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THURSDAY

Legislative profiles

B5

January 22, 2009

www.davisclipper.com

Sports

B1

See where your legislator stands

Vikings take out S. Wolves

Davis County Clipper PHONE: 295-2251

Davis Beat n Doctors sound off against power plant

n See “DAVIS BEAT,” p. A7

Davis weather watch – p. A8

VOL. 117

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BY MELINDA WILLIAMS Clipper Staff Writer WOODS CROSS — Last week’s fire at Silver Eagle left many Woods Cross residents complaining they didn’t know what was going on, or if they were really being evacuated. The incident brought to the forefront gaps in communications between officials and res-

idents. Gaps which will take time to fill. On Tuesday, South Davis Metro Fire Agency Chief Jim Rampton gave council members a synopsis of the events surrounding the fire which burned one tank and injured four refinery employees, focusing on problems in letting the public know what was going on. Meanwhile, two of the four men, Robert

NO. 101

Firefighters douse flames at the Silver Eagle refinery the night of Jan. 12.

n See “REFINERY,” p. A6

Ron L. Brown

BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer WEST BOUNTIFUL — “Not in our neighborhood.” Those were the same words spoken by several residents of West Bountiful, Bountiful, and Centerville as they packed West Bountiful’s city hall and voiced their opinions about a cogeneration plant that the Holly Refinery is looking into building. The cogeneration plant, according to West Bountiful Mayor James Behunin, would use waste by-products of the oil refining process in order to provide a secondary “power plant.” Dr. Scott Hurst, a Bountiful resident, along with two other doctors presented their case against a cogeneration plant. “This hazard is a danger that people can avoid,” said Hurst, who is part of the Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment (UPHE). “There are proven reports that Davis County, and more importantly the southern end of the county, are consistently in the top 10 worst cities/areas in the U.S.” According to Hurst, the power plant has the potential to release the same components that are found in cigarettes. Children are especially in danger of the potential emissions that could be released into the air. Hurst also stated another frightening fact afterward. “As much as 80 percent of cancers caused are caused by air pollution of some kind,” he said. “This has too much of a potential to cause harm to the people already living in close proximity to the refinery. “Then you have to think about how long that plant will be there. Not only is this bad for us and the children, but their children and many other generations to follow.” Dr. Ray Ward, a family practice doctor, said that there is a unanimous opposition to the plant, regardless of how much affect the pollutants will have according to the Division of Air Quality. “The things that are

Refinery fire exposes communication flaws • FAX: 295-3044

Davis holds first district-wide summit About-face: BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer CLEARFIELD — For the first time in its history, all eight high schools in the Davis School District held a summit of teachers and administrators teaching each other, sharing ideas and focusing on rigor, relevance and relationship in education. High schools across the nation are focusing on small learning communities, especially in those as large as the schools in Davis County. The high schools in the Davis School

District range from 1,500 students to more than 2,600. Small learning communities is a result of the shootings at Columbine High School 10 years ago. “Because of federal grants and funding, we can break high schools up from 1,500 students to just 300,” said Davis School District grant administrator, MaryAnn Nielson. Small learning communities have been under development for 10 years, and will continue to develop as educators discover more of what helps students learn. “Right now, we’re focusing on getting the

academic skills with the connections students have been able to make,” said Nielson. Dr. H. Clay Roberts from Search Institute was the keynote speaker for Davis’ first summit. His focus was on making students feel included and making them feel like they have an adult in the school they can trust and go to. He said in surveys done in the past five years by the Search Institute, only 3 percent of teens feel like they can talk to their teachers. n See “DAVIS,” p. A6

Landslide issues go downhill in NSL BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer NORTH SALT LAKE — The ground is moving again, and it’s not about to stop anytime soon. That was the message geologist Francis Ashland had for the North Salt Lake City Council during their Tuesday field trip up to the landslide on Springhill Drive, which has recently started picking up speed. Ashland also warned the council about the potential movement of a much larger landslide that the smaller landslide is located within, covering about a mile of ground

and containing about $130 million worth of real estate. “It’s not an emergency situation, but everything east of the clubhouse could potentially be affected,” said Ashland, a senior geologist at the Utah Geologic Survey (UGS). Though the exact parameters of the larger landslide haven’t been completely mapped, Ashland said that the larger landslide stretches into Bountiful, which has totally built out on the affected ground. “The smaller landslides are all moving within the larger landslide.” n See “LANDSLIDE,” p. A7

UGS GEOLOGIST Francis Ashland, right, shows the huge cracks in Springhill Drive caused by the landslide.

