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www.izzibag.com 3


6 Letter from the Editor 8 On the Cover 9 Letter from the CEO 10 Contributors 12 In the News

Anne Agoren and Wilson Lee

13 ĂŠlise Product Review

Linnea's LIghts, Soulful Charms

14 Wonderland

The photography magic of Russell Rutherfod, article By Giuseppe Grazioli

30 Toronto Fashion Week

By Y’Anad Burrell,

pictures by George Pimental

36 Project Red Dress 4

Gowns by Nikolaki


Contents

4o Nick Verreos Unveiled: 20 Questions with Nick

By Sharon Altaras

46 The First Impression By Lori Ann Robinson

48 The Dangers of Fashion

By Jennifer Adams

50 Italian Luxury Jewelry: the Heritage of Grando

By Nancy Grando

54 The Art of Sarah Davies

By Borian Tchernev

57 en verte

By Eleanor Sweetwood

58 ĂŠlise Spotlight 60 The Brick & Mortar 5


Letter from the Editor

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elcome to élise Magazine. Thank you for opening us up and browsing the gorgeous layouts and thought provoking articles.

It is an honor to be asked to be a part of this new endeavor. As Editor in Chief, my passion has always been for the reader and reaching out to others. As you read élise, you will find a fantastic magazine focused on the specific needs of the fashion conscious as well as empowering those who are in need of knowledge in the areas of fashion, design, and all things sustainable. In this new era of publishing, new sustainable ideas will cultivate change and empower technology and we are really excited about that new technology. As we move forward with élise Magazine I hope that in every issue we give you a balance of your favorite fashion items through aesthetically beautiful and creative layouts, intelligent and inspiring articles, and an international appeal from writers that you are already familiar with as well as new friends. As always we welcome your comments and your thoughts in this interactive age and would love to know what you think.

Editor in Chief, Susan J. C. Alveshere

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On the Cover: Wonderland

The Magic of Russell Rutherford Chief Executive Officer........................David Stoyanov dzstoyanov@elisemagazine.com 425.829.4602

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Communications Officer.................... Borian Tchernev btchernev@elisemagazine.com 206.619.3278

Secrets to Improve Your Style

Chief Technical Officer................................ Wilson Lee wilsle@elisemagazine.com 206.552.8604

From Hollywood Image Consultant Lori Ann Robinson

Editor in Chief............................. Susan J. C. Alveshere susan@elisemagazine.com www.susanalveshere.com Creative Director................................... Anne Reinisch www.nwcreativesolutions.com Managing Editor.................................... Christina Guan cguan@elisemagazine.com 778.995.3978 Associate Editor.........................................Kelly Boston Associate Editor................................. Sydney Hennessy Editor.................................................... Kearsten Weeks Editor...................................................... Kristina Ingles

Page 46 Nick Verreos Unveiled: 20 Questions with Nick Page 40

Visual Marketing................................... Christina Guan Fashion Director.............................. Giuseppe Grazioli Photography Director................................ Mike Adams photosby@comcast.net Cover photo by Russell Rutherford, www.russellrutherford.com Model: Kacie Schiffer – Major Model Management, New York. Clothes: Camisole Top - H&M, Blazer – Screamng Mimi’s

From Italian Royalty to your Summer Wardrobe:

Confetti Jewelry by Stefano Grando Page 50 7


Exclusive French & Italian fashion, shoes and accessories www.lolapopseattle.com 8


Letter from the CEO

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hank you for reading élise Magazine. As CEO, I look to providing our readers with a quality experience and an excellent publication. It is customary for new publications to include a statement of purpose in its first issue as a way to introduce you to our vision. élise Magazine will be one of the first publications of its kind. Not only will we seek to reach our international audience in new and innovative ways, élise will also provide its readers with a different perspective of fashion, luxury, and sustainable living. In recent years, fashion has become more environmentally conscious and at élise Magazine we wish to reflect that change in our publication. We are grateful for your support and look forward to releasing many more issues in the future.

CEO of élise Magazine, David Stoyanov

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Wilson Lee

Contributors

Technical Director of DesignerBloc, Wilson Lee has worked at both Microsoft and Mozilla in software and web development. His interest in computer science has kept him in the loop of technical chatter. Wilson is also fluent in Chinese and French.

Lori Ann Robinson

Image and fashion consultant, speaker, author and costume designer, Robinson was nominated for four Emmy awards for her work in daytime television. She is a member of the Association of Image Consultants International and Fashion Group International. www.larconsultants.com

Sharon Altaras

A reporter and editor based in the Seattle area, Altaras travels the country, documenting what it means to be American. She is available for freelance assignments and can be contacted through her blog, www.americanroad.us.

