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No.1 - Burks Falls

Matthew Volpe Erich DeLeeuw Andrew Savery-Whiteway


No.1 - Burks Falls

Matthew Volpe Erich DeLeeuw Andrew Savery-Whiteway


INDEX Pg.01.................................................................................I Haven’t Disappeared Again Pg.04.................................................................................................................Part One Pg.45..............................................................The Role Of Film With Patrick J. Adams Pg.59......................................................................................Fool’s Nest By Ben O’Neil Pg.71..................................................................................Peter Camani’s Field Of Art Pg.88.................................................................................................................Part Two Pg.123...................................................................................................................Credits


INDEX Pg.01.................................................................................I Haven’t Disappeared Again Pg.04.................................................................................................................Part One Pg.45..............................................................The Role Of Film With Patrick J. Adams Pg.59......................................................................................Fool’s Nest By Ben O’Neil Pg.71..................................................................................Peter Camani’s Field Of Art Pg.88.................................................................................................................Part Two Pg.123...................................................................................................................Credits


By Claire Harvie

We shall not cease from exploration - And the end of all our exploring - Will be to arrive where we started - And know the place for the first time. - T.S. Eliot

The invitation was to passenger an early Saturday morning drive to Hamilton, in order to buy an aural exciter from a guy. A craigslist find. Richard Zylog said we could make a day of it; have a diner lunch in a nice Hammer booth. Not my first choice of how to start a June weekend in a car that would only get hotter from the moment we got in. I had a list of things to do, and this wasn’t on it. But RZ asked again the night before, and I couldn’t seem to provide an adequate reason why I was too busy to be his craigslist chaperone. On Saturday morning RZ filled his favourite of three prized plastic thermoses with hot coffee, and wax-paper wrapped two egg drippy bagel sandwiches. Yup. We took the Gardiner, and low and behold we made it to south Hamilton before 10am pulling into the driveway behind this guy’s Lotus. One minute early in fact. There was a longish pause standing on the front steps. Maybe our being punctual was somehow an interruption. But eventually the door opened and a friendly exchange took place. Cash for electronics. Some shop talk that I listened to while continuously looking over the Lotus owner’s shoulder to a 30” x 40” studio portrait of his half-naked younger self; arms tenderly wrapped around his lace-clad wife. Wife presumably, though not necessarily. And more pleasantries that turned into detailed, Google-mapped tips of what to do in downtown Hamilton. We stayed another ten minutes politely taking in each new suggestion until somehow we made it back to the door where the memory of Jeanne Beker’s voice suddenly came through the aural exciter now in RZ’s hands. Just as we walked back out into the quietly roasting suburban morning. There was one left turn and maybe two more rights before we’re looking through the windshield at the base of the Niagara Escarpment. The cars pulled off to the side of the road let us know where the steep climb would begin, and so we made our way into the conveyor belt of an outdoor exercise group. Up. A lot of up. On aluminium

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By Claire Harvie

We shall not cease from exploration - And the end of all our exploring - Will be to arrive where we started - And know the place for the first time. - T.S. Eliot

The invitation was to passenger an early Saturday morning drive to Hamilton, in order to buy an aural exciter from a guy. A craigslist find. Richard Zylog said we could make a day of it; have a diner lunch in a nice Hammer booth. Not my first choice of how to start a June weekend in a car that would only get hotter from the moment we got in. I had a list of things to do, and this wasn’t on it. But RZ asked again the night before, and I couldn’t seem to provide an adequate reason why I was too busy to be his craigslist chaperone. On Saturday morning RZ filled his favourite of three prized plastic thermoses with hot coffee, and wax-paper wrapped two egg drippy bagel sandwiches. Yup. We took the Gardiner, and low and behold we made it to south Hamilton before 10am pulling into the driveway behind this guy’s Lotus. One minute early in fact. There was a longish pause standing on the front steps. Maybe our being punctual was somehow an interruption. But eventually the door opened and a friendly exchange took place. Cash for electronics. Some shop talk that I listened to while continuously looking over the Lotus owner’s shoulder to a 30” x 40” studio portrait of his half-naked younger self; arms tenderly wrapped around his lace-clad wife. Wife presumably, though not necessarily. And more pleasantries that turned into detailed, Google-mapped tips of what to do in downtown Hamilton. We stayed another ten minutes politely taking in each new suggestion until somehow we made it back to the door where the memory of Jeanne Beker’s voice suddenly came through the aural exciter now in RZ’s hands. Just as we walked back out into the quietly roasting suburban morning. There was one left turn and maybe two more rights before we’re looking through the windshield at the base of the Niagara Escarpment. The cars pulled off to the side of the road let us know where the steep climb would begin, and so we made our way into the conveyor belt of an outdoor exercise group. Up. A lot of up. On aluminium