Jenniffer Wardell

FIFTY CENTS

Behunin not sure plant can be halted BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer WEST BOUNTIFUL — West Bountiful Mayor James Behunin admitted he had been confident that a proposed cogeneration plant was not going to be built in his city. Now, it looks like a more difficult road is ahead. “Recently, I announced with some confidence that our zoning ordinances would not allow us to approve a co-gen plant adjacent to the Holly Oil Refinery,” he said on West Bountiful city’s website. “After further research I have discovered an old agreement that was signed with Holly before the city's most recent zoning ordinances were approved. The agreement allows Holly to build a co-gen plant as part of a larger upgrade.” During Tuesday night’s city council meeting, he continued to say that the city is making every effort possible toward rejecting the plant; however, there are certain concerns that could happen if the city turns the plant down. “We don’t see that we’re going to have much trouble denying their cogeneration plant,” he said. “However, our main concern is that if we turn down the plant, they’ll go ahead and build it somewhere withn See “BEHUNIN,” p. A7

Discussion turns lively at Town Hall meet BY BECKY GINOS Clipper Staff Writer

Index

Didn’t get a paper? Please call before 2 p.m. Wed. & Fri. for a replacement: 295-2251, ext. 119

Ron L. Brown

Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C7 Horizons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C2 Church Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C6 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A5 People/Places . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1 Viewpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A6

HOLLY RECHIS and her son Jed, presented the legislators with information on autism at the town meeting.

BOUNTIFUL — Money, money, money. No matter the legislative topic, it seems money is somehow involved. And Tuesday night’s town meeting at the South Branch Library was no exception. From budget cuts to lobbyist gifts, the majority of residents’ concerns revolved around how the state’s money is being used. “Several years ago the state established a rainy day fund,” said Bountiful resident Bob Linnell, whose comments met with appreciative applause. “Well, it’s raining out there. We can’t take food away from an 80-yearold woman and tell her ‘when it stops raining we’ll feed you again.’ You need to cut the budget with a scalpel instead of a meat ax.” Linnell was referring to some of the suggested cuts to senior programs such n See “DISCUSSION,” p. A6


A2

DavisPeople

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis County Clipper

St. Olaf’s to hold open house next week BOUNTIFUL — St. Olaf’s Catholic School invites interested parents to an open house on January 29, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at 1793 South Orchard Drive in Bountiful. St. Olaf’s School is a nationally accredited institution that emphasizes the safety and caring of each student and welcomes children from all backgrounds. The public is invited to meet teachers, tour the facilities and learn about educational programs that allow children to reach their fullest academic potential while integrating the moral values of a Christian education. St. Olaf’s provides a unique learn-

ing environment that delivers quality educational programs for children in pre-K, full-day kindergarten through eighth grade. The school offers a flexible before and after school program to accommodate the schedules of parents, intra-mural sports and Scouting programs for both boys and girls. Small class sizes promote individualized attention for every student, no matter their level of achievement, and each child receives constant attention and motivation. For more information please check the school website at www.stolafs.org, or call the school at 801-295-5341. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

LAYTON — Northridge High School will host the third annual Davis Youth Summit, and all Davis County teenagers between the ages of 13-18 are invited to take part in the festivities. The summit will be held Saturday, Feb. 28, from 12:30 to 11 p.m. at Northridge. An evening-ending stomp, keynote speaker Miss Utah USA 2007 Heather Anderson, PowerinYou.org Ambassadors, service projects, games — inflatable obstacle course, jumbo Twister and wrestling ring — dinner, snacks and break-out sessions will all be a part of the summit. Cost is $10 (which includes a T-shirt) and all participants are asked to register early since no on-site registration will take place. Registration must take place by Feb. 20 and attendance will be capped at 1,000 participants. For more information about the summit, visit faculty.weber.edu/sbthompson/davis_youth_summit.htm. sroberts@davisclipper.com