Borian Tchernev

A luxury fashion and art enthusiast, Tchernev is Chief Communications Officer at élise. He holds a zealous interest in European fashion, and is an avid follower of international happenings. Tchernev’s ability to speak three languages has enabled him to connect with people of all cultures.

Y’Anad Burrell

A San Francisco native, Burrell is the Founder & CEO of Glass House Communications. She is the Founder and Creative Director of Fashion On The Square and holds a BA and two master’s degrees. www.fashiononthesquare.com

Nancy Grando

Since 1870 the legendary Grando family has produced couture quality jewelry for Italian royalty, celebrities, socialites, business icons & luxury jewelers. In addition to her work with jewelry, Nancy works with luxury fashion. www.grandojewelry.com www.generationsofcouture.com

Giuseppe Grazioli

From Mantova, Italy, Grazioli worked in Milan and Paris as a Fashion Designer and consultant. He is fluent in six languages and has called France, Italy, Chile and Denmark home. The son of an opera singer, he learned to sew backstage, making alterations before the curtain went up.

Jennifer Adams

Jennifer Adams studied journalism at the University of South Florida. Besides writing about fashion, Jennifer is passionate about fashion show coordination and modeling. Her interest in fashion has led her to participate in many shows as an event planner and runway model.

Eleanor Sweetwood

An teacher at International Academy of Design and Technology, Sweetwood is a member of the Arbor Day Foundation, Sierra Club, Wildlife Land Trust, and Washington State Association for Multicultural Education. esweetwood@iadtseattle.com. 10


www.babyphatfragrances.com 11


In The News Shorty Awards Anne Agoren, izzi bag designer, was recently nominated for the Shorty Award at the ‘Oscars of Twitter’ 2010 hosted at the Times Building in NYC. This prestigious award is presented to individuals who are best able to utilize Twitter for reaching out to their followers. Out of 250,000 entries, Anne was the only fashion brand to reach the final 6. Anne considers herself as a ‘Maven’ in the world of Twitter and has the ability to reach over 2,000,000 people in only 140 characters. Anne also notes that the quality of her followers is far more important than the quantity. To find out more about Anne and her work as a designer visit: www.izzibag.com or tweet her at: www.twitter.com/izzibag.

Above: Anne Agoren, designer of izzi bags New York: 390 Fifth Avenue Suite 710 New York City 10018 P: 212.947.1135 www.izzibag.com

London: 89 MY HQ Cadogan Road London SE18 6YS P: 0203 287 8947

Square Up Ever since the popularity of plastic currency overtook the use of cash, getting paid isn’t as simple as it used to be. The moment a business considers taking credit cards, the heavy burden that comes with it can be immediately felt: a long contract, the bulky hardware, and the monthly fee are just one of the few things to worry about. Frustrated with this monolithic system, Jim McKelvey teamed up with Jack Dorsey, cofounder of Twitter, to work on Square,

a payment system that accepts credit cards with none of the aforementioned off-putting factors and perhaps a little bit of an advantage of its own: portability. Literally a tiny‚ "square," a device that attaches by an audio jack, a Square already works with iPads while iPhone, iPod touch, and Android support are on the way, allowing payment acceptance to be affordable even for individuals. More information regarding Square can be found at: www.squareup.com

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Upon opening the Linnea’s Lights candle one notices first the gorgeous packaging and fragrance that would appeal to the most avid scent connoisseur. The candles are hand poured with cotton wicks and triple scented. The most wonderful aspect of these candles are that they are all natural soy based. They burn for an extra long time and can become a relaxing wonderful gift to yourself or a very special person. For more about Linnea’s Lights please go to: www.linneaslights.com.

Product Review

Soulful Charms bracelets are handmade by artist Laura Bucholtz to honor the amazing women in her life. The story behind the lovely charm bracelets is what caught élise Magazine’s heart. These leather bracelets feature charms that each symbolize faith, hope, and a deeper blessing from the heart. For more on Soulful Charms please go to: www.soulfulcharms.com

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Wonderland Inside the Magic of Russell Rutherford by Giuseppe Grazioli

This outstanding worldwide artistic couple: Ann Rutherford producer, stylist and casting director who is very well known for her impeccable attention to detail and overwhelming enthusiasm, and top photographer James Russell, the man behind the lens; this team is the ying and the yang; the perfect complements. They have created an extraordinary and prolific collection of images from around the globe, capturing multiple dimensions between the human and the divine, the dream and reality, the luxurious and humble landscapes. The context seems as important as the subject. The lighting is exceptional and seems to radiate from the page. They seem to use idiosyncrasy as a concept which tends to make the observer rethink even the obvious. There seems to lie within the perfection an odd detail that is not immediately obvious. They strive to exceed our expectations and the obvious; they harness technology and artistry to capture something truly unique in each piece. Ann Rutherford is the producer and stylist of the duo, and James credits her vision and energy for their international reception and success in business. It is inevitable that one feels the power and the conscious level of their work. In this issue we are presenting the artwork entitled, Wonderland, an exquisite contrast of textures, colors, and patterns… the pairing of light and heavy volume is almost palpable beyond the printed page.

