Page 1

DAYTRIP

No.3 You Find Yourself At A Crossroads

Featuring Roberta Bondar


2


No. 3 - You Find Yourself At A Crossroads

Matthew Volpe Erich Deleeuw Andrew Savery-Whiteway Ben O’Neil Featuring Writing by Paige Lindsay


INDEX Pg.9......................................................................................Oh, Hey There Pg.13..................................................................Choose youre own Daytrip Pg.23..........................................................Fountians Pt. II By Ben O’Neil Pg.34.....................................................Choose your own Daytrip continues Pg.84.............................................The Range of Scale with Roberta Bondar Pg.104............................................................................Acknowledgements


OH, HEY THERE How nice of you to stop by. It’s been a while. So long, in fact, we have started to lose track of time. Time. Such a foreign concept to everything that isn’t a human being like you. Yes, you! Don’t worry, this story isn’t going to treat you like a tech company treats their customers when something goes wrong, using phrases like “Whoops, looks like you are an idiot and don’t know how to follow directions”. There shall be none of that. Hopefully. One could assume that you are now fully aware that this is a book on the internet. Fancy. What you might not know is that this is not just an ordinary story. Just like the life you lead, this story winds, unwinds and requires active participation. You don’t just sit back and let this happen. You choose. You decide. You own those choices and accept what happens next. Oh, and if you don’t like what happens you can just go back and try another path. Well, that’s all the onboarding we need. Good luck.

9


12


13


You find yourself at a crossroads, on the precipice of varied and sundry courses of action, about to take a step. Your options may be slightly obscured by the outcomes of choices that brought you to this moment — did you just quit your job? did you recently enter a doomed romantic relationship despite your better judgment? did you subscribe to a magazine and are eagerly awaiting its arrival? It is time to make your next move. Although someone else has written this for you, you are still you and you get to fill in certain blanks, such as: what is your hangover food of choice? what is the true nature of your heart? What combination of clothes did you put on your body this morning? There is only so much we can control. And yet, whilst this text transparently offers you the driver’s seat, this, we admit, is also a ruse. There is, contained within the covers of this edition of Daytrip, a limited number of outcomes, a finite collection of paths, of starting points and ending points. Do you believe that your destiny is set or do you prefer to think that you can create your own fate? Or do you consider both these concepts complete baloney and deem all existential preoccupation an unproductive use of your time? We have no idea. We are just an introduction. Do you want to read an interactive story? Yes, Proceed ahead! (Page 16) No, go to Interview with Roberta (Page 84)

14


15


Would you prefer to go inside or sit and join the woman? Go inside (Page 17) Sit and join the woman (Page 55)

16


GO INSIDE It is dark, hot. The room is lit and heated by hundreds of flickering scented candles. Pine Forest mixes with Summer Berries and Cinnamon Toast to form a confusing, though not unpleasant, bouquet. In a room beyond this one, someone is making breakfast, listening to the radio, Top 40. You sit in one of several empty chairs and wait for the fortune teller to reveal herself, and your destiny. Wait it out (Page 18) Investigate (Page 48)

17


WAIT IT OUT The heat of the day combines with the cumulative warmth of the candles and your brow, the insides of your arms, the backs of your knees, all prickle with sweat. You shift in your chair, hoping that the noise created by rearranging yourself will alert the missing fortune teller to your presence. It won’t Time passes. You close your eyes. You dream:

18


19


20


21


22


23


24


25


26


27


28


29


30


31


32


33


34


The sound of the woman singing outside stirs you from your sleep. How much time has passed? You look to the candles for answers but they appear unchanged, half-used, plenty of wax and wick to burn. You leave.