Lynn Bettridge

County teens need to register for annual summit

Extravaganza focuses on wildlife RIDING, HORSE, TRAIL and wildlife experts gathered at the Davis Events Center last weekend for the Trail Extravaganza. Various trails committees, horse breeders, riders and the Division of Wildlife Resources talked about what trails were available in Utah, how to best use those trails and taking proper care of equipment. Demonstrations were given on shoeing, saddling and properly brushing your horse. There were also lectures on taking care of the trails themselves. Posters calling for action to “Leave No Trace” that someone has camped on trails dotted show-boards from ranches and the Division of Wildlife Resources. The focus was on respecting the land, its history and the life that has been there for hundreds of years.

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Davis News

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, January 22, 2009

A3

Library eyes more technology Davis shows strong support for drive

BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor FARMINGTON — Libraries are a lot more than a book repository, these days. And the Davis County Library System is no exception. For decades, it has been augmenting its other collections. In the old days, that meant the old phonograph records and photographs. In the last 20 years or so, it has meant concentrating on adding cassettes and then DVDs for the automated books collection. A collection of movies is also available for checkout from any of the seven branches. The library is taking automated books to a new level, Director Chris Sanford told the board of trustees Tuesday. On a trial basis, the library has ordered three “Playaway” units in each of the seven branches. Similar to an Mp3 Player, it is adapted for listening to audio books. All of the necessary equipment will be provided, except for earplugs, which individuals will need to supply. An automatic bookmark function is included which “remembers” where the user left off. “I think some smaller, rural libraries are using them. We may find the circulation doesn’t warrant having them on hand here,” she said.

BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

THE LIBRARY has ordered new audiobook technology on a trial basis. “We are incorporating more technology,” Sanford said.“We believe it is the wave of the future. We can’t rely on books to meet the needs of young adults.” That includes looking at trends showing up in other libraries across the country, she said. “We are considering (educational) games that are being played, seeing a big push to allow those. We can’t ignore that,” Sanford said, at least in terms of taking that into consideration. “Graphic” novels are also growing in popularity, she said, emphasizing that refers to cartoons. The library is using other means to get/keep teenagers involved.

For example, on its website, www.co.davis.ut.us/library, there are several options geared to teens. The Teen Scene BookLetter offers online access to book reviews and information on hundreds of authors. The NetLibrary, meanwhile, has access to more than 1,300 downloadable audiobooks and more than 3,000 eBooks available immediately to all library bookholders. The Learning Express Library, meanwhile, allows access to practice tests and tutorial courses designed for passing academic or licensing tests. The library will be exploring more options to expand technology during the coming year, Sanford says.

In the meantime, nine new PC terminals were added to the Central Branch in Layton and North Branch in Clearfield, as part of the Gates Foundation grants to libraries across the country. Technology needs were considered some years ago when a small property tax increase was imposed following public input that more such services be offered. That said, circulation of books and other items continues to reach new levels. In 2007, nearly 2.4 million items were loaned. Preliminary figures for 2008 reflect a 6 percent increase in usage, to 2,542,000 items, Sanford said. That equates to more than eight items for every resident in the county.

Parrish Lane south work set to start BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor DAVIS COUNTY — A transmission line upgrade from the Parrish Lane area south into Salt Lake City should start soon. That will mean phased work first involving drilling of test holes, followed by building foundations for poles, placement of poles, and eventually new lines, says Steve Rush, community manager for Rocky Mountain Power. “We are beginning construction within the next month,” he told the Clipper recently. “People will see a flurry of activity,” followed by nothing, and then activity again, he said. The new lines will go to the west of existing lines.“Pole for pole, we’re replacing the old line,” Rush said. “This will allow us to carry more power.” Construction will continue south and west to the terminal substation west of the Salt Lake City International Airport, at about 4000 West and 100 South, said Dave Eskelsen, RMP public relations director. Cost of that total transmission project is estimated at $750 million. “It’s all because of

