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DavisLife

B1

February 19, 2009

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Holly Oil’s CoGen plant put on hold VOL. 118

ESTABLISHED 1891

Davis Beat n Davis poverty numbers rising BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

n See “DAVIS BEAT,” p. A4

Davis weather watch – p. B7

BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer

NATHAN CHENEY copes with the tension by holding his head in his hands.

A-D-V-A-N-C-E North end spellers head for Davis finals

STUDENTS spelled their best for an announcer and a panel of judges.

BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer LAYTON — High fives, hanging heads, hugs, cheering and second chances filled the gymnasium at Central Davis Junior High School Tuesday night as the Davis County Clipper north end spelling bee ended with 14 finalists. Elementary schools from Layton on north had three spellers per school qualify for the semi-final bees. Tuesday night’s finalists will join the students from tonight’s south end bee and students from the junior high level at the district bee on March 10. The first place

winner from that final bee will receive a copy of Merriam-Webster’s collegiate dictionary and a trip to the National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. “All the students here have worked hard to get to this level,” said Davis County Clipper News Editor and spelling bee judge Tom Busselberg. “Ultimately, we want this to be a fun, exciting competition for everyone,” said spelling bee coordinator Sydney King. She has been working with individual schools for months on getting spellers to the bee. Students were given a list of

Ron L. Brown

CLEARFIELD — Even before the “economic downturn” was in full swing, the number of Davis County residents in poverty had increased. That’s according to a report from Utahns Against Hunger, based in Salt Lake City, and the Family Connection Center, here. The FCC serves as the county’s community action agency, which advocates and assists the poor. While Davis County’s rate of poverty is lower than most counties, it still equates to the population of Centerville. In fact, the number in poverty rose by nearly 2,000 between 2007 and 2008, climbing to 17,775. The number of unemployed increased by nearly the same number, jumping from 7,659 in 2007 to 9,486 one year later. Those taking advantage of federal Food Stamp assistance, meanwhile, rose from 4,166 in 2007 to 4,602, a 10 percent increase, including an 8 percent jump just from April to October of last year. Monthly Food Stamp benefits average about $250 per household, helping provide a way to “make ends meet,” Anderson said. The only “snapshot” statistic that saw little change was in the number of Davis School District students qualifying for free and reduced lunch. It rose only slightly, from 15,109 in 2007 to 15,126 last October. However, that equates to about one in four students in the district, she said. USDA research indicates children participating in school lunch tend to have superior nutritional intakes compared to those who don’t take part. A snapshot, using October of 2007 and 2008, was used for comparison. Food insecurity is a key component of indicating poverty, Anderson said. Utahns Against Hunger noted that one in eight households across the state experiences food insecurity, or the inability to afford enough food for a healthy diet. Gene Lopez, Food Bank manager, said numbers coming

approximately 400 words from which to study and each round presented more and more difficult words until the approximately 75 students were trimmed down to 14. Words encountered ranged from “monopolize” to “flibbertigibbet” to “angioplasty.” “There was a big crowd on hand and great support for these students,” said Clipper spelling bee director Becky Ginos. Parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts and uncles all came out to the junior high to support their students in the bee. Students also n See “NORTH,” p. A4

Stimulus money could help Davis

Index Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C6 Horizons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B3 Church Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C5 Movies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B7 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B6 People/Places . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C1 Viewpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Didn’t get a paper? Please call before 2 p.m. Wed. & Fri. for a replacement: 295-2251, ext. 119

NO. 1

BY BECKY GINOS Clipper Staff Writer KAYSVILLE — With the announcement of Pres. Barack Obama’s $787 billion stimulus package, Davis County residents may ask, “What’s our piece of that pie?” “The state should get about $213 million for highways,” Doug Hattery with the Wasatch Front Regional Council, told the Davis Chamber Legislative Affairs Committee on Wednesday. “Davis and Weber Counties will get $12 million between them. UTA will get about $50 million. We’re trying to take that money and use it for current projects with the idea that it would free up money for other projects.” Hattery said the Syracuse project from 1000 W. to 2000 W. will be one of those projects to receive the

stimulus money. “It is a big project,” said Sam Klemm, public information officer for the Wasatch Front Regional Council. “It will take about $55 million and should be completed by 2011. We also have some longrange project plans that we are try-

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ing to find funding for.” Although Gov. Jon Huntsman, Jr. released the hold on road projects, Klemm said there is still some shortfall. “We have the southbound through Bountiful/Centerville extension of a TRAX-type light rail, but we don’t have the money to do that right now.” In other money-related issues before the committee, Lynne Shaf-

fer of United Way Salt Lake asked for support for continued funding for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) program. “This program is a significant stimulus package in itself,” said Shaffer. “There is $60-$80 million dollars that goes untapped each year. We need to get that money into the hands of (low-income) households.” Shaffer said they need the $50,000 allocated in last year’s legislative session to continue their outreach program and find people who qualify for the credit. “This money can bump families who are in poverty to just above the poverty level,” she said. “Money that goes unclaimed stays at the federal level — we need to bring it n See “STIMULUS,” p. A4

WEST BOUNTIFUL — Consolidated Energy LLC isn’t likely to build its co-generation plant near (and even inside) Holly Refinery any time soon. Due to the overall pressure that has been placed on the Sandybased company against building the plant at the West Bountiful refinery, it decided Tuesday to place the project on hold. “We are encouraged that Consolidated Energy has shown a willingness to respond to local concerns about the impact their proposed cogeneration plant will have on the region's air quality,” said West Bountiful Mayor James Behunin. “Even so, the fact that the Utah Division of Air Quality could approve such a plant in an EPA nonattainment area raises questions about the state's air quality standards and its strategy to reduce harmful emissions in the region.” The co-generation plant was first brought up by the West Bountiful City Council during a Jan. 6 meeting. Two weeks later, a trio of doctors and many residents packed city hall to complain about the plant possibly being located inside the refinery had the city council not approved the initial proposal to build it just outside the plant. Behunin held firm to the idea that the plant was not going to be built, despite approval from Utah’s Division of Air Quality. “Consolidated Energy Utah appreciates all of the input from concerned citizens regarding the power plant it proposed to build in n See “HOLLY OIL,” p. A4

Bill seeks to end ‘fringe gambling’ BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer SALT LAKE CITY — There’s gambling going on right under the noses of Utah residents, and Sen. Dan Liljenquist, R-Bountiful, wants to help put a stop to it. Liljenquist is sponsoring SB169, a bill designed to stop a practice it refers to as “fringe gambling” — local businesses that use promotional offers to lure people into gaming situations in which they are told they can win prizes. The businesses, which recently have cropped up everywhere from Layton to Salt Lake, are using loopholes in the state’s promotional law that Liljenquist’s bill hopes to close. “In practice, we all know this is gambling,” he said. “It looks like it, it acts like it, and it’s these discrepancies in the law that we’re trying to get people to shut down.” Liljenquist’s bill adds amendments to state law so that the promotions of these businesses, which often require the purchase of a membership or card for the opportunity to win points or cash prizes, are differentiated from restaurant promotions such as McDonald’s Monopoly game. “If a storefront’s primary business is running these promotions, then it’s gambling,” said Liljenquist. The bill also seeks to alter the state’s current legal definition of n See “BILL SEEKS,” p. A4


A2

DavisPeople

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Davis to hold annual summit BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer LAYTON — The third annual Davis Youth Summit will be held Saturday, Feb. 28 from12:30 to 11 p.m. at Northridge High School. Students between the ages of 13-18 will hear from Miss Utah USA 2007 Heather Anderson and various ambassadors. They will also participate in service projects, games, a dinner, break-out sessions and a stomp. The event is sponsored by Northridge High School student clubs

Musician helps motivate students

and academic groups, the Davis School District Impact Teams, Davis Behavioral Health, Davis County Health, Davis Youth of Promise and other Davis County cities. The cost, which includes a T-shirt, is $10. Anyone interested may register by Feb. 20 and attendance will be capped at 1,000 participants. For more information, visit faculty.weber.edu/sbthompson/davis_yout h_summmit.htm. sroberts@davisclipper.com

Homestays Abroad looks for host families and internships DAVIS COUNTY — Families and internships are needed for exchange students who will be staying in Utah between June 27 and August 1 through Adventure Homestays Abroad. Host families and volunteer/internship opportunities are things each exchange student has to look forward to during the stay. Each student is between 15 and 18 years old and all speak English, have accident/liability insurance and carry spending money. Those families interested in participating will receive $400 per student and must have the ability to transport stu-

dents. Adventure Homestays Abroad also asks that the student have his or her own bed, though not necessarily a private room. A background check will be performed and families must have a flexible three to four-week period. During the volunteer/internship opportunity, students will focus on skill building from farming to high tech occupations and will be of interest to the student. The internship is unpaid and must be flexible on the dates and times. For more information, visit www.adventurehomestays.org or call 801725-0329. sroberts@davisclipper.com

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

BOUNTIFUL — There’s more jazz in Utah than those people on the basketball court. Jerald M. Simon, musician and author of the Music Motivation book series, wants to spread the word. He’s hosting a free workshop for music teachers, students, and their families on Feb. 21 at 10 a.m. at Bountiful Music (365 N. Main) based on his most recent book,“Jazzed about Jazz - jazz, blues, and boogies woogies for the intermediate piano student.” The workshop will feature a few of the original jazz compositions Simon wrote for the book, which are broken down in such a way to help students understand the theory behind the music and give them the opportunity to use that theory for further improvisation. Performances of some of the pieces will be done by 12year-old Nate Campbell and 14year-old Steven Ward, both of rktivation wo whom are students of Simon. hold a mo . l il w N O SIM a.m “I want students to be motiJERALD M. rday, Feb. 21 at 10 tu a S n vated to play the piano not just o shop learning. because their parents and teach“Fun, upbeat songs help motiers want them to, but because vate students,” said Simon. For more they’ve fallen in love with music theminformation, please call Bountiful Music selves,” said Simon.“This way, they’re at 292-1804.“Fun songs make kids want not just prisoners of the music. They’re to play and not quit or become bored at in charge of what they’re doing.” The book features six jazz songs writ- the piano.” ten by Simon - “Boomerang Boogie,” “Skippin’ Along,” “The Sidewalk Shufjwardell@davisclipper.com fle,” “Summer Skies,” “Railroad Ruckus”

David Dunard Acting Workshop he purpose of this class is to give the actor a solid base in the art of stage and film acting, the business executive better public speaking and presentational skills and the shy person the opportunity to open up. Beginners will lose their fear of stage, camera, and public speaking. Intermediate and advanced members will work on the physical, intellectual and creative processes needed to effectively play an action. Students will be called upon the explain, discuss and perform their interpretations of the written script.

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Davis News

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, February 19, 2009

A3

In crisis, ‘examine our thoughts’

Super-sized

Ron L. Brown

BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

Crews remove a truck and its trailer Tuesday following an accident that spilled 43,000 pounds of McDonald’s hamburger patties across I-15. Police say the truck’s driver fell asleep about 5:30 a.m.,missing a turn near the I-215 junction. I-15 was closed for about three hours.

Job-making program could be cut BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor KAYSVILLE — A jobproducing partnership with strong Davis County participation could be the victim of the Utah Legislature’s chopping block. “Jobs, jobs, jobs, is what it’s all about,” said Kori Ann Edwards, vice president of Shipley Associates, a Davis County business employing hundreds that is based in Layton. The Utah Procurement Team is in potential peril, she said. That’s a partnership between the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED),Procurement Technical Assistance Centers, including one in Kaysville, the Kaysville-based Utah Defense Alliance, and Shipley. The job-development program “is working, and the momentum continues,” Edwards said. She noted that

$284 million in total contracts have been awarded to Utah businesses, including many small and disadvantaged firms. “For every dollar invested, Utah companies have been awarded $167, creating or retaining 5,680 Utah jobs with annual salaries 37 percent higher than the state’s average median wage,” Edwards said. Businesses assisted have included AQS, an environmental services company in South Weber. It landed an $863,000 contract with McConnell Air Force Base for hazardous waste management support. Kaysville’s Ensign Global, meanwhile, was awarded two contracts for $150,000 to provide helicopter track and balance services. H3Tec of Kaysville, an oil and mineral exploration company, landed a $7.9 million contract with two different Indian tribes and an oil company. At least three other Davis County firms, in Syracuse, Clearfield

and Layton ,have received contracts worth thousands of dollars, Edwards said. “Today’s federal expenditures for products and services are at historic highs — and with the cooling of our commercial marketplace, the government is a critical customer for Utah business,” she said. “Without this program most of our businesses are ill-prepared to win these opportunities,” Edwards continued. A major focus of the procurement team is to help local businesses navigate through the myriad regulations and procedures necessary when trying to land a federal contract,whether with Hill Air Force Base or elsewhere. “For many businesses that are participating, we are seeing them survive and even thrive during this cooling economy,” Edwards said.“Others are desperately entering the program asking for the team’s support to keep their workers busy and

their doors open.” She noted that more than half of the $248 million in contracts awarded to state companies come from outside the state. The other 50 percent “is contract wins from our Utah government agencies, helping to keep money in the state.” Small businesses are a great focus of the program, employing 97 percent of the state's workforce. There are 56,691 such businesses in the state, Edwards said, citing the Utah Small Business Profile released by the Office of Advocacy of the U.S.Small Business Administration. “These small businesses are the engine of job growth in our communities. When they win, great things happen: new jobs, new opportunities for financing, and increased economic contribution to our state,” she said. Sen. Sheldon Killpack, RSyracuse,and others,are among those fighting to keep the program funded.

Food Bank now offers frozen items BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor LAYTON — Thanks to new refrigeration units and cooperation with several area grocery stores, frozen foods, including meats, are now available for Food Bank patrons, here. Family Connection Center executive director Sharon Anderson said people can receive five to seven days of emergency food, once a month. That now can include frozen food, she said. “We have a new refrigeration unit and can get meat, with several grocery stores generously providing it.” Those stores include Albertson’s, Sam’s Club, Walmart and Smith’s.

“We never could provide meat before,” Anderson said. “That will allow us to give chicken,hamburger and protein items we never could before.” That’s all part of an ongoing effort to meet an ever-increasing demand for support, which has also grown to include emergency housing assistance and other services. Another bright spot came in the form of extra funds totaling nearly $70,000 awarded by the county’s Council of Governments Community Development Block Grant program for motel vouchers, which are used to house homeless singles and families,usually for one week or less. Additional funds were also allocated to provide a bit more

for emergency food and shelter assistance. In addition, the FCC is hoping for CDBG funding from Clearfield, which as an entitlement city receives its own allocation. A similar request is being made of Layton, which also receives separate funding due to more than 50,000 residents. Layton officials are being asked for a $20,000 allocation for the crisis/respite nursery program, that would provide care for 200 children. In addition,$20,000 is sought for the inhome visiting program, which would serve six families for one year with weekly visits and other services. Some $5,000 is sought for motel vouchers, which would

provide 20 weeks of motel shelter nights. “We are noting a big increase in demand for services,” Anderson said, with that number likely to increase before it goes down. The FCC has also seen a big increase in use of its respite/crisis nursery in Bountiful, she said. That provides a place for parents to leave children for several hours while they go to medical appointments or fulfill other needs but don’t have money for babysitting.

LAYTON — The current economic crisis has many people feeling glum, at times, about their futures. Whether it’s holding onto the job they have or keeping their 401K from eroding even further, such issues are near the top of concerns for many people. “One thing that’s important to do in times such as these is to examine our thoughts,” said David McKay, a member of the clinical staff at Davis Behavioral Health. “Certainly, our thoughts are influenced by past experiences. They tend to shape our perspective of how we view the world. “A thought is just a thought. If we can change our thought we can change the meaning,” McKay said. “Sometimes I’ll see individuals who are catastrophic thinkers, taking things in the worst possible outcome. “That’s something we’d want to work on, maybe looking at expectations,” he said. “To someone who dislikes uncertainty or ambiguity, things are either good or bad. “This is the kind of thinking that would generally lead to worry and anxiety,” he said. “There are things we can’t control, such as the economy. What’s going to happen when we go out the door each day” is something else we can’t totally control, McKay said. He looks at using some strategies to build an individual’s resilience in their lives. Those include making connections, building and maintaining good relationships with close family members and friends. “That’s important — accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you,” he said, adding,“that strengthens resilience.” In addition, “assisting oth-

ers in their time of need can benefit the helper.” McKay further advises: “Avoid seeing a crisis as an insurmountable problem. We can’t change the fact that these events happen, but we can change how we interpret and respond to those events.” Also he said, “Accepting change is a part of living; accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help us focus on circumstances that we can change.” Beyond that, “developing and working toward realistic goals” is encouraged. “What’s one thing I can accomplish today that will help me move in the direction I want to go?” It’s important to break big goals down into realistic parts. “If we’re worried about the economy, we won’t fix that today. It can mean saving a little bit of money” on a consistent basis, McKay said. It’s also important to try to take the good from problems, to learn from them. “If we look for opportunities for selfdiscovery, we can learn things about ourselves and may find we’ve grown in some respect as a result of the struggle. “Often individuals who have been through struggles report they have a great appreciation for life, inner strength and improved relationships,” he said. “It’s important to nurture a positive view of yourself, to keep things in perspective, which can be difficult when facing challenges and painful things,” McKay said. “Maintain a hopeful outlook; try to visualize what you want rather than worrying about what you fear,” he said. “It’s so important to take care of yourself, pay attention to your own needs and engage in activities you find enjoyable or relaxing, such as exercise.” That can mean a 10minute walk vs. the two-hour grueling gym workout, he added. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

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letters@davisclipper.com We’ll do the rest.

Even A Minor Car Accident Can Ruin Your New Year Plus: The cars that may save you from chronic pain. Many car accident victims make this painful mistake; they think because their crash is “minor” and they don’t feel any immediate pain, they must be “okay” and do not need to be examined by a doctor. But for many…days, weeks or even months later, problems begin to show up that result in long term, chronic neck, upper back pain, and even headaches. Over time, muscles can weaken, loss of coordination can set in, and too much information reaches your brain causing pain to feel more intense. This is why it is important that the doctor you choose to evaluate and document the extent of your possible injuries should ask questions about the type of car you were in and the specifics of your accident.

restraints in 1997 vehicles were properly designed to prevent injury and 50% of the seats of these vehicles had poor seat belt restraints. Vehicles with good head restraints include the Mercedes E class, Toyota Supra, Volvo 850 and 960, and Honda Civic Del Sol. Like all doctors’ offices, care may vary from office to office. But if you are looking for a Chiropractor who offers short term, car accident injury treatment, or if you have questions about your accident, call Dr. Jason L. Smith’s office at 618-3587. You can be seen immediately with no obligation to extensive treatment plans.

Head Restraints…

1. Davis, C. Chronic pain/dysfunction in whiplash-associated disorders. Journ Manip Physiol Ther 2001; 24:44-51 2. Head restraints. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Status Report 1997;32(4).

References Another cause for injuries in a low speed collision is the position of the head upon impact and the quality of the head restraint. In fact, less than 3% of 200 head 17875

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Thursday, February 19, 2009

Davis News

Davis County Clipper

City denies developer’s request Bill seeks to end ‘fringe gambling’ BY JENNIFER BECKSTRAND Clipper Correspondent

KAYSVILLE — For the second time in two weeks, the Kaysville City Council has voted to decline a developer’s request to waive roadway facilities impact fees. Oquirrh Mountain Charter School is under construction at the northeast corner of Western Drive and Angel Street, and the developer, Academic West, wants exemption from paying $30,000 worth of impact fees. The proposal was first brought before the council at the Feb. 3 council meeting, but no one representing Academic West was present to speak for the proposed fee waiver, and the request was denied. The waiver request was made again at last Tuesday’s

council meeting, and again no one from the developer was there to speak to the proposal. Several council members expressed frustration that a representative was not present. “We need an opportunity to have some dialog,” council member Ron Stephens said. In the past, the city has helped pay for project improvements, such as sidewalks and connecting streets at new schools, in exchange for priority use of the facilities for city parks and recreation needs. For example, Kaysville City helped fund the new auditorium at Davis High School with the agreement that the facility could also be used for city functions. The site where the charter school is being built is fully improved, according to City

Manager John Thacker, with necessary sidewalks and streets already in place. There are no needed improvements that the city would traditionally help pay for, so the school does not have added expenses that other new schools are burdened with. Thacker said after Academic West’s request for an impact fee exemption was denied at the previous council meeting, the developer made an offer to let Kaysville City use their facilities for parks and recreation purposes in exchange for the fee waiver. Council member Steve Hiatt was doubtful that such an arrangement with the charter school was a good trade. “We are essentially setting a value on usage (of their facility),” he said. “What are

we getting for $30,000?” Council member Gil Miller, strongly opposed to any impact fee waiver, reminded the council that last year’s tax increase netted the city $50,000. “(The $30,000 waiver the developer wants) is most of that (increase). I’m not convinced that this makes sense,” he said. Having spent a dozen years in Murray, council member Stephens saw how a good working relationship between the community and the school district was a winwin situation for both, but it was also very clear how the agreement between cities and schools functioned, he said. “I’m not sure they (the developers) know what they’re offering,” he said, when agreeing to commit a building to public use.

Stimulus money could help Davis County Continued from p. A1 home.” The committee supported her program but voiced concern that it may be too late for this budget year. Shaffer was going to look into ways she could continue the funding. Chris Dallin with Intermountain McKay-Dee Hospital asked for support on a package of healthcare bills that could potentially help small businesses and their employees with health insur-

ance. “HB188 could be very good for small businesses with 50 or less employees,” said Dallin. “The bill provides a portal where an employer can offer different insurance plans and then the employee can choose the plan that fits best. It allows for personal choice rather than mandates.” Dallin acknowledged the bill is for a pilot program that allows the opportunity to learn what works and what

doesn’t. “When the dust settles we should have answers,” Dallin said. “It will be painful for all of us. Everyone will have to give a little bit.” Dallin said HB165 deals with billing standardization so that bills would come from the insurance companies first explaining what’s been covered, then the bill would come from the provider. HB331 would create some incentives for businesses to continue providing health

insurance. “More and more businesses are dropping health insurance,” said Dallin. “We’re on a dangerous, slippery slope for people not to have health coverage. This bill would encourage employers to have coverage.” Dallin will address the legislators at the committee’s Thursday meeting on Capitol Hill for support of the bills as a package. bginos@davisclipper.com

Holly Oil’s CoGen plant put on hold in W.B. Continued from p. A1 (Holly Refinery),” said the company in a press release given to the Clipper by Behunin. “The process for a project like this should involve participation and understanding of the important issues surrounding environmental quality. “Therefore, we have decided to put this project on hold as we continue to work on designing an even cleaner generation system that will comply with the coming national and local standards

and protects the air quality in the community.” The plant had opposition from legislatures as well, as Utah Rep. Roger Barrus, R – Centerville, told some 250 people in the South Davis Branch Library last Monday. He is drafting legislation which would place a two-year moratorium on the construction of power plants which can not meet the new, stricter 2.5 ppm (parts per million) air pollution standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Davis Beat

Coalition (Safe Harbor Domestic Violence Shelter), $26,542. In addition, True Vine Baptist Church in Kaysville, which operates a holiday food pantry, will receive $3,047, and Fish & Loaves, an ecumenical food pantry program, will receive $2,041. “That’s an increase in funding of about 27 percent,” said Anderson. Many factors are used to determine funding, but increased unemployment in the county is one of them, she said. She noted that Food Stamp applications can be made at the Department of Workforce Services offices in Woods Cross, 763 W. 700 S., and Clearfield, 1290 E. 1450 S., during regular business hours. WIC (Women, Infant & Children) assistance for pregnant mothers, can be made in Woods Cross at 696 W. 750 S., Mondays and Thursdays, call 292-7803, and Layton, weekdays, 360 S. Fort Lane, Suite 110, call 546-6924. Many other services are also available. Visit the Utahns Against Hunger Website at www.utah.org.

Continued from p. A1 to the FCC Food Bank have increased dramatically over the past year. “A year ago in January, we were serving between 600 and 700 households per month. Now, we’re closing in on 1,000,” he said, noting 950 were served in January of this year. At three people per household, that’s nearly 3,000 people. “There are a lot of people experiencing foreclosures,” he said. That means many working families are seeking assistance for food or financial assistance to pay a mortgage. Or, if the house is already lost, they need money for rent or a deposit. Anderson reported that, in spite of all the government funding cuts being reported, there is an increase in money for the federal Emergency Food & Shelter program. The Bountiful Community Food Pantry has been awarded $16,350, Family Connection Center Food Bank, $65,965, and Davis Citizens

And after several complaints and local coalitions were formed in order to voice their opinions against it, Consolidated Energy decided to pull back on the plant; but not without mentioning how important the plant is first. “It is important to consider that the production of refinery by-products is an unavoidable consequence of our use of gasoline and other transportation fuels,” the company said. “All of us that use fuel for our vehicles are responsible for the creation of these

petroleum by-products. “However, Consolidated’s intention continues to be to find a way to use these byproducts in a more efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The (West Bountiful) facility, as it is designed, would be the cleanest power plant using refinery by-product fuels in the world; nevertheless, we will strive to achieve an even cleaner solution.” Clipper Staff Writer Melinda Williams contributed to this report.