WONDERLAND CONCEPTED AND DESIGNED BY JAMES RUSSELL, RUSSELL RUTHERFORD GROUP www.russellrutherford.com PHOTOGRAPHER – JAMES RUSSELL www.jamesrussellphotography.com WARDROBE ENSEMBLED IN RESALE, THRIFT, VINTAGE SHOPS, SUNDAY MARKETS AND H&M IN MAHATTAN AND STYLED BY ANN RUTHERFORD, www.annrutherfordproducer.com HAIR – STEPHANIA PARENT – FORD MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK MAKEUP – ANN RUTHERFORD – RUSSELL RUTHERFORD GROUP BACKDROP BY DEBORAH FREEDMAN

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DRESS – H&M PETTICOAT – HOUSING WORKS PATENT ORANGE SHOES - ELEVEN MODEL KACIE SCHIFFER – MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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TOP – HOUSING WORKS SKIRT AND BELT – INA SHOES - ELEVEN NECKLACE - PIPPIN VINTAGE MODEL – ELLIE CLOUGHERTY FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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TIE – H&M SHIRT - HOUSING WORKS SWEATER – INA MEN JACKET – H&M JEANS – ANGEL STREET THRIFT SHOP MODEL GRANT – FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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DRESS – THE FAMILY JEWELS VINTAGE MODEL KACIE SCHIFFER – MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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SKIRT – H&M SILK BLOUSE - INA VEST – A FABULOUSLY PECULIAR LITTLE SHOP OF ODDITIES ON W. BROADWAY JUST BEFORE HOUSTON MODEL KACIE SCHIFFER – MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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MODEL - SHAWN EDWARDS – DIRECT MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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MODEL – ELLIE CLOUGHERTY FORD MODELS, NEW YORK KACIE SCHIFFER – MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK GRANT – FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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SCARF – WHAT GOES AROUND JACKET – H&M MODEL – GRANT FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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SCARF – WHAT GOES AROUND JACKET – H&M MODEL – GRANT FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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MODEL - SHAWN EDWARDS – DIRECT MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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MODEL - SHAWN EDWARDS – DIRECT MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK AND GRANT – FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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TIE – HOUSING WORKS SHIRT – CHEAP JACKS VINTAGE NECKLACE – 1970’S “VOTE” NECKLACE – TRASH AND VAUDERVILLE JEANS - ANGEL STREET THRIFT SHOP SHOES – SALVATION ARMY MODEL - SHAWN EDWARDS – DIRECT MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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MODEL - GRANT – FORD MODELS, NEW YORK

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DRESS – H&M PETTICOAT – HOUSING WORKS PATENT ORANGE SHOES - ELEVEN MODEL KACIE SCHIFFER – MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK AND SHAWN EDWARDS – DIRECT MODEL MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK

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TORONTO

FASHION WEEK

By Y’Anad Burrell, Photography by George Pimentel

From March 28th to April 1st, Canadian fashion lovers received their long awaited dose of style for the Fall-Winter 2010 season. The event, sponsored by Canadian electronics brand LG, fused technological flare with fashion savvy styles. Themed, “The Power of Style”, the five day phenomenon drew celebrities and fashion icons worldwide to a showcase of Canada’s finest fashion. Even world renowned designer Oscar de la Renta made a guest appearance, his first visit to the country in ten years. Standouts of the week included a showcase of sustainable fur and the Heart Truth Show, a celebrity filled line sponsored by the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation. For those that were unable to attend the event, here is a bit of what you missed. 30


Designer Jules Power

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Jules Power Gaudet

Preloved

Preloved

Preloved

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Jules Power

Georgian-based designers Norm and Gio Gaudet kicked off Day Two of Toronto Fashion week with a moving tribute to Nodar Kumaritashvili, a Georgian luger who was killed in a training crash during the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver. Incorporating traditional Georgian felt, the designers created a bold Lady Gaga-esque outerwear collection entitled, ‘GAUDET’. Models with painted gold faces and teased hair walked the runway in stylish blazers, coats and dresses. Bold colours and perfect fits adorned each outfit, adding a unique touch to the collection. Toronto Fashion Week also held stage to designer Jules Power’s debut. Though the collection was anything but cohesive, Power’s collection had a ready-to-wear look that appealed to much of the audience. From felt jackets to cargo shorts, the pieces all lacked unity, but were equally wearable. Slimming jersey dresses and unicorn print served as further highlights of Power’s collection.