increased demand,” Rush said. More people are buying the big plasma screen TVs, installing central air in their homes, which tend to be larger than those built several decades ago. That’s on top of computers and other electronic gadgets, all of which require electricity to operate. Utah’s growth accounts for about 42 percent of the expenditure by RMP within its six state system, Rush said. Also due to growth, a 138,000 volt transmission line is being built between the Gentile Street substation in Layton to the Ben Lomond station in northern Ogden. That 15 mile project will cost about $1 million a mile, or $15 million, Rush said. In addition, mammoth 500 megawatt plants have been going up about one every other year in the state, costing many hundreds of millions of dollars each. “I don’t think anyone is expecting continued growth” at the level it has been over the last five years – which had reached between 25,000 and 30,000 new connections per year, said Eskelsen. “We’re kind’ve a lagging industry, watching commercial and housing development

very closely,” he said. “We are behind.We don’t have enough generation capacity to serve everybody in the summer, and have to purchase in the summer. “We want to do less of that,” he said. “Those (market) prices are liable to get increasingly volatile again as we saw in 2000 and 2001.That puts our customers at greater risk,” having to purchase excess power on the open market, he explained. “While we have used wholesale market purchases for many years, and have gotten a good value for our customers, what we’re generally seeing in the West, excess capacity that makes those prices attractive has been consumed. When peak demand comes in the summer, we won’t be able to have a good wholesale price.” That means even the most expensive generating capacity will be less costly, Eskelsen said. “The rates customers pay are the same as in 1985. And that’s not adjusted for inflation,” Rush said. “What we have told our regulators, because the rate structure has not supported the cost of providing service in

the last 10 years, our customers have gotten about $1 billion in electrical services that they haven’t paid for,” Eskelsen said. Since 2006, PacifiCorp hasn’t delivered any dividend to its shareholders. “We have put all of our revenue since 2006 back in the system, as an investment in the future,” he said. For example, in the last 16 months, almost 1,100 megawatts of wind power have been installed. Eskelsen said the utility is seeking an 8.6 percent overall rate increase, although the exact percentage will vary by classification. “We pay nominal prices for electricity today compared to 20 years ago,” he said.“After prices peaked in 1986, they climbed 30 percent in 1-2 percent increments until 1997. Only now have we reached the point where we were in 1987 (or so).” The average residential price was 8 1/2 cents a kilowatt hour, which has not yet been reached. “We (RMP) are within the lowest 25 percent of utilities in the nation,” in terms of rates, Rush added. tbusselberg@davisclipper.co

CENTERVILLE — More than 70 tons of food, toiletries and other items were donated by Davis County residents to the special United Way drive. Value placed on those items generously donated by residents was put at nearly $115,000, says Lynne Shaffer, Davis County regional director for the United Way of Salt Lake. “This generosity stems from the remarkable and countywide efforts of our COG (mayoral Council of Governments) leadership, county commissioners, and every mayor,” she said. Drop-off points were set up at many city halls or fire stations across the county, with many other donations taken directly to the Family Connection Food Bank in Layton, where 113,000 lbs. of food and other items were collected, or the Bountiful Community Food Pantry, where 30,000 lbs. were collected. “We also had tremendous support from our faith-based organizations and Boy Scout troops throughout the county,” Shaffer said. “We recognize that the timing was during a season of giving and also recognize that many gave up portions of their traditional gift giving to share of their abundance with others,” she said. “We thank every single effort, great and small,” Shaffer said. “What a difference this neighborly outreach will make in the lives of families/individuals for months to come.” The Neighbor-to-Neighbor program was a special effort quickly assembled by United Way officials and board members to assist the northern Wasatch Front as a response to the economic downturn. Nearly $2 million in dona-

Sign switch causes intersection troubles KAYSVILLE — For approximately two years during construction of the new overpass on 200 North in Kaysville, local traffic was rerouted onto alternate streets in the area. In anticipation of a significant traffic increase on Old Mill Lane, stop signs were put at Old Mill and Flint Street right before the curve where Old Mill Lane turns into Sunset Drive, making the “T” intersection a three-way stop. Once construction was completed, the stop signs were removed. The signs “actually caused (some) confusion” at the intersection, according to city planner Scott Messel. Drivers would come east around the bend in the road at Sunset Drive and encounter an unexpected sign. According to Messel, many motorists ran the stop sign because they didn’t see it in time. But residents Denny and Connie Roberts, who live on