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cheese-graters that clanged under the foot of each glistening stair-master. The top had a view that was long and hazy, and running the edge of the escarpment was another suburban street that looked much like the one we left near the bottom. Aside from the occasional passing car, no one on the streets. Everyone we’d seen so far was on the grater stairs; huffing and puffing and glistening. I wondered if a short dress was the right call as my thighs stuck back into the passenger seat. “Quick one?” The usual RZ response to a garage sale sign, arrow pointing in some direction of possible megafinds. Still well before noon and RZ had acquired a new coffee grinder. “Not that I’m counting, but don’t you already have two? Or three?” “This one’s for spices. I need to grind my spices.” “Oh. Ok.” More about increasingly sad feel of all garage sales seeming to be hosted by people selling off the estates of dead parents. Decision to drive down to Lake Erie.  Taking simultaneous shits in the only two Talize thrift store bathrooms. I didn’t buy the shoes, but did get a very out of character neon-cantaloupe string bikini top. Four cornered no-towns. Hunger that inevitably lead to low-level crabbiness, and the possibility of the wrong rash decision. “Let’s just pick something up at this store.” “But what if there’s a really cute place by the water? Where we can sit, and be normal people.” “But what if this is the end of the road for us?” At the end of the road there was pickerel and beer. By the pier. Here here! Getting really into the car. The day. The longness. Hot loud windows down and all the windmills. Swimming next to the coal plant. First use of the out-of-character bikini top. Hewitt’s Dairy Bar Made it home before six. In time to have a nap with the fan on and sun in the window. And sex. And a Lake Erie algae rinse. “Full day”, he said.

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cheese-graters that clanged under the foot of each glistening stair-master. The top had a view that was long and hazy, and running the edge of the escarpment was another suburban street that looked much like the one we left near the bottom. Aside from the occasional passing car, no one on the streets. Everyone we’d seen so far was on the grater stairs; huffing and puffing and glistening. I wondered if a short dress was the right call as my thighs stuck back into the passenger seat. “Quick one?” The usual RZ response to a garage sale sign, arrow pointing in some direction of possible megafinds. Still well before noon and RZ had acquired a new coffee grinder. “Not that I’m counting, but don’t you already have two? Or three?” “This one’s for spices. I need to grind my spices.” “Oh. Ok.” More about increasingly sad feel of all garage sales seeming to be hosted by people selling off the estates of dead parents. Decision to drive down to Lake Erie.  Taking simultaneous shits in the only two Talize thrift store bathrooms. I didn’t buy the shoes, but did get a very out of character neon-cantaloupe string bikini top. Four cornered no-towns. Hunger that inevitably lead to low-level crabbiness, and the possibility of the wrong rash decision. “Let’s just pick something up at this store.” “But what if there’s a really cute place by the water? Where we can sit, and be normal people.” “But what if this is the end of the road for us?” At the end of the road there was pickerel and beer. By the pier. Here here! Getting really into the car. The day. The longness. Hot loud windows down and all the windmills. Swimming next to the coal plant. First use of the out-of-character bikini top. Hewitt’s Dairy Bar Made it home before six. In time to have a nap with the fan on and sun in the window. And sex. And a Lake Erie algae rinse. “Full day”, he said.

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As an actor and an artist Patrick lives a life with roots in Canada and branches across borders. We spoke with him about his artwork, his life, and his upbringing. We didn’t talk about Suits.

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As an actor and an artist Patrick lives a life with roots in Canada and branches across borders. We spoke with him about his artwork, his life, and his upbringing. We didn’t talk about Suits.

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DAYTRIP What did you want to be as a kid? Patrick J. Adams [I] Pretty much always wanted to be an actor. I don’t know if it was for the right reasons, in fact, I’m sure it wasn’t for the right reasons. I loved going to the

first. So any time I saw a camera laying around I was just picking it up and playing with it. DT Can you recall the strangest thing you’ve ever photographed?

“It felt like I had a purpose, like I could document it, like even though I maybe wasn’t as vehement as some of these people were, or as involved, or educated, I still felt like I could play a role in it.” movies and I fell in love with theatre the first time I saw it. Photography never really occurred to me as a possible job but it was my favourite hobby without even knowing it. I loved taking pictures, I loved getting the pictures back, and I loved taking more pictures. My good friend Jay Shuster had a lot to do with that too. He went to Ryerson and I came back [from university] and he was telling me everything he was doing at Ryerson and I felt this burning jealousy. He really changed everything ‘cause I always just had a person I could talk shop with. DT Who gave you your first camera or how did you acquire it? PA It would have been a camera that my dad had laying around. My dad’s a journalist and he always had a couple of cameras laying around. I don’t remember what the camera would have actually had been, but I’m sure it was something that I picked up off his desk. It seemed like there was something so peaceful about a great picture and I think the nostalgia of pictures is what really appealed to me at