Continued from p. A1 gambling. Currently, it’s defined as “risking anything of value for a return, or risking anything of value upon the outcome of a contest, gaming scheme, or gaming device when the return or outcome is (i)based on an element of chance, and (ii) is in accord with an agreement or understanding that someone will receive something of a certain value in the event of a certain outcome.” In Liljenquist’s bill, the definition of “anything of value” would be expanded to include “inconvenience, time, effort, cost of mailing, and transportation expenses.” The bill is being backed by the Utah League of Cities and Towns, the Utah Police Chiefs Association, the Utah Law Enforcement Legisla-

tive Committee, and the Statewide Association of Prosecutors, all of whom initially came to Liljenquist with the belief that these businesses were increasing ancillary crime in the nearby area. “They’re shady places that have just sprung up in the last year or two,” said Liljenquist. “What we’re hearing is that these businesses move into strip malls and black out the windows. Criminals then come in to game, increasing crime in the area. It’s a problem.” The bill has been well received in committee meetings, and just recently received a positive second reading. If it passes, the bill will head to the House for further consideration, and Liljenquist expects it to receive no opposition.

North end spellers head for finals Continued from p. A1 supported each other as they gave high-fives, hugs and pats on the back. Students went through over half a dozen rounds together before the finalists were announced. The second to last round ended with eight finalists who were guaranteed a spot in the final spelling bee in March. For the last round, the remaining students were given a second chance at joining those first eight. Six of those last students took advantage of that second chance. “His dad took first place when he was young, but it was after three years,” said Judy Miller, a grandmother of Dakotah Miller from Cook Elementary. “He’s got both sets of grandparents here tonight for support.” Dakotah was one of the students who got a second chance at heading to the final bee. His grandparents, Joe and Judy Miller, and John and Anna Jo Wayne joined

an aunt, JoAnn Miller, who joined his father, Randy Miller and youngest sister, Makinley Miller. “His mother’s home sick,” said Judy Miller. “She got a text every few minutes on how he did.” “I’m excited to keep going,” said Dakotah. Sixth-grade Syracuse Arts Academy student Jacob Nutall was one of the original eight winners. His mother said he was very confident through their studying sessions. “He is a smart kid and we knew he would do well,” said Gerilyn Nutall. She and her husband Tom had Jacob’s family there for support. The south end spelling bee will take place tonight at Bountiful High School. Students need to be there and registered by 6:30 p.m. and the competition will begin at 7 p.m. The final bee will be held at Woods Cross High School on Tuesday, March 10.

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Davis News

Former sheriff remembered as mentor BY MELINDA WILLIAMS Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL — Former Davis County Sheriff Brant Johnson was remembered Wednesday as a mentor for many law enforcement officers in Davis County, including Sheriff Bud Cox. “He mentored me and was the one who encouraged me to run for sheriff. I took that (advice) to heart,” Cox said. Johnson, 72, was laid to rest Wednesday in Bountiful. He died Feb. 13 at home from complications of cancer. His funeral featured bagpipers, bugles and a flag ceremony with officers from the Davis County Sheriff’s Office and the Utah Department of Public Safety.

Brant Johnson Cox said Johnson was always active in civic life and the Republican party, but was never one to seek attention.

Johnson served as Davis County Sheriff for 10 years, between 1978-1988, when he resigned to serve as deputy public safety commissioner. He then went to the state Department of Natural Resources, where he served as director of law enforcement and was appointed by Gov. Mike Leavitt to chair the Utah Commission of Criminal and Juvenile Justice. Johnson spent his life in law enforcement. He started out as a Utah Highway Patrol Trooper, first in Southern Utah and then in Northern Utah. He then joined the Davis County Sheriff’s Office, eventually becoming chief deputy, Cox said. Cox said Johnson entered

the political ring against then Sheriff Dub Lawrence, when Republican challenger Leo Monks died of a heart attack while hunting, just before the election. The party then put Johnson’s name forward and he won, serving until being appointed to the state post. While sheriff, Johnson further developed the paramedics program, worked on jail expansion and inmates’ rights. “He was a great man,” Cox said. Johnson is survived by his wife Janet and three children Curtis (Mary Lynn), Craig (Jana) and Susan Koehn (David Copeland), 11 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

Homeless housing proposed in WX BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

not necessarily the best approach.” The proposal was outlined to the council by City Administrator Gary Uresk, along with County Commissioner Louenda Downs, Lloyd Pendleton, who oversees the state’s homelessness program, and Clark McCullough of the Davis Community Housing Authority. The DCHA would own and operate the facility. It operates other apartment complexes in Bountiful, Layton and elsewhere. “It costs one-sixth as much to keep people in housing compared to what it costs to help those who are homeless,” Pendleton said Tuesday. He was meeting with the Davis County Homelessness Coordinating Committee. “Our idea is not to just put a roof over their head but to get them trained in jobs so they will make enough to be able to pay 30 percent of their income to rent and utilities, so

WOODS CROSS — A proposal to build about 10 apartments to house homeless families is being studied by the Woods Cross City Council. The units would be part of a potential 60 to 70 new apartments that could be built on a four-acre parcel at about 440 W. between 1800 and 1900 South. No decisions were made during Tuesday night’s council meeting, where the issue was first formally presented to the council. “I’ve been outspokenly in favor of it,” Mayor Kent Parry told the Clipper. “I think Davis County hasn’t been pulling its weight” in terms of dealing with homelessness, he said. “My understanding is we’ve left things to Salt Lake and Weber Counties, with the attitude let them (homeless) go there. That’s

they’re contributing members of society,” Downs said in that same meeting. “There are issues that need to be discussed, but I think concerns can be overcome,” the mayor said. “I think the citizens of that area need to have their concerns met. “There are issues of safety, etc.,” he said. “We have a tendency to support social issues, as long as they’re built somewhere else. When that RDA (redevelopment agency) was established up there, it was established to build housing units.” Some existing structures will have to be demolished to make way for the project, Uresk said. “The proposal here is for family homeless, mainly mothers with children,” the city administrator emphasized. “When this was first proposed, there was a little concern, ‘Is this going to be a secure facility, people institu-

Sewer district now debt free WEST BOUNTIFUL — For the past two months, the South Davis Sewer District has been debt-free. That’s because bonds that paid for a $12 million upgrade that doubled the size of the plant have been paid off. At the same time, the district maintains some of the lowest fees of sewer districts anywhere. That’s the proud declaration of its manager of 24 years, Del Wayment. “We’ve been very stable, always adopted the certified tax rate,” rather than hold a hearing and raise taxes, he said. In fact, in 29 years, there were “two rate decreases,” Wayment said. For many years, district users have paid a $5 monthly fee and $5.62 property tax, per month, to maintain facilities. Industrial users pay a higher rate. “We don’t anticipate any rate increase in the near future, at least not in the next five years. If (sewage) discharge requirements stay the same, it will only be a modest increase,” he predicts. “There’s a lot of pressure on water quality on both the local and national level, for the Great Salt Lake and the Jordan River,” Wayment said. As previously reported in the Clipper, a $2 million study was conducted of the Great Salt Lake, recently, to determine mineral and other content in the lake. In addition, a Governor’s Great Salt Lake Advisory Council was established by Gov. Huntsman last summer. It is due to make recommendations and disband later this year. Depending on what the EPA and federal and state officials decide on what purity level is needed, a $130 million

Ron L. Brown

BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

SOUTH DAVIS SEWER DISTRICT pond, at headquarters near the Legacy Highway, has been debt-free since December. expansion could be necessary at the plant, Wayment said. “We would have to bond, and that could mean our customers would pay $60 a month instead of $60 a year” in taxes, he said. There are many parts to what is admittedly a complicated issue, including how Great Salt Lake wetlands should be treated. “Do we list wetlands around the lake as impaired? We don’t believe they are, the state isn’t sure, and the EPA thinks they are,” Wayment said. Such issues as whether it’s better to leave the algae areas alone on the lake or not have to be addressed, Wayment said. The Farmington Bay wetlands also play into the equation, are considered a “very hot issue.” That’s especially as it is part of an international wetlands system that serves as a bird nesting and stop-off point

for hundreds of thousands of birds annually. “We are working with the state, environmental groups, promoting science, to see what the problems are,” he said. As a part of that, an interlocal agreement has been set up with the Jordan RiverFarmington Bay Water Quality Research group. The district serves all of South Davis, operating its main plant in West Bountiful, near the Legacy Highway, and a smaller facility on Center Street in North Salt Lake. It is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, bringing sewers for the first time to many areas in 1959, Wayment said. Bountiful already had its own small sewer system. At that time, its population was only about 5,000 people. Crews maintain about 350 miles of lines, 7,000 manholes and 24,000 connections. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

tionalized?’ “That’s not the intent. The intent is for it to be a multifamily complex, with a mixture of people. Just 10 to 12 of the units would be dedicated to that (family homeless),” he said. “I think there’s a lot of information that needs to be put together. It’ll maybe be discussed again in March,” Uresk said. “There’s a lot of things that need to happen,” Parry said. “The council was amenable at least to open dialogue. We’ll go from there.” The mayor emphasized public dialogue must be an important part of the process. “We need to have that happen. This needs to be a decision that is not made behind closed doors, or have that perception. “The community needs to understand what’s being addressed, hopefully will be supportive, understanding of it.” tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

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Davis bus driver on leave FARMINGTON — A Davis School District bus driver is on paid administrative leave after being accused of hitting a 12-year-old student with a golf club. District spokesperson Chris Williams said the incident happened Feb. 10 when the bus driver was taking students home from West Point Junior High School. Williams said that apparently the seventh-grader was acting up and the bus driver used the golf club he keeps on board to tap the student to get his attention. “I don’t know how the golf club and the student’s head connected,” Williams said, and Clinton police officers reviewing a video of the incident say it’s unclear whether the driver hit the stu-

dent or if the student banged his head on the club. The student reported the incident to his parents, who then called police, Williams said. The parents won’t press charges, but the school district is investigating. Williams said the bus driver keeps the golf club on the bus to help close the door. He explained that on some older buses, the door doesn’t close all the way.A switch on top of the door closes the door and the driver uses the golf club to tap the switch. The driver has been with the district since 2003. The matter will be discussed at a weekly meeting held to discuss employee issues. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

Local man dies in plane crash The Federal Aviation Administration and National Safety Transportation Board are investigating a plane crash which killed a Centerville man in Idaho. Craig Jewitt, 41, died in a plane crash in southwestern Idaho on Sunday, but the wreckage wasn’t found until Tuesday.

According to Elmore County Idaho Chief Deputy Sheriff Nick Schilz, the plane left the airport in Caldwell between 7 and 8 p.m. Sunday and that Jewitt was last heard from about 8:40 p.m.. Jewitt leaves behind a wife and four children. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

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letters@davisclipper.com STOCKS • BONDS • CDS • MUTUAL FUNDS • IRAS Erik Knutsen, AAMS 273 W. 500 S., Ste. 18 Bountiful, UT 84010 801-292-2061 www.edwardjones.com

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Thursday, February 19, 2009

ViewPoint

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Inside story Let’s plan for the future rather than status quo here’s certainly good It was the best of times in terms of great picks for news and bad news some in his cabinet, but the on the energy front. worst of times for others In fact, we could borrow a due to their operation outline from “A Tale of Two side of the tax Cities,” by laws, among Charles Dickens. other nagging When, as a peccadillos. high school stuBut in dent, I first read terms of enerhis iconic words: gy, things “It was the best don’t look so of times, it was good.There is the worst of a decided bias times...” I wasn’t against coal impressed. (and I’m OK I thought he with that), was either being while there wishy-washy, seems to be contradictory or ROLF KOECHER an all-out trying to confuse Executive Editor effort to his readers. backtrack on As I got new oil drilling leases, couolder, however, I realized pled with what appears to he was trying to tell us the be a determination to time period he writes ignore oil shale developabout was in many ways ment near the Vernal area. about average. Once again, it seems we For some people times are on the path toward were great, while for othmore dependence on forers times were very, very eign oil because we lack bad — sometimes both the will to develop the simultaneously. resources we do possess. If we think about it, All the talk of oil shale that pretty much sums up becoming a real possibility the world today. And in a year ago seems to have the 1980s, or the 1960s, or whimpered into silence. for any decade we care to But while we have the choose. current lull in oil prices it’s For the Japanese and exactly the time we need the Germans, the 1940s to forge ahead because were pretty grim. For the commercial success can Allies, things turned out pretty well. And if we ana- take 10, 15 or even 20 or more years. lyze all the events of that If we lack the political decade, many people probwill to invest in new energy ably did very, very well sources right now — and despite the ravages of I’m including oil shale, tar World War II. sands, solar, wind, geotherFor others, the 1950s mal, etc. — it will become were filled with hardship the worst of times again despite those being years that most Americans recall once oil prices jump into the stratosphere once as being full of promise more. and prosperity. It is, of course, the worst That’s about what we’re of times for our national finding on the energy economy, but foresight front. Things turned out now could result in a much pretty well for Davis brighter future. County after Rep. Roger All this simply means Barrus proposed House that times are pretty much Bill 393, which sought to as they always have been. place a two-year moratoriThere are some very scary um on the construction of things happening to us power plants that exceedtoday, plus some very good ed federal air quality stanthings. dards during winter inverWe haven’t seemed to sions.Which was, of have learned very much course, aimed at the proposed pet coke plant at the from the lessons of the Holly oil refinery in Woods past, so we’ll probably go back to shaky financial Cross. practices on Wall Street That was followed by once the economy the announcement found rebounds and we’ll probaon today’s p.A1 that the bly forget the drive for controversial power plant energy independence as has been placed on hold. long as oil prices remain Another sign of this low. being the best of times for I would prefer, however, Davis residents in terms of that the new administraenergy is in the low price tion ease up a bit on its of gasoline at the fuel ideology and make some pump. concessions to craft solid But frankly, for our energy policies that would long-term energy indeserve us for the next 20-30 pendence picture, it could years. be the worst of times. If we do so, we have a Things have changed now chance to transform the that the Obama adminisfuture into a time of great tration is in power. and lasting prosperity — To be fair, Pres. Obama instead of just business as has done pretty well durusual. ing his first days in office.

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Letters policy All letters must (1) be signed, (2) be brief (generally under 300 words in length) (3) list the author’s city, and (4) give the writer’s telephone number. We reserve the right to edit all letters for length or content. For letters arriving by e-mail, we will use the author’s e-mail address in lieu of a signature. Letters without proper identification will not be printed.

A remembrance of a former county sheriff The views expressed in this column are the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the ownership or management of this newspaper. his column was originally focused on a pending bill in the Utah Legislature. The subject changed after I scanned the obituary page in the morning paper. Brant Johnson passed away last weekend. Younger readers may not remember him as the county’s sheriff during the 1980s, but in many ways he typified the changes in modern law enforcement. Several weeks ago, for instance, a friend was commenting about the difficulty in entering the law enforcement field. “Nowadays they try to screen out the overlyaggressive, gung-ho guys. What they want is a more educated and professional person. And that was what Brant Johnson was all about. I first met him when a member of his staff asked me to create a broad-based informational campaign explaining the

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Letters Stop pet coke plant today Editor: My name is Brandi Wendel and I live in Bountiful. I am writing because I am concerned about the possibility of the Consolidated Energy Utah LLC cogeneration, pet coke burning power plant, being built in my community. I am a mom with three young children and I am concerned about their health. I can’t understand why anyone with good conscience would allow this facility to be built. I have recently learned about this plant, and I was appalled at the information that I was coming across. I believe you should be concerned as well. Not only would this facility pollute the Davis

Davis County Clipper Clipper Publishing Co., Inc. Circulation Department: 295-2251 ext. 119 or 120 Volume 118 Number 1 February 19, 2009 THE DAVIS COUNTY CLIPPER (ISSN 1061-1223) is published each Tuesday and Thursday for $35 per year by Clipper Publishing Co. 1370 South 500 West, Bountiful, UT 84011-0267. Periodicals Postage Paid at Bountiful, UT and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Davis County Clipper, Circulation Department, P.O. Box No. 267, Bountiful, UT 84011.

Cyclops By Bryan Gray

duties of his department. He wanted the Davis County Sheriff’s Department to be more than just an entity that chased down the bad guys and locked them up. Johnson wanted his department to be known for crime prevention through community outreach, alerting teens to the dangers of drugs, showing the cost-saving concept of deputies doubling as life-saving paramedics. His easy-going manner helped him when he made budget requests of the county commissioners; he never overstated his case, but he appeared loaded with the facts. He expected his deputies to act and dress professionally. (“If they treat people with respect, they’re more likely to

get it back,” he said.) As a Highway Patrol trooper, he had been proud to be a cop and he wanted his men and women to feel similarly about the profession. Oh, he could show a temper, especially when he thought his department was being maligned. During one acrimonious re-election campaign, he told me his opponent “didn’t have the temperament” to represent the county. He appointed a retired FBI agent as his chief deputy. “These are the kind of men safe communities deserve in leadership positions,” he said, “not simply somebody who helped you in a campaign.” He was also aware of the dangers that came with the

County area, but because the pet coke will be transported daily to the refinery by open truck or train, the fine ash/dust particles can become easily windborne affecting any citizens along the transportation route. Pet coke emissions include Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP’s) that are known cancer causers, including heavy metals such as mercury, nickel, lead, benzene, and vanadium. The petroleum coke plant will also release large amounts of PM10, ozone, sulfur oxide gases, carbon monoxide, lead, and volatile organic compounds into our breathing air, which can cause — difficulty breathing, decreased lung function, aggravated asthma, development of chronic bronchitis and pneumonia, permanent lung damage, irregular heartbeat, sunburn-like skin rashes, and premature death in people with heart and lung disease. HAP’s can produce long-term neurological deficits in children, includ-

ing reduced IQ and brain damage. Not only will it cause health problems, the pet coke plant will most likely cause a drop in our property values and influx of businesses as well. Many times I have heard the news report that we had the worst air quality in the nation for that particular day. Why would we want to make our breathing air any worse than it already is? If tourists know that we have such bad air, do you really think they will continue to come here — even if we have the best snow on earth? I appreciate your taking time to read my letter. Please take action today by doing what you can to stop this pet coke plant from being built. Brandi Wendel Bountiful Editor’s note: For the latest developments, see story on p. A1.

job. Last November, his granddaughter’s husband, North Salt Lake Police Officer Charlie Skinner, was killed during an on-duty chase. For Brant it was more than a personal loss, but also one for the profession he so admired. In the late 1980s, I was given a speeding ticket between Cedar City and St. George. I paid the ticket, but somehow the payment was credited improperly, resulting in a warrant for my arrest. Several months later I was booked into the Davis County Jail. Iron County officials admitted their mistake and apologized. I didn’t expect Brant to apologize; after all, his deputy was only following court orders. But I did get something else from Brant. Shortly after my release, he sent me a framed copy of my mug shot along with a note: “Hey, try to stay out of my jail.” When Brant made a request, you did your best to satisfy him. That was the kind of man he was and Davis County was lucky to call him sheriff.

Slow down in Bountiful Editor: I am a sixth-grade student at Oak Hills Elementary School. I am also a Boy Scout working on my communications merit badge. I would like to express my opinion about the excessive speeding on the street in front of my house. We live on Bountiful Blvd. just at the top of the hill. The posted speed limit is 30 MPH. Sometimes when we are crossing the street on foot in front of our house, a car will come over the hill going so fast that we are afraid that we will be hit. When we started to cross there were no cars in sight, by the time we are in the middle of the road, a car has come over the top of the hill. And we have to run really fast to get out of the way. It is very scary! I hope that people will make more of an effort to be aware of the speed limit and slow down. Ashton Bowers Bountiful

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Davis News

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, February 19, 2009

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North Salt Lake Beat: A chance to know your city t last week’s special city council meeting on the new city hall, I saw something I don’t remember ever seeing before — the entire city council chamber was front-toback, steal-extra-chairs and siton-tables packed with people interested in what was going on with their city government. There were, of course, plenty of people who came because they wanted a chance to have their opinions heard, but there were also several people filling up those seats who didn’t even bother to sign up for a slot. Instead, they were there to listen, taking the opportunity to hear the city’s reasoning, opinions, and decisions first-hand so they could have a better understanding of

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why and how certain things were being done. Though I admit that the city hall’s current parking lots are incapable of handling that kind of crowd on a regular basis (the ones planned for the new building will take care of that problem), it was such an encouraging sign of city involvement that I felt my heart swell in one of those civic-minded “Mr. Smith Goes To Washington” moments. This carried me all along the block I had to walk back to my car. At this week’s city council meeting, though, the crowds had vanished. True, the topics weren’t quite as headline-ready whether or not to build city hall — construction managers, water lines,

and elementary schools — and the majority of the city’s population probably doesn’t have a strong opinion on any of them one way or the other. But it’s these smaller issues — which have their own reasons and decisions that can be as, or more complex than, those connected to something more splashy — that are the gears by which the city truly runs. Most residents don’t pay any attention to the city’s water lines unless there’s something wrong with them, but listening to the public works director talk about them for even five minutes highlights just how much work it takes to keep them maintained and running smoothly. Certain city council meetings

can also serve as a primer on exactly where all the city money comes from, from bonds to impact fees, and what city programs or resources that money is going to. Several people who did get up to speak at the public hearing for the new city hall said they had initially thought that the city was being irresponsible, but changed their minds when they attended meetings and learned some of the inner workings of the city’s savings plan and police impact fees. Others, admittedly, felt the city’s money was better spent on the golf course rather than a new city hall, but because of the information they’d gathered at city meetings they knew the specifics of what they felt needed to be

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL done. City council meetings are, more than anything, a chance to learn about what exactly is going on in your city and why. Just because no one is shouting about something doesn’t mean that it doesn’t have an impact on everyone’s daily lives. jwardell@davisclipper.com

U offers job, education open house BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer SALT LAKE CITY — University of Utah academic teams will gather for an open house on Wednesday, Feb. 18, designed to highlight the way the university can help its community, both in Salt Lake and Davis counties, during tough economic times. Teams from the U of U will present resume reviews, interview tips and information about professional training in business and technology fields. There will also be a focus on preparing for graduate school exams and job openings at the university itself. “Our goal is to make peo-

ple more aware of the resources that exist — both here at the U and with our partner organizations in the community — to help people not only weather the recession, but also come out ahead,” said Sandi Parkes,vice president for continuing education at the University of Utah. The professional education, technology education, human resources and test preparation departments are all participating in the open house. Information about professional training and industry-recognized certification programs will also be available. Included in the presentations will be project management, Apple and Web development certifi-

cation, tips on the GRE, GMAT and LSAT tests as well as information about prep courses and other professional development courses. “We’re targeting those looking to cement their current jobs by beefing up their skill sets, as well as those who have been laid off and are trying to figure out what to do next,” said Parkes. Human resources experts from the university will be there to review resumes and offer professional advice on job searching, interview techniques and how to research and apply for current jobs at the university. “Professional development can go a long way toward mak-

ing you appear vital in the workforce, towards making your resume shine,” said director of professional education at the U Anne O’Brien “It’s an important time to consider how to become irreplaceable.” Human resources experts from the university will also be on hand to review resumes and offer professional advice on job searching, interview techniques, and how to research and apply for the more than 150 current job openings at the U. The open house is free and will take place from 3-6 p.m. at the University of Utah. For more information,call 801-5856597. sroberts@davisclipper.com

Club U comes to Bountiful for first time BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL — For the first time in Bountiful, the Youth Education organization at the University of Utah will offer a camp for children up to age 13 focusing on science and engineering.

From March 6 to 10, Club U will offer the spring break camps at the U’s Bountiful campus. The focus of the camps is to help children discover new interests and explore the world around them. Club U also hopes to create new bonds of friendship between children.

Club U develops interests and passions through experiential education and will take children to swim, conduct scientific experiments and travel to areas for rock climbing, building rockets, animal tracking and ice skating. Camps have a new theme each day, from slimy science

to outdoor adventures to awesome art. The five-day camps run from 8 a.m-3 p.m. with the one and two-day school holiday camps running from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, visit www.youth.utah.edu or call 801-581-6984.

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DavisLife

Inside Everyday Davis . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Weddings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B3 Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 • B1

Above photo: Courtesy. Sunflower: Jenniffer Wardell

BOUNTIFUL — Art, like exercise, sometimes has to be squeezed in wherever you can make it fit. Bountiful’s art galleries — the Bountiful/Davis Art Center, Apple Frame Gallery, and Lamplight Gallery — have a practice of holding the opening galas for new shows on the same night in order to give art-lovers the chance for an evening gallery stroll (the next stroll is scheduled for Feb. 27, with live music, finger food, and artists in attendance). For those people who haven’t yet managed to find an entire evening to set aside, however, it’s possible to make your own miniature stroll during a few spare minutes of a lunch break or just before the kids get out of school. The two smaller galleries on the tour, Apple Frame and Lamplight, are located only a block apart in downtown Bountiful and welcome any and all throughout the day. Though rotating exhibits are mostly located in the east gallery at Apple Frame (70 N. Main Suite 104), they occasionally sneak to the outside perimeter of the west gallery. The back of the west gallery is also the place to find someone willing to

answer questions about a particular artist or work, and though you may have to ring the bell the people there will always be happy to help. Western-tinged landscapes, many by fairly well-known Utah artists, are a common element in the gallery (current featured artists Kate Starling and Josh Clare fall into this category), though certain exhibits offer up a lovely collection of portraits. At Lamplight (170 S. Main), the gallery’s rotating exhibit is currently right in the middle of a transitional period. The next few days will be the final ones for the multi-media, multi-artist “Out of the Box” exhibit, at which point it will be possible to watch next month’s featured artists, Tom Rogers and guest photographer Sean Dunshee, hang their work (their complete exhibit will be up by Feb. 27.) The rotating exhibit is located along the back wall of the gallery, with work often spilling over into the front windows and the wall just to the left of the front door. The center of the main floor gallery are devoted to the artist’s permanent displays, which all reflect the particular flavor of the individual artist. Beyond that, whichever artist is manning the front desk will probably serve as the best map to the work.

