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Davis College 2012–2014 Academic Catalog

It's All About Where You're Going.


Davis College 4747 Monroe Street Toledo, OH 43623 419.473.2700 800.477.7021 learn@daviscollege.edu www.daviscollege.edu


Contents Accreditations 

1

President’s Message 

1

Davis College Mission

2

General Education Core 

2

Business Core 

2

History 

2

Admissions Requirements and Procedures  3 Student Services 

4

Financing Your Education 

5

Davis College Foundation 

6

Davis College Alumni Association 

7

Programs of Study 

11

Department of General Education 

15

Department of Administrative and Allied  17 Health Professionals Department of Business Administration  and Technology

31

Department of Design 

54

Workforce Development, Personal Enrichment Courses and Business Training

68

Course Descriptions 

70

Directory 

91

Organization Ownership 

94

Davis College Board of Directors 

94

Advisory Committees 

94

Davis College Memberships 

96

Staff and Faculty Memberships 

96

Glossary 

97

2012 – 2014 Academic Calendar 

98

Map and Directions 

100


Office, US Department of Education, 600 Superior Ave East, Ste 750, Cleveland, Ohio 44114-2611, 216-522-4970-phone, 216-522-2573-fax, 216-5224944-TDD, OCR.cleveland@ed.gov.

Accreditations and Approvals Davis College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association (NCA).

Davis College is incorporated in the State of Ohio.

The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association may be contacted at (312) 263-0456 or (800) 621-7440 Fax: (312) 263-7462 Web: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org. The Higher Learning Commission is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

The Catalog Supplement, the Student Planner and Handbook, and the Allied Health Policy Manual (medical assisting students only) are essential components of this Academic Catalog.

In 2009, The Ohio Board of Regents authorized the Davis College programs.

Davis College 2012-2014 Academic Catalog Published June 2012

Davis College is recognized by the State Board of Career Colleges and Schools (State of Ohio Certificate of Registration No. 81-02-0731B), 30 East Broad Street, 24th Floor, Suite 2481, Columbus, OH 43215.

President’s Message When people walk through our doors and commit themselves to success, great things happen. Time and again, the power of increasing knowledge, skills, confidence, and the power of gaining a valuable education have changed students beyond their own expectations. We have served many of your grandparents, aunts, uncles, sons, and daughters of Toledo since even before the Civil War in this effort. We are proud of our tradition in providing this valuable service to our local community.

The Davis College Medical Assisting Associate Degree program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756 (727) 210-2350.

Our dedicated faculty and staff are committed to excellence. We exist to provide you with marketable skills. This clear focus allows us to serve you in a unique way. In fact, less than 5% of schools like ours have achieved the same accreditation* and quality standards as Davis College.

Davis College is approved for the training of eligible veterans. Education (GI Bill): 1-888-442-4551. Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities by Title IX recipients of federal financial assistance. Davis College embraces the requirements of federal, state, and local laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, disability, genetic information, marital status, amnesty, or status as a covered veteran in its educational programs and activities nor in the recruitment, selection, and subsequent treatment of students and/or employees. In accordance with Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (P.L. 93 – 112), interested persons can obtain information with respect to the existence of location of services, activities, and facilities that are accessible to and usable by physically challenged persons. Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX and its implementing regulations or equal opportunity may contact: Jane Mullikin, Title IX Coordinator, Davis College, 4747 Monroe Street, Toledo, Ohio 43623, 419-473-2700, jmullikin@daviscollege. edu or The Office for Civil Rights, Cleveland

I personally welcome you to the tradition of success at Davis College and to the excitement of fulfilling and exceeding your own expectations. It truly is all about where you’re going.

Diane Brunner President *Davis College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association (NCA). Phone: (312) 263-0456, Web site:www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org.

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General Information

Davis College is located at 4747 Monroe Street on a one-acre campus in an exciting, growing, urban area of Toledo.


provide the educational programs, services, environment, resources, and knowledge to assure its attainment.

Davis College Mission Davis College, a private, two-year institution of higher education, serves our community by offering quality educational programs and services that meet the ever-changing demands of business. Our mission is to provide marketable skills that enhance the employability of our graduates.

History In 1881, Matthew H. Davis left his chairmanship in the mathematics department and his position as director of the business department at Albert College, Belleville, Ontario, to accept the management of Toledo Business College. The small school of 35 students, which had been established in 1858, rapidly grew to 350 students.

To assure the realization of our mission, the following educational purposes, in addition to our program objectives, have been established.

General Education Core

During the 23 years Davis directed the school, four other schools were absorbed, and the name was changed to Davis Business College. The curriculum was gradually changed from Latin, German, Greek, calculus, and epistolary writing to banking, mercantile trades, shorthand, and typing.

The General Education Core is an integral part of each associate degree program at Davis College. The purpose of the General Education Core is to impart common knowledge, cultivate critical thinking, and develop values needed by every educated person. To this end, the General Education Core provides a foundation for comprehensive, life-long learning and will enable a graduate to:

After Davis’ death in 1904, his son, Thurber P. Davis, left the University of Michigan to take over the management of Davis Business College. Under the leadership of the younger Davis, electric typewriters were added, making the College one of the best equipped in the United States. Stenotype and data processing augmented the expanding curriculum.

•Read and listen critically with understanding. •Write and speak clearly and effectively in standard English. •Apply critical thinking, abstract reasoning skills, and problem-solving methods. •Describe the influences of cultural diversity.

In 1948, when Thurber became ill, his daughter, Ruth L. Davis, became the third generation of the Davis family to lead the school. In 1953, Davis Business College was among the first to be accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Business Schools. In 1964, the institution met commission requirements for a junior college of business. Office management, payroll accounting, and the Automation Institute were added to meet the growing needs of business and technology.

•Locate, gather, process, and use information.

Business Core The Business Core reflects the College’s commitment to meeting the demands of the business community we serve and is an essential part of each associate degree program and promoted in all programs. The purpose of the Business Core is to develop character, teamwork, and professionalism, all 21st century skills, valued by employers. To this end, the Business Core will enable a Davis College graduate to:

In 1983, John Lambert became President of Davis College. President Lambert expanded the curriculum to include allied health, aviation, computer, and graphic design programs, which doubled the College’s enrollment. In 1986, Davis met the requirements for accreditation by the American Association of Medical Assistants. In 1991, Davis College was granted accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.

•Demonstrate professional behavior. •Interact effectively with others. •Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations, functions, and practices of business. •Utilize computer technology. •Develop effective job search skills and employment documentation.

In 1993, Diane Brunner became the fifth president of Davis College. At the time of her appointment, she was the youngest female college president in Ohio. In 2002, Davis College hosted its first student conference, bringing nationally renowned authors to the institution. In 2008, the

The Davis College faculty, staff, and administration are committed to the mission and purposes of the College and, to this end, are committed to

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College was honored as one of Ohio’s best employers by the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. Davis College also earned the Better Business Bureau® Torch Award for marketplace ethics.

Schedule an appointment by phone or email to meet with an admissions representative. The admissions representative will assist you in your program selection, career goal setting, and other areas beneficial to your success.

As was true of all past Davis College leadership, President Brunner is dedicated to the promotion of higher educational standards and continuing the College’s service to the community.

Successfully complete the College entrance evaluation – CPAt. The minimum score for full acceptance in most programs is 130. Exception is made in the following programs: Medical Assisting (AAS) students are enrolled on a conditional basis at the time of admission. Upon successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment, students will be granted full admission into the program.

Admissions Requirements and Procedures It is a privilege to welcome to Davis College people who are ready to increase their knowledge, skills, and confidence and who understand the importance of gaining a valuable education.

Accounting (Diploma) students need a combined score of 116 or higher in Reading and Math on the CPAt.

Starting Dates of the Quarters Students may begin their education in any quarter.

Computer Forensics (Diploma) students need a combined score of 110 or higher in Language usage and Reading on the CPAt.

2012-2013 Academic Year Wednesday, August 22–November 2, 2012 Winter Quarter Monday, November 12, 2012–February 8, 2013

Complete the Application for Admission and submit the application fee.

Spring Quarter

Schedule a financial aid appointment if desired.

Tuesday, February 19–May 3, 2013

Meet with your academic advisor to schedule your first quarter classes. Students meet with an academic advisor for scheduling before orientation and for monitoring academic progress.

Summer Quarter Monday, May 13–July 19, 2013

Attend new student orientation. An orientation program is held for new students prior to their first quarter. During orientation, students will meet with various school leaders, including academic advisors, to answer questions and to finalize the enrollment process.

2013–2014 Academic Year Fall Quarter Wednesday, August 28–November 8, 2013 Winter Quarter Monday, November 18, 2013–February 14, 2014

Admissions Requirements

Spring Quarter

Applicants who have completed high school graduation requirements or have successfully completed the General Education Development Test (GED) and have successfully completed the other admissions requirements of the College are eligible to apply for admission. Formal acceptance to Davis College will be determined once verification of successful completion of high school or GED requirements has been obtained.

Monday, February 24–May 9, 2014 Summer Quarter Monday, May 19–July 25, 2014 2014–2015 Academic Year Fall Quarter Wednesday, August 27–November 7, 2014

GED Testing

Applying for Admissions

If you desire to attend Davis College but need your GED, please call or email admissions for more information.

Information on all Davis College programs can be seen on our website at www.daviscollege.edu. You can also check for information about Davis College on Facebook.

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General Information

Software Applications Professional (Diploma) students need a combined score of 110 or higher in Language usage and Reading on the CPAt.

Fall Quarter


higher in the first 12 credit hours completed at Davis College before credits can be transferred. If the student does not meet this criterion, credits will not be transferred.

Transfer to Davis College Students seeking credit for work completed at other colleges will need to request that official transcripts from each college attended be mailed directly from that college to Davis College. The student is responsible for requesting this official transcript; it is highly recommended that the transcript be received before the first quarter of attendance begins. Transcripts from other institutions become part of the student’s permanent academic file and cannot be copied for distribution.

•Credits may be accepted only upon the recommendation of the specific department in which the course work is offered. •Before credit is awarded, previous course work may be subject to validation by the department. Transferability of Credit

The Registrar will evaluate each transcript and determine the total number of credit hours which may be transferred. The Registrar may elect to accept general education courses which are not offered by Davis. The maximum number of credit hours transferred cannot exceed 50% of the total credit hours required in the program or 50% of the hours required in the major. At least one half of the credit hours required for an associate degree or diploma are required to be earned at Davis. In addition, the final 12 credit hours are required to be earned at Davis College. Additional information concerning this policy is available from the Registrar. Transferred credits will be counted as earned hours only and will not be calculated in the student’s grade point average.

The acceptability of credits by other institutions is solely the decision of the accepting institution. However, the College does maintain articulation agreements with several local colleges in the Toledo area. Most importantly, as an institution accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association, other regionally accredited schools will evaluate Davis College credits. Davis College makes no representations as to the acceptability of Davis College credits at other institutions. Tuition and Fees Tuition and fee charges are due and payable on or before the first day of each new quarter. See the Catalog Supplement for complete description of fees. Tuition and fees are subject to change without notice. Students pay the same tuition and fees regardless of the state in which they reside.

Students with previous training or experience may be granted advanced standing upon proof of ability.

Student Body

Transfer Policy for Regionally Accredited Schools

The student population at Davis College is diverse and dynamic. Ages of students range from 18-60, and the average age of the Davis College student is 32. Students attend class on a full- or part-time basis, day and/or evening, four days a week or less. Seventy-five percent of our students are working and 63% are raising children. One hundred percent are committed to learning marketable skills.

•Credits earned at regionally accredited institutions are honored provided they are included in the Davis program for which the student has enrolled and a minimum grade of “C” has been received. •Credit may be awarded as course equivalent credit. •Credit for coursework which has no Davis College equivalent may be awarded as elective credit with a XXX000 course number (e.g., HUM000, Humanities elective).

Student Services Career Services

•Coursework in the major technology (technical areas) may be subject to validation by department faculty.

One of the outstanding benefits of the College is the career services assistance which is available to students without additional cost. The mission of the Career Services Office is to provide recent graduates support in obtaining a job after college commensurate with their academic preparation, capabilities, and personal goals. The Career Services Office is the graduates’ link to the business community. Assistance in resume writing strategies, career portfolio development, job search, and networking is available to students. Although securing of positions cannot be guar-

Transfer Policy for Non-Regionally Accredited Schools •Transfers from technical colleges, business colleges, and other schools lacking regional accreditation but having accreditation by another agency recognized by the Department of Education are evaluated as follows: •The student is required to earn a GPA of 2.00 or

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anteed, every effort is made to assist students with obtaining desirable employment. The Career Services Office is interested in every student’s employment success. We encourage students to utilize this beneficial service.

Direct Title IV Funding All federal financial aid is subject to change by Congressional decisions. Student aid is conditional providing the recipient is eligible and maintains satisfactory academic progress including grade point average, completion of courses attempted, and attendance in courses. A student is required to attend a minimum of six credit hours each quarter to be eligible for the financial aid loan programs.

Counseling A professional counselor is available to our students for personal concerns. Please call Nick Nigro at 419-473-2700 extension 143 or email at nnigro@daviscollege.edu. Additionally, your academic advisor, department chairperson, and the Vice President of Academic Affairs are available for academic counseling.

Davis College is accredited and approved by the Department of Education to participate in federal financial aid programs.

Student Activities

The following financial aid programs are available to eligible students at Davis:

To benefit the most from campus life and to get connected professionally, students are encouraged to develop and participate in the activities sponsored by the College. Students are invited to participate in professional organizations such as Business Professionals of America (BPA), International Interior Designers Association (IIDA), American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), Graphic Design Student Group (GDSG), American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA), or Davis College Allied Health Organization (DCAHO).

Federal Pell Grant

Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) The OCOG grant is sponsored by the State of Ohio for Ohio residents. This grant is limited to students who have no previous attendance at a college or university. It is available to full-time, three-quarter, half-time and below half-time students. The amount of the grant is based on financial need and is not repayable by the recipient except under certain conditions of withdrawal.

Financing Your Education Financing your education is the most important investment you make in the preparation of your career. The five forms of financing your education are: 1. Student Self-Help (Personal resources)

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

2. Parental Assistance (Parental resources) 3. Financial Aid Programs (Described below)

This is a grant administered by the College and provides assistance to students with exceptional financial need. The grant varies in amount but is not to exceed 50% of the total amount of the student aid made available through the College.

4. Davis College Plan (Interest-free payment plans) 5. Employee Reimbursement (Check with your employer’s human resource department)

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program

Applying for Financial Aid To begin the process for applying for financial aid, a student will meet with the Davis College Financial Aid Office and fill out and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). To expedite the process and apply online, you will need to request a PIN number beforehand at www.pin.ed.gov. Please be sure to include the Davis College Federal School Code which is 004855 under the “schools you wish to receive your financial aid information”. Next, you will fill out the application by visiting www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Subsidized Stafford Loans These loans are made by the Department of Education. While the student is in college, the federal government pays the full interest; after separation from college, the student assumes repayment and the full annual interest on the loan. Under this program a dependent student may be able to borrow $3,500 each academic year; independent students may also be able to borrow up to

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General Information

The Pell Grant is sponsored by the federal government, and applications are available from the Financial Aid Office at Davis. It is available to full-time, three-quarter-time, and half-time students. The amount of the Pell Grant varies depending on financial need and is not repayable by the recipient except under certain conditions of a withdrawal.


$3,500. The second-year Stafford Loan may be up to $4,500. Students or parents of students need to complete a needs test form. Stafford Loans have a fixed interest rate not to exceed 8.25%. When the family income is over $30,000, the amount of the loan may be reduced. Repayment on this loan begins six (6) months after graduation, withdrawal from school, or if a student attends less than six credit hours.

1. Veterans: Form 22-1990 and certified copy of separation papers (Form DD-214). Veterans who have received VA benefits before must file a Request for Change of Program or Place of Training (Form 22-1995). 2. Widows and wives of 100 percent disabled veterans: Form 22-5490. 3. War orphans: Form 22-5490. These forms may be obtained from your VA office or the College. The College will be happy to assist you in completing the forms. Benefits will usually be received approximately 60 days after the academic quarter begins if the student has obtained a certificate of eligibility when he/she enters. For further information, contact the school’s Veterans Benefits Coordinator.

Unsubsidized Stafford Loans Dependent students are eligible for a maximum amount per academic year of $2,000; independent students are eligible for a maximum amount per academic year of $6,000. Unsubsidized loans have a fixed interest rate not to exceed 8.25%. Repayment begins six (6) months after graduation, withdrawal from school, or if a student attends less than six credit hours. This loan can be in addition to the Subsidized Stafford Loan.

Davis Plan Davis College offers cash payment options with no interest to help students finance their education. Please visit the Business Office for more details.

Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

Other Programs

Parents of students may borrow up to the cost of education minus any other financial aid per year for each student who is a dependent undergraduate attending at least six credit hours. The interest rate for this loan is fixed with a cap at 9%. The borrower needs to begin repaying a PLUS loan within 60 days of the final check disbursed to the school for a loan period.

The following specialized programs are also available: Ohio National Guard Scholarship program; UPS Earn and Learn Program; Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation; Bureau of Indian Affairs; Department of Job and Family Services; Lucas County Workforce Development Agency; and Union Education Trust. Funding through these agencies is limited. Apply to the agency as early as you can. Also local service clubs, businesses, churches, and community groups may offer some assistance.

Federal Perkins Loan Based on need and a minimum of attending six credit hours per quarter, this federal program provides loans with no repayment while the student is in college. Payment on this loan begins six (6) months after graduating or withdrawing from school at an interest rate of 5%.

Davis College Foundation The Davis College Foundation is a not-for-profit entity dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals and organizations to provide resources that enhance the education of Davis College students. Equipment donations and scholarship donations are welcome. Contact the Davis College Foundation by calling 419.473.2700.

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) The college is authorized to provide on- and/ or off-campus employment to assist students whose applications for financial aid show need. Students work a maximum of 20 hours a week with the possibility for full-time employment during vacation. Employment under this program is dependent on federal funds and requires minimum attendance of six credit hours per quarter. Priority is given to the student with the greatest demonstrated need.