35


36


As you walk towards your apartment you whistle, you kick stones, you drag your hand along fences. You realize that you are whistling the same song the woman sitting in front of the fortune teller was singing. Sweet dreams till sunbeams find you, Sweet dreams that leave all worries behind you But in your dreams whatever they be Dream a little dream of me

37


A black cat, carried on a young woman’s shoulder, crosses your path. It’s glowing eyes make you shiver, with excitement or horror. Follow the cat (Page 40) Turn around and go home immedietly (Page 47)

38


39


The woman holding the cat is walking quickly; you need to break into a jog to keep up with her. The cat bounces slightly on her shoulder, its eyes never leaving you. Several blocks later, now thoroughly out of breath, you lose sight of the pair. You look around, finding yourself in an unfamiliar part of the city. In fact, you don’t feel like you’re in the city at all; the buildings have receded, leaving only sand and low shrubs. How far from home are you? You couldn’t have been following that cat for more than fifteen minutes. You set off into the desert. Here and there lie outcroppings and structures whose meaning and purpose you can no longer decipher.

40


41


42


43


44


Suddenly, you find yourself back in the fortune teller’s candle-filled room. Your brain, as always, lurches through that moment of waking after having already woken within a dream. You must have been here for a long time by now. You listen for the woman’s singing coming through the front door, but there is none. She has left, without noticing your sleeping form. Slightly embarrassed, you decide to investigate the building further. Investigate the building further. (Page 50)

45


46


TURN AROUND AND GO HOME IMMEDIATELY At home you no longer feel so clouded, the reasons for going to the fortune teller fall away, you don’t need to know how things end, the painting will happen when it is meant to, maybe even today, but first you find your pastels, your drawing pad (a little dusty), and sit down at the table. Pushing aside the halfeaten remnants of breakfast, unfolded bills, coffee cups, you begin to sketch: a twisting concrete staircase, the web of your brother’s hand, an orange tire in a field of dirt. End 1 try again?

47


INVESTIGATE You pull back the beaded curtain at the back of the room, take measured steps down the dark hallway. The sounds of the radio, of cooking, of occasional conversation and laughter emanate from the walls to either side of you, your stomach feels pinched, you’re nervous, intruding. You quickly rehearse a couple lines about why you are here, should you be questioned ( I’m looking for the fortune teller, do you know where she might be?) and relax, a little. You come to a door, open it, and are blinded by brilliant white. You stumble into a courtyard, and give your eyes a moment to adjust to the extreme change of available light.

48


49


A sudden gust of wind pushes your hair into your face and you hear the door closing shut behind you. You turn around just in time to see the hallway become an increasingly thinning black line before disappearing all together. The sound is serious, final. The sound of a door that locks from the inside. Across the courtyard are more doors, equally locked. You resign yourself to inaction. You sit and watch the shadows stretch, waiting for someone to find you.

50


And they do, eventually, though now it is nighttime. You stammer “I’m looking for the fortune teller, do you know where she might be?” to a confused tenant, who quickly shoos you in and then out of her apartment, onto the street.

51


52


You are no closer to knowing what the future holds but at least you have flowers to bring home. Enough for the front window, the kitchen table, and a special one, indistinguishable from the others, that you’ll put on my bedside table, where it will miraculously last for three weeks. End 2 try again?

53


54


JOIN THE WOMAN It is bright, slightly cool, a hint of autumn in the late August breeze. The woman to your right is humming a tune, she smiles, nods in acknowledgment, continues to hum.

55


56


A hearse, a vehicle that, until now, you assumed was exempt from engine trouble, requires towing. You take a moment to imagine all the broken-down cars, buses, vans, and scooters in the world. You think of all the people who had planned for travel, had anticipated movement, and have found themselves, instead, waiting on tow-trucks, waiting on parents, friends, spouses, waiting on the kindness of strangers, to help get things back on track.