Gaudet

Maximizing comfort and style for the week however was a cozy collection by Preloved. Combining sustainability with style, the collection used a variety of textures in conjunction with classic looks. Vintage leather, thick wool and plaid flooded the runway along with sweaters, pencil skirts and heels. Accessorizing the collection were thigh high socks and daring horn rimmed glasses. 33


Dimitri Chris

Gaudet Gaudet

Dimitri Chris

Dimitri Chris 34

Heading men’s fashion at the event, Montreal menswear designer Dimitri-Chris presented a sporting-inspired collection. “My collection is something you can wear from a morning board meeting to dinner later the same day. San Francisco would certainly be a city that can embrace my vision”, said Dimitri. The collection, entitled “Master of the Foxhounds” was a follow-up to his “Prince of Wales” collection, introduced earlier this year. With classy slick-backed hair, models strutted the runway in reversible capes, corsets and tailored pants and shirts. Enhancing the looks were riding-style boots, complete with leather bottoms and soft trims on the calves. The Canadian designer put the finishing touches on his collection with bowties and cummerbunds, laced with shaved mink and broadtail. Though the week was filled with hits and misses, only time will tell whose looks will stand the test of wearability and practicality. Keep your eyes peeled for these looks in stores, and dare yourself to try something new. Keep in mind always: chic is never safe.


Dimitri Chris

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PROJECT

RED DRESS 36


Project Red Dress: The Art of Design

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n the beaches of California during a business trip for Fashion Group International in 2007 Monir Zandghorieshi conceived the idea for Project Red Dress. This idea gave birth to an annual event that supports students in fashion and the couture luxury market in addition to the Heart Association of America. In 2008 the first Project Red Dress came alive while partnering with Macy’s and the Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, Zandghorieshi was able to see her idea become a reality. Through Project Red Dress many students have had the opportunity to compete for the best red gown, while creatively expressing themselves through the art of design. Each year a number of students are sponsored and supported to compete for a scholarship donated by Fashion Group International in 2008 and 2009. This year's scholarship winner will be announced the night of Project Red Dress. Where: Fairmont Olympic Hotel, Seattle When: Friday June 4th, 2010 Time: Cocktail Reception 6:30 www.projectreddress.com

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Photo Credits: Brick House Photography www.brickhousephotos.com Barbie Hull www.barbiehull.com Mike Adams Photography photosby@comcast.net


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20 Questions with

Nick Verreos Project Runway’s first poster child tackles a slew of light-hearted and serious questions, proving he is still all about the clothes. Interview by Sharon Altaras n What is your favorite city of all time, style wise? New York, without a doubt. I love the energy, vibe and most importantly, just being able to see people! One minute, you will see a fabulous drag queen, then an exotic woman in a sari or fashionista girls wearing something straight from a Vogue editorial... It’s all there and all inspiring. LA comes in second – its style can be both tacky and glamorous – but with a great mixture of casual and glamour. Finally, anywhere in Italy inspires me for having the most stylishly dressed men! n If you could live anywhere outside the U.S., where would you choose? I love Paris and Madrid. The architecture, the art, the history, the people -- those cities are magical. But if I didn’t have to work, I would probably move to Kauai or Tahiti in French Polynesia.

over 10 years in Southern California and still went home and designed my gowns and dresses for private clients, and had “secret” fashion shows.Being able to do three to five things at once has always been part of my life. It has just gotten more intense since I was on Project Runway. Because, as you say, not only do I teach at a fashion school, I’m also the president and co-designer of my line, NIKOLAKI, I also do a lot of TV “red carpet” shows, and I am one of the Glam Squad for MSN.com Style Studio. Thankfully, my partner David Paul helps me manage everything and make it run as smooth as it can. n Do you ever deal with prejudices from others in the fashion industry who resent the way you became a well-known name?

n Any jetsetting fashion tips? Not really, I always over pack! My favorite “jetsetting tip” is instead of using shaving cream, use the hair conditioner the hotel provides. I learned this after so many times forgetting my shaving cream. n Let’s talk a little about the fame you’ve received following Project Runway. My first question is how you juggle the intense time requirements of speaking, teaching and designing? I worked as a designer or as a patternmaker for