We thank the following for donations since the printing of the last Catalog: Akam Enterprises, The Andersons, Angela Barney, Barry Bagels, Bell Tire, BNI, Lana Boardman, Carmen Borton, William Bostleman, Marilyn Bovia, Marv Bovia, Peggy Bovia, Rolland Bovia, Tim and Diane Brunner, Buckeye Cablevision, Tom and Mary Ryan Bulone, Kevin and Kathleen Carmony, Carpets by Otto, Certified Network Program of Ohio, James Christian, Clear Channel, COPECO, Merl Creps, Mary Deloe, Tony Desch, Terry Dippman, Sandra Ellis, The Employers’ Association, Mike Epps, Nicole Fansler, John

Veterans Administration Benefits Veterans, widows, wives of disabled veterans, and war orphans may be eligible for education benefits. The necessary Veterans Administration (VA) forms can be obtained and completed at the College. The VA student enrolling should submit the following:

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and Kathleen France, Tia Gayten, Dave Gedman, Steve Gochik, Erin Gomez, Melissa Goodman, Marcia Grossman, Fred Hall, Scott Hartman, Barb Helmlinger, Bev Helmlinger, Lynn Hoover, Gary Jacobson, Rhea Jagodzinski, Mary Ann Jan, JCI Group, Jennite Company, Kangaroos Child Care, Gwen Kauffman, Key Bank, Marsha Klingbeil, Melissa Kosinski, Jack Lamborn, Susie and TJ Lewis, Jeremy Lord, Linda Maatta, Marco’s Pizza, Maumee Valley Heating and Air Conditioning, Dan McCarthy, McClintock & Associates, The McCombs, Barb McCormick, Tom McCullogh, McGraw-Hill, Joan McVicker, John Meyer, Morgan Service, Jane Mullikin, Michael Mundwiler, Steve Nathanson, Casey Newham, Kurt Nielsen, Nick Nigro, OBTA, Shawn Orr, Debby Papay and Brian Carder, Kelly Parker, Deb Pfaff-Wilder, Steve Phillips, Dean and Nancy Powers, Sandra Price, Belinda Quinn, Greg and Georgene Rippke, Pauline Rower, Amanda Ryan, Bill and Vicky Ryan, Ryan Family Farm, George Sares, Sean Savage, Savage and Associates, Carolyn Scharer, Dave Schuck, Dr Kenneth and Joyce Searfoss, Peggy Seniuk, Ann Sheidler, Richard Shock, Smitty and Donna Smith, Cheryl Staab, Greg Stehlin, Dana Stern, Robert Stutz, Suburban Aviation, Superior Uniform Sales, Jeff Tate, Robert Textor, Chris Theodorou, Spiros Theodorou, Tim Hortons, Toledo Sign, Tony Weber, Angela Wingerd, and WTOL Channel 11.

Management degree with a cumulative GPA of 4.0. Recognizing the unique challenges faced by an individual afflicted with this disease, the scholarship is awarded to a Davis College student who is a cancer survivor. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for application details. The Thomas Bulone Memorial Scholarship The Thomas Bulone Memorial Scholarship was created in honor of Tom Bulone, friend of Davis College and husband of Mary Ryan Bulone. He passed away on October 15, 2011, following a hard fight with multiple myeloma. Because Tom was such a family-oriented person and loved his Davis family, the scholarship is awarded to a student who has had a spouse, parent, sibling, or child with cancer.

As the oldest college in the Toledo area, we have witnessed many events and changes in history. Each person who has been a part of our long and rich tradition has helped us to develop into what we have become over the decades. We appreciate being in contact with our alumni! We have graduated thousands of men and women, and it seems that everywhere we turn we run into someone whose life has been touched by Davis College. The goal of the Alumni Association is to strengthen our link with alumni and to encourage them to help us build new bridges within the community.

Davis College Foundation Merit Scholarship The Davis College Foundation Scholarship is an award for outstanding students who are committed to their career fields and communities. Davis College students who are enrolled at the College pursuing an associate degree or a diploma in a program of study listed in the current catalog are eligible. The scholarship funds can be used for tuition and books at Davis College. First quarter students are not eligible.

Alumni are invited to share information about themselves and their professional lives on Facebook. The Davis College Atrium walls are devoted to Graduate Success Stories. Please share yours with us! Annually a golf outing, Scramble "FORE" Scholarships, is held for the Davis College Foundation. To register for the Alumni Association, please log on to www.daviscollege.edu and click on the Alumni Association or call Marilyn Bovia or Mary Ryan-Bulone at 419-473-2700. On the Davis website, you will find a form that will invite you to receive the Alumni Access, our alumni newsletter, as well as give us the opportunity to find out what’s been happening in your life and to update our files. As you take time to fill it out, please know that we are eager to hear from you.

Students qualify by maintaining a grade point average of 3.0 or better; participating in community activities beneficial to others; and demonstrating outstanding character and competence by receiving a written recommendation from one faculty or staff member at Davis College. For details about applying, please visit the Financial Aid Office. The Sharon Lynn Monday Memorial Scholarship

Davis College Alumni Association Mission Statement

The Sharon Lynn Monday Memorial Scholarship was created in honor of Sharon Lynn Monday, a 2001 Davis College graduate who passed away on January 5, 2009, following a courageous fight against leukemia. Sharon earned her Business

To facilitate a forum whereby Davis College alumni can network with each other on an ongoing basis to improve their business and personal lives.

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General Information

Davis College Alumni Association


To maintain the value of their degree or diploma by ensuring that Davis retains its reputation for quality education. To provide current information about Davis College to its alumni, so that they are motivated to promote both new student recruitment and the hiring of Davis graduates. To establish a line of communication between Davis College and its alumni, for the purpose of sharing the latest information relevant to the fields of study offered at Davis and practiced by the alumni. To assist Davis in various tasks that help retain its public image as a caring, quality institution, such as promoting special events, programs, or activities, and providing scholarships that help promote pride among the current student body.

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Programs of Study

Department of Design Graphic Design (AAB)

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Graphic Design (D) Interior Decorating (D)

Administrative Professional (AAB)

Interior Design (AAB)

Administrative Professional, Insurance Major (AAB)

Motion and Visual Effects Design (AAB) Website Design (AAB)

Administrative Professional, Medical Secretarial Major (AAB) Medical Assisting (AAS)

AAB=Associate of Applied Business Degree

Medical Practice Insurance and Coding (AAB)

AAS=Associate of Applied Science Degree

Medical Practice Insurance and Coding (D)

D=Diploma

Software Applications Professional (D)

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology Accounting (D) Accounting and Human Resources (AAB) Business Management (AAB) Computer Forensics (D) Computer Networking (AAB) Programs of Study

Early Childhood Education/Administration (AAB) Hospitality Management (AAB) Insurance and Risk Management (AAB) Marketing (AAB) Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising (AAB) Sports and Recreation Marketing (AAB)

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12 Programs of Study


Department of General Education

Communication (a minimum of 13 hours)

Mission Statement and Purposes The mission of the Department of General Education is to impart common knowledge, cultivate critical thinking, and develop values needed by every educated person. Thus, the courses offered by the Department provide a foundation for comprehensive, life-long learning and will prepare a Davis College graduate to:

COM121 Composition I

5 hours

COM122 Composition II

4 hours

COM201 Oral Communication

4 hours

COM202 Interpersonal Communication

4 hours

Humanities (a minimum of 3 hours)

•Read and listen critically with understanding.

HUM135 Rhetoric of Film and Culture

3 hours

HUM151 Literature and Culture

3 hours

HUM153 Literature of the Old Testament 3 hours HUM201 Thinking Strategies

3 hours

•Apply critical thinking, abstract reasoning skills, and problem solving methods.

Science (a minimum of 3 hours) SCI160 Environmental Issues

3 hours

•Describe the influences of cultural diversity.

SCI165 Nutrition

3 hours

•Locate, gather, process, and use information.

Social Science (a minimum of 8 hours)

General Education courses are an integral part of each associate degree program at Davis College. Each graduate is required to complete a minimum of 32 hours of General Education courses from the list that follows. To qualify for the MidProgram Assessment in a student’s program area, a student needs to have completed two General Education courses and IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources, an interdisciplinary course required by the institution.

SSC130 Contemporary Social Issues

4 hours

SSC201 Economics

4 hours

SSC213 Introduction to Psychology

4 hours

Mathematics (a minimum of 5 hours)

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MTH102 Introductory Algebra I

5 hours

MTH202 Introductory Algebra II

5 hours

Department of General Education

•Write and speak clearly and effectively in standard English.


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pate in a portfolio review and assessment upon completion of 45 credit hours including foundation area courses. The Mid-Program Assessment will measure students’ basic skill development as well as their readiness for success in advanced-level courses. Additionally, all AAHP students will update and submit their portfolio to an AAHP instructor by Thursday of Week 10 (Week 9 in summer quarter) and all Medical Assisting students will submit an essay along with the portfolio. AAHP instructors will conduct the Mid-Program Assessment quarterly, Thursday of finals week at 11:45 AM and 6:45 PM.

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Mission Statement and Purposes In accordance with the mission of Davis College, the chairperson and faculty in the Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals (AAHP) view our commitment as follows: •To promote the success of the Department by continually striving to improve and upgrade the curricula. The success of the program depends upon our ability to develop marketable skills and place graduates.

Criteria for successful Mid-Program Assessment for Administrative Professional and Allied Health students are as follows:

•To provide instruction and develop skills needed in various medical offices and business facilities. •To provide an environment that promotes the development of professional behavior, dependability, punctuality, creativity, critical thinking, confidentiality, and interpersonal skills.

•Completion of IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

•To remain current with changes in the allied health and administrative areas by maintaining communication with the AAHP Advisory Committee, Career Services, and area medical practices and businesses.

•Completion of at least two General Education courses. •Completion of all portions of the assessment at 70% or higher.

•To gain the knowledge and skills to pass the Certified Professional Coder examination through the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC).

•Completion of the portfolio review with an AAHP instructor or Career Services Director. In addition, Medical Assisting students are required to complete a research paper on the Medical Assisting profession according to the Program Director’s specifications.

•To gain the knowledge to pass the CMA, AAMA certification exam. •To pursue professional development opportunities in a continual effort to provide current classroom instruction.

AAHP students are eligible to enroll in advanced, 200-level courses in their major upon successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment. Students who do not successfully complete MidProgram Assessment after the second attempt may be given an oral assessment and will meet with faculty members and academic advisors to consider options.

•To maintain accreditation of the Medical Assisting Program by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) upon the recommendation of the Curriculum Review board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE).

Successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment is required to be fully admitted into the Medical Assisting Program.

Mid-Program Assessment A student enrolled in an Administrative and Allied Health Professionals program will partici-

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Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

•Completion of the foundation courses with a grade of “C” or higher.


Administrative Professional Associate Degree The Administrative Professional program prepares graduates for an office/business career to work as part of the office administration team. Students learn to work effectively with customers, supervisors, and co-workers. Students are provided the opportunity to develop and enhance marketable skills in a variety of business-related applications. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Administrative Professional, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Operate computers using current software and technology to produce a variety of professional documents. •Utilize language arts skills to produce mailable documents. •Keyboard at a minimum rate of 40 NWPM on a 5-minute timing. •Develop a professional portfolio. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

16


Administrative Professional Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

OAM108*

Proofreading and Voice Recognition

Cr. Hrs. 3

OAM121

Introduction to Office Administration

3

OAM219

Administrative Professional Capstone

2

OAM221

Administrative Professional Externship

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

WPR114*

Skillbuilding I

2

WPR120*

Word Processing

3

WPR220

Advanced Word Processing

3

CAS114

Web 2.0

3

CAS122*

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS138

Presentation Graphics

3

CAS212

Advanced Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS/CIS/WPR

Technical Elective

2

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MGT/MKT---

Management/Marketing Elective

4

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

ACC---

Accounting Elective (ACC109 or ACC111)

3

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110†

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Foundation courses required as part of the 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment. Students are required to earn a grade of “C” or higher in each of the foundation courses. †Required before Mid-Program Assessment

17

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Administrative Professional, Insurance Major Associate Degree The Administrative Professional Insurance Major associate degree program prepares graduates for customer service, front office careers in the insurance industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn the basics of insurance and develop marketable office and business skills. Upon graduation, students may wish to pursue certifications, such as the Certified Insurance Service Representative (CISR). Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Insurance, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Articulate a strong understanding of the various types of insurance such as personal, property, and commercial. •Operate computers using current software and technology to produce a variety of professional documents. •Utilize language arts skills to produce mailable documents. •Keyboard at a minimum rate of 40 NWPM on a 5-minute timing. •Develop a professional portfolio. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

18


Administrative Professional, Insurance Major Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

OAM108*

Proofreading and Voice Recognition

Cr. Hrs. 3

OAM121

Introduction to Office Administration

3

OAM219

Administrative Professional Capstone

2

OAM221

Administrative Professional Externship

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

WPR114

Skillbuilding I

2

WPR120*

Word Processing

3

WPR220

Advanced Word Processing

3

CAS/CIS

Elective (CAS114 or CIS130)

3

CAS122*

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS212

Advanced Spreadsheet Applications

3

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

INS101*

Principles of Insurance

4

INS110

Personal Insurance

4

INS210

Property and Liability Insurance

4

INS220

Commercial Insurance

4

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110†

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Foundation courses required as part of the 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment. (INS110 may be used as an alternative foundation course for INS101). Students are required to earn a grade of “C” or higher in each of the foundation courses. †Required before Mid-Program Assessment

19

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Administrative Professional, Medical Secretarial Major Associate Degree This program prepares graduates to work as an administrative professional in a medical environment as part of a medical office team. Students are provided the opportunity to develop and enhance marketable medical and office skills in a variety of applications. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Medical Secretarial, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Operate computers using current software and technology to produce a variety of professional documents used in business and medical environments. •Utilize language arts skills and medical terminology to produce mailable documents. •Perform medical office procedures such as answering phones, scheduling appointments, organizing patient records, greeting and communicating with patients, and processing medical billing for collections. •Utilize electronic health records accurately and effectively. •Keyboard at a minimum rate of 30 NWPM on a 5-minute timing. •Develop a professional portfolio. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

20


Administrative Professional, Medical Secretarial Major Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

OAM108*

Proofreading and Voice Recognition

Cr. Hrs. 3

OAM121

Introduction to Office Administration

3

OAM219

Administrative Professional Capstone

2

OAM221

Administrative Professional Externship

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

WPR120*

Word Processing

3

WPR220

Advanced Word Processing

3

WPR222

Medical Word Processing

3

MED101*

Medical Terminology

3

MED110

Administrative Medical Office Procedures

4

MED112

Medical Law and Ethics

3

MED114

Basic Insurance and Coding

4

MED137

Introduction to Emergency Preparedness

1

CAS122*

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS212

Advanced Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS/WPR/MED

Technical Elective

3

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110†

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Foundation courses required as part of the 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment. Students are required to earn a grade of “C” or higher in each of the foundation courses. †Required before Mid-Program Assessment

21

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Medical Assisting Associate Degree The Medical Assisting program prepares the students for employment in medical offices and clinics as part of the health care team. Students will study both administrative and clinical procedures.

•Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively with patients and co-workers in the health care setting. •Demonstrate professional conduct with patients, co-workers, and other health care professionals.

A score of 130 or higher on the CPAt is one of the requirements for admission into this program.

•Perform accounts receivable, billing, and collection procedures.

All Medical Assisting students are enrolled into the Medical Assisting program on a conditional basis at the time of admission. Upon successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment, students will be granted full admission into the Medical Assisting program.

•Perform procedural and diagnostic coding.

The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredits this program upon recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Students will register for the CMA, AAMA certification examination in the Clinical Practicum course (MED250). Passing this exam entitles the candidate the credentials of Certified Medical Assistant (CMA).

•Develop a professional portfolio. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. •Meet requirements to take the National Register Certification for EKG technician and/or Phlebotomy certification examinations. •Meet requirements to take the American Association of Medical Assistants certification examination.

Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Science degree with a major in Medical Assisting, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Assist physician with various patient examinations, medical procedures, minor surgeries, and administration of medications. •Follow prescribed safety procedures in all areas of laboratory work. •Perform various administrative responsibilities including electronic health records.

22


Medical Assisting Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

MED101*

Medical Terminology

Cr. Hrs. 3

MED110

Administrative Medical Office Procedures

4

MED112

Medical Law and Ethics

3

MED114*

Basic Insurance and Coding

4

MED118*

Anatomy and Physiology A

4

MED119*

Anatomy and Physiology B

4

MED124

Pathophysiology

3

MED137

Introduction to Emergency Preparedness

1

MED201

Introduction to Clinical Office Procedures

3

MED203

Clinical Specialty Examination Procedures

4

MED205

Minor Surgery and Diagnostic Office Procedures

4

MED208

Pharmacology

4

MED212

Basic Laboratory Procedures

4

MED250

Clinical Practicum

9

OAM223

Business Communications

4

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

CAS/OAM/WPR

Technical Elective (CAS102, CAS122, OAM108, WPR109, WPR114, WPR222)

3

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

WPR120

Word Processing

3

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM202

Interpersonal Communication

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC213

Introduction to Psychology

4

IDS110†

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

110

*Foundation Courses required as part of the 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment. Students are required to earn a grade of “C” or higher in each of the foundation courses. †Required before Mid-Program Assessment

23

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Medical Practice Insurance and Coding Associate Degree The Medical Practice Insurance and Coding program prepares the students for employment in medical offices, clinics, medical billing companies, and insurance companies as part of the health care team. Students will be instructed in administrative skills using a practice management program. Students will analyze medical records, assign codes for procedures, services, and diagnoses for reimbursement purposes. A score of 130 or higher on the CPAt is one of the requirements for admission into this program. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Medical Practice Insurance and Coding, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Demonstrate knowledge of medical terminology; anatomy and physiology; and diseases, disorders, and diagnoses of the human body. •Demonstrate proficiency in completing claim forms and CPT, ICD-10*-CM coding, and knowledge of HCPCS coding. •Perform various administrative responsibilities using a practice management program including electronic health records. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively with patients and co-workers in the health care setting. •Demonstrate professional conduct with patients, co-workers, and other health care professionals. •Develop a professional portfolio. •Meet requirements to take the American Academy of Professional Coders certification (CPC) examination. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. *ICD-10 effective October 2014

24


Medical Practice Insurance and Coding Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

MED101*

Medical Terminology

Cr. Hrs. 3

MED110

Administrative Medical Office Procedures

4

MED112

Medical Law and Ethics

3

MED114*

Basic Insurance and Coding

4

MED116

Medical Insurance Billing

3

MED118*

Anatomy and Physiology A

4

MED119*

Anatomy and Physiology B

4

MED122

Coding and Applications A

3

MED123

Coding and Applications B

3

MED124

Pathophysiology

3

MED137

Introduction to Emergency Preparedness

1

MED220

Medical Insurance and Coding Capstone

3

MED225

Medical Insurance and Coding Externship

3

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM202

Interpersonal Communication

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110†

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Foundation Courses required as part of the 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment. Students are required to earn a grade of “C” or higher in each of the foundation courses. †Required before Mid-Program Assessment

25

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Medical Practice Insurance and Coding Diploma The Medical Practice Insurance and Coding program prepares the students for employment in medical offices, clinics, medical billing companies, and insurance companies as part of the health care team. Students will be instructed in administrative skills using a practice management program. Students will analyze medical records, assign codes for procedures, services, and diagnoses for reimbursement purposes. A score of 130 or higher on the CPAt is one of the requirements for admission into this program. Upon completion of the Diploma in Medical Practice Insurance and Coding, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Demonstrate knowledge of medical terminology; anatomy and physiology; and diseases, disorders, and diagnoses of the human body. •Demonstrate proficiency in completing insurance claim forms and CPT, ICD-10*-CM coding, and knowledge of HCPCS coding. •Perform various administrative responsibilities using a practice management program including electronic health records. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively with patients and co-workers in the health care setting. •Demonstrate professional conduct with patients, co-workers, and other health care professionals. •Develop a professional portfolio. *ICD-10 effective October 2014

26


Medical Practice Insurance and Coding Diploma Program Outline Course Title

MED101

Medical Terminology

Cr. Hrs. 3

MED110

Administrative Medical Office Procedures

4

MED112

Medical Law and Ethics

3

MED114

Basic Insurance and Coding

4

MED116

Medical Insurance Billing

3

MED118

Anatomy and Physiology A

4

MED119

Anatomy and Physiology B

4

MED122

Coding and Applications A

3

MED123

Coding and Applications B

3

MED124

Pathophysiology

3

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

WPR120

Word Processing

3

IDS110

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

54

27

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


Software Applications Professional Diploma This program prepares graduates for a business career by emphasizing multiple software applications. Students are provided the opportunity to develop and enhance marketable office and business skills by emphasizing current software technology. Keyboarding speed of 35 NWPM on a 3-minute timing along with basic computer experience is required for admission into this program. A keyboarding test will be given. A combined score of 110 or higher in Language Usage and Reading portions of the CPAt is also required for admission into this program. Upon completion of the Diploma in Software Applications Professional, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Operate computers using current software and technology to produce a variety of professional documents. •Utilize language arts skills to produce mailable documents. •Develop a professional portfolio.