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PA I was at the Amadou Diallo riots in New York. I was there to audition for NYU and the riots broke out. There was a big group of people amassing and then it started to turn violent. One guy went running and I saw the cops pin him down and all of a sudden the march began. I had this whole series of photos of trash cans on fire and the first guy who got pinned with a planter knocked over. It felt like I had a purpose, like I could document it, like even though I maybe wasn’t as vehement as some of these people were, or as involved, or educated, I still felt like I could play a role in it.

especially in Los Angeles. That can be fun too, but Toronto is still a major city and it has all of those [problems], but there’s something to the people; they seem to be able to have conversations in a way that isn’t about self-aggrandizing. [Canadians are] more relaxed and they move with purpose. A lot of people don’t have that purpose; They pick money and they go for that and that runs out of steam pretty quick. That probably had a pretty profound effect on me growing up and I didn’t realize it. Something I do feel always separated me was a level of calm focus and attention to detail that a lot of people there hadn’t experienced. DT Having grown up in Toronto, moved away, and returned; what is your idea of home now? PA That’s tough. I’m about to get married and being in love changes your sense of what home is. [Troian and I] have also been torn apart. She shoots in LA and I’m [in Toronto] and that’s the way it is

for seven months out of the year. California’s where all of my friends are and all of the work that I’ve done to build a community for myself in the past ten years has been there. DT How has traveling with your work impacted your photography? PA As an actor, I like to shoot a lot of stuff on set so it’s great if I’m shooting in Paris; it’s beautiful. You can steal away for a weekend here or there but if I’m on a really strict schedule of shooting on set I’m pretty tired and I don’t feel like [taking photos]. When I have a camera in my hand I feel like I have a purpose in the world and I really love that feeling. When my profession is to be in front of the camera all the time and to be the focus of everybody’s attention, it is such a relief for me to flip the switch on that. My favourite thing in the world to do is get somewhere new and put a camera in my backpack with a few rolls of film and just go and do it alone.

DT How do you think where you are from influences you? PA I didn’t pay much attention to growing up in Toronto. I mostly wanted to get out of Toronto as quickly as possible and so it’s funny that I’m back here working now. Being in America is very frenetic and there’s this sense that everyone’s fighting to get more, or to get on top,

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DAYTRIP What did you want to be as a kid? Patrick J. Adams [I] Pretty much always wanted to be an actor. I don’t know if it was for the right reasons, in fact, I’m sure it wasn’t for the right reasons. I loved going to the

first. So any time I saw a camera laying around I was just picking it up and playing with it. DT Can you recall the strangest thing you’ve ever photographed?

“It felt like I had a purpose, like I could document it, like even though I maybe wasn’t as vehement as some of these people were, or as involved, or educated, I still felt like I could play a role in it.” movies and I fell in love with theatre the first time I saw it. Photography never really occurred to me as a possible job but it was my favourite hobby without even knowing it. I loved taking pictures, I loved getting the pictures back, and I loved taking more pictures. My good friend Jay Shuster had a lot to do with that too. He went to Ryerson and I came back [from university] and he was telling me everything he was doing at Ryerson and I felt this burning jealousy. He really changed everything ‘cause I always just had a person I could talk shop with. DT Who gave you your first camera or how did you acquire it? PA It would have been a camera that my dad had laying around. My dad’s a journalist and he always had a couple of cameras laying around. I don’t remember what the camera would have actually had been, but I’m sure it was something that I picked up off his desk. It seemed like there was something so peaceful about a great picture and I think the nostalgia of pictures is what really appealed to me at

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PA I was at the Amadou Diallo riots in New York. I was there to audition for NYU and the riots broke out. There was a big group of people amassing and then it started to turn violent. One guy went running and I saw the cops pin him down and all of a sudden the march began. I had this whole series of photos of trash cans on fire and the first guy who got pinned with a planter knocked over. It felt like I had a purpose, like I could document it, like even though I maybe wasn’t as vehement as some of these people were, or as involved, or educated, I still felt like I could play a role in it.

especially in Los Angeles. That can be fun too, but Toronto is still a major city and it has all of those [problems], but there’s something to the people; they seem to be able to have conversations in a way that isn’t about self-aggrandizing. [Canadians are] more relaxed and they move with purpose. A lot of people don’t have that purpose; They pick money and they go for that and that runs out of steam pretty quick. That probably had a pretty profound effect on me growing up and I didn’t realize it. Something I do feel always separated me was a level of calm focus and attention to detail that a lot of people there hadn’t experienced. DT Having grown up in Toronto, moved away, and returned; what is your idea of home now? PA That’s tough. I’m about to get married and being in love changes your sense of what home is. [Troian and I] have also been torn apart. She shoots in LA and I’m [in Toronto] and that’s the way it is

for seven months out of the year. California’s where all of my friends are and all of the work that I’ve done to build a community for myself in the past ten years has been there. DT How has traveling with your work impacted your photography? PA As an actor, I like to shoot a lot of stuff on set so it’s great if I’m shooting in Paris; it’s beautiful. You can steal away for a weekend here or there but if I’m on a really strict schedule of shooting on set I’m pretty tired and I don’t feel like [taking photos]. When I have a camera in my hand I feel like I have a purpose in the world and I really love that feeling. When my profession is to be in front of the camera all the time and to be the focus of everybody’s attention, it is such a relief for me to flip the switch on that. My favourite thing in the world to do is get somewhere new and put a camera in my backpack with a few rolls of film and just go and do it alone.