ART BY Kate Starling (top of page) and Aaron Bushnell (above left) are currently on display at Apple Frame Gallery. At Lamplight, the permanent and rotating displays include art by Alicia Jensen (above) and Nora Del Murdock (left).

Ron L. Brown

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

Ron L. Brown

Gallery stroll: lunchtime version

Choral group brings international music to Utah

courtesy photo

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

THE SALT LAKE CHORAL ARTISTS Women’s Choir, above, will be one of the groups performing at the Feb. 21 event. The SLCA features several Davis Countty singers.

DAVIS COUNTY — There’s a world of music ready to make an appearance right next door. Salt Lake Choral Artists, a group that features several Davis County performers, will be teaming up with the University Singers to present Estonian composer Arvo Part’s “Te Deum” (We Praise Thee, Oh God), on Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Libby Gardner Concert Hall on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake. Part was 9 when his country was invaded by the Soviet Union. It is one of many influences that revealed itself in a lifetime’s worth of his work. “I could compare my

music to white light which contains all colours,” wrote Part.“Only a prism can divide the colours and make them appear; this prism could be the spirit of the listener.” A major characteristic of Part’s work is a style he called tintinnabuli, in which he plays with various inversions of a certain chord. The effect is a complex mixture of sounds that has often been compared to the sound of pealing bells. In the Salt Lake Choral Artists’ performance, the effect is reached through two voices performing the different inversions simultaneously. “Tintinnabulation is an area I sometimes wander into when I am searching for answers - in my life, my music, my work,” wrote Part.“In my dark hours, I have the certain

feeling that everything outside this one thing has no meaning. “The complex and manyfaceted only confuses me, and I must search for unity. What is it, this one thing, and how do I find myway to it? Traces of this perfect thing appear in many guises — and everything that is unimportant falls away.” The group will also be performing another “Te Deum,” written by composer Petr Eben to celebrate the fall of the Soviet Union. SLAC’s Women and Concert choirs will also be performing Slovak folk music, a soloist will be performing Yiddish folk tunes, and the University singers will be performing music from Hungary and Slovenia. jwardell@davisclipper.com


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Thursday, February 19, 2009

¿

Everyday Davis

Davis County Clipper

For online photos, select ‘multimedia’ on our website

STORM CLOUDS BRING DRAMA to the sky and light up Antelope Island, while cold temperatures freeze part of the lake, pictured.

VISITOR CENTER has information on activities and places of interest on Antelope Island.

MANY BIRDS OF PREY such as this Red Tailed Hawk can be observed at Farmington Bay Migratory Bird Refuge.

WINTER IS OPPORTUNE TIME to observe wildlife on Antelope Island. There are typically not as many visitors, sometimes giving the chance to see wildlife interaction, such as these 2 bulls sparring.

A LARGE FLOCK OF SWANS were spotted on the causeway leading to Antelope Island.

GREAT WHITE PELICANS circle about Antelope Island.

Photos by Ron L.Brown

FOUL WEATHER is a great time to observe water "fowl" as seen at Bountiful Pond.


Davis Horizons

Davis County Clipper

Wedding

Birthdays 80th: Young

Joan Vivian Hansen Young participating on programs with singing, dancing and playing the piano. It would take many pages to cover 80 years of life events, but she has survived life’s trials with faith, grace and courage. Joan has served in the Church her entire life. She has also been an admired piano teacher. Joan is greatly loved and admired by friends and family. A private family party in celebration of her life will honor Joan on her 80th birthday. The day will begin with a luncheon at Joy Luck Restaurant followed by a private family gathering with cake, fun, and family photos at the Pheasantbrook Clubhouse.

80th: Hepworth Happy Eighty To a wonderful lady! To honor and celebrate her fabulous years, Her family invites you to join in the cheers. Friday, Febuary 20, the open house will be. No gifts accepted, your presence is plenty! From 5:30-7:30 is the time, At Camelot Clubhouse, Highway 89 655 N. Highway 89, North Salt Lake.

Maudella Hepworth

Saint Olaf Church will celebrate Mardi Gras

Saint Olaf Church, Bountiful, will host a Mardi Gras celebration Feb. 21, from 6:309:30 p.m. at 1800 South Orchard Drive in the McNamara Center. Families are invited to share in this preLenten tradition. Attendees will be treated to the music of “Just Three

Words,” a local band of incredible 13-year-old musicians who play both rock music and their own. There will be face painting, games and other activities for kids of all ages. The dinner is a potluck, so bring your favorite dish. A $10 donation per family is suggested.

By JoAnn Hamilton

‘Fireproof’ relationships Katie Stock John Burton George. He graduated from Utah State University and served in the Washington, D.C. North Mission. The couple will make their home in St. George.

Eagle Scouts PAUL EVANS Paul Evans has earned his Eagle Scout award. He is the son of Randy and Teri Evans. As a student of Adelaide Elementary School, he organized his project of providing new white boards for classrooms. Paul’s project also involved planning a fund raiser to earn money for material and supplies. He is a member of the Sterling Heights Ward Troop 957 and has enjoyed camping and many fun experiences while earning 50 merit badges. Paul would like to thank all those who helped him earn the rank of Eagle Scout. Paul is now attending South Davis Junior High where he plays the cello in the school orchestra and is a member of a basketball and lacrosse team.

STEVEN WALL Steven Wall, son of David Wall and Holly Wall, will receive his Eagle S c o u t Aw a rd Saturday, Feb. 21. He is a member of Troop 113, sponsored by the Woods Cross 3rd Ward. He earned 36 merit badges. For his Eagle project he prepared the videos at Adelaide Elementary for the online public access catalog.

B3

A Minute for Parents

StockBurton Katie Stock and John Burton will be married on Thursday, February 19, 2009, in the Bountiful LDS Temple. A reception will be held that evening at the Eaglewood Golf Reception Center. Katie is the daughter of Rick and Phyllis Stock of North Salt Lake. She graduated from Woods Cross High and attended Utah State University. John is the son of Brent and Kathy Burton of St.

An angel here on earth will be celebrating her 80th birthday. Our precious Joan Vivian Hansen Young was born on February 19, 1929, in Ogden, to Nellie VanderSchuit Hansen and Norman Edwin Hansen. Joan married L. Richard Young on September 15,1950,in the Salt Lake LDS Temple and they are the parents of 10 children. They have 17 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren (with two on the way). Joan and Richard raised their family in Centerville. They served an LDS Orlando, Florida Temple Mission together. Joan’s childhood was a happy one, filled with many activities: school, church, and

Thursday, February 19, 2009

JAKE PARRY Jake Parry, son of Craig Parry and Becky Parry, will receive his Eagle S c o u t Aw a rd on Sunday, Feb. 22 at 6 p.m. at t h e Maple H i l l s Church Building in Bountiful. He is a member of Troop 876 sponsored by the Mueller Park 5th Ward. Dave Smith and George Richards are his scoutmasters. He earned 36 merit badges. For his Eagle project he acquired, inventoried and organized equipment for the Mueller Park Baseball League. He replaced the old worn and unsafe equipment. Jake and the other scouts prepared fully-stocked equipment bags for the over 60 teams that will participate in the league this upcoming season. They collected used equipment including gloves, bats, helmets and catcher’s equipment, that was still in good shape, and delivered it to the SLC Boys-Girls Club for their use. Jake is an honors student at Millcreek Jr. High School. He enjoys playing baseball and football and skiing. He is an avid Red Sox fan.

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have been convinced for years now that building meaningful relationships both in a marriage and with each individual child is imperative. What a pleasant surprise it was when a good friend dropped off the DVD, Fireproof, which dealt with relationships. I loved it! What more can I say? I want to recommend it to every family. It provides a good reminder for couples. The same techniques work on youth As you watch it, at first you will think it is only about a troubled marriage, but soon you will find it exciting and interesting. You will see a thread of pornography-use wind throughout the movie, but it is tactfully and appropriately handled. It is not the main focus of the DVD but could generate some healthy family discussions if you choose to show it to your family. I would recommend that you see it first so you can make a wise choice. The rating is PG. I didn’t hear any language problems but be aware that it centers somewhat on a journey to building a relationship with God. I didn’t find this overdone or soliciting in the approach the movie took. People used to ask me how I could influence in positive ways the troubled youth that I worked with. The answer is that I learned to build a relationship with them, and then they would listen to me. So often in the process of rearing children, as parents we can alienate our youth. They stop listening and we lose that power to reach them. This DVD shows a step-by-step plan that a husband uses to try to reestablish a lost relationship. It is true to life in that it doesn’t work for some time. Oh, how I can relate that to youth, but if and when the relationship cliques, you can begin to communicate and rebuild. One youth I worked with was gang related. How did that happen? He came from a good religious family that loved him. One day as a teen his folks took him with them as they went to some

I

parent teacher conferences. The young man drew beautifully and yet he was flunking his art class. He and his parents listened to his list of faults as the art teacher explained each one. Then they went to a science teacher. This young man was also failing that class. The teacher put a periodic table up and asked the young man for information from it. His answers were all incorrect. Everyone got angry. The boy stormed out of the classroom. Just outside was a local gang member who put his arms around this young man and understood his frustration. The young man told me later that at first he felt guilty as he did the things he did that week with the gang, but after that first week, he felt nothing. After being in the gang for a number of months he ran into a situation where he could check to see if he was colorblind. He found that he was. Why was he failing the art class: because he was colorblind. Why did he read the periodic chart wrong: because he was color blind. Why did he call me and ask for help: because I had built a relationship with him when he was in my seminary class. And why could I guide him back to the family that loved him: because of the relationship I rebuilt with him while he was in my home. I am aware of a 13-yearold boy who loved this DVD after he got through the first 10 minutes. Fireproof could potentially bring a lot of happiness into a lot of homes.

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High Notes n South end to hold bee BOUNTIFUL — The south end spelling bee will be held tonight at Bountiful High School. Elementary students from schools Kaysville south have picked three winners from each school to compete in this bee. Students need to be at the high school and registered by 6:30 p.m. The competition begins at 7 p.m. Spelling rounds will continue until there are approximately 14 students left and those will join the north end winners and junior high spellers at the final district bee on Tuesday, March 10 at Woods Cross High School. sroberts@davisclipper.com

n ‘Stars and Stripes Forever’

FARMINGTON — First-grade students at Knowlton Elementary will present a patriotic program at 2:30 p.m. this afternoon. They will be singing, playing instruments and doing a routine to “Stars and Stripes Forever.” Contact music specialist Martha Avant at 402-3000 for more information.

n Skills contest at WSU

OGDEN — Students from Clearfield, Layton, Northridge and Syracuse high schools have been qualified to participate in the Skills/Hands-On contest. Students have been selected by their teacher to compete for a set of tools, one-year tuition-wavier scholarship to Weber State University and the chance for their school to win a late model car. Contact teacher Ed Schirner at 402-8200 for more information.

n Students present museum

CLINTON — Fifth-grade students at Parkside Elementary will present an American History Museum of Famous Americans from 9:15 to 11 a.m. Contact teacher Pam Martinez at 402-1150 for more information.

n Students need sponsors

LAYTON — Students at Heritage Elementary are reading to raise money for The Sunflower Orphanage in Peru. Students are gathering sponsors for the minutes they read each week. Students will read through the end of the month to reach their reading goals. Contact Sharie Bryson at shariebryson@gmail.com more information.

n Zaslow coming to Davis

LAYTON — Author Jeffrey Zaslow will be speaking at Northridge High School for the Davis Education Foundation on Friday, Feb. 27. Tickets are $15 each and are available through Davis Reads.

Youth/Education

Davis County Clipper

Science fair attracts wide range of students BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer FARMINGTON — For students from 4th through 12th grade, the Davis County Events Center was the place to hang out and talk science yesterday afternoon. The annual Davis School District science fair saw over 550 science participants from the district. Winners from each elementary school entered the contest, along with groups from junior high and high schools.This was the first year the fair was divided into three separate fairs for elementary, junior and senior students. “It is a good thing to see so many students want to participate in this,” said Davis School District elementary science supervisor Rita Stevenson. Projects entered into the fair were broken down into 10 subcategories including chemistry, math, physics, biology, math and more. From each category, a first place winner was chosen. Then depending on the number of projects entered, each category had second and third place winners, along with fourth and fifth place winners. “There really was a wide variety of projects here,” said Stevenson. Winners will be invited to the Weber State University Science and Engineering Fair to be held the week of March 16 in Ogden. There will also be an awards ceremony for the first through third place winners tonight at Davis High

ELEMENTARY STUDENT HEATHER McWENN (top) asked if Jell-O would ruin fruit for her science project. Projects ranged from fruit and bacteria to bugs and dirt. Rose Carlisl and Madison Burtts (below) used a magnifying glass as part of their science fair projects at the district fair on Tuesday. School. For the elementary students in grades four and five, the ceremony will be held at 5:30 p.m. with the junior students in grades six through eight at 6:30 and the senior students in grades nine through 12 at 7:30. “It was a good opportunity for the sixth-grade students to participate with the higher grades,” said Stevenson. Stevenson also said so many students get involved in science fairs from all grade levels. “We could easily see 10,000 students at this fair.”

Ron L Brown

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Ron L Brown

B4

BHS club serves seniors for Valentine’s BY DANNY KINDER JR. Clipper Intern BOUNTIFUL — On Thursday, Feb. 12 Bountiful seniors headed out to a Valentine’s Dance sponsored by Bountiful High’s Interact Club and were honored by having a member of the first graduating class of 1956. Senior couples had their photos taken by Interact Club members. Throughout the

night, couples could return to the photo stand and fill out a form to have those photos sent back to them. Each couple also receive a free corsage and boutonniere made by club members. Light refreshments were

served, music was played and Interact students mingled with seniors.There were some BHS student groups singing and playing music for the seniors. All the music that was played was ear music to suite those in attendance.

“We hope to continue this dance and start a Bountiful tradition,” said Bountiful High School Interact Club advisor Jan Wray. Seniors who attended the dance varied from 55 to 85 years old.


Davis Spirit

Celebrate! n A sorrow we all must face friendships lzheimer’s renewed. Thank is an you to all who insidious “mourned with disease. Those those who suffering are mourned”. Our totally aware at feeble knees were the beginning that lifted by your they are heading kindness. down a frightenHelen Keller ing path. Even at said it best when the height, they Mark & Gayle she said,“We realize “someVan Wagoner bereaved are not thing is wrong.” alone. Those who love “We belong to the largest them end up saying goodbye company in all the world — several times, and the person the company of those who who looks like their loved have known suffering. When one is not the person they it seems that our sorrow is grew up knowing and loving. too great to be borne, let us I lost my mother to think of the great family of Alzheimer’s more than five years ago, and at that time we the heavy-hearted into which our grief has given us were warned to watch my entrance, and inevitably, we father because he was showwill feel about us their arms, ing signs that the disease was in progress in him. (What are their sympathy, their underthe odds of losing both to this standing.” She continued writing ailment?) We need to thank about the feelings of loss and the Alzheimer’s Association, offered sweet suggestions on Utah Chapter, for their suphow to lessen the sorrow, and port. Knowledge is the key to helping those afflicted, and then said this: “Often when the heart is their caregivers. torn with sorrow, spiritually When my father passed we wander like a traveler lost away last week, it was a in a deep wood. We grow blessed relief knowing my frightened, lose all sense of mom and dad were finally direction, batter ourselves together with all their faculagainst trees and rocks in our ties. We were praying for my attempt to find a path. All the dad’s release because he was while there is a path — a so miserable, and he wanted path of faith — that leads to “go home” so badly. straight out of the dense tanSo when the moment gle of our difficulties into the came, the level of sadness open road we are seeking. was unexpected. I used to If you have a loved one, talk about looking forward to his passing with a good friend or know of someone caring for some one with of mine. Alzheimer’s, please take He warned me that no matter the circumstances, los- advantage of the support offered by the Alzheimer’s ing your dad is a major event Association, Utah Chapter. in your life and to be preTheir Healthcare Provider pared for the loss. He was Education is invaluable. right. I imagined most of my It will make a tremendous tears would be tears of joy; difference in the comfort and the emptiness caught me off well-being of your loved one, guard. as well as helping you work The loss of a loved one is through all the complications a sorrow all of us must evenof caring for, and understandtually face, and I pray that when that day comes you will ing, this disease. Not to mention all of have the love and support my their other services which are family has had during our so valuable and needed! first days of bereavement. You can call toll free at It is during these tender times that active relationships 800-371-6694 or log onto their website: alzutah.org. are strengthened and lost

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Autumn Glow events Activities at the Autumn Glow Center, 81 E. Center, Kaysville, 544-1235, include: Friday Feb. 20 11:30 a.m. Attorney Clayton talks about grandparents’ rights Monday Feb. 23 11:30 a.m. What do you know about Oscar? Tuesday Feb. 24 8:30 a.m. Lapidary 9 a.m. Quilting bee 9 - 9:30 a.m. Low impact exercise 9:30 a.m. Watercolor 12:00 Movie and popcorn, “License to Wed.” 1:30 - 3:30 square dancing

Wednesday Feb. 25 9:00 a.m. Water exercise at Layton pool 10:00 a.m. Beginning computer 10:30 a.m. Bingo 11:30 a.m. Crazy auction, you move, you’ve bid! 12:00 - 3 p.m. Ceramics 1 - 2:30 p.m. Line dance

Thursday, February 19, 2009

B5

Program promotes senior activity BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer DAVIS COUNTY — The National Diabetes Education Program has suggested five ways older adults can be more active and help prevent type 2 diabetes. According to the program, older people are at a higher risk of becoming diabetic, especially if there is a family history of diabetes. Seniors are encouraged to talk with their doctors about different types of exercise and physical activity, but the main point is to simply get moving. “Studies have shown that modest weight loss through healthy eating and increased physical activity is highly effective in preventing or delaying Type 2 diabetes in people over age 60,” said Darise S. Deal from the National Diabetes Education Program. Getting started in physical activities involves setting goals. Deal said to begin with small, simple goals to improve strength, flexibility and balance. Begin with those small goals, then add a little more activity each day or each week until you reach 30 minutes of activity a day, five days a week. “There are many types of physical activity you can do at little or no cost, such as walking or doing chair exercises,” said Deal. Things seniors can do every day just in the house include standing up from a chair and sitting down again without using hands, rise up

THE DIABETES EDUCATION PROGRAM encourages seniors to set small goals and eventually get out among the community to exercise. Bountiful resident Mike Hayes runs on Bountiful Blvd.

Ron L Brown

Davis County Clipper

and down on your toes while standing and hold on to a stable chair or countertop, getting up to change the channel

on the TV instead of using a remote, walking around the house while talking on the phone or even checking out a

fitness video from the library. The National Diabetes Education Program encourages people to eventually get out of the house to exercise and meet new people. The program suggests forming or joining a walking group. Walkers can use the mall, a museum or community center as a place to meet and walk. “Make sure you wear comfortable shoes,” said Deal. Running errands is another physical activity outside the house that seniors can make a part of their schedules.“If you take the bus or train and the neighborhood is safe, get off a stop earlier and walk the rest of the way,” said Deal. Lastly, the program says to get your family involved with diabetes education as well as with your exercise. Teach the younger generation dances you love, plan a day at the pool or just go for a walk together. Golden Years, Autumn Glow and Heritage Senior Activity Centers each also have suggestions on physical activity. For more information on the program or diabetes, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-6337. sroberts@davisclipper.co

Something on your mind? contact: letters@davisclipper.com

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B6

Davis Horizons

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Obituaries Virginia D. Addams 1917-2009 Virginia D. Addams, 91, passed away Sunday, February 15, 2009, in Bountiful, Utah. She was born August 1, 1917 in Kimberly, Idaho the daughter of Alonzo and Iona James Dutson. In 1922, s h e moved to Leamington, Utah, with her family in a covered wagon. Following the death of her father, she moved to Salt Lake City. She graduated from East High School and Stevens Heneger Business College. She married Harvey J. Addams October 8, 1938. Virginia worked at Addams Realty as a secretary and book-

May Burdorf 1930-2009 May Lucille Simonson Burdorf, loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and greatgreat-grandmother passed away peacefully holding her loving husb a n d R o d ' s hand on February 16, 2009, joining her dearly departed family a n d friends. She was b o r n January 19, 1930, to Carlos Edward Stout and R u b y M a y H a m m o n d and was a member of the L D S Church. She married her . first love, Orval Simonson, a farmer from Grace, Idaho, in April 1948. They had three children, Steve, VerGean and Rose Marie. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Logan LDS Temple. In the early days of their marriage between time spent raising her children and canning everything in sight, she put in many hours help-

Alice Harris Griffiths 1919-2009 “Nana” Our dear Mom decided she wanted to spend Valentine’s Day with her sweetheart, so she quietly slipped away Saturday February 14, 2009. Although we will miss her so much, it makes us smile to know she is with our D a d again. Alice Harris was born December 15, 1919, in Richmond, Utah to William Harris and Iris Hendricks. She met her future husband, Budd L. Griffiths, in high school where they both played in the band. They were married in the Logan Temple on August 27, 1940, and spent the next 67 years together until Dad died in November of 2007. Together they had three children. Mom was an example of love and service to our family. As time went on we came to realize how much she did for us and how much she loved each one of us. She rejoiced with us in our successes and strengthened us during our trials. She was everything a mother could be. She gave service to others her whole life. Mom was an active member of the LDS Church and served as a Relief Society President, MIA President and Jr. Sunday School Coordinator for

Davis County Clipper

There are many ways to save BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor keeper. Later, she worked for and retired from Security Title Company in Salt Lake City. She was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She was devoted to her family and friends. One of her favorite activities was fishing, especially in Pinedale, Wyo. At the age of 87, she caught her biggest trout. A world traveler, she took every opportunity to explore new places and visit family members. She is survived by two sons, R. Jean Addams (Elizabeth); Lon Addams (Marsha); daughter Cande Fitch (Mark); 12 grandchildren; 18 great grandchildren; brother John J. Muir (Jeanne); and sisters Dora Flack and Carol Clonch (Robert). She was preceded in death by her husband, sister Marjorie Bentley, and brother Richard Muir. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, February 21, 2009, at the Bountiful 36th Ward Chapel, 102 E. 1400 S. A viewing will be held on Friday, from 6-7:30 p.m. at Lindquist’s Bountiful Mortuary, 727 N. 400 E. and 10-10:45 a.m. at the Chapel prior to services. Condolences may be shared at www.lindquistmortuary.com

ing on the farm during harvest time. In 1965 she lost her husband of 17 years due to a job related accident. Later her marriage to Earl Duffin ended in divorce, but added a third daughter named Christy to the family. She met and married her last love, Roderick Burdorf who loved and supported her through joys and struggles in her later years. She was a kind person who enjoyed helping and taking care of those who needed help with food, getting around or just good company. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Stout; mother, Ruby Davis; first husband, Orval Simonson. She is survived by husband, Roderick Burdorf; son, Steven Simonson (Carolyn); daughter, VerGean Brady (Alan); daughter, Rose Marie Escobar (Peter), daughter, Christy Hernandez; 15 grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. She will be greatly missed by all. The family would like to offer a special thank you to North Canyon Care Center and her hospice nurse, Mindy Green for their loving, compassionate care of their mother. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, February 20, 2009, at the Centerville 7th Ward Chapel, 270 North 300 East. A visitation will be held Thursday evening from 6-8 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main, and Friday 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the church prior to services. IntermentBountiful City Cemetery. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com.

many years. She loved the gospel and had a strong testimony. Mom and Dad had many opportunities to travel the world with dear friends and family. One of her favorite places to be was at the family cabin, Cottonwood, in Wyoming. She belonged to several clubs and made friends that lasted her lifetime. She particularly loved her home and good neighbors. We as a family appreciated all the love and kindness they constantly showed to Mom, especially after Dad died. She got her wish to stay in her home and be near her neighbors. Mom loved to do yard work, keep a clean house and go shopping. Mom, we will miss you with all our hearts. We love you and thank you for being such a wonderful example to us all. Alice is survived by her three children Brent (Sue, deceased), Suzanne (Wally) Fowler and Janet (Jerie) Davis. She is also survived by nine grandchildren Julie, Alan, Brian, Carrie, Brad, Paula, Lorri, Cami and Cindi. She will also be missed by her 29 great grandchildren who loved her so much. She is also survived by her brother Burton (Vivian) Harris and many nieces and nephews. Alice was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, her sister Helen White and her brother Bill Harris. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, February 20, 2009, at the Bountiful 31st Ward Chapel, 585 E. Center St. Friends may call Thursday Feb. 19 from 6-8 pm at Lindquist’s Bountiful Mortuary, 727 N. 400 E. and at the church from 9:45-10:45 a.m. prior to the services. Interment Lakeview Memorial Cemetery, 1640 Lakeview Dr. Bountiful. Condolences may be shared at www.lindquistmortuary.com

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Andrew Jackson Baker 1924-2009 Andrew Jackson Baker passed away Tuesday, February 17, 2009, in Bountiful, Utah. He was born July 1924, in Fulton, Missouri to Andrew Jackson and Fernie Baker and was raised in Columbia. He was better known as A.J. or Andy. He married B e t t y Oviatt on June 28, 1957, in the Salt L a k e Temple. They had 3 sons and 1 daughter, 13 grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren. Andrew served in the Merchant Marines in World War II. He was a convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and served a mission to the North Central States. Andrew was an entrepreneur of many different trades, one of which was barbering. He owned "Andy's Barber Shop", and was very successful. Later in his life he worked as a custodian for the Davis County School District. Then together, Andrew and Betty served a mission to Chinle, Ariz. Andrew enjoyed scouts as a youth and it kept him busy. He was a lover of sailboats and built two of his own. He was also very talented in wood-working and loved to carve wood. Andrew is survived by his wife and children, Steven (Jody), Christine Harker (Kent), Gary (Cindy), Larry (Julie), Sisters, Deloris Larwill (Johart) Texas, and Freda Robinson, Florida. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, February 21, 2009, at the North Canyon 5th Ward, 2505 So. Davis Blvd., Bountiful. A visitation for family and friends will be held Friday evening from 6-8 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main, and Saturday morning 9:45 10:45 a.m. at the church prior to services. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com.