28


Software Applications Professional Diploma Program Outline Course Title

OAM108

Proofreading and Voice Recognition

Cr. Hrs. 3

OAM121

Introduction to Office Administration

3

OAM219

Administrative Professional Capstone

2

OAM223

Business Communications

4

WPR114

Skillbuilding I

2

WPR120

Word Processing

3

WPR220

Advanced Word Processing

3

CAS114

Web 2.0

3

CAS120

Desktop Publishing

3

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS138

Presentation Graphics

3

CAS212

Advanced Spreadsheet Applications

3

CIS130

Data Management and Reporting

3

MGT/MKT---

Management/Marketing Elective

3

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

IDS110

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

55

29

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals

Course No.


the students’ learning. To that end, the Department supports continuing education and professional growth for all faculty members.

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology Mission Statement and Purposes

Mid-Program and End-of-Program Assessments

In accordance with the mission of Davis College, the chairperson and faculty in the Department of Business Administration and Information Technology view our commitment as follows: •To offer students the training needed to develop skills that will help them become employable in the business community. •To provide instruction that promotes creativity and develops problem-solving skills. Problem-solving skills enhance the students’ employability and promotability within the business community. Because professions in the Business Administration and Information Technology areas require diagnostic skills, the Department is committed to teaching the students how to arrive at appropriate solutions to a variety of business and computerrelated problems.

If the student does not meet the criteria for successful Mid-Program Assessment, the following recommendations may be made by the reviewer: The student may be allowed time to prepare to retake the Assessment in the following quarter. This option will be allowed only one time.

•To provide the students with curriculum, appropriate training, externships, group activities, and technical skills necessary to qualify for a position in a large or small business, or as a small business owner. This includes the development of a professional portfolio.

The student may be required to retake specific courses where the student’s abilities were determined unacceptable. The student may be advised to seek a major outside of the business or information technology area but may still minor in these areas.

•To remain cognizant of the changing marketplace and continuously changing technology through contact with our Advisory Committees, local businesses, and Career Services. We are continually looking for ways to improve and upgrade our programs so that the skills developed match the needs of area employers.

An End-of-Program Assessment, the second portfolio review near the end of the program, is intended to ensure that the student possesses the necessary skills for business positions and that the entire portfolio is acceptable for job interviewing.

•To promote the students, programs, and curricula of the Business Administration and Information Technology Department. The success of our Department depends on our ability to train and place graduates from our programs. We are constantly looking for opportunities in our roles as professionals to promote Davis College and the Department. •The Business Administration and Information Technology Department faculty is committed to

31

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Students enrolled in the Business Administration and Information Technology Department will participate in a skills assessment and portfolio review after completing approximately half of their program. This assessment may consist of an interview, assessment test, artifact review, and/ or written assignment. To determine that the student has gained the necessary skills for adequate progression in the program, the interview will allow the student the opportunity to discuss a focus for the remainder of the program.


Accounting Diploma The Accounting program prepares the student for a variety of accounting positions in business and industry. Accounts receivable/payable clerks, payroll clerks, bookkeepers, and junior accountants are a few examples. A combined score of 116 or higher in the Reading and Math portions of the CPAt is required for admission into this program. Upon completion of the Diploma in Accounting, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to process and communicate financial information about a business entity. •Identify, prepare, compare, and use financial statements. •Use accounting software to maintain accounting records and prepare financial statements. •Set up and solve business and accounting problems using a spreadsheet program and tax preparation software.

32


Accounting Diploma Program Outline Course Title

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

ACC102

Accounting Principles II

4

ACC109

Accounting Software Review

3

ACC111

Payroll Accounting

3

ACC135

Federal Income Tax

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CIS130

Data Management and Reporting

3

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

MGT105

Business Law

4

MGT110

Personal Finance

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

CAS/CIS/WPR

Computer Elective

3

COM121

Composition I

5

IDS110

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

53

33

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Accounting and Human Resources Associate Degree The Accounting and Human Resources program prepares students for employment in a variety of work environments including business, entrepreneurship, and industry. Specific emphasis will be placed on the accounting cycle, accounts receivable/payable, payroll, personal tax returns, accounting software, and payroll accounting. In addition, knowledge and skills in the areas of compensation and benefits, employee training and development, employment law and regulations, and employee recruitment and planning will be emphasized. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Accounting and Human Resources, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to complete the accounting cycle manually and in a computer system and prepare financial statements. •Process payroll and related tax returns. •Review compensation and benefit plans. •Understand employment laws and ethics related to human resource management. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Accounting and Human Resources program, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

34


Accounting and Human Resources Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

ACC102

Accounting Principles II

4

ACC109

Accounting Software Review

3

ACC111

Payroll Accounting

3

ACC135

Federal Income Tax

4

ACC225

Accounting/Human Resource Project

4

ACC/MGT

Accounting/Management Elective (ACC205, MGT211, MGT213)

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CIS130

Data Management and Reporting

3

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT115

Human Resource Management

4

MGT160

Human Resource Training and Development

4

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT110 or MGT118)

3

MGT220

Human Resource Law and Benefits

5

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment.

35

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Business Management Associate Degree The graduate will be qualified for a management position in a variety of organizations. Students are provided with the skills necessary for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling activities that will lead to the effective fulfillment of organizational objectives. Students also develop a foundation in accounting, marketing, management, written and oral communication, and leadership through simulations, group activities, discussions, and lab work. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Business Management, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Identify and assess current business situations and resolve problems within a variety of business settings. •Apply Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to complete the accounting cycle manually and prepare financial statements. •Articulate traditional and contemporary management theories and apply these techniques to real-life situations. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Business Management program, including ACC101 and MGT102, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

36


Business Management Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

ACC102

Accounting Principles II

4

ACC/MGT

Accounting, Management Elective (ACC205 or MGT230)

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

CAS/CIS

Computer Elective

3

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT105

Business Law

4

MGT110

Personal Finance

3

MGT205

International Business

3

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MGT250

Business Management Externship

3

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

INS/MGT/MKT

Insurance, Management or Marketing Elective

4

(INS101, INS220, MGT115, MGT118, MGT160, MGT202, MGT215,

MKT101, MKT203, MKT212, MKT221, MKT222, MKT230, MKT239)

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology an Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

37

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Computer Forensics Diploma The Computer Forensics Diploma program is designed to provide students the technical skills and knowledge in computer forensic science to prepare them for entry-level positions in both the public and private sectors. Students will utilize computer skills for the purpose of detection and prevention of computer crime. Principles, procedures, techniques, hardware and software tools used to collect, investigate, and analyze digital evidence related to criminal investigations will be addressed in this program. In order for a student to be accepted into the program, he/she will be required to complete a background check by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation and Identification. Individuals who have been Ohio residents for less than five years are also required to complete a Federal Bureau of Investigation check. The student will assume the cost for all background checks. A combined score of 110 or higher in Language Usage and Reading portions of the CPAt is also required for admission into this program. Upon completion of the Diploma in Computer Forensics, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Understand the science of forensics, cybercrimes, and authorized handling of evidence and confidential documents. •Describe the differences between the various file systems within computers running Windows, Linux, Unix, and Apples as well as the hardware required to operate in the different environments. •Identify the various layers used to build computer networking and utilize the necessary tools to monitor, trace, and collect data. •Demonstrate an understanding of system infiltration and security measures, utilizing assessment tools to determine viruses and malware. •Use oral and written communication skills to document findings and create reports.

38


Computer Forensics Diploma Program Outline Course Title

CIS141

Computer Concepts and Diagnostics

Cr. Hrs. 3

CIS142

Networking Concepts and Diagnostics

3

CIS153

Network Software: Windows 2008 Server

3

CIS155

Open Source Software

3

CIS158

Administering MS Windows 7

2

CIS228

Network Security and Administration

2

CIS240

Routing Concepts

3

CIS243

Computer Forensics

3

CIS245

File Systems

3

CIS247

Network Forensics and Documentation

3

CIS249

Concepts of System Infiltration

3

CIS250

IT Project

2

CAS/CIS/WPR

Technical Elective

3

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

OAM223

Business Communication

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

IDS110

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

63

39

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Computer Networking Associate Degree

Mid-Program Assessment

This program teaches students the necessary technical skills to prepare them for a position as a network engineer and the administrative skills to become a network administrator. This program will also prepare the student to take the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) certification examination.

A student enrolled in the Computer Networking Associate Degree program will participate in a Mid-Program Assessment upon completion of approximately 45 hours, including CIS115, CIS141, and CIS142. Completion of the Mid-Program Assessment is required before a student can be scheduled into advanced courses.

Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Computer Networking, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to:

This skills assessment is intended to help the Department faculty evaluate whether a student has learned and developed the basic, necessary skills needed to successfully complete the advanced courses and ultimately obtain employment. The assessment will consist of testing each student’s basic knowledge of his/her major area, which includes having the ability to navigate through different operating systems and define computer terminologies.

•Use operating system commands to perform basic system operations such as formatting disks, operating systems installations, file and printer sharing, and maintaining an operating system. •Demonstrate the ability to assemble, test, troubleshoot, and repair networks and personal computers.

The Mid-Program Assessment will be a combination of an interview and computer test, which will be conducted once per quarter by Department faculty.

•Understand terminology of networking concepts. This includes physical media, architectures, topologies, protocols, local area networks, wide area networks, and security. •Install, configure, and troubleshoot an active directory. •Install, test, and troubleshoot networking software which includes using security, addressing, and administration tools. •Install, configure, and troubleshoot a network infrastructure using routers and switches. •Utilize e-mail, websites, and news services for troubleshooting purposes. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

40


Computer Networking Associate Degree Program Outline Course No.

Course Title

CIS115*

Survey of Operating Systems

Cr. Hrs.

CIS132

Internet Systems Management

3

CIS141*

Computer Concepts and Diagnostics

3

CIS142*

Networking Concepts and Diagnostics

3

CIS153

Network Software: Windows 2008 Server

3

CIS158

Administering MS Windows 7

2

CIS210

Network Infrastructure and Protocols

3

CIS215

Directory Services Design and Implementation

3

CIS228

Network Security and Administration

2

CIS240

Routing Concepts

3

CIS251

IT Project/Certification

3

CIS---

CIS Electives (CIS155, CIS241, CIS243, CIS247)

9

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201, COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

* Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

41

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

3


Early Childhood Education/Administration Associate Degree

Early Childhood Education/Administration Admissions Requirements:

The Early Childhood Education/Administration Associate Degree program prepares students for careers in child development centers. The course work in this degree assists students in formulating a developmentally appropriate approach to the education of young children. In addition, the program prepares the student for administrative positions within corporate or small business settings.

•Background Check – Ohio Senate Bill 38, enacted October 29, 1993, requires individuals engaged in childcare activity to complete a background check by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation and Identification. Individuals who have been Ohio residents for less than five years are also required to complete a Federal Bureau of Investigation check. These background checks cannot reveal any convictions for any of the criminal offenses listed in the Ohio Senate Bill 38. In order for the student to be accepted to the program, he/she will be required to complete a background check and assume the cost for this background check.

Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Early Childhood Education/Administration, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Identify the levels of development of children and appropriate teaching aids for each level.

•Employee Medical Statement (O.D.H.S. Form 1296) completed and signed by a licensed physician within six months prior to application.

•Identify management theories and apply these techniques to day-to-day operations of a child development center.

•Child Day Care Conviction Statement (O.D.H.S. Form 1301).

•Identify, analyze, and resolve problems within a variety of business settings, including using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to measure, process, and evaluate business.

•Student References Forms. Early Childhood Education/Administration majors are required to register for at least one nonECE course each quarter.

•Analyze and resolve problems within a child development center. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively with parents and peers on a professional level. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Early Childhood Education/Administration program, including ECE102, ECE112, and MGT102, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

42


Early Childhood Education/Administration Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ECE102*

Introduction to Education

Cr. Hrs. 3

ECE112*

Child Development

4

ECE114

Literacy for Young Children

4

ECE117

Positive Management/Behavioral Issues

3

ECE118

Art, Music, and Play for Early Childhood Education

3

ECE120

Infant/Toddler Development

3

ECE122

Early Childhood Education Professional Relations

3

ECE124

Preschool/School-Age Development

4

ECE208

Special Education Programming

3

ECE211

Early Childhood Education Organization/Administration/Licensing

5

ECE214

Multicultural Diversity

3

ECE222

Health, Nutrition, and Safety

4

ECE250

Early Childhood Education Practicum and Seminar

5

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

4

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT105, MGT115, MGT118)

4

MKT---

Marketing Elective (MKT201, MKT221, MKT230, MKT239)

5

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

110

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment.

43

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Hospitality Management Associate Degree The Hospitality Management program prepares students for careers in the hospitality industry, including service quality management, purchasing and cost control, foodservice operations management, and lodging operations management. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree in Hospitality Management, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Demonstrate an understanding of the unique needs of the hospitality management field in customer service and safety. •Demonstrate an understanding of the changing business environment in the foodservice and the lodging industry. •Examine the impact of technology on marketing. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Hospitality Management program, including ACC101, MGT102, and MGT140, he/ she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine the focus for the remainder of the program.

44


Hospitality Management Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

ACC140

Purchasing and Cost Control

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT115

Human Resources Management

4

MGT118

Special Event Management

3

MGT140*

Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

3

MGT240

Foodservice Operations Management

4

MGT245

Lodging Operations Management

4

MGT248

Service Quality Management

3

MGT252

Hospitality Management Externship

3

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

45

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Insurance and Risk Management Associate Degree The Insurance and Risk Management program will prepare students for careers in the insurance industry. This option will introduce the student to topics related to insurance: fraud; customer service; underwriting and claims; personal, commercial, and property insurance; products of each industry; and essential computer applications. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree in Insurance and Risk Management, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Understand how risk is managed by individuals and businesses. •Articulate an understanding of insurance principles, practices, and policies. •Apply Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) including financial statement preparation and analysis. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Insurance and Risk Management program, including ACC101 and MGT102, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

46


Insurance and Risk Management Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

ACC102

Accounting Principles II

4

CAS122

Spreadsheet Applications

3

INS101*

Principles of Insurance

4

INS110

Personal Insurance

4

INS210

Property and Liability Insurance

4

INS220

Commercial Insurance

4

INS250

Insurance and Risk Management Externship

3

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT105

Business Law

4

MGT110

Personal Finance

3

MGT220

Human Resource Law and Benefits

5

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

MKT221

Referral-Based Marketing

4

---

Technical Elective

5

(MGT115, MGT118, MGT230, MKT101, MKT222, MKT230

CAS137, CIS100, WPR119)

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201, COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

110

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

47

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Marketing Associate Degree The Marketing Associate Degree program focuses on satisfying customers’ needs in today’s economy with an emphasis on the creation, distribution, promotion, and pricing of products and services in a dynamic environment. Students will develop skills and knowledge in business law, management, and communications as it relates to marketing. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Marketing, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Develop an understanding of how to satisfy consumer needs utilizing the marketing mix that facilitate exchanges. •Articulate an understanding of the marketing concept and the development of an appropriate target market strategy. •Examine the impact of technology on marketing. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Marketing program, including ACC101 and MGT102, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

48


Marketing Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT105

Business Law

4

MGT118

Special Event Management

3

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

MKT---

Marketing Electives (MKT203, MKT212, MKT222)

8

MKT221

Referral-Based Marketing

4

MKT230

Integrated Marketing Communications

4

MKT239

Visual Merchandising

4

MKT250

Marketing Externship

4

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM ---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC ---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

49

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising Associate Degree The Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising Associate Degree program is designed to prepare the student for positions within the retail and fashion merchandising profession. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a solid foundation in visual design and merchandising techniques, marketing and sales, management and communication. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Critically analyze the retailing process, the environment within which it operates, and the institutions and functions that are performed. •Understand and apply the design fundamentals of visual display and the methods of creating an appropriate store environment for a variety of consumer groups. •Apply retail management techniques including merchandise budget planning, buying merchandise, managing store employees, reducing inventory losses, and managing customer service. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively with clients and co-workers. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising program, including MGT102 and MKT101, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or Department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine a focus for the remainder of the program.

50


Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs. 4

FSH115

Cultural Influences in Fashion

4

FSH200

Fashion Principles

5

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT118

Special Event Management

3

MGT202

Merchandising Management

4

MGT251

Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising Externship

3

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MKT101*

Merchandising

4

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

MKT239

Visual Merchandising

4

MGT/MKT

Management or Marketing Elective

4

(MGT105, MGT115, MKT212, MKT221, MKT230)

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

51

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Sports and Recreation Marketing Associate Degree The Sports and Recreation Marketing associate degree focuses on the implementation of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas to create exchanges and satisfies organizational objectives in the sports and recreation environment. Students will explore the basic principles of marketing and how those functions are applied to sports and recreation as well as develop skills in business, sales, and communications. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Sports and Recreation Marketing, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Understand the process of designing and implementing activities for the production, pricing, promotion, and distribution of a sport or sport business product to satisfy the needs of consumers and achieve company objectives. •Articulate an understanding of the marketing concept and the development of an appropriate target market strategy. •Examine the impact of technology on sport and recreation marketing. •Use oral and written communication skills to interact effectively in the work environment. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes. Mid-Program Assessment When a student has completed approximately 45 hours in the Sports and recreation Marketing program, including ACC101, MGT102, and MGT215, he/she will participate in an interview with the Department Chairperson and/or department faculty. This interview will focus on assessing the skills the student is learning to determine adequate progression in the program and will allow the student the opportunity to determine the focus for the remainder of the program.

52


Sports and Recreation Marketing Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

ACC101*

Accounting Principles I

Cr. Hrs 4

MGT102*

Introduction to Business

5

MGT105

Business Law

4

MGT---

Management Elective (MGT211 or MGT213)

4

MGT215*

Sports Industry Management

4

MGT118

Special Event Management

3

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT203

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

4

MKT206

Principles of Selling

4

MKT230

Integrated Marketing Communications

4

MKT239

Visual Merchandising

4

MKT255

Sports and Recreation Marketing Externship

4

MKT---

Marketing Elective (MKT212, MKT221, MKT222)

4

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM ---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC ---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program Credit Hours

94

*Required as part of 45 hours completed before Mid-Program Assessment

53

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology

Course No.