57


58


59


60


And it’s not that bad, really. There is hope, in the middle of the inconvenience, that it will make a good story later. You wonder if the body is still in there. The woman, dressed in purple, adds words to her song: sweet dreams till sunbeams find you… The woman next to you says that she met her husband because of a broken blender. “I have three daughters, one son, and two grandchildren all because I bought a second-hand blender instead of a new one.” She pauses. “I’m not saying he’s perfect, life is not without it’s challenges and thirty years of marriage is a just that, a challenge .” She pauses again, trying to get it exactly right. “What I’m saying is I don’t buy new if I can avoid it. Where’s the risk? The adventure?” The woman asks if you’re looking for directions. She seems eager to direct you; perhaps she is growing tired of your presence, or perhaps she knows something that you do not. Perhaps she is the fortune teller herself. Choose your own path (Page 79) Let the woman guide you (Page 65)

61


62


LET THE WOMAN GUIDE YOU Following the woman’s wrinkled finger pointing down the sidewalk, you eventually see the three clues she has told you to seek out. Now what?

63


64


65


66


You look down and find a wallet on the sidewalk. You open it to discover a few crumpled fives, the schedule for the 27 bus route, a picture of a woman in a blue and white striped dress, and the usual collection of credit cards, and ID.

67


The driver’s license provides an address just around the corner. Thrilled by the prospect of fulfilling a good deed you take purposeful stride towards your new destination.

68


You discover that the address in question has two different apartment so you must choose: APT 1 (Page 71) APT 2 (Page 72)

69


70


APT 1 An old man answers the door, cries with delight at the sight of his missing wallet, and invites you inside. His apartment smells of newspaper, rosemary, and vinegar. Before you can make an excuse not to stay he has produced a plate of shortbread cookies and put the kettle on for tea, or coffee, if you prefer coffee. You don’t know it yet, but the man sitting across from you will one day become your closest confidant, you will start a book club, you will get matching tattoos, when he dies, in his sleep, you will look after his cat. Sometime before he dies, but not today, he will tell you about the woman in the photograph. But not today. He has lived long enough to know better than to lead with his best story. A crash from the next apartment startles the two of you. What was that? HEY! ARE YOU OKAY OVER THERE? The old man rushes over to involve himself in whatever is happening next door, which turns out to be a wrestling match between a pair of unruly toddlers and a frazzled babysitter. Go to (Page 74)

71


APT 2 A frazzled babysitter opens the door and before you can start explaining why you are there two toddlers have attached themselves to your legs and you fall, face first, into the apartment.

72


The two youngsters then go for the babysitter, who falls down next to you. From your position on the floor you hear footsteps and then the shoes belonging to the footsteps enter your field of vision. The shoes are currently being worn by an old man, you recognize him because you have a slightly younger version of him in the wallet that is protectively clenched in your hand. Go to (Page 74)

73


This is an example of a fated meeting, regardless of whether you believe in them or not. No matter if you pick APT 1 or 2 you still meet the old man, Harold. Even if you didn’t return the wallet today and then unintentionally forgot about it, you would nonetheless meet him, waiting for the 27 bus. He is eating a mango and offers you a cheek, which you accept because he feels familiar to you. His wallet is in your bedside table, laying in darkness with a couple postcards you can’t quite get rid of from people who you are no longer in touch with, elastic bands, orphaned buttons, dust. If you never found the wallet, well, then perhaps you wouldn’t become friends, but you would hold a door for him at a local diner, and he would say thank you as he shuffled through with his newspaper clutched in his delicate hand. End 3 try again?

74


75


76


CHOOSE YOUR OWN PATH Politely declining the woman’s help, you decide to try the fortune teller another time. Something about that broken-down hearse has given you the desire to walk, to move. Taking renewed pleasure in the prospect of decision, you take side streets, alleys, detours and dead ends through the city. Certain images stand out in your mind like visions or signposts, full of wonder and peculiarity. As you string these together along your path, you are swept up, forgetting the answers you were seeking.

77


78


79


80


You whistle, you kick stones, you drag your hand along fences, content, until you think of the blank canvas waiting for you in the living room. You prepare yourself for the usual onslaught of mental self-disparagement. Why didn’t you do any work? Oh, really? You needed a day off? It’snot like you did any work yesterday, or the day before. When was the last time you picked up a paint brush? What’s that point of a painter who doesn’t paint? You shrug yourself off. You call me. Though sometimes I say the wrong thing — and when you feel this way the wrong thing can be extra damaging, can be another weight added to the pile over top of your heart — today I am careful and say little. I ask you exactly where you are. Don’t move, I say. I will be right there. I run out the door, pass a flower vendor and pick a special one, indistinguishable from the others, that you will later put on your bedside table where it will miraculously last for three weeks. End 4 try again?