DT How do you think where you are from influences you? PA I didn’t pay much attention to growing up in Toronto. I mostly wanted to get out of Toronto as quickly as possible and so it’s funny that I’m back here working now. Being in America is very frenetic and there’s this sense that everyone’s fighting to get more, or to get on top,

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DT So would you say that photography has more of an influence on your travelling or vice versa? PA No, travel probably has more of an influence on my photography. I think if it were the other way around I’d be taking very specific trips to places to photograph them and I haven’t really done that yet. DT Tell us about the show you did in Toronto PA I called it “See/Land” because I have a photo of this old mud tire that had “See/ Land” on it and it’s very much what that part of the world is. [My sister] lives on the Queen Charlotte Islands now it’s called Haida Gwaii - with her son, Fisher. She lives this crazy existence out there and it’s kind of normal to me now, it’s normal to our family. [Living in Haida Gwaii is] one of the few things in my life I feel like I want to communicate to people. I have loved going out there over the years. It’s the place I always return to so I have pictures from the first camera I used to the cameras that I use now. I love going back and seeing how much better I’ve become [at photography] and also what new things I can see. [Those photos are] what I did last year for the show and I learned a lot putting that together. DT What’s the age difference between you and your sister? PA [My sister is] six years older. She was an activist for a long time with Greenpeace and got out because she got arrested too many times. 50

DT What’s the first image that comes to mind when we say “Day-Trip” PA A car, because that’s the dream, right? It’s just about being out in a car heading somewhere you don’t know. Especially when it’s a cool group of guys and you all have cameras and it’s like: “What are we gonna find?” DT Have you ever looked at your own Wikipedia page? PA I must have at some point. There was a time when it was really exciting and then all it takes it one thing that says: “Patrick is the poor man’s Aaron Paul” and you’re like, “Ok I’m not reading this” DT Do you have a favourite Camera/Film Combo? PA One of my favourite combos to shoot with is the Polaroid Land Camera with black and white film. [Troian and I] just bought a house in LA before I left last time and we were getting it all ready. It’s always a mess and everything’s in flux and I thought: “how cool is a house that’s in flux?”. So while [Troian] was at work I went around and just shot all the weird piles of mess and things that were in the house. It’ll change soon. It’ll be gone and we won’t remember it because we’ll have gotten it right, so I left all these beautiful little black and white polaroids for her and they’re just gorgeous. DT What’s the story behind “HalfAdams”? PA It was a nickname that a lot of my 51


DT So would you say that photography has more of an influence on your travelling or vice versa? PA No, travel probably has more of an influence on my photography. I think if it were the other way around I’d be taking very specific trips to places to photograph them and I haven’t really done that yet. DT Tell us about the show you did in Toronto PA I called it “See/Land” because I have a photo of this old mud tire that had “See/ Land” on it and it’s very much what that part of the world is. [My sister] lives on the Queen Charlotte Islands now it’s called Haida Gwaii - with her son, Fisher. She lives this crazy existence out there and it’s kind of normal to me now, it’s normal to our family. [Living in Haida Gwaii is] one of the few things in my life I feel like I want to communicate to people. I have loved going out there over the years. It’s the place I always return to so I have pictures from the first camera I used to the cameras that I use now. I love going back and seeing how much better I’ve become [at photography] and also what new things I can see. [Those photos are] what I did last year for the show and I learned a lot putting that together. DT What’s the age difference between you and your sister? PA [My sister is] six years older. She was an activist for a long time with Greenpeace and got out because she got arrested too many times. 50

DT What’s the first image that comes to mind when we say “Day-Trip” PA A car, because that’s the dream, right? It’s just about being out in a car heading somewhere you don’t know. Especially when it’s a cool group of guys and you all have cameras and it’s like: “What are we gonna find?” DT Have you ever looked at your own Wikipedia page? PA I must have at some point. There was a time when it was really exciting and then all it takes it one thing that says: “Patrick is the poor man’s Aaron Paul” and you’re like, “Ok I’m not reading this” DT Do you have a favourite Camera/Film Combo? PA One of my favourite combos to shoot with is the Polaroid Land Camera with black and white film. [Troian and I] just bought a house in LA before I left last time and we were getting it all ready. It’s always a mess and everything’s in flux and I thought: “how cool is a house that’s in flux?”. So while [Troian] was at work I went around and just shot all the weird piles of mess and things that were in the house. It’ll change soon. It’ll be gone and we won’t remember it because we’ll have gotten it right, so I left all these beautiful little black and white polaroids for her and they’re just gorgeous. DT What’s the story behind “HalfAdams”? PA It was a nickname that a lot of my 51


friends called me. I don’t know why they called me HalfAdams, but they did and I really liked it; firstly because my Dad is the creative one in my family and his surname is Adams, and I liked the idea of stating in my own way that whatever is out in the public sphere is not all of me. Truthfully I think the real reason I got the nickname wasn’t something good. I don’t fully know what [the reason] is and there are a couple people that have different stories about it but I like what it has become.

1) Hyde Park Fence , London, 2013 2) Parked, Raray, France, 2014 3) Hearst Column, San Simeon, CA, 2012 4) Maple Leaf, Georgian Bay, Ontario, 2014 5) Otira Viaduct, South Island, New Zealand, 2012 6) Henry and Milligram, Red Hook, NY, 2014 52

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friends called me. I don’t know why they called me HalfAdams, but they did and I really liked it; firstly because my Dad is the creative one in my family and his surname is Adams, and I liked the idea of stating in my own way that whatever is out in the public sphere is not all of me. Truthfully I think the real reason I got the nickname wasn’t something good. I don’t fully know what [the reason] is and there are a couple people that have different stories about it but I like what it has become.

1) Hyde Park Fence , London, 2013 2) Parked, Raray, France, 2014 3) Hearst Column, San Simeon, CA, 2012 4) Maple Leaf, Georgian Bay, Ontario, 2014 5) Otira Viaduct, South Island, New Zealand, 2012 6) Henry and Milligram, Red Hook, NY, 2014 52

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Speaking with Peter Camani was something we could only comprehend after listening back to our recording. To dedicate one’s existence to art, creation, and living a life that will remain a monument forever is an inspiration to aspiring young artists.

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Speaking with Peter Camani was something we could only comprehend after listening back to our recording. To dedicate one’s existence to art, creation, and living a life that will remain a monument forever is an inspiration to aspiring young artists.

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DT How do you build the heads? PC [The heads are] all made separately by making a plastic wire form. They are done on the ground and then a crane comes and lifts them up. So in this particular instance I did them in two sessions. I did the inner eye first, stood everything up, and then the outer ring I did that next season, and then stood them up.

DAYTRIP How does where you grew up influence your work? Peter Camani I was raised on the beach strip under the Skyway Bridge in Burlington. CIL Stucco, Dofasco - the fumes would come across the beach, especially at that time the particles would be all over the place, so I decided that when I went to University to leave Hamilton and head North. Basically the opportunity for a teaching job arose. I went to the University of Waterloo and to Althouse at Western University for my teaching certification. The ad was in the paper, there was a job in South River. I came up for the interview and got the job DT How did you find your property? PC This area at that time was basically considered isolated and that was forty years ago, 1973. And so I came up and I had this intention of building structures. But like everything else there was no 74

money. I lived in a tar paper shack for 8 years and then in 1981 this piece of property became available. DT When did you start building the screaming heads? PC Robin Hood was being filmed with [Kevin] Costner. The local area thought this was a castle, so the local newspaper wanted to do an article. When that article was done, Wayne Rostad wanted to do an interview for On The Road Again. I only had the tower done, so we had the interview in the centre of it but I wanted to get some of what I considered art onto the field. I made the claw on the far side of the wall - I made the claw [especially] for the interview. [Then I could] iron out all the difficulties of using cement and getting a crane [onto the property]. I put the first [sculpture] on the field in 1985 and there are 84 on the field now. There are 27 in this particular spot and if you look from the air, [this area] forms an eye.

DT And why the screaming heads? PC One of the reasons for the screaming heads is that a lot of us like to protest things, but we feel that we’re not. Nothing will get done, we can stand up and rave, we can march up and down the street; if the politician decides what’s on their agenda it’s very hard to sway them which way to go. So here I mean, in a sense, it’s like a protest, a screaming, it’s irony. Complete conflict. I mean they’re all screaming but there’s no sound. I’m away from everything, I still think on the far field, you will notice the screaming heads. They are with hands and when I first came here the hills were just rolling and in the winter time they struck me as waves. So what I did was put heads with hands coming out the side as if they were in an ocean. And they were still survivors, still screaming trying to be rescued or saved. DT What did you want to be when you were a kid? PC My family was not into art at all. In high

school they wouldn’t allow me to take art, they stuck me in music, which I was not very good at. I worked for a Veterinarian and I was all programmed to go to [University of] Guelph. But the vet that I worked with passed away, and there was a mail strike and Guelph did not send an acceptance but Waterloo did. I’d been painting and doing my own artwork since my teens and it was just houses and water, typical things that you paint, so I decided at Waterloo to take electives in art, and from that [I got] into more different types of media, printing, and various other things. I went into teaching with a double major in art and science. [The school] also wanted a cross country coach – I had run in the 1975 Olympic Trials in the marathon – so I fit all three of their categories. I was actually quite a different person. DT Has anyone you taught over the past gone on to do anything notable? Do you keep in touch with any of them at this point? PC A lot of people did leave the area and it’s surprising how many people have achieved international fame. That’s one of the reasons we started the movie. A lot of the students that wanted to go places would go to the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and get certified in the arts, or motion picture. They would get out, and [employers] would say, “Once you get experience, come back.” So we started the movie which actually gave [the students] a chance to work on jobs, but also they wouldn’t have to drop any job that they did get. One fellow, Dallas Boyes, is working right now. He’s got a job up in