Department of Design

Mid-Program and End-of-Program Assessment

Mission Statement and Purposes

A student enrolled in any associate degree program in the design area will participate in a Mid-Program Assessment upon completion of the foundation courses. The assessment will consist of a portfolio review and interview to ensure that the student possesses the necessary conceptual and technical skills before taking the advanced level (200) courses.

In accordance with the mission of Davis College, the Chairperson and faculty of the Design Department view our commitment as follows: •To prepare students for professional practice by integrating the content areas of design production, design history, design criticism, and design aesthetics. We believe that to teach students to become responsive and responsible designers in contemporary society design production alone is insufficient. Therefore, a discipline-based pedagogy is embraced by the Department.

An End-of-Program Assessment, consisting of a portfolio review and interview upon completion of the advanced level (200) courses, is intended to ensure that the student possesses the necessary skills for design positions and that the entire body of work is acceptable for job interviewing purposes.

•To provide instruction that promotes creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving and analysis. Understanding the nature of any design problem and developing a creative and appropriate solution is prerequisite to implementing any technical application.

A portfolio of 10 – 15 works should be submitted at each portfolio review. The work submitted at the second portfolio review should be representative of the student’s career direction (i.e., graphic design, interior design, motion and visual effects, or website design).

•To provide instruction that meets the technical skill level required for positions in design. Technologies in design continue to change at a rapid pace. We are committed to providing the student with relevant training that utilizes appropriate technology and equipment.

The Portfolio Review Committee will be composed of the Department Chairperson, an instructor from the major area declared by the student, and an instructor outside the major area but in the Design Department. The following criteria will be used by the Committee to determine successful completion of each Portfolio Review:

•To promote the students, programs, and curricula of the Design Department. The success of our programs lies in our ability to inform the public of the Design Department programs and the qualified students who are graduating each year. We are constantly searching for opportunities to promote the Design Department and Davis College.

•The work will demonstrate an acceptable level of competence. •The student will be able to discuss his or her work in terms of form, content, intent, and use of materials.

•The Department Chairperson and faculty are committed to the pursuit of professional development opportunities to become better informed and more competent professionals and instructors.

•The student will have achieved a passing grade in all foundation courses as well as a 2.7 GPA in the Design Department courses.

54


If the student does not meet the criteria for successful assessment and portfolio review, the following recommendations may be made by the Committee: •The student may redo specific projects where conceptual and formal requirements and/or technical ability were determined unacceptable. •The student may retake specific courses where conceptual and formal requirements and/or technical ability were determined unacceptable.

Department of Design

•The student may be advised to seek a major outside of the Design area but may still minor in the Design area. (This recommendation is only applicable when assessing Foundation Area abilities.)

55


Graphic Design Associate Degree This program focuses on developing the student’s creativity and problem-solving skills that are necessary to be a graphic designer. The program explores the relationship between client and audience and how visual messages are created and delivered. Emphasis is placed on digital technology, utilizing the computer and software to create visual messages. Graphic designers work in advertising agencies, graphic design studios, in-house design departments, and for commercial printers. Graphic designers create printed materials (posters, brochures, catalogs, books, ads, etc.), identity programs, signs and sign systems, packaging, exhibitions, and displays. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Graphic Design, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate for graphic design, which includes the synthesis of typographic and visual elements to create effective visual messages. •Use appropriate computer hardware and industry standard page layout, and image editing software. •Analyze and evaluate his/her work in terms of the design elements and principles, process, project requirements, and client needs. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

56


Graphic Design Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title Drawing Principles

Cr. Hrs. 3

DSN105*

Drawing Concepts

3

DSN110*

2D Design

3

DSN115*

3D Design

3

DSN124*

Letterforms

3

DSN125*

Typography

3

DSN127*

Print Production

3

DSN130*

Digital Page Composition

3

DSN135*

History of Graphic Design

2

DSN140*

Color Principles

3

DSN145*

Digital Illustration

3

DSN160*

Digital Photography

3

DSN200

Graphic Design Principles

3

DSN220

Packaging Design

3

DSN230

Publication Design

3

DSN240

Visual Identity Systems

3

DSN270

Design Externship

2

DSN---

Design (DSN) Elective

3

CAS/CIS/WPR

Computer Elective

3

MGT102

Introduction to Business

5

MKT201

Marketing

5

MKT---

Marketing Elective (MKT206, MKT221, MKT222, MKT230)

4

OAM223

Business Communications

4

COM121

Composition I

5

COM122

Composition II

4

COM---

Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202)

4

HUM---

Humanities Elective

3

MTH102

Introductory Algebra I

5

SCI---

Science Elective

3

SSC201

Economics

4

SSC---

Social Science Elective

4

IDS110*

Forum on Technology and Resources

5

Total Program

Credit Hours

110

* Foundation courses (prerequisites to all DSN200-level courses)

57

Department of Design

Course No. DSN101*


Graphic Design Diploma This program is designed to develop the technical skills required for “production artist” and/or desktop publishing positions within advertising agencies, graphic design studios, and in-house design departments. The student utilizes industry standard imaging, illustration, and page layout software to produce printed materials (posters, brochures, catalogs, books, advertisements, etc.) Upon completion of the diploma in Graphic Design, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate for graphic design, which includes the synthesis of typographic and visual elements to create effective visual messages. •Use appropriate computer hardware and industry standard page layout, image editing, and interactive media software. •Use written and oral communication skills to interact effectively.

58


Graphic Design Diploma Program Outline Course No.

Course Title

DSN110

2D Design

Cr. Hrs. 3

DSN124

Letterforms

3

DSN125

Typography

3

DSN127

Print Production

3

DSN130

Digital Page Composition

3

DSN145

Digital Illustration

3

DSN160

Digital Photography

3

CAS120

Desktop Publishing

3

WPR120

Word Processing

3

OAM223

Business Communications

4

CAS/CIS/WPR

Computer Elective

3

COM121

Composition I

5

IDS110

Forum on Technology and Resources

5 44

Department of Design

Total Program Credit Hours

59


Interior Decorating Diploma The Interior Decorating program will provide knowledge of the design principles and elements, history of furniture and architecture, and sustainability. The diploma program is an excellent choice for those who wish to begin their career in design or further their education. An individual with a diploma in Interior Decorating may be employed as a visual merchandiser; assistant to an interior designer; sales associate in a furniture, antique, or accessory boutique; or a stager for a realtor. Students who wish to transfer credits into the Interior Design program, are required to earn an average grade of “B” or higher in the DSN Design courses and INT Interior Design courses. Aa score of 130 or higher on the CPAt exam is required to be enrolled in this program. Upon completion of the diploma in Interior Decorating, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate to interior decorating projects which include the creation and understanding of floor planning, window treatments, textiles, color harmony, and design materials. •Analyze and evaluate his/her work in terms of the design elements and principles, project requirements, and client needs. •Apply marketing concepts and skills to develop effective sales presentations.

60


Interior Decorating Diploma Program Outline Course No.

Course Title

DSN--DSN110 DSN115 DSN140 INT--INT125 INT138 INT235 MKT206 MKT239 COM121 OAM223 IDS110

Design Elective (DSN101 or DSN105) 2D Design 3D Design Color Principles Interior Design Elective (INT110 or INT120) Floor Planning Textiles Window Treatments Principles of Selling Visual Merchandising Composition I Business Communications Forum on Technology and Resources

Cr. Hrs.

46

Department of Design

Total Program Credit Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 4 5

61


Interior Design Associate Degree The Interior Design associate degree program is designed to prepare students for positions within the interior design profession. This program integrates problem-solving abilities, aesthetics, technical skills, and communication skills in planning and designing interior space. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Interior Design, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate for interior design, which includes the creation and drafting of functional space plans and floor plans and the incorporation of finishes, window treatments, and furniture into a cohesive interior environment. •Use technology that is appropriate for interior design professional practice including industry standard computer aided drafting software. •Analyze and evaluate his/her work in terms of the design elements and principles, project requirements, and client needs. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

62


Interior Design Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

DSN101* DSN105* DSN110* DSN115* DSN140* INT110* INT120* INT130* INT138* INT220 INT230 INT231 INT232 INT234 INT235 INT243 INT244 --MGT102 MKT201 MKT--OAM223 COM121 COM122 COM--HUM--MTH102 SCI--SSC201 SSC--IDS110*

Drawing Principles Drawing Concepts 2D Design 3D Design Color Principles History of Interior Design: Prehistoric to Early American History of Interior Design: Early American to Present Drafting Techniques Textiles Interior Design: Residential Interior Design: Commercial Space Planning Computer Aided Drafting and Design Advanced Computer Aided Drafting and Design Window Treatments Interior Design Externship Lighting Technical Elective (CAS/CIS/WPR/DSN160) Introduction to Business Marketing Marketing Elective (MKT206, MKT221, MKT239) Business Communications Composition I Composition II Communication Elective (COM201, COM202) Humanities Elective Introductory Algebra I Science Elective Economics Social Science Elective Forum on Technology and Resources

Cr. Hrs.

Total Program Credit Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 5 110

* Foundation courses (prerequisites to all INT200-level courses.)

63

Department of Design

Course No.


Motion and Visual Effects Design Associate Degree This program focuses on developing the student’s creativity, problem-solving abilities, and technical skills that are necessary to be a motion and visual effects designer. The program explores the relationship between client and audience and how visual messages are created and delivered. Emphasis is placed on digital technology, utilizing the computer and software to create visual images. Motion and visual effects designers work in advertising agencies, graphic design studios, video production companies, and in-house video production departments. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Motion and Visual Effects, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate for motion and visual effects design, which includes the synthesis of typographic and visual elements to create effective visual images. •Use appropriate computer hardware and industry standard desktop video editing, video effects, and image editing software. •Analyze and evaluate his/her work in terms of the design elements and principles, process, project requirements, and client needs. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

64


Motion and Visual Effects Design Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

DSN101* DSN105* DSN110* DSN115* DSN124* DSN125* DSN135* DSN140* DSN145* DSN152* DSN154* DSN160* DSN252 DSN254 DSN256 DSN258 DSN270 DSN--CAS/CIS/WPR MGT102 MKT201 MKT--OAM223 COM121 COM122 COM--HUM--MTH102 SCI--SSC201 SSC--IDS110*

Drawing Principles Drawing Concepts 2D Design 3D Design Letterforms Typography History of Graphic Design Color Principles Digital Illustration Digital Video Editing Digital Video Effects Digital Photography Motion Design Principles 3D Modeling Computer Animation Kinetic Typography Motion and Visual Design Externship Design (DSN) Elective Computer Elective Introduction to Business Marketing Marketing Elective (MKT206, MKT221, MKT222, MKT230) Business Communications Composition I Composition II Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202) Humanities Elective Introductory Algebra I Science Elective Economics Social Science Elective Forum on Technology and Resources

Cr. Hrs.

Total Program Credit Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 5 110

*Foundation courses (prerequisites to all DSN200-level courses)

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Department of Design

Course No.


Website Design Associate Degree The Website Design program focuses on developing the student’s creativity, problem-solving abilities, and technical skills that are necessary to be a website designer. The program blends design and technical aspects of creating websites including web authoring tools, programming languages, and web standards. Website designers work for website design and development companies, advertising agencies, graphic design studios, and in-house website design departments. Upon completion of the Associate of Applied Business degree with a major in Website Design, the Davis College graduate will be prepared to: •Apply the elements and principles of design to create a visual language appropriate for website design, which includes the synthesis of typographic and visual elements to create effective visual messages. •Use appropriate computer hardware and industry standard webpage layout, illustration, and image editing software. •Apply web authoring tools, programming languages, and web standards to the design and implementation of websites. •Analyze and evaluate his/her work in terms of the design elements and principles, process, project requirements, and client needs. •Apply the principles and intentions of the General Education and the Business Core purposes.

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Website Design Associate Degree Program Outline Course Title

CIS119* DSN101* DSN105* DSN110* DSN115* DSN124* DSN125* DSN135* DSN140* DSN145* DSN160* DSN212 DSN214 DSN218 DSN219 DSN224 DSN228 DSN270 DSN--MGT102 MKT201 MKT--OAM223 COM121 COM122 COM--HUM--MTH102 SCI--SSC201 SSC--IDS110*

Introduction to HTML Drawing Principles Drawing Concepts 2D Design 3D Design Letterforms Typography History of Graphic Design Color Principles Digital Illustration Digital Photography Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Website Publishing Client Side Scripting Web Page Design MVC Concepts Mobile Web Design Design Externship Design Elective Introduction to Business Marketing Marketing Elective (MKT206, MKT221, MKT222, MKT230) Business Communications Composition I Composition II Communication Elective (COM201 or COM202) Humanities Elective Introductory Algebra I Science Elective Economics Social Science Elective Forum on Technology and Resources

Cr. Hrs.

Total Program Credit Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 5 110

*Foundation courses (prerequisites to all DSN200-level courses)

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Department of Design

Course No.


Workforce Development, Personal Enrichment Courses, and Business Training.

Partial List of Course Offerings

Davis College has partnered with a number of content developers to offer flexible and affordable certification programs, personal enrichment classes, as well as specialized business training programs.

EKG Technician Certification

Online Courses

Project Management Professional

Davis College has joined forces with ProTrain to offer certification courses in multiple areas to assist in career development and advancement. These courses are 100% online and can be completed at your own pace. Most courses come with instructor support.

Six Sigma Black Belt

Certified Associate Business Manager Certified Associate in Project Management Java Associate Lean Enterprise Certification 1 Phlebotomy Technician Certification

Six Sigma Green Belt A complete list can be found at daviscollege.edu/ wfd.html. If you would like additional information about our affordable certification programs, personal enrichment classes, or specialized business training programs, contact Dan Brunner, Director of Workforce Development Programs at 419.473.2700, 800.477.7021 or djbrunner@daviscollege.edu.

Classroom Courses Davis College, in collaboration with Pearson Learning Solutions, offers a number of certification courses on-site at the college. Conveniently located in Toledo, Ohio, these courses are taught by knowledgeable and experienced faculty in a traditional classroom setting. Interaction with other students as well as instructors enhances this educational experience. Personal Enrichment Davis College has teamed up with Ed2Go to offer a number of personal enrichment and resume enhancement courses. These classes are 100% online and can be completed at your own pace. Business Training Davis College can design, develop, and deliver specialized courses for businesses, creating flexible programs that meet your organization's training needs—at your location or on our campus.

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69 Department of Design


Course Descriptions

ACC135 Federal Income Tax (3-2-4) This course will explore fundamentals, terminology, and reporting for individual income tax returns. Problems will be worked manually and on the computer using tax preparation software such as Turbo Tax.

Explanation of Course Description Codes 1st digit signifies course hours; the number of hours per week a course meets in a lecture classroom. 2nd digit represents lab hours; the number of hours per week a course meets in a laboratory environment, which may be in addition to course hours.

ACC140 Purchasing and Cost Control (3-2-4)

3rd digit states credit hours; the number of credits to be awarded to students who successfully complete the course.

This class will focus on practical food and beverage cost control. Students will learn how to plan, assess, and interpret the many cost control aspects of food and beverage operations. Students will explore successful cost management strategies. Prerequisite: ACC101 Accounting Principles.

Accounting

ACC199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) The student will have the opportunity to research a topic or work on a project in the field of accounting. (Permission of the Business Administration/ Information Technology Department Chairperson is required.)

ACC101 Accounting Principles I (3-2-4) The student will complete the accounting cycle for a service business from recording transactions to producing financial statements and closing the books in preparation of a new fiscal period. The payroll process and accounting for cash, including bank reconciliation, are also included. Problems will be worked manually and on the computer.

ACC205 Corporate and Cost Accounting (3-2-4) Students will study corporation accounting with an emphasis on formation, earnings, and capital transactions. Financial statement analysis and the statement of cash flows will be studied. Departmentalization and standard/job/process cost accounting is included. Prerequisite: ACC102 Accounting Principles II.

ACC102 Accounting Principles II (3-2-4) This course builds on the basics learned in Accounting Principles I. The steps in the accounting cycle are reinforced with a study of a merchandising business. Receivables, payables, uncollectible accounts, merchandise inventory, depreciation, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), and the partnership form of business organizations are studied. Prerequisite: ACC101 Accounting Principles I.

ACC225 Accounting/Human Resource Project (0-9-3) Students will work on specific projects, externships, or service learning activities in conjunction with their specific learning objectives as well as participate in activities to work on their professional portfolio and business network. Fundamentals of customer service and strategies for formulating customer service plans may be explored.

ACC109 Accounting Software Review (1-4-3) This survey course will explore current accounting software packages including QuickBooks and Peachtree. Students will focus on basic accounting principles utilizing current technology. Prerequisite: ACC101 Accounting Principles I. ACC111 Payroll Accounting (2-2-3)

Computer Applications

The rules and regulations governing the payroll process will be explored. The student will fill out various federal and state forms that need to be completed. Journal entries related to the payroll process will be reviewed, and a comprehensive problem will be completed manually and on the computer. Prerequisite: ACC101 Accounting Principles I and CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications or equivalent.

CAS102 Basic Computer Applications(1-0-1) This course is designed to provide students with basic computer concepts and functions. CAS114 Web 2.0 (1-4-3) In this course, students will be introduced to the most common ways of communicating and collaborating in today’s online world, including but not limited to chat, online meetings, and blogging. This course may be offered in a blended or webbased format. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

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CAS120 Desktop Publishing (1-4-3)

CAS212 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications (1-4-3)

Desktop publishing programs allow the user to create sophisticated publications. In this blended course, students will be introduced to a popular desktop publishing program. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

Students will create and edit complex spreadsheets to manipulate data associated with finances or other numbers-based information. Students will also work with advanced formulas and functions; tables and data features; data analysis features; protection and sharing workbook; macros; importing, exporting, and distributing data. This course may be offered in a blended or webbased format. Prerequisite: CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications with a grade of “C” or higher.

CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications (1-4-3) In this course the students will work with spreadsheets in accounting and business situations. Entering data, using formulas to do mathematical operations, copying data and formulas from one cell to another, and setting up a presentable spreadsheet are among the topics covered.. This course may be offered in a blended or web-based format. A grade of “C” or higher is required to advance to CAS212 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

Computer Information Technology CIS100 Laptop Computer Seminar (1-0-1)

CAS123 Basics of Excel (1-0-1) In this course students will learn the basic Excel skills to create a worksheet such as editing, viewing, and printing a worksheet; working with formulas and functions; and changing the appearance of a worksheet. Prerequisite: Basic keyboarding skills. This class cannot be taken as a substitute for CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications.

CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems (2-2-3) Various versions of desktop operating systems are used to give the student hands-on experience with various tasks, such as installing, upgrading, and troubleshooting a desktop operating system. In this foundation course, students will expand on their basic knowledge of desktop operating systems.

CAS125 Excel Intermediate Skills (1-0-1) In this course students will receive a strong foundation in Excel intermediate skills. Students will learn how to chart in Excel, work with large worksheets, add graphics, use templates, and protect workbooks. Prerequisite: CAS123 Basics of Excel or CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications or equivalent. This class cannot be taken as a substitute for CAS122 Spreadsheet Applications.