81


82


83


84


86


DAYTRIP How are you? Roberta Bondar Next question. DT What drove you to photography? RB Well this will be a long afternoon. Actually the first photograph, or one of the first images I have of black and white that I took with the old roll of film, was with my Brownie Hawkeye camera when I was about 9 or 10. And the photograph was of the plastic model rockets that I put together, and my first microscope. That’s a photograph that I used to point out when I speak to groups, because people don’t understand that there could be a connection that long ago. My uncle was a pharmacist and he sold high end Leicas and Nikons, so he was the northern Ontario rep for Leica and Nikon. I used to think you always got cameras in the pharmacy. My life doesn’t separate things, it never has. I think curiosity is the thing that goes across what people have put in traditional boxes. I think that if a person is curious enough to understand and want to understand how light can be captured and how the human brain will process that information, that person will also be interested in the technology of how to acquire that visual imagery. They’ll be interested in how to make it better and how to share it. All of those things that cross traditional art, that cross traditional science, that cross traditional technology,it’s like

87


a venn diagram. They have overlapping spectra. When it comes down to it you can pigeonhole me for one minute but it won’t last long. My Dad was the first one to get interested in photography. My dad is very technically minded and my mother was very creative, so I just grew up with 8mm cameras and 35mm cameras the whole time. It wasn’t a stretch that when i got older I upgraded my camera system and that I also found ways of using it in all the activities that were involved in training to be a physician or scientist. I developed new techniques for electromicroscopy and black and white microscopy. When I was in the space program I was trained on 13 different cameras, everything from Imax right through to Ricohs, because we were an international flight and the Germans didn’t want to use the Japanese cameras, and the Americans didn’t want to use the German cameras, so we had this plethora of cameras. Some had to be attached to microscopes, and then parts fell off and flew away in space, so we just had to know everything about camera systems. We had the first electronic cameras and we were a stepping stone to space stations, so they were trying out this international culture, how we would get along with each other from different countries and how different camera systems could work optimally for which type of experiments. It was heavy duty training. I met Christine because we had the Imax, and she was the publicist for Imax and the movie Destiny in Space.

88


Christine Yankou ~ When it was owned by Canadians! ~ RB One of the film guys suggested that if I was really interested in doing more, because I’d worked very hard with the Earth observations people to get everything they needed when I was in my flight, that I should go and study at the Brooks Institute of Photography which just recently closed. But it was one of the most prestigious schools in North America. So I went out and just did the semester that had professional landscape and nature photography, and then kept going. That was in ‘96, and at that time I was 4 years into my space medicine research. I did that for ten years and during those ten years i was head of an international space medicine research team that supported over 24 missions including the MIR Space Station and cosmonauts and astronauts. So in ‘96 I did this training and by ‘98, ten years after I started with the research stuff, I decided that I would take my knowledge base and photograph the national parks. I mortgaged my home. I had no salary, no income, nothing. Christine paid for my place, everything. It was a self-designed project for which I had some lending bureau money but didn’t have nearly the expense of it. So I developed a portfolio of very large fine art images that I have now donated to my foundation and they’re the core of what we use to develop our programs and support the things we do.