Nathan Warwood 1918-2009 BOUNTIFUL — Nathan Hale Warwood, 91, passed away Feb 13, 2009 at a Bountiful hospital. He was born Jan 7, 1918 in Oakley, Idaho to Walter Tracy and Sarah Annie Hale Worwood. He was the eldest of seven children. H e served in Wo r l d War II. He worked in Scouting for 35 years and helped m a n y young men get their Eagle. He married Frances Marian Irwin Nov 9, 1953, in the Salt Lake Temple. He is survived by his wife, Frances; children, Kevin (Chris) of West Valley City, Marian McLorance of Rexburg Idaho, five grandchildren, three great grandsons; sister, Minnie (Varsel) Jenks of Perry; brother, Varian (Marjorie) of Burley Idaho, many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and two sisters. Funeral Services will be Feb 21, 2009, at the Bountiful 9th Ward, 585 E Center St, at 12 noon. A viewing will be at 11 a.m. prior to services. Interment, South Morgan Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Boy Scouts. E-mail condolences to the family at www.walker-mortuary.com

Obituary deadline: Monday and Wednesday, 10 a.m.

THE BOTTS

David, Robert, Jason, Ammon, and Josh

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FARMINGTON — Being strapped for cash doesn’t have to mean an end to “going out” or enjoying that special evening with a friend or loved one. It comes down to the phrase, “It’s not what you earn, but how you spend it,” said Joanne Roueche, Family & Consumer Education Specialist at the Utah State University Extension, Davis County. “There are so many factors” that have led to the economic downturn hitting people across the nation, she said. “We had a very good period before. Many people pushed their debt to the limit, got new cars, bigger homes. Now times are not that good, are more difficult than we’ve seen in a very long time.” People are now having trouble making their house or car payments, with the value of the car potentially lower than what they owe or the house, now unaffordable, not possible to sell at the price it was purchased, Roueche said. “Lives may have to be altered” due to the economic

downturn, she said. Instead of being able to go out for a nice meal and a movie, it may be necessary to only do one or the other, such as, have a nice dinner and then rent a movie. “Or maybe look for and enjoy that special program on TV, and add to the enjoyment by popping some popcorn,” Roueche said. “If you normally buy CDs, try the library. It’s a great time to explore alternate resources,” she said. “Track what you are spending,” Roueche advised. Just like calories, it can be hard to imagine how many can be eaten in such a short time. For example, you may find yourself spending $1 a day for a soda when you could buy a 12-pack and save a lot of money each week. Or, rather than eating lunch out every day, make that a once-a-week treat and bring a sack lunch otherwise. “There are ways to save without totally sacrificing” lifestyle, Roueche emphasized. “It’s going to take all of us doing something. People need to try and stay on top” in this

economic climate, she continued. “Eat healthy food, exercise, do what makes you feel better,” vs. what is the easy route: over-eating, for example. As thoughts of spring cross more people’s minds, it might be time to consider a garden, she said. If space is limited, that could even be accomplished with a flower pot or two, strategically placed. Consumers should also check for sales, not only from the circulars that arrive in the mail or newspaper each week, but also via various Internet sites, Roueche urged. Rebates can also be a way to save, but consumers need to carefully follow directions to achieve maximum savings. “These downturns come in cycles,” she said. “There are reasons we need to prepare for when times are not good,” and that includes during healthy economic periods. “Not one size fits all” as far as making adjustments, or determining what changes can be made to a person’s or family’s life, Roueche said. “All families are going to have to end up helping each other.”

$20,000 given to housing project FARMINGTON — Some $20,000 has been awarded to a Clearfield housing project that targets homeless singles and women with children. Funds are being allocated by the Davis County Homelessness Committee, and come from money raised during the county’s gala last September. The facility is a former twostory office building near Davis Hospital that will need extensive renovations, said Don McKinnon, Davis Behavioral Health consumer support director. It will become part of DBH’s transitional housing program to assist homeless people into gaining jobs, permanent housing, etc. “We’ll partner with other agencies,” he said, including Safe Harbor, the domestic violence shelter. It will provide case management for tenants. “We hope to have something done before October,” McKinnon said. He said the

building has been appraised at between $300,000 and $320,000. However, the owner is willing to sell it for $170,000. He said some partnerships may be forged with the Davis School District, Clearfield Job Corps, or others, who could provide students trained in various building trades. DBH may seek to purchase a second building as it tries to expand its program, which includes a resident training component, McKinnon said. “Our real interest is to prevent homelessness by rapidly rehousing people, or keeping them out of shelters,” said Lloyd Pendleton, state homelessness program director and a Bountiful resident. “If people are going to be high-functioning, we have to bring them out of homelessness,” said Lisa Hunt, DBH transitional housing director. Of the $40,000-plus raised during the gala, $3,500 will be reserved for a homeless apartment project planned in

Woods Cross, and $10,000 for the Family Connection Center’s homeless assistance programs. Homelessness was the theme for the last gala, with this committee formed several months ago under direction of the Davis County Commission. It is co-chaired by County Commissioner Louenda Downs and MaryAnn Nielson, Davis School District homeless student coordinator. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

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GATEWAY 8 CINEMA 206 South 625 West West Bountiful • 292-7979 • Listings for Feb. 19, 2009 Inkheart (PG) 12:50, 4, 6:30 pm Hotel for Dogs (PG) 1:20, 3:50 pm New in Town (PG) 6:50 pm Confessions of a Shopaholic (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 pm Taken (PG-13) 1:50, 4:30, 7:30 pm Coraline (PG) 1:40, 4:10, 6:40 pm Friday the 13th (2009) (R) 2:40, 5, 7:40 pm He’s Just Not That Into You (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:10 pm Push (PG-13) 2:10, 4:50, 7:20 pm

LOEW’S LAYTON HILLS 9 728 W. 1425 North • 774-8222 • Listings for Feb. 20 The International (R) 1:55, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20 p.m. Taken (PG-13) 1:50, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10 p.m. Confession of a Shopaholic (PG) 1:45, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45 pm Coraline (PG) 1:35, 3:55, 6:20, 8:40 pm He’s Just Not That Into You (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30 pm

KAYSVILLE THEATER 21 N. Main,Kaysville • 546-3400 •Listings for Feb. 20-26 *No passes or special offers accepted Bolt (PG)

Underworld: Rise of the Lycans (R) 2:10, 4:25, 6:40, 9 pm Push (PG-13) 1:25, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30 pm Slumdog Millionaire (R) 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50 pm Friday the 13th (2009) (R) 2, 4:35, 7, 9:40 pm

TINSELTOWN USA LAYTON Layton HIlls Mall Ring Rd. • 546-4764 • Listings for Feb. 20 Coraline 3D (PG) 11:15 am, 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:35 pm He’s Just Not That Into You (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 pm Pink Panther 2 (PG) 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25 pm Fired Up (PG-13) 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20 pm Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail (PE-13) 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25 pm Confessions of a Shopaholic (PG) 11:15 am, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 pm Friday the 13th (2009) (R) 12, 1:15, 2:30, 3:45, 5, 6:15, 7:25, 8:45, 10 pm

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GATEWAY 165 S. Rio Grande St. (801) 304-4636 • Listings for Feb. 19 New In Town (PG) 12:20, 2:30, 7:30 pm The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (PG-13) 2:45, 8:30 pm He’s Just Not That Into You (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 pm Pink Panther 2 (PG) 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:45 pm Taken (PG-13)

Thursday, February 19, 2009

12:50, 3:15, 5:40, 8:05, 10:25 pm Push (PG-13) 1:55, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45 pm Paul Blart: Mall Cop (PG) 1:50, 4:05, 6:25 pm The Uninvited (PG-13) 12:40, 6:15 pm Gran Torino (R) 4:50, 9:40 pm The International (R) 1:20, 4:15, 7, 9:50 pm Underworld: Rise of the Lycans (R) 1:25, 3:50, 8:15, 10:30 pm Confessions of a Shopaholic (PG)

B7

12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8, 10:35 pm Friday the 13th (2009)(R) 1:30, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30, 10:05 pm

IMAX THEATRE AT THE CLARK PLANETARIUM 110 S. 40 W., SLC • (801) 532-7827 • Listings for Feb. 19, 2009 Under the Sea 3D (G) 1:15, 4, 6, 7:30 pm Dinosaurs 3D: Giants of Patagonia (NR) 2:45 pm Space Station 3-D (NR) 12, 8:45 pm


B8

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Davis County Clipper


Sixth Sense

SportsWeek Weekend

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

John Leavitt photos

Driven Vikings capture 6th state title

Coach of the Year spreads the love

COACH BRANDON Ripplinger talks to state placer Austin Thompson.

BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

VIEWMONT’S MIKE WINGER celebrates his championship at 125 over Fremont’s Matt Finger. The Vikes also won the team title. BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

XXXXXX

OREM — The goal was set back before Thanksgiving. Viewmont coach Brandon Ripplinger presented an idea to his team. “We talked about going to the state tournament and having it wrapped up when we walked out there on Thursday night,” Ripplinger said. “We didn’t want to leave anything to chance.” The state tournament is a three-day event with the semifinals taking place on Thursday. On Friday there are two consolation rounds and the finals. The Vikings reached their goal

Inside

RONNIE WYMAN placed sixth at 275 for the Vikings who won their sixth title in 8 years.

on Thursday night and went back to their hotel with the knowledge that the tournament was over and the sixth state 5A champion trophy would be heading home with them. “We could have lost but only if every single person left on our team had lost and other teams had pinned every person they face,” Ripplinger said. “We knew we had it and it made for a fun, relaxing night Friday.” Thursday night was certainly no cake walk, however. But after dropping the first three matches of the night, the Vikings went on a roll. It all began with eventual 125 pound champion and eventual 130 pound finalist Josh Smoot. Both had semi-final matches against opponents who had n See “VIKINGS,” p. C3

OREM — After winning two state titles in his first two seasons as head coach for the Viewmont Viking wrestling team, Brandon Ripplinger was named Utah 5A Wrestling Coach of the Year. “It’s nice to be honored,” Ripplinger said. “But there is so much that goes into this program that I share this award with everyone.” Ripplinger pointed out that while there is a Viewmont wrestling team, there is also a sense of Viewmont wrestling community. “We have people that start kids when they are five and six years old,” Ripplinger said. “We have people like Shandell Smoot who run the Northside Wrestling Club and is head coach at Centerville Junior High along with Roger Key who gets these kids ready so when they get to high school they are already wrestling at a high level.” Buck Ekstrom, who is a principal at King Elementary, spends as much time as possible in the room fine tuning wrestlers moves. Viewmont teacher Mel Robinson joined the staff this year and Ripplinger said, “he is great with the bigger guys and is quiet and does a great job with them.” Ripplinger’s brother, Matt, is a leg riding master and works with may of the athletes on that part of the sport. “Matt Ripplinger is a big part of the reason I won my state title,” said 125 pounder Mike Winger. “He worked with me on my leg riding and made me so much better.” Eric Call, a 2008 graduate of Viewmont, helped give a young wrestler in the room for the athletes to train with. Ken Hansen, who keeps all of the stats for Viewmont, along with the team managers, help when there is a question concerning points. Ripplinger also gave high praise to assistant coach, Robbie Gunter. n See “COACH,” p. C3

Davis comes back to grab second BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

Basketball action

John Leavitt photos

C4

OREM — Davis High wrestling coach Neal Porter had just watched his team have one of the worst days of the wrestling season. And to make matters worse, this bad day happened on the second night of the state 5A wrestling tournament. The Darts had lost several close matches in the semi--finals and in the consolation rounds to drop from second place to fourth with Region 1 Weber High in a close fifth. So Porter gather his troops and gave them some tough love. “I didn’t sugar coat it,” Porter said. “I was blunt about how I felt about things and about how poorly we had done. Then I reminded these guys that even though first n See “DAVIS,” p. C3

TODD SMOOT of Davis was part of the Darts’ amazing comeback Friday at the state tournament.


Finals

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Davis County Clipper

John Leavitt

C2

John Leavitt

BRAIDEN HART earned the state 140 championship over Viewmont’s Ikeru Abe.

DANNER KJAR turned it on in the second half of the season and won the state 5A title.

Jacob of Pleasant Grove, 2-1. Trailing 1-0 with 10 seconds remaining in his final, Kjar earned a takedown and rode the wily Jacob out to win the title at 145. “I had set the goal to be a state champion and now I want another one,” Kjar said. “When I got that take down I knew I have to hang on for 10

it was not sitting well with him. “I just decided I needed to get mentally tougher and wrestle better,” Kjar said. The second half of the season Kjar became unstoppable and in doing so followed in his brothers’ footsteps by winning the state 5A tournament in dramatic fashion over Clint

OREM — Danner Kjar sat at the first two tournaments of the year and watched as other wrestlers earned medals. The Viewmont junior didn’t place at the Layton or Viewmont tournaments, and

seconds and it seemed to take forever. “I am real happy that I have been able to work with my brothers. They have helped me reach this goal, like my coaches and teammates.” “I know I’ll have a target on my back next year,” Kjar said.“That’s fine.” sschulte@davisclipper.com

Winger takes title in last seconds

deep and kicked away. “I was able to kick hard at the right time and get away,” Hart said. In the final seconds of the match, Hart used his scrambling skills to keep Abe from finishing off a takedown to grab the win. “I was just exhausted after the match,” Hart said. “Not much was running through my mind. I just kept thinking that I better not wake up and have this be a dream.” This was no dream at all. It was as real as it gets for high school wrestlers. “One of the things that really helped me was usually when I wrestle Viewmont guys their crowd is so loud chanting for their guy.Tonight I could hear my fans drowning them out. That gave me the help I needed in the last minute.” Hart heroics as being the lone state champion for Davis helped the Darts in their comeback for second place. “It’s a great feeling to have the state title and then finish second as a team.” sschulte@davisclipper.com

wrestling.” Mike is the second Winger to become a state champion. Brother Richard won state for Viewmont in 2006.

every day to get there this year,” Winger said. “I like working the legs and Matt Ripplinger is a great coach for that and he pushed me and helped me learn more and more about that part of

MIKE WINGER won the 5A 125 pound final after winning a triple overtime match in the semi-finals..

Scott Kimber

John Leavitt

BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor OREM — Mike Winger saw the clock and knew he was only 2 seconds from becoming a state champion. Winger had earned an escape to take a 1-0 lead on Fremont’s Matt Finger with just nine seconds left and the two seniors went out of bounds. “I had worked all year for this moment,” Winger said.“I knew I had him. My coaches were telling me to just circle for the last two seconds.” Winger did just that and handed Finger only his second loss of the year. “Matt Finger is a great wrestler and even with two seconds I was nervous because I knew he could do something.” Winger used not placing last year as motivation to push himself in the hot summer months when wrestling season is not on the minds of many people. “I was mad that I didn’t place last year and I worked

BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor OREM — What a difference a week can make. In the Region 1 finals Braiden Hart appeared helpless in the final round of his final against Viewmont’s Ikeru Abe as the Viking captured a 12-7 victory. Heading into the state finals last Friday, Hart knew his rival would be coming after him again. But Hart had a plan and it worked as the Davis senior captured a dramatic 3-2 win and the state 140 title. “I knew I had to keep him tied up because he shoot better from places where he’s not tied up,” Hart said. “I also knew I had to match his intensity in the third round.” Hart led 3-1 after Abe was hit with one unnecessary roughness and one illegal hold penalty and Hart escaped.Abe’s escape made it 3-2 and the last minute of the match was on. With 30 second left, Abe had Hart in a single leg and it looked as if Abe would get a takedown. Hart dug down

Another title for Kjar family BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

Hart captures title over Viking Abe

JOSH SMOOT gets a hug from his Ucle Shandell after winning his semi-final.

Smoot’s 2nd place Rasmussen motivated by finals loss helped Vikings final match of the year it’s a big motivator because it’s what you remember,” he said. “This match is just going to make me work harder, go to more camps and tournaments. I’ll be more committed than ever to get better.” In the final minute of the match Nicholes held off Rasmussen as the Viking tried to find openings to get a take down. But with the constant hand movement, Rasmussen was unable to find any openings. “It was a slow match and I never felt like things got going,” he said. “I don’t like losing so I’ll come back harder.”

BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

Scott Kimber

OREM — Sometimes a loss can prepare an athlete for the future. Viewmont’s Mitch Rasmussen believes this is the case after dropping a tough 32 match to Alex Nicholes of Pleasant Grove in the state 5A 152 finals. “I came off the mat and I didn’t feel like I had wrestled my best match,” Rasmussen said. “He did a good a job of keeping me away and getting the win.” Rasmussen, one of a large number of Viewmont wrestlers who will return for his senior year believes this loss will prove as a positive for next year. “When you get beat in the

MITCH RASMUSSEN vows to use his loss in the finals as motivation for next year.

OREM — Josh Smoot has been part of Viewmont wrestling since birth. One of the many Viewmont Smoots, Josh had worked to reach the finals and as the moments of his sem-final match with Brighton’s Conner Meadows ticked away, he knew he had helped his team win another state title. “We dominated this year and it feels great,” Smoot said. “I wish I had done better in the finals, but to be part of another state title team helps take the sting away a little.”

Smoot dropped a 7-0 final to Bingham’s Kade Moss. Moss has been in and out of the national rankings all year. “We are always about team first,” Smoot said. “We never really talk about winning individual state championships. We talk about winning team championships. “I think Coach Ripplinger has really turned this into a team sport for us. That’s what he preaches to us all the time. “I’m proud that I had the chance to get to the finals. It was a great experience and so was winning the team title.” sschulte@davisclipper.com


Davis Sports

Thursday, February 19, 2009

C3

John Leavitt photo

Davis County Clipper

ASSISTANT COACH Robbie Gunter and Head Coach Brandon Rippliner talk to Ron Wyman.

John Leavitt photo

Coach of the Year spreads the love VIEWMONT’S SAM JENSEN in a state match. Jensen was one of 11 state placers for the Vikings.

Vikings capture 6th straight title Continued from p. C1 become thorns in their sides over the year. First, Winger avenged his Region 1 semi-final loss to Davis High’s Todd Smoot with a 2-1 triple overtime victory. Next it was Josh Smoot who shut down Brighton’s Conner Meadows, 3-1. “After those wins, the whole team got on a roll,” Ripplinger said. “Those were such huge matches for those two guys and the team.” As the night progressed, Ripplinger said it became fun and exciting to watch the whole night play out. “We had 11 guys place and so we had quite a few going into those rounds Thursday night and I could tell as our fans got louder and louder throughout the night that things were going real well. It was a great experi-

they don’t do it. “They are the most selfmotivated group of young men I’ve ever worked with.” Ripplinger gave credit to members of the team that didn't not place this year as a major reason for the success of the Vikings. “We have guys like Austin Smoot and Andrew Kimber who didn’t place this year, but without them we wouldn’t be state champions,” Ripplinger said. “They come into our room and battled every day and they give the other guys everything they could ever want during practice.” “We have been fortunate to have guys like that this year.” Finally, Ripplinger pointed out his 215 pounder Hayden White as a young man who battled adversity to help

ence.” With 11 state placers including two state champions (Winger and Danner Kjar) and three second place finishers (Josh Smoot, Mitch Rasmussen and Ikeru Abe), Ripplinger gave credit to what he calls a team full of athletes with “extraordinary personal drive.” “When we have a dual meet and the guys find out they don’t have a match they get together on their own and go back into the room and train,” Ripplinger said. “This isn’t something I ask them to do. They just do it. And they take those times serious. They come out of those sessions exhausted. “I’ve never seen it. Usually if guys don’t have matches it’s a night off. Not with this team. They know taking a night off will hurt them so

the team. “You know, Hayden blew out his knee during football and then about two weeks after he was able to start wrestling he came down with pneumonia and was out while he worked through that. “A lot of guys would have just given up and Hayden didn’t. He came back and gave us everything he had.” White made it to the semifinals and lost by one point, but still placed 6th earning all-state honors. “There are stories like that up and down our team,” Ripplinger said. “These guys set the goals and then just go after those goals with everything they have.” “It really is fun to watch.” sschulte@davisclipper.com

Davis comes back to grab second Continued from p. C1

CALEB WARD (above) and Jason Thomas helped Davis to a second place finish at the state tournament last week. given up when he was on his back, but he fought off,” Porter said. “He was down 50, but he just fought and pulled off the win.” His 5-3 win over Brett Clapier gave Smoot his third and Davis some precious team points. “Todd is one of those guys who when I need something said or done I go to him first,” Porter said. “He’s always in the room early and stays late.” At 103, Jason Thomas came back after dropping a semi-final match to take third. Brett Naylor, one of the state’s best 112 pounders, dropped a 5-4 match in the semi-finals and came back to take third win a thrilling overtime victory over Derek Jesse of Skyline. “I am so proud of the way we responded,” Porter said. “It was an exciting day.” Porter acknowledged the Davis faithful and those wrestlers who did not place for helping to carry the team on Friday. “When we got back to the arena on Friday the guys

Scott Kimber pho-

place was out of reach, we needed to show character and what we were made of to come back and get that second place trophy.” The Darts went back to their hotel, met again and received another long talk by their one finalist, Bariden Hart, and then came back Friday and took it to the competition to leap frog Fremont and Pleasant Grove while holding off Weber. The result was an amazing comeback and a second place finish. “We’ve had adversity al year with injuries and things and we have always bounced back,” Porter said. “I was convicted we could do it again.” One of the big comebacks came from Zak Baker. The 119 pounder was a state finalist a year ago, but was beat in the first round making it necessary for the senior to set aside personal disappointment and win five straight matches to take third place. “When Zak lost I was worried about him,” Porter said. “He’s a senior and lost his first match and we talked and he just came back and was focused for the team. He did a great job winning five ina row and getting third.” Another third place for the Darts came from senior Todd Smoot. Like Baker, Smoot had placed second a year ago, but was beaten in triple overtime by Viewmont’s Mike Winger. “That was tough on Todd, but he is a tough kid and I knew he would fight back,” Porter said. Showing his grit, Smoot came from behind in his next match to beat Cody Wharton of Jordan, 10-8. In the first round, Wharton threw Smoot to his back adding to the dramatic match. “Todd could have easily

were all working together to get ready,” Porter said. “The guys who were out of the tournament were helping the guys who were still alive.” Our fans were great. They made so much noise and cheered so hard for us.” The Darts did so much in

the two consolation round that they were able to distance themselves from the rest of the field and had second place wrapped up. “This was quite an experience for all of us.” sschulte@davisclipper.com

Sports Photos by Photojournalist

Ron L. Brown as seen in the Clipper

Available online at:

www.ronbrownphotos.com

Continued from p. C1 “Robbie is a great technician and a great person to have on this team because he is a great coach but more important, a great person. “I’m glad we’ll be able to see him at some tournaments next year when he moves to Box Elder.” Gunter will be the head football coach at Box Elder and will be an assistant to Ripplinger’s father, Mike, for the Bees, one of the storied programs in Utah. “I also never forget what Bart Thompson did long before I ever got here,” Ripplinger said. “He is the one who created this program and got it going.”