CIS119 Introduction to HTML (2-2-3) Web page development is explored. Students learn how to design web pages using HTML. Emphasis is placed on web page creation, programming and scripting. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

CAS137 Basics of PowerPoint (1-0-1) After using the basic features of PowerPoint, students will work with various formatting features, animation and transition, clip art and Smart Art to create slide shows. Prerequisites: Basic keyboarding skills. This class cannot be substituted for CAS138 Presentation Graphics.

CIS125 Visual Basic.NET (2-2-3) Visual Basic is an object-oriented programming language for developing Windows applications. Students will use Visual Basic to develop simple Windows containing dialog boxes, buttons, and scroll lists. Prerequisite: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems.

CAS138 Presentation Graphics (2-2-3) This course introduces students to the basics of presentation graphics software. Students will develop basic oral presentation skills with emphasis placed on enhancing these presentations utilizing an electronic slide show. Lab time will be spent on developing a variety of slide shows, which incorporate features such as animation, transition, embedded graphics, tables, and charts. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

CIS130 Data Management and Reporting (1-4-3) The student is introduced to the theory and application of database management. Students design and build a database on personal computers using Microsoft Access. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

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Course Descriptions

In this hands-on course students will focus on the basic functions and operations of a laptop computer. Topics include application of Windows 7 procedures, basic functions of Microsoft Office 2010, and security precautions when accessing and using the Internet. Upon completion, students will be able to perform basic computer commands, access files, print documents, and complete fundamental application operations.


system. This course prepares students to take Microsoft Certification exam 70-270. Prerequisite: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems, or a minimum of one year’s experience implementing and administering any desktop operating system in a network environment.

CIS132 Internet Systems Management (2-2-3) The student will learn how to build, maintain, and grow a website in a safe and secure environment. Students will configure and maintain a website server as well as develop and publish to a website. Basic Internet terminology, business models, and UNIX commands are also covered. Prerequisite: CAS 102 Computer Applications or equivalent.

CIS199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of information technology. (Permission of the Business Administration/Information Technology Department Chairperson is required.)

CIS141 Computer Concepts and Diagnostics (2-2-3) The fundamentals of personal computer hardware are introduced. Emphasis will be on introducing students to the requirements of the A+ certification through lecture, demonstration and hands-on projects. A+ test preparation tools will be used throughout the quarter. Prerequisite: CAS102 Basic Computer Applications or equivalent.

CIS210 Network Infrastructure and Protocols (2-2-3) This course introduces the different network protocols used today and will include installing and configuring DNS and DHCP. Microsoft TCP/ IP, VPNs and remote access, WINS, IP routing, Gateway Services and RIS Security will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment.

CIS142 Networking Concepts and Diagnostics (2-2-3) Students will install and configure network interface cards, choose the correct cabling, and troubleshoot hardware for both stand-alone computers and network installations. The OSI model and different topologies are discussed. Network+ test preparation tools will be used throughout the quarter. Prerequisites: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems and CIS141 Computer Concepts and Diagnostics.

CIS215 Directory Services Design and Implementation (2-2-3) In this course the student will learn how to install, configure, and troubleshoot an Active Directory. The planning and implementation of a Windows 2008 Network structure, creating groups and policies, as well as data recovery and maintenance, will be discussed. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment.

CIS153 Network Software: Windows 2008 Server (2-2-3) The student will be trained to install, configure, and maintain the current Microsoft Windows Server as well as implement network security, troubleshoot networking connections, and optimize system performance. Prerequisite: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems.

CIS223 Advanced Data Management (1-4-3) Building on the skills learned in Data Management and Reporting, the student develops a complete business application. Specifically, the student will gain the skills to enhance a database application through menus, toolbars, and macros and will be exposed to the use of VBA modules. The topic of protecting data integrity in a multi-user environment will also be introduced. Prerequisite: CIS130 Data Management and Reporting.

CIS155 Open Source Software (2-2-3) This course is intended for students who need to understand basic network and security technology in a context of a Linux based server. The focus is practical with hands-on installation using several different versions of Linux and comparing and contrasting each. Students should have some background in operating systems and be comfortable with a Linux or Unix command line. Prerequisite: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems.

CIS228 Network Security and Administration (2-0-2) This introductory, lecture only course, covers industry-wide topics, including communication security, infrastructure security, cryptography, access control, authentication, and operational security. This course prepares students to take CompTia’s Security+ Certification Exam. Prerequisite: CIS115 Survey of Operating Systems.

CIS158 Administering MS Windows 7 (1-2-2) Students will install, configure, and perform advanced administration techniques that would be required of network administrators in a small, medium, or large network environment that uses Microsoft Windows 7 as a desktop operating

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level courses required in the Computer Forensics Diploma program (CIS141, CIS142, CIS153, CIS155, CIS158).

CIS229 Security in a Microsoft Windows Server Network (1-2-2) This course measures a student’s ability to implement, manage, maintain, and troubleshoot security in a Windows Server 2008 network infrastructure and also plan and configure a Windows Server 2008 Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). This course prepares students to take Microsoft Certification exam 70-299. Prerequisite: CIS228 Network Security and Administration, or a minimum of one-year administration of a Windows Server 2008 environment.

CIS245 File Systems (2-2-3) In this course, file systems encountered in the field are addressed including history of FAT, FAT32, NTFS, Linux, and Sub Systems. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CIS100level courses required in the Computer Forensics Diploma program (CIS141, CIS142, CIS153, CIS155, CIS158). CIS247 Network Forensics and Documentation (2-2-3)

CIS234 Database-Driven Websites (2-2-3) Students are introduced to the PHP programming language and MySQL database management system. Students will develop scripts that dynamically build web pages using content from a variety of sources including single database tables. Students will also write scripts that process and store data generated from a variety of sources including, for example, web forms. Prerequisite: CIS119 Introduction to HTML.

This course will focus on different layers used to build computer networks. Using tools to monitor those layers and collect network traffic, students will learn the necessary element of documenting their findings and creating reports. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CIS100-level courses required in the Computer Forensics Diploma program (CIS141, CIS142, CIS153, CIS155, CIS158).

ASP.NET is a web application framework programming language. Students will focus on using ASP.NET to understand basics to create and support dynamic database-driven websites, web applications, and SML web services using any Microsoft.NET language. Prerequisite: CIS119 Introduction to HTML.

The technical foundations of system infiltration (ethical hacking), foot printing, scanning, and security assessment are major components of this course. Students will also use assessment tools to understand viruses and malware in addition to setting up Honeypots and simple password cracking techniques. This course correlates with Certification Exam 31250. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CIS100-level courses required in the Computer Forensics Diploma program (CIS141, CIS142, CIS153, CIS155, CIS158).

CIS240 Routing Concepts (2-2-3) The student will learn the basic concepts of network routing. This will include network devices, TCP/IP and IP addressing, internetworking, WAN concepts, network management, access lists, routing protocols, frame relay, and configuring routers. Prerequisite: CIS142 Networking Concepts and Diagnostics.

CIS250 IT Project (0-4-2)

This course provides students the opportunity to deploy and manage software and asset management within a Windows network environment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

The student will meet for ten hours utilizing MS Project Software to create a specific project according to their specific program. This project will include 30 hours of hands-on experience in an externship or preparing for industry certification. For maximum student benefit, this course should be taken in a student’s last quarter. Prerequisite: Completion of 24 hours of technical courses and successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

CIS243 Computer Forensics (2-2-3)

CIS251 IT Project/Certification (1-4-3)

This course outlines the basic understanding of forensics and applied computer technologies. Students will learn about the science of forensics, cybercrimes, case studies, and authorized handling of evidence and confidential documents. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CIS100-

The focus of this course is to provide students the opportunity to prepare for specific certifications including A+, Network+, Cisco, CCNA, and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exams. Students may also create a specific project utilizing MS Project Software or gaining hands-on experience in an externship setting. For maximum student benefit, this

CIS241 System Center Configuration and Management (2-2-3)

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Course Descriptions

CIS249 Concepts of System Infiltration (2-2-3)

CIS239 ASP.NET (2-2-3)


course should be taken in a student’s last quarter. Prerequisite: Completion of 24 hours of technical courses and successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

adapt to significant relationship and cultural influences. Students will also learn strategies for managing self-disclosure, defensiveness, assertiveness, and conflict. Understanding will be evaluated by tests, essays, and role-plays.

Communication

Design

COM121 Composition I (5-0-5)

DSN100 Learn to Draw (1-0-1)

Students will address various audiences for assigned purposes using appropriate methods of developing ideas such as observing, remembering, evaluating, summarizing, and arguing. In addition to writing from personal experience, students research to provide support for their positions, and respond to literature. The course emphasizes strategies for collecting ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Writing is evaluated with an emphasis on support for ideas, strong sentences, clear organization, and correct mechanics.

This course provides an introduction to drawing including the basic principles of composition, values, and rendering techniques. This course is for non-design majors only. DSN101 Drawing Principles (2-2-3) Basic principles of drawing and composing twodimensional space are investigated. The student is introduced to a variety of drawing media and techniques. Linear perspective will be addressed in this course. Direct observation and interpreting photographic sources are used to develop the student’s image-making abilities.

COM122 Composition II (3-2-4) The major focus of this course is writing a research paper. Students complete each stage of the research project culminating in a paper that uses MLA documentation. Writing with supporting evidence, clear organization, effective expression, and correct mechanics is emphasized. Composition II is a blended course using both classroom and web-based learning platforms. Prerequisites: COM121 Composition I with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the General Education Department Chairperson; IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

DSN105 Drawing Concepts (2-2-3) Understanding form, positive and negative space relationships, and composition are emphasized. Students will also be introduced to the human figure as well as work with various drawing skills. Direct observation and interpreting photographic sources are used to develop the student’s imagemaking abilities. DSN110 2D Design (2-2-3) The elements and principles of design that form the foundation for composing two-dimensional space are explored. The relationship between form and space is emphasized, as well as design terminology.

COM199 Communication Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore specific topics/projects in the field of communication. (Permission of the General Education Department Chairperson is required.)

DSN115 3D Design (2-2-3) The elements and principles that form the foundation for creating forms in space are explored. The relation between form and three-dimensional space is emphasized as well as design terminology. This course also explores the concept of sustainability and green design.

COM201 Oral Communication (4-0-4) Students learn to communicate professionally in various contexts including presenting a persuasive speech. Developing speeches using research, critical thinking, and outlines are skills the course emphasizes. Evaluations will focus on adapting to audience needs and interests, organization, and effective delivery. This course may be offered in a blended format.

DSN124 Letterforms (2-2-3) The use of letterforms as expressive visual elements of graphic design is explored. The student learns to exploit typographic form, structure, and space to amplify visual messages.

COM202 Interpersonal Communication (4-0-4)

DSN125 Typography (2-2-3) Typographic form and syntax are explored. The student learns to arrange type into clear visual hierarchies that conform to the elements and principles of design.

This course emphasizes interpersonal communication as a process. Skills will be developed in creating and understanding verbal and nonverbal messages. Students will learn to identify and

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ered. This course may be offered in a blended format.

DSN127 Print Production (2-2-3) The student will learn digital prepress processes (including file, font, and color management), output options (including film, plate, and direct to press), and printing technologies (including letterpress, offset lithography, and screen printing) to gain a comprehensive understanding of print production.

DSN199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects on an independent basis. Topics are designed to meet the interests of the student in relation to professional practice. (Permission of the Design Department Chairperson is required.)

DSN130 Digital Page Composition (2-2-3) This course is an introduction to digital page composition using industry standard software (Adobe InDesign). The student acquires computer skills that are necessary for manipulating texts and images to produce effective visual communication. This course may be offered in a blended format.

DSN200 Graphic Design Principles (2-2-3) The student manipulates typographic forms and images to understand the relationship between content and form in creating meaningful visual communication. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN135 History of Graphic Design (2-0-2) The history of graphic design from the Victorian era to the present is explored. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between graphic design and culture with regard to the creation of visual communication. This course may utilize a web platform.

DSN212 Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) (2-2-3)

DSN140 Color Principles (2-2-3) Color theory and principles are investigated. The relationship between color, light, and visual perception are emphasized as well as color terminology.

DSN214 Website Publishing (2-2-3) The course introduces students to publishing and editing websites through FTP (File Transfer Protocol). Version control is also covered. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

DSN145 Digital Illustration (2-2-3) This course is an introduction to creating computer illustrations using industry standard software (Adobe Illustrator). The elements and principles of design along with the application of traditional illustration techniques to the digital environment are covered. This course may be offered in a blended format.

DSN218 Client Side Scripting (2-2-3) This course introduces the core JavaScript language. Students will use JavaScript to enhance user experience in web sites. JavaScript frameworks will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN152 Digital Video Editing (2-2-3) This course is an introduction to digital video and editing techniques including composition, lighting, and synchronizing with audio. The student will use industry standard software.

DSN219 Web Page Design (1-4-3)

This course is an introduction to digital video effects using industry standard software. The student will learn how to animate and apply visual effects to objects.

The principles of web page design are emphasized using web programming languages and industry standard software (Dreamweaver). Web standards, usability, and web content creation are main components of this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN160 Digital Photography (2-2-3)

DSN220 Packaging Design (2-2-3)

This course is an introduction to image creation and manipulation using industry standard software (Adobe Photoshop). The use of image correction tools along with adjusting levels, brightness and contrast, color balance, and curves are cov-

Formats and materials for packaging design are explored. Emphasis is placed on conceptual design solutions based on package requirements and audience analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN154 Digital Video Effects (2-2-3)

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Course Descriptions

This course builds upon basic CSS (cascading style sheets) knowledge learned in CIS119 Introduction to HTML. Emphasis will be on creating rollovers with image sprites, applying style through advanced selectors, and using multiple style sheets for layout. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.


DSN224 MVC Concepts (2-2-3)

DSN258 Kinetic Typography (2-2-3)

This course introduces students to MVC (Model View Controller) concepts and how it relates to web design. Open source MVC frameworks will be used to create dynamic websites. Server side languages are also introduced. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

This course introduces the student to typographic transformations using time-based media to amplify visual messages. Narrative structures are explored with relation to typography and visual communication. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN228 Mobile Web Design (2-2-3)

The culmination of the skills learned is applied to hands-on experience at an appropriate facility. The student will perform 60 contact hours. Prerequisites: Student needs to have completed 30 credit hours in major courses and have a 3.0 GPA in those courses. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

DSN270 Design Externship (0-6-2)

Building websites in a mobile context will be studied. Students will learn how to use CSS media queries to provide a responsive web design. Students will also study current frameworks and tools that aid in building mobile websites. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

DSN299 Contemporary Graphic Design Issues ( Credit Hours 1-5)

DSN230 Publication Design (2-2-3) In this course students write, design, and produce a commercially printed design journal. Format, text, and image solutions are based on content, formal characteristics, and audience analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

Technological, professional, societal, and cultural issues related to graphic design are explored. Topics vary each quarter. (Permission of the Design Department Chairperson is required.)

Early Childhood Education

DSN240 Visual Identity Systems (2-2-3) Corporate identity systems are researched and analyzed. Elements and applications are emphasized. Students create an identity system that reflects corporate history, organizational structure, corporate philosophy, and market position. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

ECE102 Introduction to Education (3-0-3) Students will study the evolution of education and the various programs available in the education field. This course examines school organization and finance, including non-profit and profit schools, company-sponsored, and government-run programs. Students will participate in 5 hours of community service.

DSN252 Motion Design Principles (2-2-3) Design elements and principles are applied to time-based media. The student is introduced to editing theory and dynamic visual message making. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

ECE112 Child Development (4-0-4) This course focuses on levels of development of children through physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and language theories and research. Emphasis is placed on the environment and its relationship to development.

DSN254 3D Modeling (2-2-3) This course introduces the student to concepts of 3D modeling using industry standard software. Modeling, lighting, and texture mapping are major components of the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

ECE114 Literacy for Young Children (3-2-4) Students will become familiar with the many different tools and guidelines for literacy by utilizing the Early Learning Content Standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) that encourage literacy and writing. Books, flannel boards, pictures, etc. will be studied to use as “grabbers,� introductions, activities, follow-up, and transitions.

DSN256 Computer Animation (2-2-3) This course introduces the student to animating objects using industry standard software. Animation concepts including keyframes, interpolation, timing, and transformation are covered. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

ECE117 Positive Management/Behavioral Issues (1-4-3) Students are provided the opportunity to observe and evaluate different types of discipline techniques. Students are to concentrate on gaining knowledge of how to build positive self-concepts,

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individual strengths, and develop a positive environment with developmentally appropriate lesson plans.

ECE211 Early Childhood Organization/ Administration/Licensing (5-0-5) The day-to-day operation of a child development center will be explored, from implementing staff issues to parent and licensing concerns. Students will investigate proper and legal equipment needs. Real life scenarios will be reviewed, and students will analyze and problem-solve the situations. This is a critical course in understanding the rules and regulations of state childcare licensing and implementation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

ECE118 Art, Music, and Play for Early Childhood Education (2-2-3) This course concentrates on play and the different approaches and creativity to environments. The emphasis is on art and music, which reaches into the hearts of children, and its importance in keeping children thinking creatively. Prerequisite: ECE102 Introduction to Education or ECE112 Child Development.

ECE214 Multicultural Diversity (2-2-3)

ECE120 Infant/Toddler Development (2-2-3)

This course showcases understanding differences and cultural teachings. Students will develop developmentally appropriate lesson planning techniques which will reflect an understanding of the values of other cultures. An understanding of immigration and citizenship will be studied and discussed. Prerequisite: ECE102 Introduction to Education or ECE112 Child Development.

The focus of this course is on the developmental levels for the early years. Teaching aids will be developed and students will have a lab experience with infants and toddlers. Prerequisite: ECE102 Introduction to Education or ECE112 Child Development. ECE122 Early Childhood Education Professional Relations (3-0-3)

Health, nutrition, and safety are explored. Lesson plans that are developmentally appropriate will be planned. Community helpers will be implemented in their labs. Upon completion, students will receive First Aid, Infectious Disease, CPR, and Child Abuse Prevention certifications and cards. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment. ECE250 Early Childhood Education Practicum and Seminar (1-12-5)

ECE124 Preschool/School-Age Development (2-4-4)

Students will do on-site teaching at an approved childcare site where they will have an opportunity to apply all skills learned in the Early Childhood program. Observation of the administration is also included. The student will be evaluated and a file kept for each student. Age groups will vary, but concentration will be three to five year olds. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ECE classes.

The student will receive hands-on experience and understanding of implementing proper developmentally appropriate lesson plans. The learner will have a clear understanding of ODE Early Learning Content Standards for Preschool and School-Age Children. While working with the children, the students will construct a unit of lesson plans and teaching aids. Prerequisite: ECE102 Introduction to Education or ECE112 Child Development

Fashion

ECE208 Special Education Programming (2-2-3)

FSH115 Cultural Influences in Fashion (4-0-4)

Special education programs will be reviewed, with emphasis on understanding and implementing these programs for special needs children. Students will explore sound, early intervention practices, and review curriculums. The importance of testing and record keeping will be studied, and case studies will focus on respect issues for families and providers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

The progression of fashion from early Egyptian time to present day is explored with reference to the climatic, social-economic, and religious influences. Particular emphasis is placed on recognizing and analyzing recurring themes in clothing, cosmetics, and accessories.