89


90


The photography moved from 120 when I was growing up. Now because of the digital age I use digital photography all the time. And I’m always, I’m just continuing because - you might not ask me this question but I think it’s pretty important - a lot of people stay with one type of camera and they explore maybe different kinds of subjects with one camera. I explore different subjects with different cameras and I see what I want to photograph and which camera really supports it best. I went out in the field to do the Passionate Vision work for the national parks and I had a Linhof panoramic camera, I had two 4x5 view cameras, one with a betterlight scanning back with double bellows, I had a hasselblad 2 and a quarter with film and I had a Hasselblad 205 FE with the 2º spot meter that i used for aerial work. So I worked with the zone system. I also had a Sylverstri architectural camera that allowed me to do a lot of other things after my Passionate Vision project. I use cameras for different purposes so if i see something anywhere I do a lot of research in terms of weather patterns, what the light might look like. I get as much as I can out of the internet, I just squeeeeeze it dry and then I feel that I’m best prepared. I end up with a shot list and I go to these national parks. I may fly a whole day for 7 hours for 45 minutes of shooting in some northern park where it’s minus 20 degrees outside the helicopter and I have 45 minutes to shoot, and you have to think of the wind, you have to think of what the helicopter can do. And as a pilot I’m not gonna ask them to do something that’s really stupid or get into

91


arguments about it. It’s really important that the aerial photographer knows what they’re doing. DT Traditionally in fine art photography there’s a tendency to stylize the work, whereas in scientific photography the work might be a little more clinical or accurate. Do you find you lean more to one side? RB I don’t, deliberately, but you make a good point. For years when I was doing my research it was supposed to be about documenting, because science is about seeking truth and it’s about documenting things so that you can share a truth with someone else I am of the Ansel Adams school, He did not have to have some human influence in his images to make them good. There are some photos that he took that have structures in them but by and large he really had enough respect for the environment that it was perfect enough and beautiful enough to photograph it. He would concentrate his efforts on trying to impose his emotion on it. The second thing that I like about his work is that he believed in having things sharp from front to back. Because I’m a neurologist and have some training in neuropathology, this is very important to me. I’m about taking a landscape image and having it be as sharp as it would be if you were there. I impose on my images a broader view and a broader vision. It’s not a snapshot, far from it.

92


DT Why not black and white? RB It’s not why not, it’s the appropriateness of black and white to the subject matter. The reason why my national parks were all in colour is because from space, when I looked away from the planet, black and white was the majority of what I saw and the stars don’t twinkle and there are holes of light and it’s very cold light, meaning this light is probably dead, meaning it takes over thousands of years for light to reach my eye and I have no idea if that light is still there. The predominant black is very chilling, in fact I call it light-sucking black because there’s no depth to it, it’s bottomless. To keep focussing on that is, to me, almost a negative property, when you look at my images there’s really never more than about 3 colours in the image, because I don’t want to confuse the human visual system. I use a lot of telephoto stuff, and so the black and white I keep reserved for mystery, wanting a different kind of sense. I grew up in a black and white world which you people don’t know. I grew up with black and white TV, and it sounds odd now but when we were growing up the black and white TV didn’t look much different from life in colour, because we didn’t know any different. So when colour TV came in it was suddenly like ‘wow, this is kind of like real life.’ I had a BW printer that said I should really try BW because of the sense of mystery BW gives. I thought most men are red-green colorblind or have a touch of it and I don’t. I’ve examined people for it, but I photograph in the colour that I see.

93


This is a sidebar but people who have cataracts, their photographs change too. They don’t see things as vibrant anymore, things become a bit more yellow and so a bit duller. People with cataracts, if they’re photographers, they have to get those things fixed, and when they do the world becomes so vibrant it’s like looking at velvia film all the time. DT From seeing our world on a planetary level, all the way down to microscopic scales, your work has seen a massive range of perspective. What inspired you to focus on the landscape primarily? RB One word: space. I had always felt very close to the environment. My upbringing was all about being in an actual environment and loving biology, and loving birds and butterflies, and the absolute enchantment of trees and the wonderful things that other lifeforms can do that I absolutely can’t do. It’s that respect and that dignity for the environment outside that’s always made me look. But I must say space flight was the inspiration. The training for it it was trying to teach us a different way of seeing. So that if you look at something, not necessarily seeing it from space, there emerged new patterns. I think that’s why people get sort of enthralled about some astronauts’ photography: you take a camera and shoot it out the window and the shuttle or the space station is travelling at mach 25, so it’s going just under 8km/s or 5mps so you don’t have a lot of time to be artistic up there. The