“We also have parents, people like Bob DeCarolis, who tapes every match so we can go over them with the athletes, parents who support the team in many different ways. We have a school and student body that supports us.” Ripplinger said his returning wrestlers enjoyed the state title for a day and now is getting ready for next year. “The guys coming back and their parents are already planning on getting to camps and getting ready for next year. “I am very fortunate to have people like this involved in this program.” sschulte@davisclipper.com


C4

Sports Weekend

Thursday, February 18, 2009

Davis County Clipper

Davis shoots down Vikings, 68-52 BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

“I thought Trevor played a great game for us,” Welk said. “He did a lot of things for us.” Taylor finished the night BOUNTIFUL — The Davis High basketball team with 11 points. The biggest praise from went into Viewmont Tuesday night knowing it needed a Welk came for Tallon Burton. good, solid game to get a win. He came off the bench and And when the game ended connected on five-of-six shots the Darts had done just that, for 12 points while picking up picking up a 68-52 Region 1 three rebounds. “We were in win taking one more foul trouble early step toward winning and Tallon came another title. in and gave us a “I think we came in huge lift,” Welk and did some good said.“He played a things tonight,” said great game when Davis coach Jay Welk. we needed him “We have been Darts and to do it in a improving in a lot of rivalry game in areas and it’s making this gym...I’m just us a better team.”. Vikings real proud of The first quarter him.” saw a tight battle with For Viewmont, Chase Christensen of sharp shooter Viewmont tying the score at 11-11. But Kelvin Tay- Christensen finished the lor was on the receiving end night with 17 points and three of a solid pass from Chase assists. “It seems every year I’m Nye to give the Darts a 13-11 telling someone at Viewmont edge. In the second quarter that I’m glad they are graduDavis began to slowly pull ating,” Welk said. “I said that away from the Vikings behind to Chase Christensen. He is its hot shooting and tough so tough to guard and is a defense to take a 27-19 lead great basketball player.” Kyle DeHart had another into the half. Davis came out in the stellar game for the Vikings, third period and outscored finishing with 15 points and Viewmont12-8 to put the Vik- nine rebounds. “Viewmont is always a ings into a tough 12 point tough team and this game hole at 39-27. Trevor Daniels led a bal- was much more difficult than anced Davis attack with 13 the score may indicate,” Welk points, five rebounds, five said. sschulte@davisclipper.com assists and a steal.

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Ron L. Brown

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DAVIS HIGH’S CHRIS LARABEE goes to the basket and is fouled by Viewmont’s Kyle DeHart. Trevor Daniels (Inset) grabs a rebound for the Darts. Davis ran away from the Vikings and came closer to wrapping up another Region 1 title.

Lady Darts race away to victory BY SHIAN GILLET Clipper Sports

20 points in the quarter while holding Viewmont to just six. Taylor Ryan had a strong first half for Davis, putting up 11 KAYSVILLE — points and five The game between rebounds as the the Davis Lady Darts Darts took a comand the Viewmont manding halftime Lady Vikings was a lead. tale of two teams. The second half Davis, with one game started with a flurry remaining on their of points from both schedule, is looking Darts Davis and Viewfor yet another playmont, as they tradoff berth, while Viewed baskets early mont was attempting Vikings and often. Howevto avoid another winer; while Davis was less season. able to maintain Tuesday night, their point scoring, both teams continued their respective stories, as Viewmont was not. And even Davis took control early and though the Lady Vikings scored often, leading them to outscored Davis for the quarter, they were still down by a 66-30 win. The first quarter Davis wide margin heading into the scored 20 points as they start- final frame. The fourth quarter saw ed heavy with their offensive Davis pull back offensively, attack. Nearly every Dart starter scored points for the taking a lot of time in between team in the first quarter, while shots and grabbing rebounds holding Viewmont to just two to extend plays. They scored points. The two points came 14 points in the quarter; howwith four minutes left in the ever, most were done from the first quarter, and Davis was free-throw line and close to easily ahead heading to the the end of the game. For Davis, Ryan had 14 second period. The second quarter was a points and five rebounds in mirror image of the first for the win. Leah Ellertson led Davis, as they posted another Viewmont nine points.

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BOUNTIFUL and Woods Cross boys basketball teams stayed at the front of the pack in Region 5 basketball with wins Tuesday night.

Ron L. Brown

Ron L. Brown

30

ALLIE BLAKE drives to basket for the Lady Darts. Davis closed out Viewmont in Kaysville Tuesday night..

Braves, Cats remain in Region 5 lead BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor BOUNTIFUL — Christian Taylor went off for 21 points and Sean Carey poured in 11 while Jeff Moncur picked up 10 as Bountiful kept on track to win Region 5 with a 62-36 beating of Bonneville. Woods Cross: 39 MTN Crest: 37 Woods Cross remain just

one game behind Bountiful for the Region 5 title after an exciting 39-37 victory over Mountain Crest. Austin Bankowski led the Wildcats with 11 points. Girls Basketball Bonneville used an 11-3 first quarter to open up on the Bountiful Lady Braves. The Lady Lakers never looked back and came away with a 40-29 win.

Heather Stucki led Bountiuful with 11 points. MTN Crest: 43 Woods Cross: 40 In one that got away, Woods Cross allowed a 19-12 half time lead slip away as Mountain Crest edged the Lady Cats, 43-40. Nikki Fernandes led Woods Cross with 10 points. sschulte@davisclipper.com

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Church Life

Davis County Clipper

Missionaries

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Book heartwrenching to write BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer

Called to serve

Returned home

ELDER EWELL Elder Taylor Ewell, son of Karlan Ewell and Curtis Ewell, has been called to serve in the N e w Hampshire Manchester Mission. He will speak Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. in the Greenfield Ward, 1298 North 400 West.

SISTER BARRUS Sister Christina Barrus, daughter of Craig and Janice Barrus, has returned home after successfully serving in the Bolivia Cochabamba Mission. She will speak Feb. 22 at 10:50 a.m.in the Bountiful 24th Ward, 720 E. 550 North.

SISTER FACKRELL Sister Elise Fackrell, daughter of Sue and Brent Fackrell, has been called to serve in the Argentina Cordoba Mission. She will speak Feb. 22 at 12:50 p.m. in the Centerville 6th Ward, 900 South 400 East, Centerville. ELDER JACKSON Elder Joshua Jackson,son of Chris Jackson and John and Tonna Jackson, has been called to serve in the Massachusetts Boston Mission. He will speak Feb. 22 at 2:50 p.m. in the Woods Cross 2nd Ward, 800 West 1500 South. ELDER MORRILL Elder Alex L. Morrill,son of Leland R.and Sharlene W.Morrill,has been called to serve in the Kentucky Louisville Mission. He will speak Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. in the N o r t h Canyon 5th Ward, 2505 S. Davis Blvd. SISTER OLSEN Sister Heidi Olsen, daughter of Patrice and Kent Olsen, has been called to serve in the Taiwan Taipei Mission. She will speak Feb. 22 at 11 a.m. in the Kays Ward, 925 S. Deseret Drive,Kaysville. SISTER PETTY Sister Brooke Petty, daughter of Richard and Martha Petty, has been called to serve in the Singapore Mission. She will speak Feb. 22 at 2:20 p.m. in the Canyon Park Ward, 1190 E. Bountiful Hills Drive, Bountiful. ELDER WAITE Elder Patrick Waite, son of Mark and Eileen Waite, has been called to serve in the Mexico Ve r a c r u z Mission. He will speak Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. in the Mueller Park 2nd Ward, 1825 S. 850 East,Bountiful.

ELDER IPSON Elder Brett Ipson, son of Sally and Dan Ipson, has returned home after successfully serving in the France Paris Mission. He will speak Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. in the Greenfield Ward, 1296 North 400 West, Centerville.

ELDER AND SISTER MICHAELIS Elder Clifford and Joyce Michaelis have returned home after successfully serving in the South Africa Johannesburg Mission. They will speak Feb.22 at 10:50 a.m. in the Lakeview Ward, 455 South 1200 East, Bountiful.

Artists will be featured at LDS museum SALT LAKE CITY — The Church History Museum will host a special “Artists at Work” event on February 27, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During this event, the public can watch and interact with multiple artists as they sculpt, paint, draw, weave, and create current works of art. Featured artists include renowned sculptor Ortho Fairbanks, who carries on a running commentary as he works on his sculpture, Garth and Anne Marie Oborn (oil painting), Charlene Lind (rug weaving), Sheri Doty (colored pencil), and Elizabeth Peterson (bobbin lace). The event will take place in the central gallery located upstairs in the Museum where patrons will be treated to live background music. Light refreshments will be provided. Free parking for this event will be available at the parking lot just west (behind) the museum. The Church History Museum preserves and displays Latter-day Saint art and artifacts from around the world. For more information please call (801) 240-4615, or go online at www.churchhistorymuseum.org.

www. davisclipper.com

Missionary deadline: Monday, 5 p.m. 295-2251

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FARMINGTON — After a half-dozen years of working on the book, “Massacre at Mountain Meadows,“ Farmington resident Glen Leonard isn’t surprised the book seems to be flying off the shelves. Leonard, now retired as director of the LDS Museum of Church History and Art, along with Ronald Walker and Richard Turley authored the book which details one of the darkest chapters in LDS Church history, the massacre of 120 men, women and children by a band of Mormon militia in 1857 near Cedar City. Leonard, who has published books on local history before, collaborated with Walker and Turley on the book which Leonard described as the most difficult piece of historical writing he’s ever had to work on, but it’s a story all three men felt needed to be told. Leonard said the three men approached leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with the book idea,telling them to do it properly, they needed access to all the sources the church had concerning the massacre. Church leaders turned over all documentation they had — mainly from letters from those involved. They took a middle of the road approach to the book, telling both sides of the story. The three authors each took a third of the topics they

BOOK “MASSACRE at Mountain Meadows,” detailing massacre by Mormon militia in 1857 has already sold 33,000 copies. Glen Leonard, Farmington, was one of three authors. felt needed to be covered and critiqued each other’s research. “The book was in constant flux,” Leonard said. Walker then took the initial drafts and gave it one voice. “Our intent was a narrative history. We wanted our words to reach the general audience, not just a scholarly audience,” Leonard said. Interest began building in the book even before it was published, and the publisher Oxford University Press in New York City, had sold the first three printings before it

was out. As of last month the book had sold 33,000 and is now available through the History Book Club and soon through the Military Book Club. Its story is heart-wrenching and was difficult for the three Utahns to write. “We wanted to tell it like it is and hope it brings closure now,” Leonard said. One of the comments written in a review of the book said it reads like a Greek tragedy.“I found that interesting because we saw it that way too,” Leonard said. He said

like a Greek tragedy the men in that militia group were basically good men who had their weaknesses. “They were like fallen heroes,” Leonard said. He said they hoped, through the book, to have people consider what they would have done faced with a similar situation. “What is the lesson here?” Leonard said “It’s in human nature that we all have the potential to do bad.” Like others who the authors have heard from, Leonard found the book an emotional experience. He said he and his fellow authors were shocked and had nightmares while writing the book. And like some readers, Leonard cried. But it was also a cathartic experience, one, along with memorials to the victims, which helped him and the church come to terms with the massacre and to help resolve some of the criticism The Church has suffered through the years. Now formally retired, Leonard still keeps busy. He’s writing a history of Farmington City. “I’m right back where I started,” Leonard said. “I did my master’s thesis on the city of Farmington.” He’s also picked up two projects he left off to write “Massacre at Mountain Meadows” a history of Nauvoo and a book of essays. He said “Massacre at Mountain Meadows” is now receiving more attention nationwide. His co-authors will be in Boston this week to speak at Harvard University. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

Ash Wednesday begins season of Lent BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper News Editor Lent, the 40-day period of reflection prior to Easter begins early this year, on Wednesday, Feb. 25. The season begins each year on Ash Wednesday and runs for 40 days excluding Sundays through Easter. Lent is a time of looking inward and repenting of sins to prepare for the joyful resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter morning. For those following the liturgical year, it is preceded by a time of celebration, of carnivals. Even in the early church, great carnivals were held prior to Ash Wednesday,

when Christians would overindulge before having to fast and repent during Lent. Those carnivals were handed down through the centuries even as the church relaxed some of its restrictions during Lent, and “carnival” became a part of many cultures in celebrations such as Mardi Gras in New Orleans. As the name Mardi Gras implies, the festival ends on “Fat Tuesday” with great feasting. Many local churches today host pancake suppers on that night. Ash Wednesday is characterized by a worship service in which the minister imposes palm ashes in the form of a

cross, while reciting the phrase, “from dust were you made, and dust you shall be.” The ashes were used as early as the fourth century. Those accused of serious sin, whether of humble or noble birth stood barefoot before the cathedral with bowed heads. The bishop would pass among the people, assigning acts of penance. The sinners would then enter the church and before the altar, recite seven penitential psalms. Then, each sinner would come before the bishop, who would place his hands on the sinner's head, sprinkle him with water, throw ashes on him and dress him in a sackcloth tunic.

They left the church and were forbidden to enter until Holy Thursday. They had to spend the time separated from their families, living in a monastery, performing manual labor and praying. Through the centuries, the practice evolved until even the devout took part. By the 11th century, the practice was in general use. During the Reformation, many Protestant churches discontinued the practice of imposing ashes on the faithful, but with time, some Protestant churches have reinstated the practice, along with the observance of Lent. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

March FamilySearch conference planned SALT LAKE CITY — FamilySearch will hold its second annual conference for software and Web application developers and its inaugural FamilySearch Software Awards on March 11 in conjunction with the Brigham Young University Computerized Family History and Genealogy Conference in Provo. Attendees of the 2009 FamilySearch Developers Conference can register online at familyhistoryconferences.byu.edu/familysearch. The 2009 FamilySearch Developers Conference provides a unique forum and opportunity for developers of genealogy-related desktop and Web applications to meet with other professionals who use similar development technologies to confront common technical challenges and share effective solutions. Conference attendees will learn about new and updated FamilySearch Web services from FamilySearch engineers and best practices from current community developers. FamilySearch engineers and community developers will discuss version 2 of the FamilySearch Family Tree Web service, Standards Authorities, Record Search,

Timeline, and Catalog Web services. Phillip J. Windley, Ph.D., Kynetx CTO and former Utah CIO, will be the keynote speaker. Dr. Windley said, “FamilySearch is taking the lead with an open platform, third-party services, and this annual conference for software developers interested in the growing family history and genealogical market.” Dr. Windley will present his best ideas on how the genealogy industry can better embrace new emerging technologies. “Solutions to match the astonishing growing desire of families to find and share information about themselves and their ancestors can only be created and delivered by a network of providers committed to open data and open technologies,” added Dr. Windley. FamilySearch’s annual Software Awards has been launched to encourage and recognize software development that benefits the family history and genealogy industry. “We are excited to announce the launch of the 2009 FamilySearch Software Awards. The purpose is to publicly and formally celebrate the software achieve-

ments of those developers and companies that are making important contributions to the family history and genealogy industry,” said Gordon Clarke, FamilySearch Web

services product manager. Conference sessions will be divided into three tracks: FamilySearch API, Third Party Libraries, and Emerging Models and Technology.

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Thursday, February 19, 2009

Courtesy photo

On the Move

RAY’S MUFFLER in Bountiful is one of two companies in the city that have the new LED lights installed. The lights are said to last nearly 100,000 hours.

n Local business saving on costs

BOUNTIFUL — Swiss Boy, located at 305 North 200 West in Bountiful, is helping other businesses save money. Recently they’ve installed new LED-lighting systems that use one-tenth the electricity of standard outdoor lights and can last as many as 100,000 hours, according to a press release. Each light is custom cut and installed for each building at a cost of roughly $25 per foot installed. So far the company has installed lights in two local companies — their own Swiss Boy company as well as Ray’s Muffler at 700 South, 500 West in Bountiful — and have seen initial success in popularity. For more information about the lights, visit www.channelbrite.com.

n Fitness center offers help

NORTH SALT LAKE — BodyFit, a local business located in North Salt Lake, is offering an alternative to the typical gym membership for those wanting to get fit. The fitness center announced last week that they will be offering personal trainers and fitness professionals at the price of a typical membership. “It’s an ideal situation for frequent travelers and clients with busy schedules,” said Matt Neve, BodyFit’s founder. “Why would they pay for a gym membership they never use when they can work one-on-one with an expert and get better results? “It just makes sense and saves time and money. They can train in our facility, or in their home for even more convenience.” Neve was recognized as one of Utah’s Fittest Executives by Utah Business magazine, and also specializes in executive and corporate fitness. “I enjoy working with people who expect results,” he said. “Our clients are extremely busy and working with a trainer means they can make the most of every minute they invest in their workout.” For more information about the fitness center or about their training programs, visit their website at www.bodyfitwellness.com.

n Company contest back in Davis

DAVIS COUNTY — Grow Utah Ventures, stationed in Salt Lake is looking for another entrepreneur. The company recently announced that in combination with Zions Bank, USTAR Salt Lake Community College’s business resource center among others is holding its annual “Concept to Company” contest. The contest this year is focused on medical devices and technology. “Each ‘Concept to Company’ contest is designed to focus on a region’s core strengths,” said Alan Hall, founder and chairman of Grow Utah Ventures.“Utah is well known for its innovative work in the healthcare industry and we’re confident that the ideas from this contest will lead to and enhance the state’s worldwide reputation as a pioneer in medical devices and related technologies.” The contest is open to all entrepreneurs and businesses in Davis County and elsewhere with an idea for a medical device or medical technology in the invention or business itself. “The results of the two previous ‘Concept to Company’ contests have been outstanding,” said T. Craig Bott, president and CEO of Grow Utah Ventures.“We have seen hundreds of great ideas, many of which will become viable businesses in the future. “We are confident that the contest will garner the same innovation and ingenuity seen in our previous contests.” Three winners will be awarded prizes, with the grand prize winner receiving $20,000 and the other two receiving $10,000. The money will be provided by Zions Bank. Scott Anderson, president and CEO of Zions, said the company is happy to be a sponsor for the contest, as it has been their belief to provide strong monetary support toward great innovations. For more information about the competition, visit the website at www.concepttocompany.org.

DavisBusiness

Davis County Clipper

Small business index falls again BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer DAVIS COUNTY — Small businesses may not be doing as well as some thought. According to Zions Bank, the Small Business Index fell from 68.8 in December to 67.5 in January. The lower index numbers recently have been associated with less favorable business conditions for Utah’s small businesses. The index has also been on the decline over the past dozen years. According to the index, it measured at 100.0 in January 1997. “It just reflects the fact that the U.S. recession is hitting every state, including Utah,” said Zion’s Bank economic consultant Jeff Thredgold. “The biggest change in the index was that the next 12 months of Utah employment are starting to look pretty ugly.” Last year roughly 25,000 jobs were lost, with the blame falling on stock markets, large “big box”type stores filing for bankruptcy, and an overall sense of restlessness due to the rapid decline of the auto industry. However, they have also had a significant impact on small businesses, particularly a few years ago when unemployment was at it’s lowest levels in the state’s history.

Shain Gillet

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SMALL BUSINESSES such as Francisco’s (above) are starting to feel the pinch of the state’s economy, with the index falling again from 68.8 to 67.5 from December to January. But now that the growing number of jobs available are shrinking, especially in construction and mining, it’s difficult to gauge how much further the index will fall. “From the perspective of a small-business owner or manager, in theory, higher unemployment means that there are more people available to be hired,” said Thredgold.

“It’s kind of a perverse logic, but looking from the viewpoint of a business manager, greater levels of labor to draw from is a positive thing.” But some business owners don’t see it that way,as they’ve been struggling to try and keep several employees. “There’s a lot of people being laid off right now,” said Julie Farnesworth, a small

business owner in Kaysville. “I had as many as 30 employees at one point and all of them were busy. “Now I only have 15 employees, and only five of them are working for me full time with not that big of an hourly wage.” Farnesworth said her struggles have been seen as far back as September, forcing her to lay-off 10 employees in October and another five in November in order to keep her business open. “It was hard for me to let those people go,” she said. “They all worked so hard for me, but they also understand that this is a rough patch we’re going through right now.” The small business report said that the current U.S. recession, which officially began in December 2007, could continue longer than the current consensus view of economic analysts. The U.S. lost almost 600,000 jobs in January alone; and the national unemployment rate rose to a 16-year high of 7.6 percent, according to the report. “Utah will probably feel some of the same pain in the coming months,” said Thredgold. “As long as the national economy is struggling and as long as financial markets are struggling, the state is going to struggle.” sgillet@davisclipper.com

Commercial vacancy remains steady in Davis BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer DAVIS COUNTY — Commercial real estate vacancy is relatively the same. That’s according to NAI Utah, which tracks vacancy rates for commercial businesses in the state. According to their report, direct vacancy in the industrial market has remained steady throughout the year and is currently at 4.45 percent, while total availability is still holding at 5.92 percent. Retail and office vacancies are also on the rise, as they have increased by 1.5 and two percent respectively. Activity and leasing rates have been the main reasons behind the steady numbers, as total lease activity from last year totaled 917,000 square feet and is now at 1.2 million square feet since January 2008. Pricing lease rates have decreased slightly since last January as well. In all, the price for a per square foot has fallen from 56 cents per square foot to 52 cents a square foot with a maximum space allowance of 10,000 square feet. The numbers also change dramatically from 10,00020,000 square feet; falling from 52 cents to 48 cents a square foot. From 20,00050,000 square feet the price is 32 cents and beyond 50,000 square feet the price is down from 24 cents to 22. “It should be an indicator that the time to lease a commercial real estate space is now,” said Jake Bowman, a commercial real estate agent. “If prices are down and the

availability is up, people should be looking into leasing a space for their business.” However, not everyone is comfortable about starting a business during the current economic recession. Mark Knold, an economist for the Department of Workforce Services said small businesses

have had a difficult time remaining open. “Big box stores too,” said Knold. “Circuit City is gone, Best Buy is trying to fight through their own situation. It’s difficult to gauge where some businesses are going and that’s why — even though there aren’t that many

spaces available — there is a lot of space where those buildings are.” NAI Utah is located in Salt Lake City. To find out more about vacancy rates in other areas of the state, visit their website at www.naiutah.com. sgillet@davisclipper.com

n MediaRif has new VP/Director

KAYSVILLE — Benjamin Fuller is starting to climb the ladder yet again. Tuesday, MediaRif in Kaysville announced the appointment of Fuller as their new Vice President/Director of Client Services and Business Development. Fuller brings to the company more than 15 years of experience in the IT and Sales department, according to the company’s press release. “I am completely excited to work with MediaRif, especially in these times,” said Fuller. “With the economy struggling, now is the time to prepare to take advantage of other opportunities when things turn around.” For more information about the company, visit their website at www.mediarif.com. sgillet@davisclipper.com

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Feb. 21 Dale Moulton, Fruit Heights, will discuss his experience with several different civilian aircraft, 1 p.m. at the Hill Aerospace Museum, theatre. This program is free and open to the public. Moulton has flown for Sky West and has spent years in aviation.

Feb. 28 Duke Baron will relate his experiences with the F-4U Corsair. Baron flew with Air Group VBF 15 in 1944-45. The free program will be held at the Hill Aeorspace Museum, theatre, 1 p.m., and is open to the public.

Through Feb. 29 The Davis County Library will make discarded magazines available to interested citizens free of charge, at each county library location.

March 7 Gail Halverson, Provo, the internationally famous “Berlin Candy Bomber” will discuss his experiences during the Berlin Airlift. Presented in conjunction with the Berlin Airlift traveling exhibit commemorating the 60th anniversary of the operation. Hill Air Force Base Museum, 1 p.m. 777-6818

Through March 15 Berlin Airlift Traveling Exhibit. Produced by the German Information Center of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Washington, D.C. This free special exhibit commemorates the 60th anniversary of the airborne relief supplied by the Allies to the more than two million people of Berlin during the Soviet blockade in 1948/49 and the resulting friendship between Germany and the United States that endures to this day. Hill Air Force Base Museum. Call 7776818 for more information.

February 27 Temple Square Concert Series: Lawrence Green, classical guitar, Conference Center Theater, 7:30 p.m. Open to all ages 8 and older.

February 28 Temple Square Concert Series: Lara Lambert Allen, pianist, Conference Center Theater, 7:30 p.m. Open to all ages 8 and older.

STAGE

Ballet West presents “Madame Butterfly” at the Val A. Browning Center, Ogden, 399-9214.

Through Feb. 28

March 25-28 Suessical Jr, presented by Farmington City Arts Youth Theatre, 7 p.m. with a matinee on March 28, 1 p.m. Farmington Community Center, 120 S. Main, Farmington. Tickets $5 in advance or $6 at the door. 4510953 or farmington.utah.gov.

Feb. 19

Ballet West presents “Madame Butterfly” at the Capitol Theatre, SLC. 355ARTS or www.arttix.org.

Bread basics: whole wheat deliciousness, $10 12:30 p.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801-866-1111.

Feb. 13-28

Feb. 21

Romeo and Juliet, Pioneer M-Th, 7:30 p.m., F-S, 8 p.m., Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., Simmons Pioneer Theatre Memorial Theatre, 300 South 1400 East, SLC. 581-6961, www.pioneertheatre.org

Culinary Kids: February edition, $15 11:30 a.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801-866-1111.