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Course Descriptions

ECE222 Health, Nutrition, and Safety (2-4-4)

Students will examine community, family, and school relationships and explore what it means to be professional as they encounter stressful but realistic situations, which include understanding the diversity within families relating to discipline and communication. Students will be provided with an overview of the importance of professionalism and presentation in the early childhood field.


FSH199 Independent Study/Seminar (1-5)

HUM201 Thinking Strategies (3-0-3)

Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of fashion merchandising. (Permission of the Business Administration/Information Technology Department Chairperson is required.)

Students in this class will examine the thinking and decision-making process. They will be challenged to notice cultural influences in thinking, to express their own ideas logically, and to analyze the ideas of others through reading, writing, and discussion. This course may be offered in a blended format.

FSH200 Fashion Principles (5-0-5) This survey course explores the fashion industry. Topics to be discussed will include individual designers and their contributions to and their financial impact on the fashion industry; trends in retailing, analysis, and marketing; and advertising and promotion. The design, production, and marketing of apparel from the development of fabrics to the strategies of fashion merchandisers will also be explored. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

Interdisciplinary IDS101 Career and Life Planning (1-0-1) This course will enable students to develop their own individualized plan for personal, academic, and career success. Students will engage in selfevaluation exercises and highly interactive classroom activities in order to formulate an effective and realistic action plan. IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources (4-2-5)

Humanities

This interdisciplinary, blended course empowers students to be successful by providing opportunities to cultivate values and technological skills needed to enhance their careers and to be capable life-long learners. Essential computer applications that enhance marketability are integrated with self-management skills, which include critical thinking, learning strategies, time management, and diversity. Students will research topics for written and oral reports and develop a career portfolio that is used throughout their program for assessment. This course is a prerequisite for all Mid-Program Assessments. Prerequisite: CAS102 Basic Computer Applications, WPR109 Basic Keyboarding or equivalent.

HUM135 Rhetoric of Film and Culture (3-0-3) This course is designed to survey American and international cinema and determine through critical analysis the influence that culture has on the form and content of the film medium. Students will analyze and describe film as a significant rhetorical means of influencing and communicating culture. Coursework includes screening film, discussions, and written critiques. This course may utilize either a blended or web-based format. HUM151 Literature and Culture (3-0-3) The goal of the class is to read short stories, essays, poetry, biography, and fiction that will enable students to explore the similarities and differences among people of North America whose voices are seldom heard.

IDS201 Service Learning (1-4-3) The course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of social responsibility, volunteerism, community service, and civic engagement as it relates to the successful operating of today’s society and social economy. Through service learning, students gain insights into the application of common business skills and also gain experience in organizations that may broaden their vision and better prepare them for their chosen professions. The service activity as well as specific assignments and reflections connect the activity to coursework, and it relates directly to academic studies and potentially to future careers. Each student will participate in a service learning experience for up to 40 hours during the term and share their experiences with peers through reflective web-based forums and presentations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

HUM153 Literature of the Old Testament (3-0-3) The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the content of selected Old Testament texts in an academic setting. Expect to discuss and analyze various genres of literature such as history, hero stories, prophecy, poetry, law, and wisdom literature as an insight into ancient cultures. HUM199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Students are provided the opportunity to explore specific topics/projects in the field of humanities. (Permission of the General Education Department Chairperson is required.)

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and culture with regard to the creation of furniture, furnishings, and interior space. This course may be offered in a blended format.

Insurance INS101 Principles of Insurance (4-0-4) This course focuses primarily on the consumers of insurance and provides background information on the modern property and casualty insurance systems. A basic overview of insurance law, risk management, and insurance products will be explored.

INT120 History of Interior Design: Early American to Present (3-0-3) This history of interior design from the early American era to the present places emphasis on the relationship between interior design and culture with regard to the creation of furniture, furnishings, and interior space. This course may be offered in a blended format.

INS110 Personal Insurance (4-0-4) Students will learn personal insurance concepts and products as they explore automobile insurance, residential insurance, homeowners insurance, life and health insurance, long-term health care, financial planning, and other property and liability insurance coverages. This class will assist students in handling their own personal insurance needs.

INT125 Floor Planning (1-4-3) This course investigates space planning for residential design and introduces students to interior design computer software. INT130 Drafting Techniques (1-4-3) This course is an introduction to drafting principles and techniques. The use of scale, dimensioning, and developing an architectural lettering style are emphasized.

INS210 Property and Liability Insurance (4-0-4) This lecture course will provide students with knowledge essential for understanding the property and liability areas of insurance. Topics such as different types of insurers, institutions that provide insurances, how the insurance industry is regulated, insurance marketing, underwriting, and claims will be explored. Students will also be exposed to insurance contracts and risk management.

Students will study the development of textiles from fiber to finished fabric. Fabric qualities are explored in detail and will be related to interior furnishings and fabric applications. INT199 Independent Study/Seminar (1-5) Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of interior design. (Permission of the Design Department Chairperson is required.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

INS220 Commercial Insurance (4-0-4) Students will analyze the insurance needs of businesses in this commercial insurance course. Concepts such as property insurance, commercial crime insurance, general liability insurance, business income insurance, worker’s compensation, and commercial automobile insurance will be explored.

INT220 Interior Design: Residential (1-4-3) The design of residential spaces and applying the elements and principles of design to solutions is the focus of this course. Depicting elevations, rendering techniques, choosing finishes and furniture pieces for presentation boards, and providing details are a major part of this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

INS250 Insurance and Risk Management Externship (0-9-3) This course has been developed to offer Insurance and Risk Management students an opportunity to work in the insurance environment. Students will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment

INT230 Interior Design: Commercial (1-4-3) This course investigates the design of commercial spaces. Depicting elevations, learning and choosing furniture, fixtures, and finishes for commercial use are a major part of this course. Ergonomic and sustainable design are also introduced. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

Interior Design INT110 History of Interior Design: Prehistoric to Early American (3-0-3) In the history of interior design from Prehistoric times to the early American era, emphasis is placed on the relationship between interior design

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Course Descriptions

INT138 Textiles (1-4-3)


Medical

INT231 Space Planning (1-4-3) The principles of space planning for residential and commercial applications are investigated. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

MED101 Medical Terminology (3-0-3) This medical terminology course utilizes an audio-visual presentation. Identification of medical terminology elements, proper pronunciation, spelling, and medical abbreviations will be the focus of this class. A grade of “C” or higher is required for a student to take additional MED courses.

INT232 Computer Aided Drafting and Design (1-4-3) This course is an introduction to drafting techniques and space planning using CAD software applications. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

MED110 Administrative Medical Office Procedures (2-4-4)

INT234 Advanced Computer Aided Drafting and Design (1-4-3)

This course is designed to give students experience working with health information technology, which includes a practice management program and electronic health records (EHR). The student will manage the revenue cycle, document patient encounters, charge and bill patient encounters, produce reports, and follow up with patients. In addition, the student will be instructed in professionalism, managing office supplies and equipment, records management, and telephone techniques. This course may be offered in a blended or web-based format. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources; MED101 Medical Terminology; and MED114 Basic Insurance and Coding.

This course is designed to build upon the skills learned in INT232. Students will execute projects that are specific to interior design applications. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment and INT232 Computer Aided Drafting and Design with a letter grade of “C” or better.. INT235 Window Treatments (1-4-3) The design and applications of window treatments are investigated. Emphasis is placed on conceptual visualization techniques and an understanding of materials. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

MED112 Medical Law and Ethics (3-0-3)

INT243 Interior Design Externship (0-12-4)

This course is designed to instruct the student in the moral and legal responsibilities of the medical profession. It will identify the roles of the physician and the office personnel in these areas. Included will be legalities of record keeping, public duties and responsibilities, negligence, necessity of following OSHA and HIPAA guidelines, consent forms, authorization forms for various procedures, and medical ethics.

The culmination of the skills learned in interior design is applied to hands-on experience at an appropriate facility. Thirty (30) hours of work is equivalent to one credit hour. Prerequisites: Student needs to have completed 30 credit hours in major courses and have a 3.0 GPA in those courses. INT244 Lighting (1-4-3)

MED114 Basic Insurance and Coding (3-2-4)

Principles and application of lighting design are investigated. The properties of light, color theory, lighting applications, and familiarity with the National Electric Code are emphasized. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

Students will be introduced to medical documentation, HIPAA guidelines, and the medical billing cycle. A review and comprehension of various health insurance coverage and completion of the CMS-1500 insurance form will be completed in this class. Students will be introduced to Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 and/or ICD10), and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code books. Students will learn the importance of assigning proper codes and the effect it has on the payment process. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisite: MED101 Medical Terminology.

INT299 Contemporary Interior Design Issues ( 1-5) Technological, professional, societal, and cultural issues related to interior design are explored. Topics vary each quarter. (Permission of the Design Department Chairperson is required.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

MED116 Medical Insurance Billing (2-2-3) This course is designed for students to continue to master the analysis of medical records and as-

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signment of codes for indexing diagnoses, symptoms, diagnostic tests, procedures, and treatments and to provide information for insurance forms. Students will become familiar with manual and electronic claim forms and the effect of assigning the proper code on the reimbursement process for various payers in the insurance industry. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisites: MED110 Administrative Medical Office Procedures, MED114 Basic Insurance and Coding, MED122 Coding and Applications A, and MED123 Coding and Applications B.

MED123 Coding and Applications B (3-0-3) This course teaches the numerical coding system (Current Procedural Terminology – CPT), published by the AMA and CMS and used to report medical procedures and treatment along with numerical and alphabetical codes when reporting disease, injuries, and external causes of disease as well as supplemental classifications of disease using the ICD-9-CM and/or ICD-10-CM code book. The systems studied in this course include anatomical descriptors and body directions, circulatory, cardiovascular, hemic and lymphatic, digestive, urinary, reproductive, maternity and delivery, and endocrine. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisite: MED114 Basic Insurance and Coding; Corequisite: MED119 Anatomy and Physiology B.

MED118 Anatomy and Physiology A (3-2-4) The focus of this course is the study of particular body systems, their structures, functions, disease processes, disorders, treatments, drug classifications associated with the particular system, and terminology pertaining to each system. Included will be anatomical descriptors and body directions, the cell, integumentary, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and nervous systems. Laboratory instruction and assignments are included in this course to reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisite: MED 101 Medical Terminology.

MED124 Pathophysiology (3-0-3)

MED119 Anatomy and Physiology B (3-2-4)

MED133 Understanding HIPAA (1-0-1)

The study of particular body systems, their structures, functions, disease processes, disorders, treatments, drug classifications associated with the particular system, and terminology pertaining to each system will be the focus of this course. Systems included will be the circulatory, blood, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine. Laboratory instruction and assignments are included in this course to reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisite: MED 101 Medical Terminology.

This course is designed to assist the student in understanding HIPAA guidelines as they pertain to the medical office. Work ethics, professionalism, and compliance issues will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on identifying patient confidentiality and the importance of meeting HIPAA regulations. MED137 Introduction to Emergency Preparedness (1-0-1) In this course students will explore the impact of man-made and natural disasters on public health and healthcare systems. Discussion will include emergency management roles from the local, regional, and national levels, along with the role of hospitals and healthcare facilities. Instruction will be given in personal preparedness and emergency response procedures, which include CPR and First Aid.

MED122 Coding and Applications A (3-0-3) This course teaches the numerical coding system (Current Procedural Terminology – CPT), published by the AMA and CMS and used to report medical procedures and treatment along with numerical and alphabetical codes when reporting disease, injuries, and external causes of disease as well as supplemental classifications of disease using the ICD-9-CM and/ or ICD-10-CM code book. The systems studied in this course include anatomical descriptors and body directions, evaluation and management, anesthesia, integumentary, musculoskeletal, respiratory, nervous system, eye and ear, radiology, pathology and general medicine. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisite: MED114 Basic Insurance and Coding; Corequisite: MED118 Anatomy and Physiology A.

MED201 Introduction to Clinical Office Procedures (2-2-3) This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide the student an introduction to clinical office procedures with entry level knowledge and performance skills in infection control, universal precautions, and guidelines as mandated by OSHA and other regulating bodies. The student will learn the importance of sterilization, sanitization, and disinfection techniques as well as preparing instruments for the sterilization procedure. This course emphasizes the importance of

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Course Descriptions

This course focuses on the various diseases affecting the human body. The emphasis of this class will include disease definitions, etiology, diagnostic studies, and treatments. Prerequisites: MED118 Anatomy and Physiology A and MED119 Anatomy and Physiology B.


medical asepsis, teaches the student how to take vital signs, and introduces medical record documentation. Students will also gain hands-on experience with electronic health records and HIPAA guidelines. Students will be expected to display the same conduct and professionalism that will be required in a medical office facility. A grade of “C” or higher is required for students to take additional 200 level MED classes. Prerequisites: MED foundation courses with a grade of “C” or higher and successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

MED212 Basic Laboratory Procedures (3-2-4) This lecture and laboratory course will provide the student with knowledge and skills essential in the medical laboratory. Procedures will include venipuncture, hematology, urinalysis, and basic laboratory tests utilized by the physician in diagnosing diseases and disorders. This course will provide students with knowledge and performance skills in infection control, universal precautions, and guidelines as mandated by OSHA and other regulating bodies. The student will use electronic health records and follow HIPAA guidelines. Prerequisites: MED203 Clinical Specialty Examination Procedures, MED205 Minor Surgery and Diagnostic Office Procedures. Corequisite: MED208 Pharmacology.

MED203 Clinical Specialty Examination Procedures (3-2-4) This lecture and laboratory course includes instruction in the role and responsibilities of the medical assistant with various examinations, including physical examinations, eye and ear assessment, gynecology examination, prenatal care, pediatric examination, and cardiopulmonary procedures. This class will provide the student with knowledge and performance skills in infection control, universal precautions, and guidelines as mandated by OSHA and other regulating bodies. The student will use electronic health records and follow HIPAA guidelines. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisite: MED201 Introduction to Clinical Office Procedures.

MED220 Medical Insurance and Coding Capstone (2-2-3) Students will be provided the opportunity to reinforce and utilize the knowledge gained in coding and insurance billing with emphasis placed on practice and preparation for the CPC exam. The student will further develop a career portfolio that will be used for course, program, and career development assessment. Eligibility requirements: completion of all required Medical (MED) foundation courses with a “C” or higher and successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment. Prerequisite: MED116 Medical Insurance Billing. Corequisite: MED225 Medical Insurance and Coding Externship.

MED205 Minor Surgery and Diagnostic Office Procedures (3-2-4) This lecture and laboratory course includes instruction in the role and responsibilities of the medical assistant to assist with minor office surgery and physical agents to promote tissue healing including usage of heating pads, hot and cold soaks, compresses, and chemical packs. The student will be introduced to the male reproductive health issues, colon and radiologic procedures, and various diagnostic imaging procedures. The student will use electronic health records and follow HIPAA guidelines. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisite: MED201 Introduction to Clinical Office Procedures.

MED225 Medical Insurance and Coding Externship (0-9-3) Medical Insurance and Coding majors have an opportunity at the end of their program to utilize and enhance knowledge and skills while receiving hands-on experience working with various billing programs while in the field. The student, under supervision, will complete 90 hours of externship in a medical billing facility. Eligibility requirements: completion of all specified medical (MED) and foundation courses with a “C” or higher, successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment, accumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, report of a physical examination and drug screen on file at the College, attendance at the pre-externship meeting, and availability to complete a minimum of 90 hours of work experience in a medical or billing setting during normal workday hours (8:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Monday through Friday). Prerequisite: MED116 Medical Insurance Billing, Corequisite: MED220 Medical Insurance and Coding Capstone.

MED208 Pharmacology (3-2-4) This lecture and laboratory course will focus on pharmacology principles such as drug calculations, administration of pediatric and adult oral and parenteral medication, as well as frequently prescribed medications. This class will provide the student with knowledge and performance skills in infection control, universal precautions, and guidelines as mandated by OSHA and other regulating bodies. A grade of “C” or higher is required in this course. Prerequisites: MED201 Introduction to Clinical Office Procedures and MTH102 Introductory Algebra I.

MED250 Clinical Practicum (3-18-9) In this course Medical Assisting majors will demonstrate their skills and knowledge in a physi-

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cian’s office or health care facility. The student will, under supervision, complete a minimum of 160 hours of externship experience in clinical and administrative duties. Students are required to meet weekly for portfolio review, certification examination preparation, and discussion of learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Eligibility requirements: successful completion of all specified (MED) and foundation courses with a “C” or higher; availability to complete a minimum of 160 hours of work experience in a medical facility during normal workday hours (8:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Monday through Friday). The following documentation is required to be on file at the College: certification in healthcare provider CPR, First Aid, emergency preparedness, physical examination, and drug screen.

MGT115 Human Resource Management (4-0-4) As an introduction to the field of human resource management, the role and responsibility of the human resource manager will be explored. All of the activities involved in acquiring, maintaining, and developing an organization’s human resources in order to meet organizational objectives will be examined. Students will have the opportunity to observe different human resource management systems. This course may be offered in a blended format. MGT118 Special Event Management (3-0-3) This course prepares students to successfully organize and manage special events. Students will explore the fundamentals of event planning from conception to on-site operations. Topics covered include selecting the venue; preparing and managing the budget; scheduling, staffing and collaborating with other related professionals; and coordinating food and beverage, décor, entertainment, and themes.

Management MGT102 Introduction to Business (5-0-5) The student will study the basic concepts of business operations in our society and the various functions within a business enterprise. Aspects of business from basic economics to marketing principles will be included as topics for discussion. This course is a valuable starting point for further business management study or an excellent review of the fundamentals of business.

This introductory course assists students in learning the fundamentals of the hospitality industry. It will provide a comprehensive view of the hotel, restaurant, and recreational businesses. Students will also examine an array of careers available in the hospitality industry.

MGT105 Business Law (4-0-4) This course introduces the student to the legal aspects of common business transactions, contract law, tort law, business organizations, agency law, and governmental regulations.

MGT160 Human Resource Training and Development (4-0-4) This course incorporates training and developing human resources, industry needs assessment, program planning, understanding and utilizing learning principles, and managing employee relations.

MGT109 Basic Money Management (1-0-1) In this web-based course, students will learn basic personal finance concepts that will allow them to understand basic money management fundamentals such as income, expenses, assets, liabilities, and risk management. The knowledge gained from this course will allow students to incorporate these concepts into their everyday lives, thus providing them with knowledge and skills that will last a lifetime.

MGT199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of management. (Permission of the Business Administration/ Information Technology Department Chairperson is required.)

MGT110 Personal Finance (3-0-3) Students taking this course will use an active approach to help develop successful financial skills. The practical aspects of financial management, with an emphasis on decision making in order to achieve financial goals, will be explored. During this class students will create a personal budget and develop an understanding of money management activities. This course may be offered in a blended format.