94


shots that I like best were not the ones that were straight down, but the ones that encompass the edge of the earth. Anybody can take an aerial photograph from an airplane straight down. But trust me, from space you see it as a planet so there’s this black out there, and you see the edge of the atmosphere and then you see the little North Bay compared to this 1200km stretch that’s out there with the edge of the earth. That perspective is the meaningful part, to be able to look at these new patterns and say ‘I wonder what’s inside those.’ It’s that desire to come back and explore so microscopically and submicroscopically there’s always different patterns to see. We think morphologically all the time, we are great believers in vision and substance so when we see something inside a cell it’s a lot easier to relate to that than when we hear about it. We hear about black holes, but no one’s ever seen one. People all the time are trying, on Star Trek or whatever, to construct what a black hole looks like. But we haven’t seen that pattern. DT This sort of leads into our next question RB Of course DT Besides using photographs as an educational tool, it seems like there’s a certain level of empathy which which you approach your work. Can you speak on that?

95


96


RB I think people do a lot of things to express themselves or try to create emotion in somebody else, whether it’s the same one or different. Once your art’s hanging on the wall someone else can interpret it differently or feel differently. Every time i have a frame that i’m really happy with, it is a piece that reflects my respect and dignity for the planet and for the lifeforms how can i mine the human visual system and all its connections to be able to pull something forward to make people look at it in a different light? So I don’t want my work to look like someone else’s. But a friend of Christine’s came over once, we were having dinner and she looked at that image and you know what she said? That is such a great Ed Burtynsky - laughs (Christine gestures to a large landscape photograph framed on the wall) DT Speaking of Canada... what do you find inspiring about Canada in particular, and what’s kept you here, having seen so much of the world? RB People are always trying to seek their heritage. My parents were born in Sioux St. Marie but their parents were not, so if you go back through your lineage I could say there are other places I could live comfortably. I have remained in Canada because I’ve had too many responsibilities related to being a Canadian, and to being very public about trying to stimulate other Canadians to be interested in their country. I could do that not being in the country

97


as well, but my family was here, my Mum was here. There are all kinds of reasons personally why I wanted to stay here. A big chunk of my life has been involved in international activities, so the fact that I hang my hat in Canada allows me to be visible here. Being Canadian means something. It means something deep DT Could you speak a bit about your foundation? RB The foundation started with that program, and we did the travelling exhibition, and from that the Bondar challenge was developed, which we ran in schools. We gave kids cameras, and we gave them a program not just to take pictures but to understand the tech of the camera, and the power of the camera for sharing and capturing a moment. We wanted people to not only understand about the tech but also about spatial things in art, and also the sciences and the environments around them. We started at one school as a pilot and the kids hadn’t used a camera for any other purpose than to take pictures of each other. We have now reached well over 20000 students since the camping program began and it covers people with disabilities, certain diseases, diabetes, sickle cell... DT We were reading about the Bondar Challenge and we’re particularly interested in the wilderness program around Port Smith. Why did you choose that location?

98


RB It’s one of those serendipity things. I had done a lot of work with the parks because of my Passionate Vision project, and one of the areas that I visited to photograph was Wood Buffalo National Park, which is our largest national park. Actually it’s the second largest natural protected area in the whole world, second only to Greenland. In the 1940’s they found it was also the nesting area of the whooping crane, so my desire to go back to Wood Buffalo was to take pictures of whooping crane nesting areas. We would talk to the people there about our program and they said maybe you could do something with students, so we ran a pilot and now we do it every year. DT What does the concept of home mean to you? How does change affect that? RB Home can operate on different levels when a person’s in space. Even for shorter periods of time, home becomes a place that you get used to and you go to to relax, even if it’s a little cubby hole it’s individually defined. I think of it as something that I can surround myself with independent of a physical space, so that I could be at home in my car. Or if I’m going on a trip over to Kenya it takes me two days to fly and it won’t matter if I’m sitting in a chair here or sitting in a chair on Air Canada. My home can’t be defined by my visual sensation alone; I feel it has to be internally driven.