Nick and élise contributor Sharon Altaras 41


It’s a mixed bag, to be honest. A lot of people in the fashion industry have been very nice and approach me expressing how much they loved me on the show and how much they loved my designs. But then I also get another camp of fashion industry people who are more distant, and you do feel that they are thinking, “Oh, look at him, just because he was on TV, he really thinks he is somebody...” I am very humbled and proud to have been on Project Runway and what it has done to my career so I am very comfortable to be representing it. n Do you see problems from a fashion designer’s perspective with reality TV or the pervasiveness of today’s media? I do feel that reality TV and the pervasiveness of today’s media gives a false sense of entitlement and makes these people think that you can just do these shows and then be instantly be rich and famous. But at the same time, fashion people who have been in this industry for a long time can see who’s “real” and has talent and who is not and just wants to get famous quick. n How do you think the traditional fashion houses will be required to change in the next decade? Well, this is a question that can be argued. A lot of the big fashion houses are feeling the pinch from 42

all those fast fashion companies, such as H & M, Forever 21, Zara and TopShop. Those companies can translate a trend, copy a style that just came out on the runways and have it out in their stores in less that a month! This scares more traditional fashion houses. But people always suggest that fashion houses have to adapt by making cheaper stuff for the mass market. I don’t agree with that. There will always be that “high end” market of clients who will want to buy more quality one-ofa-kind stuff. Even if, in this recession economy, they will do it more privately. n You taught at FIDM in LA for several years. What are the top qualities you look for in a student? I look for those “diamonds in the rough,” who actually want to learn and who appreciate that I am there to teach and inspire them. I don’t have to be there, considering how valuable my time is, but I am there and love to do it, so I want the students to give me 110 percent of themselves as well. Most students nowadays, unfortunately, just want to go 0 to 60 in an instant. In other words, they don’t want to “pay their dues” and school is just a way to “kill time” until they start their line immediately and get “discovered” and become rich and famous. When I was in design school, I knew there was


no way I was going to start my own line or company right after school. I knew that I had to pay my dues and work in the industry for at least ten years. n As a fashion designer, what skill came easiest to you? Designing and drawing. I draw like a madman. I am always sketching. I have about 200 notebooks all over my studio filled with thousands of sketches. David and I have begun the process of now categorizing them so I can bring them out whenever we begin designing a new season. I would say that the other easiest skill is draping and doing the patterns. I absolutely can’t wait

to get going after we have OK’d my sketch. Just leave me alone for six hours at my pattern table and I am one of the happiest men on Earth! n Which was the most difficult to master? The business aspect of being a fashion designer. I am not a business man but I have had to become one, very fast. When I began my line NIKOLAKI, in 2001, I had some very early harsh lessons. n If you were an animal, which would you be, and why? If I was an animal, I think I would be a labrador retriever. Why? Labs are faithful, friendly, overlyexcited and amorous, and yes, sometimes they can be a big bundle of mess! But good mess! n Let’s talk about Nikolaki, which is in its ninth season. Where did that name come from? The name NIKOLAKI means “Little Nick” in Greek. My father is Greek-American and he would call me “Nikolaki” when I was young and so I decided as an homage to him, I would name the line that. It also sounded good and looked good on a label. Around the same time, lawyers recommended that I should not name my line with my name, in case I was ever bought by a multi-million dollar conglomerate (I wish!). (continued on page 45)

Nick and élise Editor in Chief Susan J. C. Alveshere 43


Above: NIKOLAKI Spring 2009 Collection featuring Nick and his partner David on the catwalk

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Nick and his nephew Alain (left) and his niece Casia

Nick and his sister Rita


n Who do you listen to or what do you do/watch/ eat for inspiration? I have an eclectic mix on my Ipod--from Janelle Monae’s sultry soulful musings to “Hed Kandi’s” lounge house/disco. I want to feel relaxed and feel as if I am sitting pool side in some Greek island when I am working. I also have a nice flat screen TV by my work table and have CNN, MSNBC, and BBC World News on while I am draping and doing my patterns. I know this sounds crazy but it’s actually relaxing! Food doesn’t necessarily inspire my work or collections, but my favorite foods happen to be rather exotic: Persian, Ethiopian and Venezuelan. n What did you eat for breakfast this morning? I’m not good with breakfast, unfortunately. I had a large cup of coffee with Vanilla-Caramel flavored creamer. I only have breakfast if I traveling and there’s a breakfast buffet in the hotel! n Will you or have you incorporated the economic recession into your designs? Well, of course, the economic recession has affected all of us. However, since I design mainly red carpet gowns for actresses, they still want full out glamour, and that’s costly. But I have begun talks about doing a web-only line with simpler, less-expensive NIKOLAKI dresses, tops, etc. So you could have a piece of NIKOLAKI without the $10,000 price tag.

answer, I would say The Beatles. n Any celebrity or politician you’re dying to see in a Nikolaki? The First Lady, Michelle Obama naturally. So many people tell me “OMG, you should TOTALLY dress Michelle Obama..she needs to be wearing NIKOLAKI...” Well, if there was a way for me to get in touch with her or her social secretary, don’t you think I would have tried already? And I have, but no e-mails have been returned yet, unfortunately. I am also obsessed with “Slumdog Millionaire” star Freida Pinto. I think she would look amazing in one of my Grecian Goddess draped jersey dresses. I would also love to dress Penelope Cruz, Queen Rania of Jordan and Angelina Jolie. n Tell us a lesser-known hobby or interest of yours. I really enjoy making mix music CD’s for my friends. Before I was on Project Runway, I used to have more time and would make like one CD a week for my best friends. I also love swimming in my pool or just sitting in my pool, relaxing. Trust me, just sitting in my pool is a hobby, considering my crazy schedule! n What do you want to be known for in 20 years? Being a really nice guy who made women look more beautiful in my dresses. Oh, and being “that guy” from Project Runway.

n Who are your all-time favorite designers? My all time favorite designer icons are Cristobal Balenciaga, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent and Charles James. I am ALWAYS going back to “History of Couture” books and referring to them and their designs. They constantly amaze me! n From a fan’s perspective, The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? You know, I was never a fan of either of them. I grew up during the disco and “new wave” era. Duran Duran were my Beatles and Donna Summer was my Paul McCartney. So, if I had to

Nick and friend Hiedi Klum 45


5 By Lori Ann Robinson

The First Impression

Secrets to Improve Your Image You never get a second chance to make a first impression. Those words speak volumes, and are absolutely true. Be it a business or social situation, we are judged by the way we look and judged in a blink of an eye (well, actually less than 7 seconds). This is not much time and certainly not enough time for our marvelous qualities and charm to shine through. If you blow this opportunity you may never recover because your viewers don’t realize they’ve judged you. But they believe what they think is true, and that’s hard to dislodge.

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Rest assured you don’t need to ‘smoke’ your credit card and show up wearing the latest designer clothing. What you do need to do is convey an air of confidence and look really great in what you do have. You can look fabulous, darling, no matter your shape, size or budget by wearing clothing that fits and flatters you. Be well put together!

Prepare your outfit. Just a bit of thought and preparation helps. Know the event and type of clothes you are expected to wear. Business casual? Formal? Semi-formal? This is the time to conform. Look in the mirror and make sure everything fits properly. Clothes to big? Don’t do it. You’ll look frumpy, not thin. Too tight? You’ll look heavier than you are.

Think head to toe. From hair to footwear, you’re all one package. Yes, like it or not, shoes are as critical as grooming. Don’t leave any details to chance or think they won’t be noticed. They will. Update your hair and makeup. Ease off on the goth dark lipstick if you’re over 40. And, open-toed shoes? Get thee a pedicure.

Accessories all matter and lend an air of success and power to your first impression. Match your natural style with your accessories. Big girl? Big accessories. Petite? Keep it thus. Handbags must be in tiptop shape. If you’re at a cocktail party be sure you don’t have to juggle an awkward ‘suitcase size’ purse with your martini.

Smile, with your gleaming pearly whites.

Take advantage of the opportunity to start off with a powerful first impression. A good first impression makes everything else you need to accomplish easier.

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High Heels:

Dangers of Fashion By Jennifer Adams

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hether high, low, kitten or stiletto, heels are no stranger to the fashion front. When it comes to heels, the question that we should ask ourselves is, “To wear or not to wear?” Though fashionable, the consequences of high heels provide solid proof that the price of fashion can be sky high. An informal survey conducted in 2009 found that from over ı00 females, most wear their heels 2-3 times a week, with the most common heel height being 2-3 inches. The most frequent area of pain: the feet, followed by the ankles, lower back and knees, sparking concern amongst podiatrists and chiropractors alike. According to Mike O’Neill, spokesman for the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrics, “High heels make you raise your heel and as soon as you do that, your center of gravity is pushed forward. What happens then is you bend your lower back to compensate for this and you change the position of your spine, putting pressure on the nerves in the back.”