“It’s surprising, the bigger I get it seems the more I am doing custodial things than actually creating” 75


DT How do you build the heads? PC [The heads are] all made separately by making a plastic wire form. They are done on the ground and then a crane comes and lifts them up. So in this particular instance I did them in two sessions. I did the inner eye first, stood everything up, and then the outer ring I did that next season, and then stood them up.

DAYTRIP How does where you grew up influence your work? Peter Camani I was raised on the beach strip under the Skyway Bridge in Burlington. CIL Stucco, Dofasco - the fumes would come across the beach, especially at that time the particles would be all over the place, so I decided that when I went to University to leave Hamilton and head North. Basically the opportunity for a teaching job arose. I went to the University of Waterloo and to Althouse at Western University for my teaching certification. The ad was in the paper, there was a job in South River. I came up for the interview and got the job DT How did you find your property? PC This area at that time was basically considered isolated and that was forty years ago, 1973. And so I came up and I had this intention of building structures. But like everything else there was no 74

money. I lived in a tar paper shack for 8 years and then in 1981 this piece of property became available. DT When did you start building the screaming heads? PC Robin Hood was being filmed with [Kevin] Costner. The local area thought this was a castle, so the local newspaper wanted to do an article. When that article was done, Wayne Rostad wanted to do an interview for On The Road Again. I only had the tower done, so we had the interview in the centre of it but I wanted to get some of what I considered art onto the field. I made the claw on the far side of the wall - I made the claw [especially] for the interview. [Then I could] iron out all the difficulties of using cement and getting a crane [onto the property]. I put the first [sculpture] on the field in 1985 and there are 84 on the field now. There are 27 in this particular spot and if you look from the air, [this area] forms an eye.

DT And why the screaming heads? PC One of the reasons for the screaming heads is that a lot of us like to protest things, but we feel that we’re not. Nothing will get done, we can stand up and rave, we can march up and down the street; if the politician decides what’s on their agenda it’s very hard to sway them which way to go. So here I mean, in a sense, it’s like a protest, a screaming, it’s irony. Complete conflict. I mean they’re all screaming but there’s no sound. I’m away from everything, I still think on the far field, you will notice the screaming heads. They are with hands and when I first came here the hills were just rolling and in the winter time they struck me as waves. So what I did was put heads with hands coming out the side as if they were in an ocean. And they were still survivors, still screaming trying to be rescued or saved. DT What did you want to be when you were a kid? PC My family was not into art at all. In high

school they wouldn’t allow me to take art, they stuck me in music, which I was not very good at. I worked for a Veterinarian and I was all programmed to go to [University of] Guelph. But the vet that I worked with passed away, and there was a mail strike and Guelph did not send an acceptance but Waterloo did. I’d been painting and doing my own artwork since my teens and it was just houses and water, typical things that you paint, so I decided at Waterloo to take electives in art, and from that [I got] into more different types of media, printing, and various other things. I went into teaching with a double major in art and science. [The school] also wanted a cross country coach – I had run in the 1975 Olympic Trials in the marathon – so I fit all three of their categories. I was actually quite a different person. DT Has anyone you taught over the past gone on to do anything notable? Do you keep in touch with any of them at this point? PC A lot of people did leave the area and it’s surprising how many people have achieved international fame. That’s one of the reasons we started the movie. A lot of the students that wanted to go places would go to the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and get certified in the arts, or motion picture. They would get out, and [employers] would say, “Once you get experience, come back.” So we started the movie which actually gave [the students] a chance to work on jobs, but also they wouldn’t have to drop any job that they did get. One fellow, Dallas Boyes, is working right now. He’s got a job up in

“It’s surprising, the bigger I get it seems the more I am doing custodial things than actually creating” 75


the Arctic doing these gold mining reality TV shows – he’s one of the sound men. That’s one of the reasons why we’re not editing on the movie right now. DT It sounds like there’s a lot going on. Are you still able to produce new work? PC It’s surprising, the bigger I get it seems the more I am doing custodial things than actually creating. The place is getting more, and more, and more, people through it. Plus the people want you as a tour guide, and that’s actually one of the reasons this place is open. I don’t mind it being open, but I don’t want to be locked in. So people say, “Well what hours?”. I don’t have hours. It does not bother me, as long as you’re not disturbing me you can come and wander around all you like. I think of us as custodians; you don’t OWN property even if you think you do. DT Did the context of the work that you’re doing here and throughout your life develop before or after the work itself? PC I like the idea of monoliths and I like the idea of the cement mainly because it’s so cheap. If you did something in brass, or bronze, or whatever, it’s vulnerable. [If] somebody wants the metal it can be melted down. There is no use for a cement structure, other than what it is. It’s not valuable; you’re going to be able to grind it down and make more cement from it, if you move it you have to place it somewhere. It’s going to take you more energy to do that then just to leave it where it is. And that’s basically why I use cement. DT How exactly do you make the heads?