99


DT Do you think that your feelings on that maybe shifted after your space flight? RB Well they had to be shifted for space flight because I wasn’t anywhere near my home. I looked down at Canada or places that I knew, and it felt more homey to me in the sense that I felt more protected and there was a safety net. I think if we start talking about what our top 3 things are that describe what home is, one of them is going to be that we feel safe, that there is some kind of a safety net for us, whether it’s that we can lock the door and not let people in 10 minutes early, or whether we are some place in space and flying over some place that looks very very cold in the winter, which is what I did flying over Russia (phone rings)... RB It’s probably marketing. Hang up! RB All the training for space flight also took me around to different places that were quite strenuous from what I physically would have been comfortable in. There were a lot of times where there were very uncomfortable physical environments, and I had to be able to get into a place where I had a safety net. we have to let our heads go some place that will provide us some kind of comfort. If we don’t, we become angstridden, and it’s hard to focus and be disciplined about what one is doing. It’s hard to sleep when you’re feeling threatened

100


CY Going to Russia, you used to go to the cosmonauts when you were examining.... Roberta... the first time she went, she took a lot of warm clothes but the second time she took canned tuna . DT That was home? The canned tuna? RB That’s right, it was the food.

101


We find ourselves years in the future, unsure of how we got here so quickly, time having slipped through our hands like pages torn one by one from the spine of an age-worn book. We here at DAYTRIP have been anxiously watching these pages accumulate on the ground at our feet, hoping that one day they’ll be gathered up once again into a book; a book very much like the one that you, dear reader, have hopefully been enjoying. “What took you so long?” you might be asking us at this point, in relation to the construction of this book, which has taken almost four years. We have no satisfactory answers for you, instead pointing out the fact that not all adventures are linear, and some Daytrips can take what feel like months, years, lifetimes. You’re right, we are waxing poetic to avoid the question. Oh well. The point is, we have finished after all, and now so have you, arriving here with us on the last page. Hello, and goodbye. Thank you, and you’re welcome.


DAYTRIP

Matthew Volpe - Erich Deleeuw - Andrew Savery-Whiteway - Ben O’Neil Daytrip is a collective that strives to flesh out the subtleties of Canadian culture through art, travel and discussions with artists from a variety of backgrounds.

103


Photogtaphy by Steven Beckley....................................................................................Pg.21,37 Andrew Blake-Mcgill..............................................................................Pg.79 Ali Bosworth......................................................................................Pg.39,67 Julianna Damer......................................................................................Pg.75 Aaron Densmore.................................................................................Pg.64,65 Magida El-Kassis...................................................................................Pg.51 Ben Freedman..............................................................................Cover, Pg.59 Brett Gundlock..............................................................................Pg.49,56,78 Julia Hendrickson....................................................................................Pg.50 Hongen Nar............................................................................................Pg.52 Abby Klagas.......................................................................................Pg.62,80 Paige Lindsay..........................................................................................Pg.72 Dylan McAurthur..............................................................................Pg.10,34 James Morley...........................................................................................Pg.58 Stephanie Power.................................................................................Pg.69,83 Brian Rideout.........................................................................................Pg.17 Jesse Sarkis..............................................................................................Pg.15 Ryan Walker............................................................................................Pg.16 Stanley Wong......................................................................Pg.19,20,41,42,43

105


107


ISSN 2368-4240

Profile for DAYTRIP MAGAZINE

Daytrip Magazine Issue No. 3: You Find Yourselves at a Crossroads  

Featuring Roberta Bondar Photography by Steven Beckley, Andrew Blake-Mcgill, Ali Bosworth, Julianna Damer, Aaron Densmore, Magida El-Kassis,...

Daytrip Magazine Issue No. 3: You Find Yourselves at a Crossroads  

Featuring Roberta Bondar Photography by Steven Beckley, Andrew Blake-Mcgill, Ali Bosworth, Julianna Damer, Aaron Densmore, Magida El-Kassis,...

Profile for day-trip
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded