment for learning Hold records of the house Main Circulation Way Create A Point of Origin self-supporting skills. Experience Entry Path has shown that it takes at least six Connection to Community individuals to form an effective group. Individuals in addiction recovery are more successful in homogeneous living. It is a self-govern environment, Maintain Home where every individual has an equal vote. Without the pressure to leave, Hearth they can focus on recovery, which gives individuals a sense a security and comfort. Disruptive behavior is not tolerated.

Create A Point of Origin


Curated by: Dustin Buzzard & Lindley Bynum Advised by: Sergio Palleroni, Professor of Architecture Š Fall 2012

Department of Architecture



Rethinking Shelter