February 25 Vienna Boy’s Choir, 7:30 p.m., Libby Gardner Concert Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, SLC, 581-7100.

Feb. 25 29-Minute Meals: Cooking under Pressure $15 6:30 p.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801-866-1111.

Feb. 28 Attention deaf education professionals, interpreters, and any who want to be or are affiliated with the deaf community, Utah State University Winter Workshop, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. visit https://sites.google.com/a/aggie mail.usu.edu/winter-workshops for details and registration.

March 6 Incredible cheesecakes $35

Free health education classes. Dr. Lloyd of Lloyd Natural Healing in Layton is offering free health seminars to educate the public about nutrition and common health concerns. These one hour classes are held Thursdays @ 7p.m. 1-2 times a month and are open to the public but require reservations to assure seating. Please call 801525-4625 for questions and reservations. Seating is limited.

2nd and 4th Thursday

Feb. 27-28

“Show Boat” presented at Layton High School, 7 p.m., with a matinee March 14, 2 p.m. Tickets $8 for adults, $7 seniors, $6 for students and children. For tickets and information, 402-4888 or dferrin@dsdmail.net.

Thursdays

Davis County LP meetings, 7 p.m. at 1617 N. 350 E., Layton. Brent at BDZ132@yahoo.com or 773-4162.

Thoroughly Modern Millie, Rodgers Memorial Theatre, 292 E. Pages Lane, Centerville. 298-1302.

March 12-21

Alzheimer Support Group Thursdays, 3 p.m., Orchard Cove Alzheimer Community, 485 E. 500 S., Bountiful. 2924800 for more info. Free day care while attending the support group.

Second Thursday

Feb. 20-March 21

Feb. 13-21

Benefit concert for Leah Warren, featuring Kenneth Cope, 6-9 p.m. at Northridge High School 801-593-8181. Tickets sold at the door, children under 5 free, over 5 $8. Families of five or more $40. There will also be a raffle and silent auction.

3. This is one of the longest-running juried visual arts exhibitions in Utah highlighting the works of Utah’s most creative visual artists. There will be an Opening Reception honoring this year’s artists selected for the Annual Competition on Friday, Feb. 27, beginning at 7 p.m. The Awards Ceremony will begin at 8 p.m. The juror for this year’s competition is Justin Diggle, associate professor, Department of Art and Art History, University of Utah. Results of the jury action will be mailed to all artists on Monday, Feb. 23. Awards include $400 First Place, $250 Second Place, $150 Third Place and Honorable Mentions.

Beauty and the Beast, Woods Cross High School, 7 p.m. Matinee on Feb. 21, 2 p.m. For tickets call 402-4611.

Romeo and Juliet, Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 8 p.m., 300 S. 100 East, SLC. 581-6961, pioneer theatre.org.

C7

Thursdays

Bountiful/Davis Art Center’s Annual Statewide Competition will be exhibited from Feb. 27 through April

Feb. 20-21

CONCERTS CLASSES

February 20

Thursday, February 19, 2009

6:30 p.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801866-1111.

March 14 Bread basics: whole wheat deliciousness, $10 11:30 a.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801-866-1111.

Tuesday and Saturday Cooking classes. Peruvian and Vegan cuisine, low fat and no trans fat. In Bountiful. Learn how to use new herbs and spices in your food. For information call 397-5222.

Farmington Recreation Fabulous Ballroom Dance Classes Cost is $7/couple for resident and $10 non-resident if pre-registered or $10 at the door . Register at Farmington Parks, 720 W. 100 N. or at farmington.utah.gov. Classes are scheduled for Feb. 27, March 6 and 20 and April 3 and 17 from 7:30-10 p.m. at the Farmington Community Center, 120 South Main. Farmington Flash Soccer Signups through Feb. 27, $35 residents, $50 non-residents (add $10 for uniform.) Farmington City has ongoing signups for classes offered: guitar, karate, ceramics, Play onYouth Theater Academy. For more information visit the website. Register at Farmington City Parks and Recreation office, 720 W. 100 N. or www.farmington.utah.gov. 451-0953.

Training Beginner triathlon training for women. Twelve-week comprehensive training program includes nutrition, transitions, racing strategies, distance and open water swimming, daily workouts, running interval training, group rides and plyo-

metric drills. Begins end of February. Space is limited. www.blonderunner.com. Lora Erickson 299-1601 or lora@blonderunner.com.

Running The South Davis Road Runners is a local volunteer driven adult running group. All fitness levels welcome. Routes are provided. Most runs between 3-8 miles and can easily be shortened or lengthened as needed. Yearly membership fee is $15. Triathletes and all community members welcome. Lora Erickson at 299-1601 lora@blonderunner.com or visit www.sdroadrunners.com.

Saturdays Stop worrying about money. Learn to improve your financial conditions or help others improve theirs. Maintain your lifestyle while controlling spending, eliminating debt and finding more money in your current budget. Free public service 90-minute class in Bountiful, 8:30-10 a.m. You must pre-register. No sales pitches presented. 294-7040.

Tuesdays Safe Harbor Crisis Center’s Domestic Violence Outreach Program offers weekly support groups for domestic violence victims. Groups held at 6 p.m. 444-3191. Groups free/confidential.

Tuesdays Safe Harbor Crisis Center’s Rape Recovery Program offers weekly support groups for survivors of rape/sexual assault, family members and friends, 7 p.m. at Safe Harbor. 444-3191. Groups free/confidential.

Wednesdays Learn how to get out of debt and make more money! 7:30 p.m., Money Mastery, 1403

S. 600 West, Suite A, Bountiful. Register 292-1099.

Wednesday Spanish classes, in Bountiful. Call 397-5222.

Wednesdays Lose your fear of public speaking! Local Toastmasters group meets at 7 p.m. in the Deseret First Credit Union building. Email Victor. Hernandez1@atk.com for details.

Second Wednesday Monthly support group meeting held for all weight-loss surgery patients, and those interested in learning more about the surgical treatment of obesity, 6:30 p.m. Davis Medical Center Classroom 1, 1600 Antelope Dr., Layton. tbartz@bariatricsupportcenter.c om

The Ultimate Health Workshop. Free class to educate and inform about new natural treatments for the vast array of health issues confronting our world today. Demonstrations and health info. 7 p.m. Lloyd Natural Healing @ 543-4325 to reserve your seat.

Third Thursdays Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets at 6 p.m., at the CAMT Building (Neurology Clinic) at 729 Arapeen Drive, SLC (in U of U Research Park). Monthly informative presentations to educate newly diagnosed and established PD patients, family members and friends, parent/caregiver forums. 2921023.

Fourth Thursday The American Lung Association of Utah offers classes to help smokers become nonsmokers. Hypnosis clinics are held from 6-8 p.m., 1930 S. 1100 E., SLC. Call 484-4456.

Thursday-Friday

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Support group will meet at the Bountiful Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Julie 292-6040 or Sandi 543-1915.

Come dance to a live band at the Golden Years Activity Center, 726 South 100 East, Bountiful from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. every Thursday and Friday morning.

Third Wednesday

Saturdays

Brain Injury Support Group, 7 p.m. Skyroom at South Davis Community Hospital. All those touched by brain injury are invited to join for support, informal discussion and sharing. Louise or Corrine, 295-2361.

The Health & Wellness Clinic will hold an acupuncture support group for weight loss, 11 a.m.- noon. Four needles are placed in the ear that help regulate appetite, decrease cravings and stimulate metabolism. Along with acupuncture therapy the group will discuss weight loss ideas and host a guest speaker each week. Cost is $25 per session. 544-4333

Third Wednesday

Thursdays TOPS Club weight loss support group meets every Thursday at 5 p.m. in the Episcopal Church, 1131 South Main, Centerville (use East entrance). www.tops.org.

Thursdays Single Swingers Square Dance, 975 Wall Ave., Ogden, (back door Eagle Lodge), 78:30 p.m., $4/night. Carol 2921354, Irene 479-4555.

Ongoing Healing Arts Associates is offering a new ongoing education program. Well Being and Chronic Conditions is available to patients, families and health professionals who live with chronic illnesses, conditions and stress-related health problems. 801-583-7204 or 801-558-5715.

BASEBALL REGISTRATION Sign-ups for boys and girls wishing to play Bountiful Mueller Park Baseball will be held at Scoreboard Sports on the date and times listed below. NOTE: A parent or legal guardian must register each player, as a signature is required on the registration form. Bountiful Mueller Park Baseball is pleased to announce its continued affiliation with Babe Ruth League, Inc. and Cal Ripken Baseball, Inc. Registration is open to all players in Davis County.

Registration Dates Saturday, February 14 Wednesday, February 18 Saturday, February 21*

Time 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

SCOREBOARD SPORTS • 509 W. 2600 SOUTH (COLONIAL SQUARE)

Age (As of April 30, 2009)

6 & Under 7-8 9-10

Age League Cost T-Ball ..............$55 Rookie ............$65 Minor ..............$70

(As of April 30, 2008)

11-12 13-15

League Cost Major ..............$80 Babe Ruth ......$85

1. * A $15.00 late charge will apply to any registration after the Feb. 21st deadline. NO EXCEPTIONS! 2. A $5.00 DISCOUNT PER PLAYER FOR FAMILIES REGISTERING TWO OR MORE PLAYERS. 3. Reduced fees available if a family’s circumstances warrant. Please e-mail knudfam@msn.com with requests or other questions.

17475

Please visit www.muellerparkbaseball.org for further information.

416a

EVENTS

Calendar

Davis County Clipper


C8

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Davis County Clipper

HOME - GARDEN

Spectacular FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 20 & 21 DAVIS COUNTY EVENTS CENTER, FARMINGTON 151 SOUTH 1100 WEST • PARKLANE EXIT OFF I-15

This 2009 Event features demonstrations throughout the two days with helpful gardening and home tips, and much more! FREE ADMISSION Show Hours: Friday, 10am-9pm Saturday, 10 am-5pm

If you have a business and want to participate in this event, please call the Clipper at (801) 295-2251 ext. 137.

PRIZES GALORE! There will be valuable prizes given away every hour throughout the two-day event.


Clipper Classiads

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, February 19, 2009

D1

YOUR A to Z CLASSIFIED ADS SERVING THE NEEDS OF DAVIS COUNTY EVERY WEEK

Find all the content of the Clipper — including Classiads — online! Visit www.davisclipper.com.

Online: www.davisclipper.com

TO PLACE AN AD

Click on “advertising”

INDEX p Announcements . . . . .890 p Apartments For Rent . .570 p Autos For Sale . . . . . . .330 p Business Opportunity .130 p Child Care . . . . . . . . . .530 p Commercial Property . .810 p Computers . . . . . . . . . .235 p Condominiums . . . . . .610 p Condos For Rent . . . . .550 p Duplexes For Rent . . .575 p Duplexes For Sale . . . .825 p For Sale . . . . . . . . . . . .240 p Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .880 p Garage Sales . . . . . . . .250

p Health Care . . . . . . . . .140 p Help Wanted . . . . . . . .100 p Holiday Greetings . . . .885 p Home Appliances . . . .280 p Home Furnishings . . .290 p Homes For Rent . . . . .580 p Homes For Sale . . . . . .820 p Horse-Stock . . . . . . . . .200 p Hunter Specials . . . . . .840 p Instructions/Tutoring . .520 p Job Opportunities . . . .105 p Land For Sale . . . . . . .700 p Lost & Found . . . . . . . .510 p Lots For Sale . . . . . . .640

TO CONTACT US

p Love Lines . . . . . . . . . .830 p Miscellaneous . . . . . . .220 p Mobile.Mfg. Homes . . .630 p Money To Loan . . . . . .650 p Motorcycles . . . . . . . . .500 p Musical Instruments . .300 p Office Space-Rent . . . .750 p Open House . . . . . . . .620 p Personal . . . . . . . . . . .135 p Pets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210 p Produce . . . . . . . . . . . .230 p Real Estate Investments .670 p Recreation Vehicles . . .320 p Rooms For Rent . . . . .560

p Services . . . . . . . . . . . .120 p Snow Removal . . . . . .125 p Sporting Goods . . . . . .310 p Sport Utility Vehicles . .425 p Storage For Rent . . . . .590 p Tax Preparation . . . . . .122 p Time Share . . . . . . . . .540 p Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260 p Trucks For Sale . . . . . .400 p Vans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .410 p Want To Buy . . . . . . . .270 p Want To Rent . . . . . . . .600 p Want Work . . . . . . . . . .110 p Yard Work . . . . . . . . . .115

PHONE

295-2251 ext. 100, 101, 102 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

E-MAIL

Go to www.davisclipper.com and click on “advertising”

FAX

295-3044

BY MAIL THE CLIPPER CLASSIADS 1370 S 500 W Bountiful UT 84010

STOP BY THE CLIPPER 1370 S 500 W Bountiful UT 84010

CLASSIADS DEADLINES LINERS: TUESDAY 12:00 Noon for Thursday FRIDAY 12:00 Noon for Tuesday

Call (801) 295-2251 Ext. 100, 101, 102

FREE CLASSIADS ITEMS UNDER $100 (20 WORDS OR LESS - 1 WEEK) Private party only. Price must appear in the ad. Only 1 item per ad. Mail in, Fax or Walk in only. No Phone-ins please. Garage Sales Excluded . 1 Ad per month

GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Always ask for the ad to be read back to you. 2. Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears. Clipper Newspapers will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion at no greater cost than cost of original space. Publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omission of copy. 3. Rate charges are determined at the time of placement.

4. Cancellations: No refunds or cancellations on extended weeks. 5. Payment is due upon placement of ad unless an account has been established. JUST CHARGE IT

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

115 YARD WORK

120 SERVICES

120 SERVICES

Do You Have The World’s Cutest Baby?

Ready-Set-Grow

SIX FIGURE income. 30/hr work week. Results oriented people. Call 888-894-8147 today.

KARL’S TREES Pruning, shaping, removal trees and bushes. Free estimates Call Karl 801-298-0610

ACTIVE CONCRETE 15 yrs expericence in Davis County. Flat work, Stamb Concrete. Footing. basekball court , tennis court, side walk.414-3718

120 SERVICES

HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE Are you looking for someone to clean your home? Let us do it for you! We do excellent work. Sr. Citizen dis count. 295-8095 or 7557706

IN-HOME DAY CARE A Happy Place. Over 20yrs experiences, indoor and outdoor playground, 6 play areas in our home. We offer Dance lessons, Music and Preschool. 1 Full and 1 PT openings for girls ages 2kindergarten. West Bntfl Call Kari 295-2853

Call

801-274-3290 17471

Customer Service For Express Shuttle, FT/PT, $8$10/hr. plus benefits.Call 5963708 or fill out an application at 427 W 800 N, SLC. GALLERY PHOTOGRAPHY is hiring, we are looking for 2 fun, energetic, highly organized and self motivated people to help with running a photography studio duties included helping clients, organizing, selling and more, average about 20-30 hrs per week , T-Sat, must be able to work some mornings and evenings. Stop in for a appl. or drop in a resume. 163 So. Main St. in Bntfl. FARMINGTON DENTAL Office is looking for a dental hygienist M & T 8-5 and F 8-3. Knowledge of Dentrix preferred. Send resume to 801-451-9419 OPENINGS FOR Hair Stylist & Nail tech. Booth Rent or Commission. 1/2 of 1st mo. Busy Bountiful Location. Call Yvonne at 801-292-8177 IN HOME CARE Non medical looking for CNA’s or experienced personal care aides. Flexible schedules. Call Cathy @ Salus Home Care 801-5661185.

(801) 294-0602

• Arts & crafts, reading,

SOLDIERS WANTED F/T and P/T positions available. Up to $40,000 singing bonus. Over 100 career fields to choose from 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical and Dental benefits available. Contact SFC Boehme at 801-598-0268

science, music, much more • Secure & clean learning environment • Highly qualified teachers who are CPR & first-aid trained

Winter Special Enroll your 2-year-old & receive the 3rd month 1/2 OFF! 17428

CNA CLASSES Become a certified nurse assistant in just 6 weeks! Classes held Tues & Thurs from 6:30 pm- 10 pm & Sat 8 am - noon. Call for future class dates. All classes are held at Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful. For more information, or to register, call Janice at the NURSING EDUCATION CENTER

589-2597 or visit www.cnacareers.com

PUDDLE JUMPERS is growing and is hiring a full time Toddler Teacher. Great pay benefits included. Call Lori 5360993 or email Resume to center150@sshouse.com SECRETARY P/T M-F 8:001:00pm. Must be organized, detail oriented, reliable, and a fast learner. Able to answer multiple phone lines, provide customer service and schedule appts. Will train. Email resume to info@rockymountainmovers.net or apply in person 663 S 600 W., SLC, UT. or call 801-3557700

Want to be in Movies, Commercials & Print Ads?

CARRIAGE FOR HIRE Horse drawn carriage drivers needed. 21 or older w/valid Ut drivers license. Call Rob Mon & Thurs from9-5 or Fri 1-5. 3638687

All looks / all ages needed! 17471

FULL - TIME Appliance Delivery/Installer wanted in Bountiful. Excellent hours and wages. Requirements: Clean driving record, self-thinker, mechanically inclined and able to lift heavy weights. Please contact Gerald or Dale at ADC 292-8229.

FERT/PEST APPLICATOR needed. Licinsed perfered but will train. 10-12/DOE. Seasonal March-October. Call 451-2220 or 499-0770

Now Enrolling! We welcome age 2 to school age

17494

Come audition for BIG $$$!

Preschool & Childcare 215 S. 300 E., Bountiful

Audition today! Call 801-274-3377

NOW BOOKING Actors, extras, models! Fexible hours. Earn $85-$895 daily. Free workshops. Call 801-438-0067 CUSTOMER SERVICE Lexington Law Firm seeking pro fessional for full/part time customer service positions. Strong written and oral skills and basic computer knowledge are required. Training provided. Day, evening, weekend shifts available with bilingual opps. NSL location. E-mail resumes to: HR@creditrights.org HIRING EXPERIENCED stylist and nail tech for new salon in Kaysville. Call Jen for info at 801-499-1223 MOTIVATE CAR sales person for Best Buy Auto in Centerville. Call 915-5367 SECRETARY NEEDED in an auto dealership. Experience preferred but will train the right person. Call 915-5367 LUCKY’S CONVENIENCE STORE in West Valley City is looking for customer minded people to work morning, day, and evening shifts. Duties include cashiering, cleaning, and customer service. Interested candidates should call 801-451-5158 for more information.

105 JOB OPPORTUNITIES $600 - $800 MONTH. Parttime hours. Pampered Chef is hiring. Love to cook? Hate to cook? Perfect! Susie Clawson 801-779-9288

BOUNTIFUL DENTAL office needing a part time hygienist. Busy , great environment. Fax resume to 801-298-7229 DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF Helping people w/disabilities in their home. PT/FT shifts available in the Bountiful /Centerville areas. Must be at least 18 yrs old & able to pass a background check. Benefits available. Training provided. Call LuAnn at 860-3116 COMFORT KEEPERS IS Looking for caring and dependable caregivers to assist seniors in their homes with general homemaking and personal care in Davis and Weber counties. Live in and hourly shifts available. Call Mon-Fri after 9 am 801629-4663 or 800-593-6808.

www.davisclipper.com

Davis County Sales Executive Opportunity! Are you driven by meeting and exceeding goals? Do you want to work with local businesses to maximize their 2009 Revenue? Join us and connect businesses with the Davis Clipper’s online readership!

UTAH’S #1 Booking Agency is expanding our children’s division. Auditions are being held NOW! Call

801-274-6218. 17471

B2B and/or Outside Sales experience a plus!

Email resume to jennifer.jackenthal@matchbin.com or call 801-797-8322 with any and all questions.

Freestone plumbing Repairs, remodels, new construction. No job to small. Water heaters, softeners, disposals ect. over 30 yrs. experience. Call Allen 292-9521 or 8080812. Free Est. We accept Visa, Mastercard and Discover. GARAGE DOORS & Openers Repairs on all makes & models, Broken springs, free est on new doors. Mountain West Doors 451-0534, 294-4636. HANDY MAN Services, New, remodel, framing, dry wall, electrical, plumbing, concrete, title, paint etc. 447-3437, or 3476518 SPRING TIME Is Here. Time for Spring Clean-up. Shrub trimming, fruit trees and ornamentals. Refer to this ad for a 10% discount. Call Lem 801-8594873 CLEANING LADY Consistently Dependable. thorough, Licensed. Bonded. Insured. Call Style Cleaning Services. 2957895

Paul’s Landscape & Concrete Services Let Us fulfill ALL Your landscape/yard care needs! General cleanup, complete tree service, sprinkler system, retaining wall, concrete work Licensed Insured. Free estimate 973-2724. SPLIT FIREWOOD $140-$180 per cord. Delivery or pick-up available, Call 801-295-8907 ARE ALL THOSE SMALL JOBS BECOMING DIFFICULT TO KEEP UP WITH? Your Girl Friday is ready to vacuum, do dishes, laundry, ironing, general cleaning, organizing, what ever you need done. Call Angela at 801-831-2978 JORDAN BATSELL Cleaning Service, floor maint., office cleaning general janitorial services. Excellent service, reasonable rates, experienced, references. Call for free estimate 294-0118.

HANDY ANDY’S Landscaping and Hauling. We do it all. Clean and Haul. Free estimates. Call 296-1396 HOME REMODELING/REPAIR Finish Basements, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Painting, Drywall/ Patching, Finish Carpentry, Small Jobs OK, Licensed/ Insured. Call Kevin 801-5416195 AC CONCRETE landscaping! Yard clean up, tree trimming. Re roofing. Free estimate Call Lea 347-7149. DRYWALL HANG & tape New house or remodeling or basement 40 yrs experience Licensed/ Insured Call Phill 8350414. SHELLEE’S HOUSE Cleaning Constantly through, dependable. Call 746-9115 CLUTTER CONTROL! I can clean and organize ANY area! I also do junk removal. Jared 801-652-3028 *PROFESSIONAL* PAINTER 25 yrs. exp. Free Estimates. Call Scott Wray 699-1942.


Clipper Classiads

120 SERVICES

240 FOR SALE

CUSTOM MASONRY Brick, Block, and Stone exteriors also fireplaces, mail boxes, chimney repair, cement work, and concrete sealing. Call 801589-5634

MAPLE SLIDING Glass Door Curio (dark finish) 4 adjustable glass shelves, ball foot engraved detailing exterior lighting 81x40x15. Antique bronze finish mirror w/beveled edge holly leaf design frame 42x30 Call 294-4641

GOLESH PAINTING WERE QUALITY COUNTS 20yrs experience, no job too big or too small. New or redo. $5085 per rm. Free estimates, References avail. Call Shane 801-638-0270 LAWN TECHNICIAN, Green Pointe is looking for F/T-P/T persons. Must be at least 21. $10/hr starting rate, up to $15/hr DOE clean cut appearance, highly motivated & reliable. Commissions, Bonuses, Holiday’s, Vacation, Benefits. Good driving record, Call for an Interview at 801-381-5321 or 801-261-1171

LOCAL HONEY 3 lb qt $8.00 a lb, half gal/6lbs-$14.00, gal $27/12lbs. Also raw honey gal $27. 1162 North Main Farimington. 801-451-2346 Perry Honey Farm SPORTCRAFT BILLIARD TABLE, complete with 4 cues and balls. $175 Call Steve at 680-6651 BEAUTIFUL LADIES diamond ring, size 7, 14k good. Retails $700 - Sacrifice $99 (never worn) Candy 298-3000

DRYER VENT CLEANING Prevents fires and overheating. $29.00 limited time offer. Quality service since 1983. Call 5108181

3000+ SPORTS cards. basketball, football, Variety mostly baseball. 1970’s, and after. Some Jazz $99 OBO 4510333

CONCEALED FIREARMS PERMIT training $50. Call Stephen 801-647-2884 Joint and ladies class available.

KING SIZE water bed, good condtion. $500 OBO. Call Gail at 801-230-4941

QUALITY PAINTING & TILE Drywall repairs, water damage, tile, improvement upgrades, finish work 801-949-3411

250 GARAGE/ BOUTIQUE SALES

****PAINTING**** Bountiful Painting, Professional finish guaranteed. Int/Ext. 14 years exper. Free est. 295-3523. HOUSE CLEANING Highest Quaility Deep Detail. $100-150 per house. Call Paula 598-2004. GROCERY DELIVERY afford- able rates. 801-232-0512 or info@fsdutah.com

122 TAX PREPARATION INCOME TAX PREPARA TION C.P.A. with over 35 yrs experience. Reasonable rates & free E-file. Free Financial Needs Analysis ($400 value). Call Kent Jasperson. CPA 801-599-6760 **QUICK BOOKS PRO** Call a pro to clean up your books! Bookkeeping, acctg, Tax Serv. & payroll. QB set up, clean up, training & support also avail. BS in finance, 7 yrs exp. QB Pro certified. Servicing Mac & PC clients. Call Jenny 515-689-6555

GARAGE SALE on the 2oth and 21st of Feb. 9-3pm, File cabinets, washers, dryers, desk, electrical parts, tile, tires, rims and 3 cubical and desks, 506 North 7th West NSL any questions call Bill Austin @ 541-8310

290 HOME FURNISHINGS

330 AUTOS FOR SALE

www.KandJauto.com

RENT TO OWN

OUR WINTER CLEARANCE SALE IS A GREAT TIME TO SAVE!