Even though heels highlight a women’s body, most don’t consider the damage that they cause. “High heels are generally not meant for comfort, but rather fashion. We are in a society where we would much rather look good than feel good,” said Dr. Eric Springer, owner of Northeast Chiropractic Center in St. Petersburg, Florida. Models have it especially tough when it comes to heels and safety. “Once, during a show in Paris, they had us wearing these seven inch wedge platforms that were really thin on the bottom and made us walk the runway. Every girl just about broke her ankle as we all wobbled down the stage,” said model Genii Tully. Over time, the damage done to the body can cause severe consequences. “Your spine can start to adapt to the heels which in turn may cause hyperlordosis (increased curve) in the lumbar spine. This could affect the nerves that run down your leg causing numbness or tingling at your toes,” said Springer. And so, with the true destructive nature of heels revealed, women of the world, be warned. Think twice before choosing those stilettos.

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Exclusively Grando

From Italian Royalty to Your Summer Wardrobe Stefano Grando, a third generation jeweler from Vicenza and one of Italy’s most well-known jewelry designers recently stepped into the spotlight to introduce himself and his new Confetti collection to the rest of the world. Grando’s pedigree and background is impressive. His grandfather, the founder of the original company in the late 19th century, was a jeweler to the King and Queen of Italy. As a young man pursuing ( continued on page 52)

Stefano’s grandfather, Ignacio Grando, is depicted above in this photograph. He was the co-founder of the first industrialized jewelry manufacturing company in Northern Italy. Ignacio Grando created fine jewelry for the King and Queen of Italy.

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Left: Stefano Grando creating gold chain in his family factory L’Oromeccania. This factory was the largest producer of gold chain at the time. It was also the most technologically advanced jewelry factory in Italy at the time. Above: Stefano working in his studio


Confetti collection by Grando

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his family’s tradition, Grando learned the art of jewelry making from a master jeweler in his family’s facility. To enhance his experience and credentials, Grando was trained in product design and technology at the Instituto Technico Industriale in Vicenza, as well as being a “diamond graduate” from the Gemological Institute of America. He is also the holder of many international patents for his technical innovations in jewelry making. Grando, the chairman of Grando, Inc. in Los Angeles, is a board member and past president of the Jewelers 24 Karat Club, a Southern California-based national association. The Confetti line is a fitting tribute to Grando’s legacy. Named and inspired by the Italian wedding tradition of tossing colorful almond candies (confetti) at the bride and groom, the Grando Confetti™ collection consists of vibrant, full-cut gemstones and diamonds that are micro pave set under a microscope. The first product to be introduced in the line is the Confetti band. "Confetti bands are thin and fit snugly together so they can be worn alone or in multiple colors. Being versatile, the wearer can choose to create looks for any occasion. They are an ideal choice for wedding bands and may equally accent an engagement diamond. They further serve as mementos of a child’s birth and can be worn with the birthstones of family members. Highly

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addictive, many women want a band in every color for their wardrobes." Grando assures that bangles and earrings from the same collection will be unveiled next month. Grando’s Confetti bands are all handmade in the U.S. and represent the finest quality bands on the market. While being approximately half the cost of Tiffany & Company bands of a comparable design, each ring is created in Grando’s factory by Grando and his team of master jewelers. The consumer gets the benefit of the highest quality jewelry at the most competitive prices. To continue the celebration, and as a special gift to everyone who purchases a band from the Confetti jewelry collection, Grando provides a complimentary box of authentic Italian confetti candies from the new Grando Culinary Gemstone collection. In addition to the candies, the collection consists of bomboniere (favors) for weddings and baby showers. For more information about Grando’s Confetti collection and to view Grando’s original signature designs, visit: www.grandojewelry.com.

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Vast Expanses

THE ART OF

SARAH DAVIES 54


I

nfluenced by the rugged scenes of the west since her youth, Idaho native Sarah Davies paints vivid images of her surrounding nature. Still moved by the western landscapes, Davies recalls, “For as long as I can remember, the West has fascinated me. Its landscape draws me in to experience the vast expanses of prairies, canyons, forests, and powerful mountain ranges that have been home to my family for generations.” Davies is not only a commissioned artist, but has also had her work displayed in numerous gallery collections. Her career spans a venerable 40-year period filled with a plethora of honors. Davies got her start at the University of Denver where she studied both painting and art history. She continued to refine her artistic abilities at the Coupeville Art Center, and the Seattle Academy of Fine Arts. Presently, she is still actively involved with the Pratt Institute of Fine Arts, and Atelier with David DeVeilier. Although she took a turn away from the arts in