MGT202 Merchandising Management (3-2-4) Tactical decisions concerning merchandising and store management are explored in this course. Topics covered include merchandise budget planning, buying merchandise, managing store employees, reducing inventory losses, and managing customer service. This course may be offered in a blended format.

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Course Descriptions

MGT140 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (3-0-3)


tendency and dispersion, construction of tables and graphs, probability, sampling, decision-making under uncertainty, study of indexes, simple regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: MTH102 Introductory Algebra I.

MGT205 International Business (3-0-3) Students will learn basic international business concepts and skills they will need to function successfully as world-class employees in today’s global economy. This course will incorporate cultural geography, international economics, global entrepreneurship, and human resource management issues in the study of international business. This course may be offered in a blended format.

MGT240 Foodservice Operations Management (4-0-4) Students are introduced to the operational and management practices in both startup and established restaurants. Appropriate service, customer relations, and menu development are also explored. Students will also be exposed to the financial management of foodservice operations, including pricing, budgets, cost control, payroll, fixed assets, leasing, and cash and revenue control.

MGT211 Management Principles (4-0-4) Management Principles is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of management, administrative staff, and operations management. The student will conduct a thorough examination of management thought including historical management philosophy and contemporary philosophy. The course includes a study of successful management principles and techniques.

MGT245 Lodging Operations Management (4-0-4) This class will expose students to the different operations within the lodging industry. Students will examine all aspects including front office, finance, marketing, and housekeeping through the use of case studies and practical applications. The latest issues affecting the industry will also be explored.

MGT213 Small Business Management (4-0-4) This course introduces the student to hands-on management theories and practical information helpful for operating small entrepreneurial endeavors. The components of a business plan and its importance to the success of a business endeavor will be covered. Students will be required to prepare a business plan using the concepts discussed in this course.

MGT248 Service Quality Management (3-0-3) Students will study the concepts and principles of service quality management, with emphasis on various ways that organizations achieve excellence in the guest experience.

MGT215 Sports Industry Management (4-0-4) This course will focus on the unique management challenges in the sports industry and incorporates information about functional areas such as finance, marketing, and legal aspects of that industry. Students will examine management principles, concepts, and issues from the perspective of how to improve the performance of sports organizations. This course may be offered in a blended format.

MGT250 Business Management Externship (0-9-3) This course has been developed to offer business management students an opportunity to work in a business environment. Students will take this externship in conjunction with MKT206 Principles of Selling and will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Mid-Program Assessment.

MGT220 Human Resource Law and Benefits (5-0-5) This course focuses on all aspects of employment law. Students will learn the procedures and laws surrounding the hiring process which includes recruiting, the application and interview process, and conducting background checks. Special emphasis will be placed on how to manage a diverse workforce by understanding affirmative action, harassment law, and all aspects of Title VII. Students will also focus on pay, benefits, union relations, and safety and health issues.

MGT251 Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising Externship (0-9-3) The culmination of skills learned in Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising is applied in a hands-on experience at an appropriate facility. Students will take this course in conjunction with MKT206 Principles of Selling and will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

MGT230 Statistics (4-0-4) An introduction to the following are covered in this course: methods of collection, tabulation, presentation, and analysis of numerical data including frequency distributions, measures of central

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order to better understand the selling process. Fundamentals of sales such as understanding consumer buying behavior and relationship management are also explored. Students will also participate in activities to work on their professional portfolio and continue the development of their business network. This course may be offered in a blended format. Students enrolled in Business Management, Hospitality Management, Retail Management and Fashion Merchandising, Marketing, and Sports and Recreation Marketing will take this course in conjunction with their externship.

MGT252 Hospitality Management Externship (0-9-3) This course has been developed to give Hospitality Management majors an opportunity to work in an appropriate business. Students will take this course in conjunction with MKT206 Principles of Selling and will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MidProgram Assessment.

Marketing

MKT212 Nonprofit Marketing (4-0-4)

MKT101 Merchandising (3-2-4)

This course will give students an understanding of the basic organizational structures, systems, and practices of nonprofit organizations. Emphasis will be placed on identifying various types of nonprofit organizations, nonprofit marketing mixes, and nonprofit marketing strategies. This course may be offered in a blended format.

This course identifies the functions performed by merchandisers and the variety of decisions merchandisers make to satisfy the needs of their customers in a highly competitive market. Background information is presented to develop and effectively implement a merchandise market strategy. This course may be offered in a blended format. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

The Referral-Based Marketing class covers every aspect of a well-rounded, referral-based marketing program. The students will clearly understand what they are selling, whether it is themselves for a job or a product or service for a business. Each of the modules represents a highly interactive workshop for each participant.

MKT201 Marketing (5-0-5) Basic marketing principles covering product development and termination, distribution strategies, promotion, pricing, and marketing analysis are covered. Specifics such as conducting marketing research, ethics, the marketing environment, and target market analysis are also included. The student is expected to complete a marketing plan to enhance the theoretical and practical understanding of the marketing decision-making process. This course may be offered in a blended format. Prerequisite: MGT102 Introduction to Business.

MKT222 Internet Marketing (3-2-4) This course explores the marketing opportunities and challenges facing web marketers. Topics covered include developing an online marketing strategy, online selling, and web-based promotions. Special emphasis is placed on emerging e-commerce strategies, such as permission marketing, affiliate programs, social networking, and e-mail strategies. This course may be offered in a blended format. Prerequisite: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

MKT203 Sports and Entertainment Marketing (4-0-4) Concepts that differentiate the marketing of sports and entertainment from the marketing of tangible products are studied. Students will study the basic functions of marketing, marketing products and services through sports, applying market information to recreational events, and careers in sports marketing. This course may be offered in a blended format. Prerequisite: MGT102 Introduction to Business.

MKT230 Integrated Marketing Communications (3-2-4) Students will analyze the integrated marketing communications approach businesses utilize in public relations and advertising campaigns. This course will focus on the study of communication activities used to create and maintain favorable relationships between an organization and various public groups, both external and internal. Students will be directed through the process of building an integrated marketing communications plan which will enhance their understanding of the decision making process. This course

MKT206 Principles of Selling (4-0-4) Students learn techniques for the development of an effective sales presentation including the approach, securing desire, handling objections, and closing the sale. The student selects a product or service, develops a complete sales presentation, and role-plays the presentation in class in

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Course Descriptions

MKT221 Referral-Based Marketing (4-0-4)


may be offered in a blended format. Prerequisites: COM121 Composition I; IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

(Credit Hours 1-5) Independent study/seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of math. (Permission of the General Education Department Chairperson is required.)

MKT239 Visual Merchandising (3-2-4) Students will learn hands-on techniques for creating effective visual displays. Emphasis will be placed on basic design elements, use of signage and mannequins, color, lighting, and careers in the visual merchandising area.

Office Administration OAM108 Proofreading and Voice Recognition (2-2-3)

MKT250 Marketing Externship (0-12-4) This course has been developed to offer marketing students an opportunity to work in a business environment. Students will take this course in conjunction with MKT206 Principles of Selling and will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

This course is designed to develop and reinforce proofreading skills. Rules of basic grammar, spelling, and punctuation will be reviewed as students will proofread, edit, and correct documents. Students will practice using a reference manual effectively and efficiently. Throughout the course, students will use voice recognition software. The importance of producing mailable/useable copy will be emphasized.

MKT255 Sports and Recreation Marketing Externship (0-12-4) The culmination of the skills learned from courses in the Sports and Recreation Marketing program is applied in a hands-on experience at an appropriate facility. Students will take this externship in conjunction with MKT206 Principles of Selling and will focus on learning outcomes derived from their externship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment.

OAM121 Introduction to Office Administration (2-2-3)

Mathematics

OAM199 Independent Study/Seminar Credit Hours (1-5)

This course introduces the student to basic techniques needed to transcribe dictation from digital recording equipment. Students will review basic grammar, spelling, punctuation, and formatting along with a review of customer service skills through text exercises and the use of an office reference manual. Prerequisite: Basic keyboarding skills. Corequisite: WPR120 Word Processing.

MTH100 Introduction to Math (3-0-3)

Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of office administration. (Permission of the Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Department Chairperson required.)

This course is designed to improve basic computation skills, as well as introduce the student to some preliminary algebraic manipulations. The material covers whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Correct terminology will be used. Application problems are used extensively throughout the course.

OAM219 Administrative Professional Capstone (1-2-2)

MTH102 Introductory Algebra I (5-0-5)

This course will provide assessment for various skill sets within program majors during students final quarter. Additionally, students will refine and update their portfolios and present them for final critique. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment, and a “C” or better in the following classes: WPR220 Advanced Word Processing, CAS212 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications. Additional prerequisite for Medical Secretarial majors: a “C” or better in MED110 Administrative Medical Office Procedures. Additional prerequisite for Insurance majors: a “C” average in INS classes.

This course is an introduction to algebra. The content will cover the study of integers, the solution of equations with one and two unknowns, and coordinate graphing. Correct terminology will be taught. Application problems are used extensively throughout the course. MTH202 Introductory Algebra II (5-0-5) This course is a continuation of Introductory Algebra I, covering polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, and radicals. Prerequisite: MTH102 Introductory Algebra I. MTH299 Independent Study/Seminar

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a student’s last quarter. (Required of students receiving transfer credit for OAM223 Business Communications).

OAM221 Administrative Professional Externship (0-9-3) This course has been developed to afford students an opportunity at the end of their program to utilize and enhance knowledge and skills while receiving hands-on experience working for local businesses. Under supervision the student will perform tasks and procedures and receive feedback on his/her performance. Eligibility requirements: Successful completion of Mid-Program Assessment, availability during normal weekday working hours (8:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Monday through Friday), and an accumulative GPA of 2.0. Prerequisites: WPR220 Advanced Word Processing, COM121 Composition I, CAS212 Advanced Spreadsheet Applications, OAM108 Proofreading and Voice Recognition, OAM121 Introduction to Office Administration. Additional prerequisites for Medical majors: MED110 Administrative Medical Office Procedures and MED112 Medical Law and Ethics. Additional prerequisites for Insurance majors: INS101 Principles of Insurance, INS110 Personal Insurance, INS210 Property and Liability Insurance, INS220 Commercial Insurance. Corequisite: OAM219 Administrative Professional Capstone.

Social Science SSC130 Contemporary Social Issues (4-0-4) Selected contemporary social issues as they spring from and affect the social context in which we live and work are analyzed. Students will explore topics such as poverty, crime, and challenges resulting from diversity in age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Potential approaches to these issues will be examined. SSC199 Social Science Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Students will have the opportunity to explore specific topics/projects in the field of the social sciences. (Permission of the General Education Department Chairperson is required.)

Included in this course are the process and determinants of overall activity and trade among nations, income and employment, supply and demand, and monetary and fiscal policies as they affect the economy and society as a whole. The course includes both micro and macro economic principles.

OAM223 Business Communications (3-2-4) Students will be required to write the various types of correspondence they may be responsible for in business, such as letters, memos, resumes, and electronic communications. The importance of correct mechanics, clear expression, correct style, and thorough planning will be emphasized. In addition to written communication, this course also includes interview techniques, job search techniques, and business etiquette. In this blended course, additional assignments and instruction are given using a web-based learning platform. For maximum student benefit, this course should be taken in a student’s last quarter. Prerequisites: COM121 Composition I, IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources.

SSC213 Introduction to Psychology (4-0-4) The science of behavior and mental process is examined. Topics include human development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, thinking, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapies, health and well being.

Science SCI160 Environmental Issues (3-0-3) The goal of this course is to prepare students to make responsible decisions regarding environmental issues as individuals, citizens, and members of their chosen career communities. The course will challenge students to think critically about various points of view proposed by scientists investigating environmental problems. This course may be offered in a blended format.

OAM234 Professional Development (1-0-1) The overall goal of professional development is to help prepare the student to begin the job search and gain employment. The student will be required to prepare professional employment communications, participate in a mock interview and a portfolio review, as well as investigate job search possibilities on the Internet. Professional development students should contact the current Business Communications instructor during the first week of the quarter to set up meeting dates and times. This course should be taken in

SCI165 Nutrition (3-0-3) This course presents a cumulative approach to the study of nutrition. Scientific principles regarding the body’s use of food and nutrients and how they impact cellular health are examined. Students apply critical thinking to various theories surround-

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Course Descriptions

SSC201 Economics (4-0-4)


ing nutrition, food labeling, and diet planning. Dietary needs of various age groups and disease states are explored.

WPR120 Word Processing (1-4-3) Basic procedures of entering, editing, formatting, printing, and storing documents on a computer using a word processing software package will be featured in this course. Students will also gain an understanding of many of the intermediate features of word processing software by creating documents utilizing find and replace, bullets and numbering, tabs and tabbed columns, and headers and footers. This course provides students with foundation skills needed to succeed on the Administrative Professionals Mid-Program Assessment and in the Advanced Word Processing course. This course may be offered in a blended or web-based format. A grade of “C” or higher is required to advance to WPR220 Advanced Word Processing. Prerequisite: Basic keyboarding skills.

Word Processing WPR109 Basic Keyboarding (0-2-1) Beginning keyboarding skills are introduced in this course. Proper keyboarding techniques are also reinforced. Students work toward a goal of 20 NWPM. WPR114 Skillbuilding I (1-2-2) Students will build speed and accuracy on the computer keyboard by taking timed writings and then completing corrective practice drills. Students will develop skills needed in the entry of data, utilizing the 10-key pad on the keyboard. In addition to the use of the keyboard, voice recognition software will be used in the class. This course provides students with foundation skills needed to succeed in the Mid-Program Assessment and to be marketable in the work force. This course may be offered in a blended or web-based format. A grade of “C” or higher is required to advance to WPR115 Skillbuilding II. Prerequisite: a minimum speed of 20 NWAM on a 5-minute timed writing.

WPR199 Independent Study/Seminar (Credit Hours 1-5) Independent Study/Seminar is designed to provide a student with the opportunity to work on special topics/projects within the field of word processing. (Permission of the Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Department Chairperson is required.) WPR220 Advanced Word Processing (1-4-3) Students will be introduced to tables, Smart Art, and merge functions of a word processing program after which they will reinforce all word processing skills as they work through an office simulation. Advanced Word Processing may be offered in a blended or web-based format. A grade of “C” or higher is required to advance to OAM219 Administrative Professional Capstone. Prerequisites: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources and WPR120 Word Processing with a grade of “C” or higher.

WPR115 Skillbuilding II (1-2-2) Students will build upon the skills obtained in Skillbuilding I as this is a continuation of that course. This course may be offered in a blended or web-based format. Prerequisite: WPR114 Skillbuilding I with a grade of “C” or higher. WPR117 Business Documents Using Word (1-0-1) After working with Word basics, students will learn to use various features and functions of Word to create a business letter and memo, a press release, and a simple report. Additional features will be introduced. Prerequisites: Basic keyboarding skills. This class cannot be substituted for WPR120 Word Processing.

WPR222 Medical Word Processing (1-4-3) Students will gain realistic work experience as they simulate the position of the word processing specialist in a medical environment. Throughout the course, students become familiar with a variety of medical documents commonly produced in a medical office. Proofreading, medical terminology, and keyboarding of medical documents at a fast and accurate rate are also emphasized. Medical Word Processing may be offered in a blended or web-based format. Prerequisites: IDS110 Forum on Technology and Resources; WPR120 Word Processing with a grade of “C” or higher.

WPR119 Word Table and Desktop Publishing (1-0-1) Students will be introduced to the table function in Word. Additionally, some desktop publishing features such as WordArt, Clip Art, Smart Art, and themes will be introduced as students create a newsletter, brochure, and policy manual. Prerequisite: WPR117 Business Documents Using Word or WPR120 Word Processing. This class cannot be substituted for WPR120 Word Processing.

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89 Course Descriptions


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Administration, Directors, Faculty, and Staff

Department of Student Services Mary Ryan Bulone Vice President of Student Services (1978) Academic Advisor M.A.O.M., Spring Arbor University; B.A., University of Toledo; A.A.B., Davis College

Administration Diane Brunner President (1984) M.Ed., University of Toledo; B.A., Michigan State University

Marilyn Bovia Student Services Officer (2001)

John Lambert President Emeritus (1979)

Amanda Ryan Student Services Assistant/Admissions (2008)

Jane Mullikin Assistant to the President (1994) Human Resources Coordinator/Title IX Coordinator

Nick Nigro Career Services Director (1999) Counselor M.A., Athenaeum of Ohio; B.A., Loras College

Department of Academic Services

Ann Sheidler Database Administrator (1987)

Vicky Ryan Vice President of Academic Affairs (1969) Academic Advisor M.Ed., B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State University

Aaron Cowell Network Administrator (2005)

Shawn Orr Dean of Faculty (1995) Academic Advisor M.A., B.A., Bowling Green State University

Steve Gochik Receptionist (1995)

Marsha Klingbeil Registrar; Assessment Coordinator (1974) Academic Advisor M.Ed., University of Toledo; B.S.Ed., Otterbein University

Carmen Borton Receptionist (2010) Norma Hernandez Evening Receptionist (2000)

Margaret Peterson-Seniuk Librarian (1998) M.A., University of Wisconsin at Madison; B.A., Northern Illinois University

Ellen Pfaff Saturday Receptionist/Davis Store (2007) Gwen Kauffman Administrative Assistant (2011)

Sandra Price Project Manager (1998) Library Administrative Assistant

Greg Rippke Facilities Manager (2005)

Tia Gayten Student Assistant (2007)

Scott Hartman Custodian (1999)

Sandra Ellis Academic Advisor (1980)

Jeff Siler Custodian (2008)

Pauline Rower Administrative Assistant (1990)

Department of Institutional Advancement

Mary Kay Stobinski Academic Advisor/Administrative Assistant (2006)

Timothy Brunner Vice President of Institutional Advancement (1987) M.A., Eastern Michigan University; B.F.A., University of Toledo

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Directory

Adam Young Lab Technician (2011)


Daniel Brunner Director of Workforce Development Programs (2012) Mike Lambert Special Projects Coordinator (2012)

Business Office Barb Helmlinger Bursar (1983); VA Coordinator Belinda Quinn Financial Services Coordinator (2007); VA Coordinator Carolyn Scharer Executive Vice President Emerita (1949); Payroll Administrator; VA Counselor

Department of Financial Aid Melissa Kosinski Financial Aid Director (2009) Melissa Goodman Financial Aid Assistant (2011)

Department of Admissions Dana Stern Admission Director (1987) Debra Pfaff-Wilder Admission Representative (1998)

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Terry Dippman Chairperson (1983); Assistant Professor M.Ed., B.Ed., University of Toledo Kimberly Griffin Program Director, Medical Assisting (2008); Master Instructor B.A., Lourdes University; CMA (AAMA); RMA; AHI Lana Boardman Master Instructor (1974) B.A., Spring Arbor University

Sandy Ellis Instructor (1980) Academic Advisor A.A.S., Davis College; Barbara Frankforther Master Instructor (2011) B.S.N, Lourdes University Linda Maatta Master Instructor (1980) B.A., University of Toledo; A.D., Prospect Hall College Karen Patton Master Instructor (2004) B. A., University of Toledo; CPC; CMC; CCP Donna Smith Master Instructor (1988) B.S.Ed., Manchester College