Cars • Trucks • Vans

$500 Deposit, NO CREDIT Drive Today! REQUIRED!

801-298-5820

168 Contemporary $ 2 pc Sofa & Love 599 Plasma TV Stand $ 239 with Storage Light Dining $ 5 pc Set Ashley 299 5 Drawer Chest $ All Wood & Assembled

199 Love Seat Only $299 $ Area 5 Foot Rugs 149 6 Foot Oak Book $ 99 Case Ashley Recliner $289 All New Merchandise $ 35 Ashley Lamps 5 Foot Crazy Sac

$

KINDERMUSIK Early Childhood Music and Movement classes. Age-appropriate programs from newborn to age 7, including Baby Sign Language. Maestro Program with 14 yrs exp now Registering. Limited openings Call Anne: 295-2458 or visit: kidsandkeys.kindermusik.net

PIANO LESSONS for you or your child. Pre to adult. Private & group. Certified w/BA & Pedagogy degree. Call 801-6944343 OAK GLEN Preschool-Now accepting 2009-2010 fall enrollment for 4-5 yr. old classes. Sensory Teaching Cirrculum. Exp. teacher/double master degrees. Call Char 292-1613 (Mueller Park area)

MATTRESS & FURNITURE

BOOKS WANTED! I pay cash for old LDS & other books. Also old photos & historical memorabilia Call 800823-9124.

40 W.500 S.,Bountiful

290 HOME FURNISHINGS

330 AUTOS FOR SALE

A NEW Pillowtop Mattress 5 Year warranty. Can deliver. King $299. Queen $199. Full $159. Twin $139. Call 4990129

$3000 Chevy Prizm 2002 Body:4dr Slvr/Gry. Tranny:Auto. Cond:Good. Miles:145K, 3032mpg. Clean Title. IntCond:no smoke, clean. Call 801.645.6463 to test drive. Will fill tank upon purchase.

CLASSIADS

2002 PONTIAC GrandAm 35,000 miles, excellent condition. Book value 7,600-10,000. Price 7,999 OBO Call 801-7979553

locally owned & operated

520 INSTRUCTION/ TUTORING

CONCEALED FIREARMS PERMIT TRAINING $100 Morning, afternoon, evening courses. COLEMAN SECURITY 801-521-3155

Assembled

across from Dee’s

310 S. Main, Bountiful K & J Auto

SUNRISE MONTESSORI Preschool Kindergarten & Elementary Bountiful 295-9802, Layton546-4343 http://web.mac.com/sunrise school.

270 WANT TO BUY

295-2251

Davis County Clipper

530 CHILD CAR CHILD CARE IN BOUNTIFUL close to Temple. Full time and drop in’s. Kristine 801-673-1180

INFANT CARE SPOTS OPEN! Bryden Academy currently has infant care spots available. Don’t miss out!

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE

ST. GEORGE luxury home 1/5th share w/pool, view + extra lot. Next to Sunbrook. Call Vicor 292-2882- $125K.

FABULOUS SAN DEIGO beach Condo on the sand. 2bd, 2bth, 2 balconies over looking the beach 3 TV’s, DVD’s VCR’s, full kitchen. Sea World and Zoo 15 mins. 801-859-8473 or 888203-9484. sdoceans.com

• AC/GAS FURNACE INSTALLATION • ELECTRICAL REPAIRS, REMODELS, NEW CONSTRUCTION Most Major Brands of Energy Efficient Furnaces Available

FREE ESTIMATES

Call Denise today

Licensed & Insured

(801) 397-0937

CALL ALAN 688-7118

17395

Thursday, February 19, 2009

17409

D2

130 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY As part of our expansion program, a small company looking for PT work-from-home account mgrs & sales reps. $2000/mo plus benefits & only a little of your time. Requirements: Computer literate. 3-4 hours internet access per week. 20+ yrs of age, effieient &dedicated. For more info, please e-mail work_less_earn_more@yahoo. com Donald Ralph 718-2348097 EARN EXTRA Income at Home Northing to Buy. Host a Jewerly Party . Call Ross 801884-8845

Learn how to save and make money. Great opportunity, work either part or full time. Call 801-618-8297

re business for mo in n e e b s a h re My guitar sto during that d n a w o n lf a h a s in than a year and n a regular basi o d e is rt e v d a e s time we hav increase in sale d e rk a m a e se the Clipper. We of comments ts lo t e g d n a s r ad when we run ou at looking our re g w o h t u o b a from customers e placed ads v a h e W . re a s d da dClipper designe e had better fee v a h t u b rs e p a in other newsp lipper. We are C e th in s d a l a loc isback from our asonable advert re e th h it w y p p extremely ha ing in the Clipis rt e v d a t a th l e ing rates and fe g dollar for in is rt e v d a r u o se of per is the best u Clipper staff re ti n e e th to s k our area. Than g success of in lm e h rw e v o the for helping with our company.

Mike Murphy

Owner ars Murphy’s Guit Bountiful

for details and to schedule an appointment. 220 MISCELLANEOUS SAVE MONEY on Oriental Trading Orders. I will order it for you for less. call Ross 801-8848845

240 FOR SALE * IGNITE STATIONARY BIKE $385 (LESS THAN 1YR OLD). * HOME GYM $100, * MASSAGING FOOTSTOOL $50 OR OBO CALL TERRY 801336-7232

Find out how you can put the power of the Clipper to work for your business today. Reed 295-2251 ext. 133

Chris 295-2251 ext. 135

Wendy 295-2251 ext. 136

rstahle@davisclipper.com

cbradshaw@davisclipper.com

wwaller@davisclipper.com


Clipper Classiads

Thursday, February 19, 2009

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE

570 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

575 DUPLEXES FOR RENT

610 CONDOS FOR SALE

GOLFING PARADISE All year long, 5hr away at Masters Villas in Mesquite, NV. Stay at a 5 star resort and play at a discount at any of the 7 championship courses. Large 1620sqft 2bd, 2bth. Deeded, floating red week. Private driving range with free range balls, golf cart, close to national parks and Las Vegas. Buy direct from the Association, no closing costs, $5500 for a week each year, + 12 free rounds of golf. 888-6495019 or rick@mastersvillas.com

NORTH SALT LAKE – $575/mo Large, luxurious, spacious, clean 2 bedroom. Fireplace. Covered parking. Great, quiet location. Easy access to I-15 and Highway 89. Located between Orchard Dr. and Highway 89. FREE ONSITE LAUNDRY. NO SMOKERS. NO PETS. Hidden Villa – Resident Manager in Apt. #1 at 290 E. Odell Lane (100 North). 801-292-6415 or 801-486-4148.

2-3 BDRM, 1BA, 1350 sq. ft. Spacious, great centralized location, No smoker/pets, Avail 2/17 $850/mo, $450/dep. 801231-3320

CENTERVILLE LARGE CONDO 2bdrm, main floor living, Call on this or other properties. Realty Exes. Alan 647-0254

BOUNTIFUL 2BD, 1 bth, very clean, W/D hook ups, A/C, Carport, Great Location, No smoking/pets. $690/mo. 54 W 1998 S . Call 451-5292

750 OFFICE SPACERENT

550 CONDO FOR RENT Centerville townhouse 2 BR 1 1/2 bath townhouse in Cedar Springs, covered parking, pool. $750 rent, $400 deposit. Carol 856.0740 CENTERVILLE 2BD, 1.5 bth, Townhouse, Amenities. Hookups $725/mo, No Pets/smoking, 88 West 50 South, #M6 Cedar Springs Condos Davidson Realty 801-4665078 LARGE, SPOTLESS, 1 bdrm 1 bath, pantry, pool, D/W, W/D access, most utilities incl, No smoking/pets,$550/mo 4519254

560 ROOMS FOR RENT FEMALE ROOMMATE PREFFERED in Layton home. Private bath, lots of extras. Close to freeway. $400/mo + 1/2 utlities Call 801-831-2978 for information.

NSL LARGE very clean 2bd, 1bth, dishwasher, disposal, hook ups, A/C. No smoking No pets. $525/mo Call 801-859-8475 STUDIO APT. No pets/smoking, includes all util.but power, patio, coin op. W/D, $525/mo. 21 South 200 East Bntfl. 7925190 A GREAT QUIET PLACE Bountiful 2 bed, 1 bath, firepl., A/C, pool. New carpet/tile. $695., $300. dep. 639 S. Main. 298-0687 FOR RENT: Nice Bountiful 2bdrm, 1-bath, in duplex, $625/mo, $250/dep. plus gas/electric. No pets/smokers. Great location, good conditions. 2233 S. 200 W. Bntfl. Call Rich: 635-6545 NSL LARGE Studio Apt. In a Historic bldg. $425/mo. Includes all utilities except electric. No smoking/pets. Call 936-5521 237 EAST 300 NORTH BNTFL, Apt #1, 1Bdrm, 1 bath, covered parking, rent $495/mo dep $430 + utils. 530-5005

ROOMS FOR RENT Bountiful 2 rooms $350/mo Farmington 1 room $350/mo Each includes utilities. Own entry. 299-0599

BOUNTIFUL 2bd, 1bth, huge and very clean. W/D, A/C. Covered parking, storage. No Smoking/pets. $600/mo 801898-0098

CENTERVILLE ROOM Female with High standards on bus route includes utilities kitchen laundry $325. Judy 2981356

2BDRM BOUNTIFUL w/d included, dishwasher, tile, slate, travertime, $650/mo No smoke/pets Call 801-440-5887.

CENTERVILLE/FARMGTN MALE $325 + $25.00 UTL, W/D, Nice Home No smoke/ Drink/Pets 721-8229

570 APARTMENTS FOR RENT HUGE 2 and 3 Bedroom Townhomes 1100sqft & 1600sqft, 1.5 bath Town homes in NSL. 2 carports, lots of storage, w/d hook-ups, dishwasher. No pets, No smoking $770 & $960/mo ***Great Specials*** 6710303. KAYSVILLE APT’S 1BD, 1BTH, utilities included $645/mo Call 381-4981 or 7218364 REMODELED 1BD, 1BA, ground level apt. Great Bntfl location - W/D hookups, dishwasher, disposal, covered parking, No smoking/pets $595/mo. $500 deposit. Please call 801294-7040. BOUNTIFUL LG 1200 sq.ft., 2bdrm,1.5 bath, Townhouse Apt. New paint, carpet, apps. & fixtures. Quiet, central air, cv’d pkg, patio,w/d, hk’ups, dish washer, satellite/cable hk’ups. No smoking/pets, $895/mo $450/dep 292-1774 3 Bdrm Bntfl Apt, cv’rd prkg, w.d hook-ups, berber carpet, ceramnic tile WOW! updated kitchen, On quiet circle, walkway to school, New paint. Nice! 882 W 4100 S. No pets/smoking $825/mo, $400/dep. 801-6719698

LARGE 1 BDRM, 1 BATH, Basement Apt. $575/mo incl. Utilities, No smoking/pets 4519254 SUPER NICE Newly remodeled 3bd home in Davis Co. with w/d hook-ups,. $1100/mo, $600 deposit. No smoking/pets. Call 801-860-4850 ONE BEDROOM Apartment $500.00, nice neighborhood, Wood Cross. No pets/smokers, covered parking, coin operated laundry, Steve 259-2678, 2959111 NOW RENTING 1 & 2bd apartments. Starting at $625/mo, $400 security deposit. Ask about our specials. Call Gordon 801-499-3394. CLEAN 2 BRDM 1 BATH, New Carpet, W/D hkups, Covered Pk’ing, No smoking/Pets $597/mo 2985309, 330-0303 QUIET ONE level living, Perfect for Seniors. 2bd, 1bth. $750/mo, $500 deposit. 1443 S. Main Bountiful. New carpet and vinyl. Covered parking, D/W, A/C, No Pets/smokers. Call 801792-4356 2BD, 1BTH, upstairs oversized. Covered parking, close to bus and park. Gas paid. No smoke/pets, 1yr lease. $690/mo Call 801-292-5927 or 801-7198523 MOTHER-IN-LAW APT. 1bd, 1bth, living rm, kitchen, W/D & utilities & cable TV included. $700/mo. No smoking/pets. Call Joe 801-529-3717

BOUNTIFUL 3BD, 2bth, Duplex, Large fenced back yard, carport, hookups, dishwasher, patio, No pets/smoking. $900 213 E1400 N. Call 597-4965 BOUNTIFUL TOWNHOUSE 3bd, 2.5 bth, 1car garage, A/C, New carpet/appliances. No smoking/pets. Rent $950/mo, Deposit $500, 6/mo lease. 129 W 100 N. 295-8695

580 HOMES FOR RENT WEST BOUNTIFUL Twin Home 3bdrm 1.75ba, No pets/smoking 868 W. 1000 N. Bonded Realty $1150/mo 801359-7979 BOUNTIFUL LARGE 4bd, 3bth, family rm, double garage, fenced yard. 743 S 650 E $1195/mo. No pets/smoking. Bonded Realty 801-359-7979

820 HOME FOR SALE

OFFICE/WAREHOUSE For Lease, 500 South. $500/mo,Call for other prop. Call Alan Reality Exec. 801-647-0254

810 COMMERICAL PROPERTY

BOUNTIFUL BENCH 275 S. Ridgeview (950 E.). 4 bdrm, 3 bath, 2 gar, fenced yard, A/C, No-smoke/pet, $1,295/mo (801)386-8057

FARMINGTON PURCHASE OR LEASE Charming free standing house. Fantastic location, visibility, and accessibility. Large parking lot. Wired for six work stations. Could be a turn key sandwich shop. Many possibilities. 451-5654 or 209-0881

KAYSVILLE RAMBLER, 3 bdrm, 1 bth, $1050/mo, 462 North 400 East, Miller & Co. 801-566-7922

37 ROOM HOTEL Plus Lovely home in Tremonton, Very profitable, in great condt. Call Banner Inv. RE 801-992-3492

Centerville, cute family HOME. 4BR/2BA fam/room, liv/room, fncd yd, 2 car gar., fridge, no smoking, $1300/mo (801)755-6907 (801)294-0004

200 SQFT WAREHOUSE/ 12 Office space, for lease in WX 294-7212 or 706-9968

BOUNTIFUL 3BD, 2bth, 2 car garage, A/C No smokers/pets. Call 397-1688 LAYTON RAMBLER, 3bdrm, 1.5bath, carport, $935/mo 702 North Colonial (725 E.) Miller & Co. 801-566-7922 FARMINGTON LARGE 4bd, 2bth, family room, new paint, new carpet, double garage. No pets/smoking. $1195/mo. 692 S 100 E. Bonded Realty 359-7979 CENTERVILLE 3BD/2bth, family rm, W/D hk’ups, lrg yd. No smoker/pets. 45E. 100N. 1095/mo, $650 Deposit. Call Becky 801-856-8566 WX TOWNHOME for sale/rent Mt view. 3bd, 3bth, 1920sqft. 100% finished. Blt 2005. W/D, parking for 2cars. $1200/mo or $184,900. No smoking/pets. Call Joshua 801-634-9839

BOUNTIFUL HIGH VISI BILITY Commercial-Office warehouse. Great location. 500 S. 1100 W. 3700sqft. 898-0098

BOUNTIFUL HOUSE for rent. 1200/mo, 4bd, 2.5 bth, quiet great location, close to schools . Fenced yard, garage. Call 801-755-2973 **BOUNTIFUL 4Bdrm, 2bath, 3280 sq.ft. Dble gar, New carpet fencedyrd, walkout bsmnt, No smoke, $1295/mo. 801-703-1129

BOUNTIFUL-2 BDRM 2 bath Condo. Very private secure, hardwood floor and new carpet, built in 2001. below market at $149.900 801-554-3791

CENTERVILLE 2BD, 1bth house, large yard, stream, hardwood floor in kitchen. No smoking. Avail immediately $650/mo + deposit. Call 801-660-9654 or 682-33309

KAYSVILLE TRI-LEVEL super starter. 3bd, new paint, new flooring. Cul-de-sac, Steal at $159,900. Frankin Group Quinn Hepworth 801-547-0554

EAST BOUNTIFUL 5bd, 3bth, newly remodeled. $1500/mo. Call 801-556-7533 LAYTON 3BD, 2bth, clean, no pets/smoke, $900 + deposit. Available March. Call for information 801-550-0407 FENCED BACK YARD, Bountiful 3BD, 1.5Bath, 4 place car/port, storage, A/C, No Pets/ Smoking. $975/mo 633-7418

30 Years Real-Estate expertise

FREE RECORDED MESSAGE 1-800-608-0982 Ext... Exquisite Centerville ‘06 1 level Condo All Custom! MUST SEE Ext 062 West Bountiful 1 level! Gorgeous Remodel! Priced to sell FAST! Ext 042 Immaculate 1 owner! Lush Secluded yard Great E. bench location! Ext 052 Bntf. Totally Remodeled! Forest like yard! 4 bdrms wood floors Ext 045 Roy built 2000 Vaulted ceilings! Next to park huge RV parking Ext 082 Huge Workshop Bntf 4 bdrm lrg. RVprk Ext 102 Free market analysis find out your homes current value Call 801-292-4488 Get it SOLD find out How Call Gary 801-292-4488 See photos on web site ShinerHomes.com 17884

NEW CONSTRUCTION East Kaysville 4 bd,2.5 bath, Tile fls., spacious Master, .24 racers, Work for down payment $283,900. Country West Const. 801-698-7045 ROY GORGEOUS newer home 3000 sq ft 4 bd, 2bth, separate master suite with jetted tub. huge yard, 2 car garage. $10k below appraisal 801-5488435

For Virtual Tours and MORE... www.JudyAllen.com One Stop Shopping

NEW LISTING

• 1070 Windsor Dr., NSL • $255,000 • 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bath • Foxboro Development • Fireplace, High Ceilings, Loft Area, Huge Bedrooms • Built in 2005 • Looks like model home www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

SYRACUSE REDUCED TO SELL!

• 3 Car Garage • 2957 S. 1320 W. • 6 Bedrooms, 3 Bath • 2005, Rambler • 3408 Sq Ft • Cul-De-Sac www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

CENTERVILLE SMOOT FARMS • Pool, Slide, Diving Board • Backs Park & Tennis Court • 6 Car Garage • .29 Acre • 40 West 1500 N.

$399,000

www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

BOUNTIFUL • Custom Rambler • 5080 Sq Ft • 6 Bedroom • .41 Acre Lot • 4-5 Car Garage • 1343 E. 600 N. www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

EAST LAYTON, GEOR GOUS Home on cul-desac, 4-3, 2200 sqft. 2 full rock fireplaces, huge flat .38 arce lot Priced $209,900. 801-548-8435 TIRED OF RENTING? Get huge savings plus low or no down through l Gov’t Grants l Short Sales l Bank owned homes l Discounted properties l Gov’t owned homes Call the Davis County specialists Sid Davis & Assoc 580-1189

Judy Allen

597-5656 GARY SHINER SHINER REAL ESTATE 379 W 500 S Bountiful ShinerHomes.com 292-4488

820 HOME FOR SALE BOUNTIFUL CHARMING Rambler excellent neighborhood. Wonderful front porch. 4bd, large lot, fruit trees, garage, green house. $209,900 Franklin Group Quinn Hepworth 801547-0554

820 HOME FOR SALE

ROY 3BD, 2bth, 1700sqft new carpet throughout home in culde-sac, fenced yard. Great deal. A/C, Sprnk. sys., & recent updates $149,900 801-5488435

OFFICE SPACE for lease. Only one left, includes utilities, Main St. in Bountiful, $275/month. Call Brad 792-8894 676 AND 775 sq.ft. at 405 South 100 West, Btfl, May be combined for 1401 sq.ft. At 500 South and 100 100 West 1,050, 875 and 466 sq.ft. available. Basement work and storage space available in the same building. Very competitive rates. Two months free rent is possible. Jay Hansen 273-8888.

D3

WOODS CROSS NEW LISTING

Advertise in the

2179 S. 1350 W.

$284,900

CLASSIADS

• 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bath • 2658 Sq Ft • Custom Built

295-2251

www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

Deadline: Tuesday and Friday 12 noon

For more information visit us online at

www.JudyAllen.com

17424

Davis County Clipper

Visit us online today — or anytime — at www.davisclipper.com

It’s a great Price Reduced to $57,500 time to buy! Fabulous rates ... Wonderful inventory! • FHA Manufactured Home • Spacious 1600 Sq. Ft. • 3 Bedrooms • 2 Tiled Bathrooms • Central Air Conditioning

• Large Fenced Yard • Garden Area • 2 Patios Plus Deck • Storage Shed • Financing Available O.A.C.

253 Guenevere St. Home located in Camelot, NSL BRENT CHECKETTS

(801) 856-1701

OPEN HOUSE - Centerville 88 West 50 South, R-1, 12-4 pm 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Newly Remodeled. Covered Parking, Pool, DEHAAN REAL ESTATE Club House. Zero down financing available. Seller will pay buyers George DeHaan closing costs. Priced at only 529-8952 $135,700. Buy for less than rent! Susan DeHaan Owner/Agent

“Service That Moves You!”

792-1326

See photo tours at www.dehaanrealestate.net

17885

SALE FAILED! EAST BOUNTIFUL $349,900 Beautiful home with sports court. New 2009 Honda Civic included w/ purchase.

TOTAL MAIN FLOOR LIVING • $467,000 Beautiful Barton Woods home. Everything on the main floor w/ 100% basement finish. 6 Beds, 3 Full Baths, formal dining.

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

Lease option or rent. An absolutely dynamic home by Eaglewood BARGAIN Golf Course. 6200 sq HUNTERS DELIGHT! ft, 6 Bds, 5 Baths. $269,000 STEP BACK IN Custom throughout. Bountiful east side ramTIME• $259,900 Call for details! bler, 3200 sq ft. Lots of Charm and character updating, abound in this historic gorgeous yard Bountiful home. 4 beds, w/ large basketball SASSY! and 2 full baths, lots of CLASSY! $329,900 court. Ready for you updating. to move in! Freshly decorated and well kept! 4 beds, 3 baths, main floor family room and laundry, formal dining, family room down w/ wet bar. Fully fenced manicured yard.

Louise Gunther Andy Gunther 518-7000 541-6820 Visit our web site at www.searchforutahhomes.com 17882


D4

9000

Thursday, February 19, 2009

LEGAL NOTICES

PARENTS URGED TO PICK UP RECORDS Parents of special education children born in 1982 may request their records from the Davis School District. Students who graduated 2003 may also request their records. The district is required to retain special education records for four years after a student’s 22nd birthday or four years after a student’s high school graduation. Records of students born 1982 or that graduated from high school in 2003 will be destroyed unless parents request the records. Written requests should be sent to: Davis School District, Lowell Oswald, Special Education Director, P.O. Box 588, Farmington, Utah, 84025-0588. Requests must be received by March 6, 2009. Files not requested will be destroyed after that date. C-4445 2/12-19 SUMMONS (20 days) Civil No. 080700507 Judge Page IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR DAVIS COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. TRAVIS IZATT, an individual; PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CORP., a Utah corporation; PRICE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P., a Maryland limited partnership; BARNES BANKING COMPANY, a Utah corporation, Defendants. THE STATE OF UTAH TO DEFENDANT: TRAVIS IZATT You are hereby summoned and required to file with the Clerk of the Second Judicial District Court, Davis County, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, a written answer to the attached Complaint, and to serve upon or mail to Marlon L. Bates of SCALLEY READING BATES HANSEN & RASMUSSEN, P.C., Plaintiff’s attorneys, 15 West South Temple, Suite 600, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101, a copy of your Answer, within twenty (20) days after service of this summons upon you. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in said Complaint which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court, and as hereto annexed and herewith served upon you. DATED this 29th day of January, 2009.

SCALLEY READING BATES HANSEN & RASMUSSEN, P.C.