order to pursue an impressive career within the fashion industry, the arts have always been an ongoing influence. Davies has served as Nordstrom’s Corporate Fashion Director for twenty years. More recently, she has been a producer and stylist in Portland and Seattle. Davies tends to draw upon the same love that drew her into fashion that also fuels the inspirations for her art. “I see huge valleys, cool rivers, wildflowers, boulders, majestic trees and wild colorful skies. They become a blend of images in my mind that blur the line between reality and abstraction.” Her paintings have been displayed at various galleries and venues. In 2006 they even served as imprints incorporated into Tommy Bahamas’ fabrics for their men’s line. When asked about what moves her to paint, Sarah exclaimed “The light is always powerful and present in my work as a painting unfolds suggesting memory of place. My paintings are based on thoughts about magical natural places that have been worshipped and revered for centuries.” For more information: www.sarahdaviesartist.com 55


en �ert� Child’s Toy Could Solve Global Water Shortage By Eleanor Sweetwood

T

he Earth holds 326-quintillion gallons of water. That’s how much water there is on Earth. Of that amount, only 0.014% is available for humans as drinkable water. In addition, the world faces three major water-related concerns: too little water in some places, too much water in other regions, and water pollution worldwide. In the United States, we are blessed with abundant access to clean, potable water. We even have the freedom to choose between tap water, bottled water, or wells. Water is effortless.

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The majority of people on the planet do not have it so easy, however. Some have to travel long distances by foot to retrieve a bucket-size amount of water. Washing hands with soap is considered one of the most effective ways to limit the spread of disease, yet this too is a rarity in the far reaches of the world. The global population stands at 6.8 billion people, yet �.� billion have no access to clean water and 2.6 billion are without adequate sanitation facilities. In the U.S., we may take these basic necessities for granted. In fact, we have the luxury of using an average of 2 billion gallons of water each day for golf course irrigation alone.


But, imagine children playing on a merry-goround while pumping clean, underground water to a holding tank for the community to use! This very technology exists and is being utilized in rural communities in �� countries around the world, including Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Uganda, and India. How does it work? Through joint efforts of PlayPumps International, Roundabout Outdoor, and other non-profit organizations, water is delivered to a community at the rate of up to �,400 liters per hour. The technology is elegant and simple. While children have fun spinning the merry-go-round, clean water is pumped into a 2,500-liter tank standing seven meters above the ground. The tank has a convenient tap for access, and excess water is stored in a separate tank for later use. No stone goes unturned as the sides of the tank are sold for advertising billboards, the revenue of which is used for maintaining and repairing the pump. Local mechanics are hired to maintain and service the systems for a fee, which is paid by water committees in each village. This innovative approach to solving water and sanitation focuses on “keeping costs and maintenance to an absolute minimum, while entertaining the children” according to the Roundabout Outdoor's website. This is just one example of cost efficient solutions that can bring water to people in desperate need while allowing a community to become self-reliant. For more information about this program, visit: Roundabout Outdoor Picture Key ı. merry-go-round 2. plumbing system 3. water source 4. water storage 5. distribution area 6. excess water release 7. advertising

Sources: Time Magazine, December 15, 2008. Cascade Crest, Sierra Club, March/April/May 2009. Elaine Packard, Water and Salmon Committee Miller, G.Tyler, Scott Spooman. Environmental Science. Belmont:Thompson Higher Education, 2008. Print. Gwin, Peter. Golf ’s Hot Green. New York: National Geographic Society, April 2010. Print. http://www.roundabout.co.za/main_the_playpump.htm 57


Designers Ken Kaufman and Issac Franco with the new collection straight from the runways of Milan. For more on Kaufman Franco please go to: www.kaufmanfranco.com

élise Spotlight

élise Magazine Contributor Nancy Grando and her husband Stefano of Grando Jewelry

Editor in Chief Susan Alveshere with designer Joseph Abboud 58

élise’s Jennifer Adams with Project Runway’s Ben Chmura

Editor in Chief Susan Alveshere with deisgner Ken Kaufman

Editor in Chief Susan Alveshere with Project Runway’s Logan Neitzel

Editor in Chief Susan Alveshere with eco-model Summer Rayne Oakes


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Jade Jezebel Jagger introduces “Pretty Vacant”for Spring/Summer 2010 Jade’s British heritage is proudly referenced throughout the collection For shopping guide go to: www.iwantjezebel.com

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BOLD, CONFIDENT, AUDACIOUSLY SEXY AND FUN For more information about the Baby Phat fragrance range please visit www.babyphatfragrances.com 61


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élise Magazine Issue One 2010