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology Mary Deloe Chairperson Assistant Professor (2001) M.B.A., LeTourneau University B.S., Butler University Janet Aguilar Master Instructor (2005) B.A., Bowling Green State University James Allen Assistant Professor (2009) J.D., University of Toledo; B.A., Denison University Ben Bolbach Master Instructor (2009) B.S., Bowling Green State University Marvin Bovia Master Instructor (1989) B.A., Spring Arbor University; A.A.B., Davis College Edward Gaston Assistant Professor (2009) M.B.A., University of Findlay; B.A., Spring Arbor University; A.A.B., Davis College Erin Gomez Master Instructor (2004) B.A., Ohio University

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Dan McCarthy Master Instructor (2005) B.B.A., University of Toledo CPA

Renee Turissini Assistant Professor (2009) M.B.A., University of Michigan; NCIDQ Certified

David Misko Master Instructor (2002) B.A., University of Toledo

Department of General Education Kathleen France Chairperson (1991); Assistant Professor M.A., Bowling Green State University; B.A., Ball State University

Raina Mitchell-Feathers Master Instructor (2011) B.A., Spring Arbor University; A.A.B., Davis College

Mitchell Clark Assistant Professor (2011) M.Div., Bethel Theological Seminary; B.A., Bloomfield College

Neil Neukam Master Instructor (2002) B.S., University of Toledo William Nickens Master Instructor (2007) B.S., Siena Heights

John France Assistant Professor (1995) J.D., University of Toledo; B.S. Ball State University

Pamela Parsons Master Instructor (2006) B.S., Bowling Green State University Laura Randall Master Instructor (2002) B.A., Michigan State University

Marsha Klingbeil Assistant Professor (1974) M.Ed., University of Toledo; B.S.Ed., Otterbein University

Department of Design Janet Weber Chairperson Master Instructor (1990) B.A., Art, University of Toledo; B.A., Art History, University of Toledo; LEED AP

Martin Lahey Assistant Professor (2006) M.B.A., B.A., University of Toledo Nick Nigro Assistant Professor (1999) M.A., Athenaeum of Ohio; B.A., Loras College

Holly Whitney Program Director, Graphic Design (2000); Master Instructor B.A., University of Toledo

Shawn Orr Assistant Professor (1995) M.A., B.A., Bowling Green State University

Sally Mielcarek Program Director, Interior Design (1995) Master Instructor B.A., Bowling Green State University

Jane Pfeifer Assistant Professor (2008) M.A., Eastern Michigan University; B.S., Central Michigan University

Jo-Anne Gembolis Master Instructor (2012) B.S., Ohio University

Anthony Quinn Associate Professor (2012) Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; M.S., University of Missouri; B.A., Mid-American Nazarene University

Kristine Polus Master Instructor (2011) B.F.A., Indiana University

Vicky Ryan Assistant Professor (1969) M.Ed., B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State University

Scott Radcliff Instructor (2009) A.A.B., Davis College

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Directory

Rhea Jagodzinski Assistant Professor (2009) M.Ed., University of Toledo; BSN, University of Akron


Jeff Savino Assistant Professor (2009) M.S., B.S., University of Toledo Linda Schlachter Assistant Professor (2005) M.A., Sienna Heights; B.A., Lourdes College Roger Smith Assistant Professor (1988) M.Ed., B.Ed., University of Toledo

Organization Ownership Davis College, Inc. is an Ohio corporation. Ms. Diane Brunner is the stockholder of record of Davis College, Inc., and President of the Corporation.

Davis College Board of Directors The governing body of Davis College is its Board of Directors. The Board of Directors is a group of experienced, dedicated individuals who benefit Davis College with their commitment to excellence and to the quality of Davis College. The Board of Directors provides direction and focus to Davis College ensuring quality education and preserving institutional integrity. Dr. Kenneth Searfoss, Chairman Executive Director of the Division of Vocational, Technical, Career Education and Guidance Services, Toledo Board of Education, Retired Mr. Timothy Brunner Vice President of Institutional Advancement, Davis College

Program Advisory Committees Program Advisory Committees provide valuable information including current trends in curriculum, employment, equipment, and software, which impacts the quality of our programs. Community and business leaders including alumni, employers, four-year college educators, and high school educators join Davis College faculty and representatives to form the Program Advisory Committees. Davis College is grateful to the following individuals for their guidance and support.

Department of Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Advisory Committee for Administrative and Allied Health Professionals Ms. Casey Hem Dr. Anders Office Ms. Lynn Hoover Rohrbachers, Light, Cron and Trimble Ms. Julie Keaton Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA) Ms. Rose Kuceyeski Owens Community College Ms. Marcia Meeker University of Toledo Medical Center Orthopedics Clinic Ms. Diane Morlock Owens Community College Mr. Jim Scharer Fremont High School

Mr. John Lambert President Emeritus, Davis College

Ms. Dorothy Schober Roemer Insurance

Mr. John Meyer Executive Director, BNI Ohio, Inc.

Dr. Jackie Vannuyen Puckett and Vannuyen

Mr. Steve Nathanson Regional Vice President Strategic Planning, Mercy Health Partners

Ms. Angie Wingerd, CFP Angela Wingerd Financial Services

Ms. Debbie Papay Attorney, Bayer, Papay, & Steiner Co., LPA Ms. Carolyn Scharer Executive Vice President Emerita, Davis College

Department of Business Administration and Information Technology Advisory Committee for Business Administration and Information Technology Ms. Jan Aguilar Gallon, Takacs, Boissoneault & Schaffer

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Mr. Matt Davis Bowling Green State University

Ms. Julie Bolfa Greater Toledo Convention and Visitors Bureau

Ms. Deborah Howard-Stutesman Marco’s Franchising

Ms. Evelyn Conway Toledo Blade

Ms. Kathy Kackmeister Goodell Investments

Ms. Patti Fofrich Faurecia

Mr. Doug Kisor College for Creative Studies

Ms. Erin Gomez Davis College

Ms. Rebecca Knorek SSOE

Ms. LuAnne Inmann Dillards

Mr. Steve Lark Woodward High School

Ms. Cathy Longacre, CPA Franciscan Care Center/Lourdes University

Ms. Kim Marion Clair/David Office Furniture

Mr. Jeremy Luring Bowling Green State University

Mr. Joe Pinciotti Ulrich Pinciotti Design Group

Mr. John Meyer Business Network International

Ms. Kristi Polus Tandem Creative

Mr. David Misko Toledo-Lucas County Public Library

Mr. W. Gene Powell SPOKE

Mr. Neil Neukam Toledo Mud Hens/Toledo Walleye

Mr. Scott Radcliff Independent Website Developer

Mr. Bill Nickens Self-employed

Ms. Shauna Riggs La-Z-Boy Incorporated

Mr. David Noel Toledo-Lucas County Public Library

Mr. Bill Sattler Madhouse

Ms. Pamela O’Connell Parsons Kangaroo’s Childcare, Inc

Mr. Bruce Yunker Tandem Creative

Ms. Debby Peters Sales and More

Department of General Education

Ms. Jacqueline Porter Block Communications, Inc.

Advisory Committee for General Education Ms. Heather Bradley The Flourishing Company

Ms. Laura Randall Maumee Valley Habitat for Humanity

Dr. Susan Ruth Carlton Bowling Green State University

Ms. Cathy Simpson Kangaroo’s Childcare, Inc

Mr. Mitch Clark Toledo Christian Schools

Ms. Angela Wingerd, CFP Angela Wingerd Financial Services

Dr. Vicki Dagostino University of Toledo

Department of Design Advisory Committee for Design

Mr. Dan Dippman Genoa High School

Ms. Suzanne Brockway Brockway Art Design

Dr. David Edwards Spring Arbor University

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Advisory Committees

Mr. James Allen Allen Ventures, LLC


Ms. Nancy Emrick Owens Community College Library

Ohio Association of Career Colleges and Schools

Ms. Becky Engel Sylvania Schools

Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce

Ohio Board of Regents Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce

Ms. Michelle Martinez University of Toledo

Staff and Faculty Professional Memberships

Mr. John Pendell, Jr. University of Michigan

Advertising Club of Toledo (ACT)

Dr. Anthony Quinn University of Toledo, College of Medicine

American Academy of Professional Coders American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO)

Ms. Jackie Vankirk Promedica PPG

American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) American International Recruitment Council (AIRC)

Davis College Career Services Board of Action

American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Baby Boomers Regional Network (BRN)

The Career Services Board of Action was formed to help the students and graduates of Davis College to prepare for their careers and job search and to enhance their professional presentation and marketing expertise. We are grateful to this board for their service.

Business Professionals of America (BPA) College English Association of Ohio Collegiate Employ-Net Consortium Connext Nation Building Referral Community (CN)

Mrs. Heather Bradley The Flourishing Company

Delta Pi Epsilon

Mrs. Sue McMahon Living From the Heart

Greater Toledo Area Chapter of the American Society for Training & Development (GTACASTD)

Mr. Nick Nigro Career Services Director, Davis College

Lake Erie Higher Education Consortium (LEHEC)

Mrs. Debby Peters Sales and More/Certified Networker

Lucas County Workforce Investment Board (WIB)

Ms. Amanda Ryan Student Services Assistant, Davis College

National Association of Medical Assistants

Mr. Jeff Schulte Lutheran Homes Society

National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators

National Art Education Association National Association of School Nurses (NASN)

National Business Education Association (NBEA)

Mrs. Jill Marie Zachman First Impressions Etiquette Training

National Council for Marketing and Public Relations (NCMPR) The National Council of Teachers of English

Davis College Institutional Memberships

North Central Business Education Association (NCBEA)

Better Business Bureau Career College Association Employers’ Association

Northwest Ohio Association of School Nurses (NWOASN) Board

Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association

Northwest Ohio Business Teachers Association (NWOBTA)

Key4Women National Advisory Board

Ohio Association of Collegiate Registrars and

Michigan/Northwest Ohio District Advisory Board

Admissions Officers (OACRAO)

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OBTA – An Association for Business Technology Educators

Family Promise of Greater Toledo

Ohio Association of School Nurses (OASN)

Heartbeat of Toledo

Ohio Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators

Junior Achievement

Friends of the Library

Lenawee County Conservation League

Ohio Business Teachers Foundation

Lenawee County 4-H

Ohio Library Council

LineDrive Baseball Club

Ohio Mathematics Association of Two Year Colleges

Lucas County Agriculture Society

Ohio School Board Association

Lucas County Educational Service Center

Ohio Society of Medical Assistants

Lucas County Farm Bureau

Practice Management Institute

Manchester College Alumni

Professional Association of Healthcare Office Management

Maumee Watershed United Methodist Women District Team

Professional Healthcare Institute of America

Meals on Wheels of Lenawee County

Sigma Theta Tau International: Honor Society of Nursing

Metroparks of Greater Toledo

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)

Nature’s Nursery

National FFA Alumni Association Order of the Eastern Star

Spring Green Educational Foundation

Ottawa River Elementary School Volunteers

Toledo Area Human Resource Association (TAHRA)

Outings Unlimited Boating Club Players Guild of Dearborn

Toledo Artist’s Club

Princess Cruise Captain’s Circle

Toledo/Lucas County Chapter of Medical Assistants

Reserve Officers Association

Two-Year College English Association

Riverview Yacht Club Ladies Auxiliary

Women’s Entrepreneurial Network (WEN)

St John’s Jesuit High School and Academy Marketing Committee St Joseph Maumee Parish Volunteers

Staff and Faculty Personal Memberships Agricultural Society of Lenawee County

Sand Creek Community School District Advisory Board Member

Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society

Schedel Arboratum

American Heart Association Heartsaver AED

Sunningdale Woods Neighborhood Association

American Hosta Society

Sylvania Metro Amateur Hockey League (SMAHL)

American Legion Post 110 Auxiliary

Toledo Museum of Art

Anthony Wayne Alumni

Toledo Neighborhood Block Watch Program and Board

Anthony Wayne Board of Education Black Swamp Bird Observatory

The Toledo Zoo

Black Swamp Hosta and Daylily Society

University of Toledo Alumni

Cancer Connection of Northwest Ohio (CCNWO) Board Catholic Youth Organization (CYO)

Glossary

Central Elementary (Sylvania) Parents’ Club

Academic Services: Personnel who assist students in scheduling and curriculum planning.

The Daily Bread of Lenawee County Detroit Institute of Art

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Memberships

Overland Park Project Citizens’ Committee

Toledo Area Librarians’ Association


Associate Degree: Awarded to a student who has completed 90–110 credit hours pertaining to a specific program as outlined in the college catalog.

Fall Quarter (20124)

Admission Representative: A person representing the admissions department who speaks with prospective students and enrolls them in the college.

Fall Quarter New Student Orientations August 16 and 21, 2012

Session A Wednesday, August 22–November 2, 2012

Session B August 22–September 21, 2012

Catalog Supplement: Information regarding current tuition, fees, and financial aid.

Labor Day (Building Closed) Monday, September 3, 2012

Corequisite: A course that needs to be taken before or at the same time as the listed course.

Session C September 24–November 2, 2012

Credit Hours: Units of measurement assigned to courses based upon the amount of time spent in the classroom and/or lab.

Finals Week October 29 – November 2, 2012 Break Week November 5–9, 2012

Diploma: Awarded to a student who has completed a program of 40 – 89 credit hours, as outlined in the college catalog.

Winter Quarter (20125)

Elective: A course a student may take which is not specifically required in a major, but will count toward graduation. (Students should consult their advisors about electives appropriate for their major.)

Session A November 12, 2012–February 8, 2013 Winter Quarter New Student Orientation November 8, 2012 Session B November 12–December 14, 2012

Prerequisite: A course that needs to be successfully completed before another course can be taken. Information concerning prerequisites is noted in the college catalog.

Thanksgiving Vacation November 21–23, 2012

Program of Study: Courses required to be taken to complete a specific degree or diploma.

Christmas Vacation December 17, 2012–January 1, 2013

Quarter: One-third of the academic year (excluding summer session).

Classes Resume Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Registrar: The person responsible for maintaining each student’s academic record.

Session C January 2–February 8, 2013

Transcript: A copy of the student’s academic record which may be obtained from the Registrar. (It requires a signature and a seal to be considered official.)

Martin Luther King Day (No Classes) January 21, 2013

Transferred Credits: Credits given for courses taken at another institution; determination is made by the College’s Registrar.

Break Week February 11–15, 2013

Finals Week February 4–8, 2013

Spring Quarter (20132)

Undergraduates: College or university students who have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree. (Diplomas and associate degrees are undergraduate awards.)

Session A February 19–May 3, 2013 Spring Quarter New Student Orientation February 14, 2013 Session B February 19–March 22, 2013

Academic Calendar Session A refers to the full quarter.

Session C March 25–May 3, 2013

Session B refers to accelerated courses offered the first half of the quarter.

Finals Week April 29–May 3, 2013

Session C refers to accelerated courses offered the second half of the quarter.

Break Week May 6–10, 2013

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Finals Week February 10–14, 2014

Summer Quarter (20133) Session A May 13–July 19, 2013

Break Week February 17–21, 2014

Summer Quarter New Student Orientation May 9, 2013

Spring Quarter (20142)

Session B May 13–June 14, 2013

Session A Monday, February 24 – May 9, 2014

Memorial Day (Building Closed) Monday, May 27, 2013

Spring Quarter New Student Orientation February 20, 2014

Session C June 17–July 19, 2013

Session B February 24–March 28, 2014

Independence Day (Building Closed) Thursday, July 4, 2013

Session C March 31–May 9, 2014

Finals Week July 15–19, 2013

Finals Week May 5–May 9, 2014

Break July 22–August 27, 2013

Break Week May 12-16, 2014

Fall Quarter (20134)

Summer Quarter (20143)

Session A Wednesday, August 28–November 8, 2013 Fall Quarter New Student Orientations August 22 and 27, 2013

Summer Quarter New Student Orientation May 15, 2014

Session B August 28–September 27, 2013

Session B May 19–June 20, 2014

Labor Day (Building Closed) Monday, September 2, 2013

Memorial Day (Building Closed) Monday, May 26, 2014

Session C September 30–November 8, 2013

Session C June 23–July 25, 2014

Finals Week November 4 - 8, 2013

Independence Day (Building Closed) Friday, July 4, 2014

Break Week November 11–15, 2013

Finals Week July 14–18, 2014

Winter Quarter (20115)

Break Week July 28–August 26, 2014

Session A November 18, 2013–February 14, 2014

Fall Quarter (20104)

Winter Quarter New Student Orientation November 14, 2013

Session A Wednesday, August 27–November 7, 2014

Session B November 18, 2013–December 20, 2014

Fall Quarter New Student Orientations August 21 and 26, 2014

Thanksgiving Vacation November 27–29, 2013

Session B August 27–September 26, 2014

Christmas Vacation December 23, 2013–January 5, 2014

Labor Day (Building Closed) Monday, September 1, 2014

Classes Resume Monday, January 6, 2014

Session C September 29–November 7, 2014

Session C January 6–February 14, 2014

Finals Week November 3–7, 2014

Martin Luther King Day (No Classes) January 20, 2014

Break Week November 10–14, 2014

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Academic Calendar

Session A May 19–July 25, 2014


Secor Rd.

Alexis Rd. I-75 Sylvania Ave.

I-475 nr Mo oe St.

I-280

US 24

TOLEDO I-475 US 23

80/90 (OHIO TURNPIKE) I-75

Directions to Davis College

N

From the East

From the North Take I-75 South to I-475 West. Exit at Monroe Street. Head West past Secor Road. Davis College is on the left side.

Take 80/90 [Ohio Turnpike] West and exit at 64. Head North on I-75 to I-475 West. Exit at Monroe Street. Head West past Secor Road. Davis College is on the left side. From the West

Take US -23 South to I-475 East. Exit at Secor Road. Head North on Secor Road then West on Monroe Street. Davis College is on the left side.

Take 80/90 [Ohio Turnpike] East and exit at 64. Head North on I-75 to I-475 West. Exit at Monroe Street. Head West past Secor Road. Davis College is on the left side.

From the South Take I-75 North to I-475 West. Exit at Monroe Street. Head West past Secor Road. Davis College is on the left side. Take US -23 North to I-475 East. Exit at Secor Road. Head North on Secor Road then West on Monroe Street. Davis College is on the left side.

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101 Academic Calendar


Editor's Note It is an attitude toward worthwhile change that keeps the College at peak effectiveness in meeting its mission. Davis College therefore reserves the right to change policies, procedures, requirements, courses, textbooks, tuition, and fees without prior notice. Although the editor of this catalog has made every reasonable effort to attain factual accuracy herein, no responsibility is assumed for editorial, clerical, or printing errors, or errors occasioned by mistake. The editor has attempted to present information, which at the time of preparation for printing, most accurately describes the course offerings, faculty listings, policies, procedures, regulations, and requirements of the College. However, it does not establish contractual relationships. The College reserves the right to alter or change any statement contained herein without prior notice.

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It's All About Where You're Going


2012–2014 Academic Catalog