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PC At one point [I] had thought about making a form and trying to pour the cement from the top - the pressure at the bottom would be so immense. So then suddenly one night I got a eureka moment and said, “well why not just make it on the ground, and get it craned in?” The crane costs about 1000 bucks a day but it can stand up 15 heads in one day. Less than 100 bucks just to stand them up, and besides that, you have a crane operator who is certified. Because I’m so safety conscious it’s always good to work with an expert. There’s a small head over on the far side [of the field] I was trying to put up with my backhoe. Some tourist came running from the side, leans under the head, and was attempting to push up a 14 tonne piece of concrete. My brakes aren’t necessarily very good on the tractor. I’m trying to push it up and screaming and screaming [for him] to move. If the head had come down, he would’ve be there forever. DT Have you had anybody mix their ashes in with the concrete as you mention on your website? PC There’s Justin who is the light stand - he’s down there on the corner [of the field], and DeSean’s we’re in the process of doing. [DeSean is] the one with the disc golf. If you look at some of the disc golf white ones, like the actual cages, the white ones, you’ll notice there are sayings all over them. He was a man of many words, well actually few words but he always had that little snap. I’m going to make the actual tower, he liked cardinals so we will put a cardinal in there; we’ll put the quotations in there and it will represent him well. Plus it will be the light stand over the dock. So he will light the way across the water. 77


the Arctic doing these gold mining reality TV shows – he’s one of the sound men. That’s one of the reasons why we’re not editing on the movie right now. DT It sounds like there’s a lot going on. Are you still able to produce new work? PC It’s surprising, the bigger I get it seems the more I am doing custodial things than actually creating. The place is getting more, and more, and more, people through it. Plus the people want you as a tour guide, and that’s actually one of the reasons this place is open. I don’t mind it being open, but I don’t want to be locked in. So people say, “Well what hours?”. I don’t have hours. It does not bother me, as long as you’re not disturbing me you can come and wander around all you like. I think of us as custodians; you don’t OWN property even if you think you do. DT Did the context of the work that you’re doing here and throughout your life develop before or after the work itself? PC I like the idea of monoliths and I like the idea of the cement mainly because it’s so cheap. If you did something in brass, or bronze, or whatever, it’s vulnerable. [If] somebody wants the metal it can be melted down. There is no use for a cement structure, other than what it is. It’s not valuable; you’re going to be able to grind it down and make more cement from it, if you move it you have to place it somewhere. It’s going to take you more energy to do that then just to leave it where it is. And that’s basically why I use cement. DT How exactly do you make the heads?

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PC At one point [I] had thought about making a form and trying to pour the cement from the top - the pressure at the bottom would be so immense. So then suddenly one night I got a eureka moment and said, “well why not just make it on the ground, and get it craned in?” The crane costs about 1000 bucks a day but it can stand up 15 heads in one day. Less than 100 bucks just to stand them up, and besides that, you have a crane operator who is certified. Because I’m so safety conscious it’s always good to work with an expert. There’s a small head over on the far side [of the field] I was trying to put up with my backhoe. Some tourist came running from the side, leans under the head, and was attempting to push up a 14 tonne piece of concrete. My brakes aren’t necessarily very good on the tractor. I’m trying to push it up and screaming and screaming [for him] to move. If the head had come down, he would’ve be there forever. DT Have you had anybody mix their ashes in with the concrete as you mention on your website? PC There’s Justin who is the light stand - he’s down there on the corner [of the field], and DeSean’s we’re in the process of doing. [DeSean is] the one with the disc golf. If you look at some of the disc golf white ones, like the actual cages, the white ones, you’ll notice there are sayings all over them. He was a man of many words, well actually few words but he always had that little snap. I’m going to make the actual tower, he liked cardinals so we will put a cardinal in there; we’ll put the quotations in there and it will represent him well. Plus it will be the light stand over the dock. So he will light the way across the water. 77


DT Do you have anything planned for yourself, if that’s not too personal? PC Once I go, I go. It doesn’t matter, that’s the whole thing, I have no belief past death. I think you’re born and you die, and the trouble is there are many many paths in between. You can sit and watch television, watch all the soccer; you can eat, and eat, and eat; you can even run and run and run. It doesn’t matter what you do, time is going by. DT How did you like teaching? PC You can only do so much. The pressure was really on when I was teaching. When you’re teaching, that’s the thing that comes first. Everything else was second, and with me, personal stuff came last. I sometimes wonder if I’ve actually missed that whole thing, but at this age I don’t think I did. But if I was going to have a family, I think it should have been started much earlier than so-called “66”, I have a number of students I try and pay attention to. So I mean, in a sense, they’re adopted children, in the sense that they even attempt to send me things on fathers day. It’s not really the way you want to look at things but it’s kinda cute. Anyway...