Marlon L. Bates Attorneys for Plaintiff Type of Action: Rescission of Trustee’s Deed and Restoration of all Parties to Pre-Sale Positions C-4446 2/5-19

PUBLIC NOTICE Woods Cross City has received a petition for annexation by Ivory Development / Ivory Land and on January 21, 2009, the City Recorder certified the petition met the necessary statutory requirements to be accepted by the City. The property proposed for annexation is located at approximately 1400 South and 1900 West and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE EXISTING WOODS CROSS CITY BOUNDARY, SAID POINT BEING N0º12’36"W, 2027.59 FEET ALONG THE SECTION LINE AND WEST, 334.50 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN AND RUNING THENCE ALONG THE EXISTING WOODS CROSS CITY BOUNDARY LINE DUE WEST, 1951.83 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF THE LEGACY HIGHWAY CORRIDOR; THENCE LEAVING THE EXISTING WOODS CROSS CITY BOUNDARY AND RUNNING ALONG SAID CORRIDOR N02º 53’06"E, 17.64 FEET; THENCE EAST, 1950.87 FEET TO THE EXISTING WOODS CROSS CITY BOUNDARY; THENCE S00º12’37"E, 17.62 FEET ALONG THE EXISTING WOODS CROSS CITY BOUNDARY TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINS: 0.7891 ACRES The annexation petition and plat is available for inspection and copying at the Woods Cross City Recorder’s Office located at 1555 South 800 West, Woods Cross, Utah, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Woods Cross City may grant the petition and annex the area described in the petition unless written protest to the annexation is filed before February 20, 2009 with the Davis County Boundary Commission and a copy of protest is filed with the Woods Cross City Recorder at the address listed above. Protests filed with the boundary commission should be addressed to the Davis County Boundary Commission and sent to the Davis County Department of Community and Economic Development, P.O. Box 618, Farmington, Utah 84025 C-4448 2/5-19

AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED JULY 30, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT THE PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. The foreclosure sale through public auc-

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

tion will be held on the front entrance of the Davis County Courthouse in Layton at 425 North Wasatch Drive, Layton, Utah on Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 4:30 p.m. This sale is being held for the purpose of foreclosing a Deed of Trust originally executed by James and Pam Fournier, in favor of First National Bank of Layton, covering real property located in Davis County, Utah, and more specifically described as follows: Beginning at a point South 745.47 feet from the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 4, Range 2 West, Salt Lake Meridian, thence East 122 feet, thence South 146.84 feet, thence West 122.0 feet, thence North 146.84 feet to the point of beginning. The Real Property Tax Identification Number: 1-12-003-0009. The current beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is First National Bank of Layton and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is James and Pam Fournier. The successful bidder must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon on Friday, March 13, 2009 in the Trustee’s Salt Lake office. Both the deposit and the balance must be in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds payable to Richards, Brandt, Miller & Nelson. Cash payments will not be accepted. A trustee’s deed will be delivered to the successful bidder within three business days after receipt of the amount bid. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. Additional information regarding sale maybe available at http://www.rbmn.con/bids/index. htm DATED this 2nd day of February, 2009.

/s/ Wayne Z. Bennett

Wayne Z. Bennett, Trustee Richards, Brandt, Miller & Nelson 299 South Main Street, 15th Floor Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801) 531-2000 C-4447 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, at the front steps of the Davis County Courthouse at 800 West State Street, Farmington, Davis County, Utah, on March 9, 2009 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed originally executed by Ryan Williams, as Trustor, in favor of Utah Central Credit Union, covering real property located at 551 East 3550 South, Bountiful, Utah 84010, and more particularly described as: Lot 19, OAK HOLLOW ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the official plat thereof, filed in the Davis County Recorder’s Office as Entry number 2199722 in Book 4112 at Page 1464. #01-382-0019. The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Utah Central Credit Union and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Ryan Williams. This Trust Deed is recorded as Entry Number 2288135 of the records of the Davis County Recorder. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or certified funds. The trustee maintains a bona fide office in the state meeting the requirements of Subsection 57-1-21(1)(b). The address of the office of the trustee is P.O. Box 25786, Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786. The hours during which the trustee can be contacted regarding the notice of default are 8:30 a.m.to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, with the exception of legal holidays. The trustee may be contacted by telephone during these hours at (801) 972-0307. THIS IS AN EFFORT TO COLLECT A DEBT. INFORMATION RECEIVED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 9th day of February, 2009.

BRUCE L. RICHARDS, Trustee

1805 South Redwood Road P.O. Box 25786 Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786 C-4475 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated August 11, 2004 and executed by DONNA W ABRAMS, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 34, SUMMER HAZE UNIT 2, LAYTON CITY, DAVIS

9000

Clipper Classiads LEGAL NOTICES

COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 112110034 The address of the property is purported to be 2104 EAST SUMMERWOOD DRIVE, LAYTON, UT 84040. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be DONNA W ABRAMS. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 2, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109036 C-4449 2/5-19 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, at the front steps of the Davis County Courthouse at 800 West State Street, Farmington, Davis County, Utah, on March 9, 2009 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed originally executed by Cody Roberts, as Trustor, in favor of Utah Central Credit Union, covering real property located at 180 North 1300 East, Bountiful, Utah 84010, and more particularly described as: All of Lot 1, PARK PLACE MANOR, SUBDIVISION, according to the official plat thereof, on file and of record in the Davis County Recorder’s Office. #04-173-0001. The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Utah Central Credit Union and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Cody Robertsl. This Trust Deed is recorded as Entry Number 2264227 of the records of the Davis County Recorder. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or certified funds. The trustee maintains a bona fide office in the state meeting the requirements of Subsection 57-1-21(1)(b). The address of the office of the trustee is P.O. Box 25786, Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786. The hours during which the trustee can be contacted regarding the notice of default are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, with the exception of legal holidays. The trustee may be contacted by telephone during these hours at (801) 972-0307. THIS IS AN EFFORT TO COLLECT A DEBT. INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 9th day of February, 2009.

BRUCE L. RICHARDS, Trustee

1805 South Redwood Road P.O. Box 25786 Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786 C-4473 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, “at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah”, on March 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated August 7, 2007 and executed by ERIC CLASS AND AIMEE CLASS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County:

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

ALL OF LOT 1629, FOXBORO PLAT 16, NORTH SALT LAKE CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICAL PLAT THEREOF. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 013541629 The address of the property is purported to be 824 WEST SOMERSET DRIVE, NORTH SALT LAKE, UT 84054. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be ERIC CLASS AND AIMEE CLASS, HUSBAND AND WIFE. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank “Official Checks” are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 16, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0108830 C-4450 2/5-19

Davis County Clipper

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 2, DEER RUN ESTATES, UNIT NO. 6, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS, RESTRICTIONS AND RIGHTS OF WAY APPEARING OF RECORD OR ENFORCEABLE IN LAW EQUITY AND GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR THE YEAR 2005 AND THEREAFTER. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 131410002 The address of the property is purported to be 2384 DEER RUN DRIVE, SOUTH WEBER, UT 84405. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be EMELIDA DEL ROSARIO ATENCIO DE QUIROZ, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank “Official Checks” are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 16, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, at the front steps of the Davis County Courthouse at 800 West State Street, Farmington, Davis County, Utah, on March 9, 2009 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed originally executed by Glen M. Sidwell, as Trustor, in favor of Utah Central Credit Union, covering real property located at 477 East 3550 South, Bountiful, Utah 84010, and more particularly described as: Lot 17, OAK HOLLOW ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the official plat thereof, on file and of record in the Davis County Recorder’s Office. #01-382-0017. The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Utah Central Credit Union and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Glenn M. Sidwell. This Trust Deed is recorded as Entry Number 2283589 of the records of the Davis County Recorder. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or certified funds. The trustee maintains a bona fide office in the state meeting the requirements of Subsection 57-1-21(1)(b). The address of the office of the trustee is P.O. Box 25786, Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786. The hours during which the trustee can be contacted regarding the notice of default are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, with the exception of legal holidays. The trustee may be contacted by telephone during these hours at (801) 972-0307. THIS IS AN EFFORT TO COLLECT A DEBT. INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 9th day of February, 2009.

BRUCE L. RICHARDS, Trustee

1805 South Redwood Road P.O. Box 25786 Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786 C-4474 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, “at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah”, on March 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated March 29, 2007 and executed by EMELIDA DEL ROSARIO ATENCIO DE QUIROZ, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0108829 C-4451 2/5-19 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the time of sale at the North front entrance of the Second Judicial District Court located at 805 S. Main Street, Bountiful, Utah on March 2, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.; foreclosing a Trust Deed recorded March 30, 2004 executed by Robert M. Myers, in favor of Loan Link Financial Services, covering real property purportedly located in Davis County at 915 N. Garnet St., Layton, UT 84041, and described as follows: LOT 372, DIAMOND HILLS NO. 3 SUBDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF LAYTON, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas formerly known as Banker's Trust Company, as Trustee for Saxon Asset Securities Trust 2004-2 and, as of the recording of the Notice of Default, the property was owned, according to record, by Robert M. Myers. The sale is without any warranty and is voidable by the Trustee, without any liability, for any circumstance unknown to the Trustee affecting the validity of the sale. The successful bidder must provide certified funds to the Trustee within 24 hours of the sale. Dated February 3, 2009

/s/David B. Boyce

Successor Trustee C-4455 2/5-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, “at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah”, on March 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 27, 2006 and executed by RICHARD H VAN SCHALKWYK, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 1, PAGES CIRCLE SUBDIVISION, WEST BOUNTIFUL CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RE-

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

CORDER. MORE CORRECTLY DESCRIBED AS ALL OF LOT 1, PAGE CIRCLE SUBDIVISION, WEST BOUNTIFUL CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 062500001 The address of the property is purported to be 926 N 800 W, WEST BOUNTIFUL, UT 84087. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be RICHARD H VAN SCHALKWYK. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank “Official Checks” are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 16, 2009

By: Arien Molina, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x5559 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0108827 C-4452 2/5-19

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, without warranty as to title, possession or encumbrances, payable as stated below in lawful money of the United States, at the Main Entrance (public entry), Courts Building, Davis County Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah, on March 2, 2009, at 11:30 a.m., for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed dated October 30, 2006, executed by Gold Medallion at Greyhawk, LC, as Trustor, in favor of Centennial Bank, Inc., as Trustee and as Beneficiary, covering real property located in Davis County, Utah, and described as follows: A parcel of land lying within the Southeast quarter of Section 3 and the Southwest quarter or Section 2, Township 4 North, Range 1 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian. Beginning at the South quarter corner of said Section 3 (basis of bearings being South 89º13'30" East along the Section line between the South quarter corner and the Southeast corner of Section 3, 2555.14 feet and North 00º46'30" East 597.41 feet to the point of beginning, and running thence North 29º11'28" West 97.08 feet; thence North 25º28'38" West 60.02 feet; thence North 63º09'55" East 11.44 feet; thence North 29º11'28" West 153.03 feet; thence 0066North 00º16'51" East 454.70 feet; thence South 89º30'09" East 260.00 feet; thence South 44º36'39" East 14.17 feet; thence South 07º21'40" West 80.70 feet; thence North 63º09'19" East 74.26 feet; thence South 26º50'05" East 100.01 feet; thence North 63º09'55" East 142.00 feet; thence North 26º50'05" West 100.04 feet; thence North 63º09'19" East 209.71 feet to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the left, of which the radius point lies North 25º07'36" West, a radial distance of 170.00 feet, having a chord bearing of North 33º12'07" East, and a chord distance of 178.51 feet; thence Northeasterly along the arc, through a central angle of 63º20'32", a distance of 187.94 feet; thence North 01º31'51" East 569.21 feet; thence South 88º28'43" East 106.96 feet; thence North 05'22'51" East 93.82 feet to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the right, of which the radius point lies North 84º37'09" West, a radial distance of 13.50 feet, having a chord bearing of South 50º22'51" West, and a chord distance of 19.09 feet; thence Southwesterly along the arc, through a central angle of 90º00'00", a distance of 21.21 feet; thence North 84º37'09"


Davis County Clipper

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

West 8.67 feet to a point of curve to the right having a radius of 570.00 feet, and a chord bearing of North 83º10'23" West, and a chord distance of 28.77 feet; thence Westerly along the arc a distance of 28.77 feet; thence North 81º43'37" West 84.10 feet to a point of curve to the left having a radius of 235.50 feet, and a chord bearing of North 84º44'49" West, and a chord distance of 24.81 feet; thence Westerly along the arc of a distance of 24.82 feet; thence North 07º15'33" East 93.58 feet; thence North 28º41'36" West 10.28 feet; thence North 47º54'01" East 472.95 feet; thence North 89º28'31" East 294.35 feet; thence South 05º22'51" West 654.63 feet; thence South 01º31'51" West 427.07 feet; thence South 07º18'32" East 778.85 feet; thence South 07º11'08" East 128.60 feet; thence South 15º23'59" East 104.16 feet; South 62º47'29" West 306.22 feet; thence North 26º50'05" West 595.51 feet; thence South 63º09'55" West 845.17 feet to the point of beginning. Less and excepting the following property which has been reconveyed: Parcel 1: Lot 16, GREYHAWK SINGLE FAMILY SUBDIVISION, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in the Davis County Recorder's Office. Parcel 2: Beginning at the East quarter corner of Section 3, Township 4 North, Range 1 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; beginning at a point which is South 00º16'49" West 1329.18 feet along the said Section line and South 44º36'39" East 14.17 feet and South 07º24'56" West 80.75 feet and North 63º09'55" East 431.13 feet; to a point of curve to the left having a radius of 170.00 feet and a chord bearing of North 32º20'53" East and a chord distance of 174.18 feet; and Northeasterly along the arc a distance of 182.87 feet and North 01º31'51" East 569.21 feet to a point on the West line of property conveyed in Warranty Deed recorded April 11, 2007, as Entry No. 2260785, in Book 4259, at Page 666, to the point of beginning; thence North 01º31'51" East 31.35 feet; thence North 76º37'52" West 37.73 feet; thence North 05º22'51" East 42.00 feet; to the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the left, of which the radius point lies South 05º22'51" West, a radial distance of 221.00 feet, having a chord bearing of North 86º26'14" West, and chord distance of 14.02 feet; thence Westerly along the arc, through a central angle of 03º38'09", a distance of 14.02 feet; thence North 07º15'33" East 15.01 feet; thence South 84º25'57" East 14.03 feet; thence South 81º43'37" East 84.17 feet; to a point of curve to the left having a radius of 570.00 feet and a chord bearing of South 82º42'44" East and a chord distance of 37.94 feet; thence Easterly along the arc a distance of 37.94 feet; thence South 84º37'09" East 10.21 feet to the point of curve to the right a radial distance of 13.50 feet; having a chord bearing of North 50º22'51" East and a chord distance of 19.09 feet; thence Northeasterly along the arc a distance of 21.21 feet; thence South 05º22'51" West 93.82 feet; thence North 88º28'43" West 106.96 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel 3: Beginning at the East quarter corner of Section 3, Township 4 North, Range 1 West, Salt Lake Base and Meridian; beginning at a point which is South 00º16'49" West 1329.18 feet along the said Section line and South 44º36'39" East 14.17 feet and South 07º24'56" West 80.75 feet and North 63º09'55" East 74.26 feet to a point on the Northwesterly line of property conveyed in Warranty Deed recorded April 11, 2007, as Entry No. 2260785, in Book 4259, at Page 666, and to the point of beginning; running thence along said line South 26º50'05" East 100.01 feet; thence North 63º09'55" East 142.00 feet; thence North 26º50'05" West 100.04 feet; thence South 63º09'55" West 142.00 feet to the point of beginning. The above metes and bounds legal description is now included in the GREYHAWK SINGLE FAMILY SUBDIVISION. Less and excepting the following property which has been reconveyed: Lot 101, GREYHAWK SINGLE FAMILY SUBDIVISION. The resulting ownership of GOLD MEDALLION AT GREYHAWK, LC and GOLD MEDALLION CUSTOM HOMES, LC, in the below listed building lots reflects the entire metes and bounds legal description less land dedicated for public use and land already reconveyed. Lots 102 through 192, GREYHAWK SINGLE FAMILY SUBDIVISION, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in the Davis County Recorder's Office. Real property tax identification number nos. 09-365-0102 through 09-365-0192. The street address of the property is purported to be: Unknown, Layton, Utah. The undersigned disclaims any liability for any error in the street address. The current Beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Centennial

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

Bank, Inc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be Gold Medallion at Greyhawk, LC. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the Successor Trustee a $25,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance by 10:00 a.m. the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of cashier’s checks payable to the order of "William G. Marsden, Successor Trustee for the Benefit of Centennial Bank, Inc." THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 2, 2009.

/s/ William G. Marsden, Successor Trustee

Prince, Yeates & Geldzahler 175 East 400 South, Suite 900 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801) 524-1000 E-mail: wgm@princeyeates.com C-4453 2/5-19 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the North main entrance of the Courts Building, Davis Justice Center, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah, on March 10, 2009, at 12:00 p.m. of said day for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed dated April 12, 2006, executed by JUSTIN DANIEL BANKS, as Trustor(s), wherein JAX H. PETTEY, Attorney at Law, is the Successor Trustee, ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, is the Beneficiary, and which covers the following described real property situated in Davis County, State of Utah, more particularly described as: LOT 1, EASTLAND SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Serial No. 06-148-0001 The property address is purported to be 1339 North 550 West, West Bountiful, Utah. The undersigned disclaims any liability for errors in the address. Said Trust Deed was recorded April 14, 2006, as Entry No. 2160565 in Book 4013 at Page 1044 of Official Records. Notice of Default was dated June 9, 2008 and recorded June 9, 2008 as Entry No. 2371092, in Book 4550, at Page 352 of Official Records. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M1 , and the record owner(s) of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are JUSTIN DANIEL BANKS. The Sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances. Successful bidder must tender a cashier’s check for $5,000.00 to the trustee at the sale and a cashier’s check or wire transfer for the balance of the purchase price within 24 hours after the sale. Cash is not acceptable. This Trustee’s Sale is subject to payoff, reinstatement, bankruptcy filing, incorrect bidding instructions, or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Should any of these conditions exist, this sale shall be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the trustee and the beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for interest or any other damages. DATED this 5th day of February, 2009.

JAX H. PETTEY, Successor Trustee

881 West Baxter Drive, South Jordan, UT 84095 Office hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Telephone: (801) 748-0646 www.petteylegal.com P&A File No.: L28059 File Name: Banks THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. C-4462 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated July 12, 2007 and executed by JACOB HARWARD, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 36, COOK SUBDIVISION, LAYTON CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 10-079-0036 The address of the property is purported to be 111 NORTH 575 WEST, LAYTON, UT 84041. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be JACOB HARWARD, AN UNMARRIED MAN.

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Clipper Classiads LEGAL NOTICES

Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: September 25, 2008

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0073306 C-4464 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated August 18, 2006 and executed by AMY CHOURNOS, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 6, LAYTON RIDGES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 09-332-0036 The address of the property is purported to be 3194 E Layton Ridge Dr, Layton, UT 840407125. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be AMY CHOURNOS. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0024218 C-4465 2/12-26

CLASSIADS 295-2251

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated March 23, 2007 and executed by JASON R. REESE AND MONIKA M REESE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH FULL RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 63, COUNTRY CROSSING PHASE 3. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 121720063 The address of the property is purported to be 2049 WEST 1175 SOUTH, SYRACUSE, UT 84075. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be JASON R. REESE AND MONIKA M REESE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH FULL RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109697 C-4467 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated May 1, 2007 and executed by JIM STEVENS, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: PARCEL 1: ALL OF LOT 409, CONTAINED WITHIN FARMINGTON GREENS PUD, PLAT 4 AS SAID LOT IS IDENTIFIED IN THE PLAT OF SAID DEVELOPMENT, RECORDED IN DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, AS ENTRY NO. 1988215, IN BOOK 3544 AT PAGE 1469 AND IN THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS, RECORDED IN DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ON MAY 1, 2005 AS ENTRY NO. 2066528, IN BOOK 3768, AT PAGE 910, AND ANY AND ALL AMENDMENTS THERETO. PARCEL 1A: TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT AND EASMENT OF USE AND ENJOYMENT IN AND TO THE COMMON AREAS DECRIBED, AND AS PROVIDED FOR, IN SAID DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS, AND RESTRICTIONS, WHICH INCLUDE, WITHOUT LIMITATION, AN EASEMENT FOR VEHICULAR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS SAID COMMON AREAS TO AND FROM SAID LOT. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 08-329-0409 The address of the property is purported to be 141 SOUTH 1225 WEST, FARMINGTON, UT 84025. The undersigned dis-

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Thursday, February 19, 2009

LEGAL NOTICES

claims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be JIM STEVENS. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109870 C-4468 2/12-26 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated February 8, 2007 and executed by AUDREY L GRAHAM, AND MICHAEL S WOOD, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 40, SPRINGFIELD ESTATES PHASE 2, SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 12-494-0040 The address of the property is purported to be 32 EAST 2200 SOUTH, CLEARFIELD, UT 84015. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be AUDREY L GRAHAM, AND MICHAEL S WOOD. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: November 25, 2008

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0067586 C-4491 2/19-3/5

9000

D5

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated April 21, 2004 and executed by IRENE S SHAW, A SINGLE WOMAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: BEGINNING 790.75 FEET NORTH AND 2143.5 FEET EAST FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK L, NMC PLAT, BOUNTIFUL TOWNSITE SURVEY, THENCE NORTH 154.5 FEET TO THE STREET; THENCE WEST 122 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF ANOTHER STREET; THENCE SOUTH 154.5 FEET; THENCE EAST 122 FEETTO THE BEGINNING. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 03-040-0048 The address of the property is purported to be 128 EAST 1200 SOUTH, BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be IRENE S SHAW, A SINGLE WOMAN. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109368 C-4469 2/12-26

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated May 9, 2007 and executed by DALE CLARKE, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 310, LEWIS PARK SUBDIVISION PHASE 3, BOUNTIFUL CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 051280310 The address of the property is purported to be 331 PARK VIEW CIRCLE, BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010-5768. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be DALE CLARKE. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following re-


D6

9000

Clipper Classiads

Thursday, February 19, 2009

LEGAL NOTICES

ceipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109561 C-4470 2/12-26

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on March 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated May 31, 2007 and executed by CODY MALMROSE, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 6, VALENTINE ESTATES PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 06-260-0006 The address of the property is purported to be 1932 WEST 2185 SOUTH, WOODS CROSS, UT 84087. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be CODY MALMROSE. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: February 9, 2009

9000

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

nificant adverse environmental impact. An Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), therefore, is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the Kaysville City Offices at 23 East Center, Kaysville, Utah and may be examined or copied during regular business hours. Public Comments Any individual, group or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project may submit written comments to Kaysville City Corporation to the attention of Dean Storey, Finance Director. All comments received by March 6, 2009 will be considered by Kaysville City Corporation prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Request for Release of Funds On or about March 9, 2009 Kaysville City will submit a request to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the release of funds in the approximate amount of $147,000 under the Economic Development Initiative – Special Project Neighborhood Initiative and Miscellaneous Grant in support of park improvements at the Kaysville Heritage Park at Fairfield Road and 200 North Street in Kaysville. Release of Funds Kaysville City certifies to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that Neka Roundy in her capacity as Mayor of Kaysville City consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development approval of the certification satisfies its re-

LEGAL NOTICES

sponsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows Kaysville City to use program funds. Objections to the Release of Funds The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will accept objections to its release of fund and the Kaysville City certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are made on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of Kaysville City; (b) Kaysville City has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations 24 CFR Par 58; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR part 58 before the approval of a release of funds by the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development; or (d) another Federal agency, acting pursuant to 40 CFR part 1504, has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures of 24 CFR Part 58 and shall be addressed to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Region VIII office, 8ADE, 1670 Broadway Street, Denver, Colorado 802024801. Potential objectors should contact the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to verify the actual last day of the objection period. Mayor Neka Roundy Certifying Officer Kaysville City 23 East Center Street Kaysville, Utah 84037 C-4489 2/19

It’s all about the people you know.

NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST THE RELASE OF FUNDS KAYSVILLE CITY HERITAGE PARK February 19, 2009 Responsible Entity: Kaysville City Corporation 23 East Center Street Kaysville, Utah 84037 (801) 546-1235 This notice satisfies the procedural requirements for the activities to be undertaken by Kaysville City Corporation related to Kaysville Heritage Park and funding made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Finding of No Significant Impact Kaysville City has determined that the Heritage Park Property will have no significant impact on the human environment. Based on an environmental assessment, Kaysville City had determined that the Heritage Park project will not have a significant adverse impact on the quality of the human environment or a sig-

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Coupon expires Feb. 28, 2009

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RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0109380 C-4471 2/12-26

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BUILDING & REMODELING

SOUTIES “The Last of the Little Guys”

Alignments, Repairs & Tires on Most Vehicles Bring in this coupon and receive

15

$

Most OFF Alignments

Ray Stewart Alignment & Suspension Specialist 30 Years Experience

Call 801-295-3481 to make an appointment

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE Richard Rowe Automotive

British & South African Specialty Shop — Imported Comfort Foods —

$500 OFF purchases of $40 or more.

Phone: (801) 295-0579 Cell: (801) 726-5663

BEAUTY SALON

•1/2 Off Cut

– FEBRUARY SPECIAL –

$15

• Off Cut/Color

Oil Change & Tire Rotation

$

Only

95 Up to 5

29

Quarts of Oil

Plus we will perform a multi point courtesy check absolutely FREE Richard Rowe Automotive 520 W. 2200 N., West Bountiful • 801-295-7772

180 N. Highway 89 North Salt Lake

Mindi Rowe Hair Stylist Nail Technician

$10

• Off Acrylic Nails

38th Street Salon 867 W. 3800 S., Bountiful • 618-9773

FEBRUARY SPECIAL

Building and Remodeling Since 1976

• Complete Basement Finishes

• New Kitchens & Bathrooms

“Costs are way down - Value is way up”

• Complete Home Renovations

FAST • FAIR PAY AS YOU GO

Pictures, Virtual Tours & Client Testimonals At:

WWW.CAMEOHOMESINC.COM Call 801.296.9700 or 801.450.2147

PHOTOGRAPHY CLASSES


Davis Clipper February 19, 2009