posts, gas stations, and restaurants were gone. So at night, there are no gas station open between Huntsville and North Bay; there are day gas stations, but not night gas stations on the highways as there used to be. There are information booths in Emsdale, and in Burks Falls. They employ people and those people want to tell [tourists] where to go. DT Would you consider the peacocks to be part of the work itself? PC The peacocks are one of my nuisances, I mean, I am concerned about them but as soon as I get chicks, I try to give them away – although I do like the mothers taking care of them. I get complaints about [the peacocks] on the side of the road, and these two that have gone rogue. That one that’s in Burks Falls is a three year old, so for three years it’s lived on its own, in parallel with me. But I’m not there to protect it from foxes at night, I’m not there to protect the nest from raccoons. Although I do try to live-trap the raccoons and move them out. There is a responsibility to give them as much assistance as possible. But this bird is a rogue, it did the same thing last year – it took off at the same time last year. Wandering away...

DT What were tourists’ reactions to the screaming heads? PC I try not to encourage, if they want to come out they come out. Here a lot of property is actually up for sale. The highway actually, this place here, was only intended for my home, OK? That’s the only reason I was doing it. When they built the new highway all the trading 78

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DT Do you have anything planned for yourself, if that’s not too personal? PC Once I go, I go. It doesn’t matter, that’s the whole thing, I have no belief past death. I think you’re born and you die, and the trouble is there are many many paths in between. You can sit and watch television, watch all the soccer; you can eat, and eat, and eat; you can even run and run and run. It doesn’t matter what you do, time is going by. DT How did you like teaching? PC You can only do so much. The pressure was really on when I was teaching. When you’re teaching, that’s the thing that comes first. Everything else was second, and with me, personal stuff came last. I sometimes wonder if I’ve actually missed that whole thing, but at this age I don’t think I did. But if I was going to have a family, I think it should have been started much earlier than so-called “66”, I have a number of students I try and pay attention to. So I mean, in a sense, they’re adopted children, in the sense that they even attempt to send me things on fathers day. It’s not really the way you want to look at things but it’s kinda cute. Anyway...

posts, gas stations, and restaurants were gone. So at night, there are no gas station open between Huntsville and North Bay; there are day gas stations, but not night gas stations on the highways as there used to be. There are information booths in Emsdale, and in Burks Falls. They employ people and those people want to tell [tourists] where to go. DT Would you consider the peacocks to be part of the work itself? PC The peacocks are one of my nuisances, I mean, I am concerned about them but as soon as I get chicks, I try to give them away – although I do like the mothers taking care of them. I get complaints about [the peacocks] on the side of the road, and these two that have gone rogue. That one that’s in Burks Falls is a three year old, so for three years it’s lived on its own, in parallel with me. But I’m not there to protect it from foxes at night, I’m not there to protect the nest from raccoons. Although I do try to live-trap the raccoons and move them out. There is a responsibility to give them as much assistance as possible. But this bird is a rogue, it did the same thing last year – it took off at the same time last year. Wandering away...

DT What were tourists’ reactions to the screaming heads? PC I try not to encourage, if they want to come out they come out. Here a lot of property is actually up for sale. The highway actually, this place here, was only intended for my home, OK? That’s the only reason I was doing it. When they built the new highway all the trading 78

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DAYTRIP

Matthew Volpe - Erich DeLeeuw - Andrew Savery-Whiteway Claire Harvie - Ben O’Neil

DAYTRIP is a collective that strives to flesh out the subtleties of Canadian culture through art, travel and discussions with artists from this great country. Issue 1 highlights a trip from Toronto, Ontario to Burks Falls, Ontario with ample discourse along the way. Thank you for coming along on the ride with us.

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DAYTRIP

Matthew Volpe - Erich DeLeeuw - Andrew Savery-Whiteway Claire Harvie - Ben O’Neil

DAYTRIP is a collective that strives to flesh out the subtleties of Canadian culture through art, travel and discussions with artists from this great country. Issue 1 highlights a trip from Toronto, Ontario to Burks Falls, Ontario with ample discourse along the way. Thank you for coming along on the ride with us.

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Thank you To our families and friends for their continued support and love.

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Thank you To our families and friends for their continued support and love.

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© DAYTRIP, 2014 day-trip.ca 126

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© DAYTRIP, 2014 day-trip.ca 126

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Profile for DAYTRIP MAGAZINE

Daytrip Magazine Issue No.1: Burks Falls  

Featuring Patrick J. Adams and Peter Camani ISSN 2368-4240

Daytrip Magazine Issue No.1: Burks Falls  

Featuring Patrick J. Adams and Peter Camani ISSN 2368-4240

Profile for day-trip
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