Sunset Drive, want the stop signs put back. According to Denny Roberts, there have been four accidents on that part of the road in the last month and a half. Connie Roberts says the stop signs slowed traffic around what she said was a dangerous curve. “I’ve been fighting with (the city) since they took (the stop sign) down,” she said. From her front window, she sees near-misses every day on Sunset Drive and is afraid that someone is going to get killed. Roberts said she fears for the children who wait at the

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bus stop at Whit’s End and Sunset Drive and for horses and their riders who often use the road. “People just fly through here,” she said, and the telephone company told her it costs them thousands of dollars every time the phone box is hit. Roberts says the police told her they would increase their presence in the area to encourage cars to slow down, but she hasn’t seen the police patrolling the road. “I was the one who came to the council and suggested the stop signs be removed,” said council member Ron

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Stephens. Stephens says he had a meeting on the site to see what could be done to increase safety after the stop signs were taken down. At that meeting it was determined that a center yellow line down the street would help. Directional and speed limit signs were also installed. But Denny Roberts says the added signage hasn’t helped, and cars still cross over the yellow line into the oncoming lane. City staff are studying the accident history and will make a recommendation to the city council at its Feb. 3 meeting.

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tions were generated from Davis, Salt Lake, Tooele and Summit Counties, said Bryson Despain, spokesman for the nonprofit agency. That included more than $1.1 million in cash and more than $840,000 received in goods. That is in addition to major gifts provided by the LDS Church and the George S. and Dolores Dore’ Eccles Foundation. Gov. Huntsman was among those who stood solidly behind the effort. “This is an amazing example of how people in our community dig deep and give generously during a time of great need,” said Deborah Boyle, United Way of Salt Lake president and CEO. Some 95 coordinated drives were conducted across the four-county area, including grassroots neighborhood efforts such as some previously highlighted in the Clipper, in Davis County and beyond. In addition to food, toilet paper, diapers, baby wipes, baby formula, baby food, underwear and socks were donated. These items were immediately delivered to service providers in need of supplies for their clients, Despain, a Farmington resident, said. Nearly $950,000 has been granted to 37 community agencies, including such local groups as the Family Connection Center, which provides emergency housing and food services. Most of the money went to address such “core” issues as rental assistance, foreclosure prevention aid, emergency shelter, transportation and utility assistance and benefits enrollment. Another $180,000 of funds collected will be allocated to assistance agencies, he said. During the drive, funds were distributed within a week of being received to eligible human service agencies. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

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Centerville, UT 84014 801-294-0143 Member SIPC

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Church Life

Missionaries Called to serve ELDER ANDERSON Elder Matthew Kelly Anderson,son of Kelly and Lisa Anderson, has been called to serve in the Oklahoma Tulsa Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 10:45 a.m. in the Bountiful 14th Ward,600 East 1500 South, Bountiful. ELDER BROOM Elder Adam Broom, son of Jean Broom and Joseph Broom, has been called to serve in the Switzerland Geneva Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 12:50 p.m. in the Bountiful 25th Ward,1500 South 600 East, Bountiful. ELDER BROWNING Elder Landon Browning, son of Brian and Jane Brownhas ing, been called to serve in the Arizona Phoenix Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 9 a.m. in the Bountiful 30th Ward, 2150 South 650 East,Bountiful. SISTER FEDOR Sister Torrie Lynn Fedor, daughter of James Fedor and B i l l i e Allred, has been called to serve in the El Salvador San Salvador West/Belize Mission. She will speak Jan. 25 at 10:50 a.m. in the Bountiful 20th Ward, 102 East 1400 S., Bountiful. SISTER HAHN Sister Niccol Hahn, daughter of Brian and Laurie Hahn, has been called to serve in the Wa s h i n g ton, D.C. South Mission. She will speak Jan. 25 at 1 p.m. in the Chase Lane Ward, 1125 North 400 West, Centerville. SISTER JACOBSON Sister Crystal Michelle Jacobson, daughter of Trish Ja c o b s o n and Brent Jacobson, has been called to serve in the Thailand Bangkok Mission.She will speak Jan. 25 at 1 p.m. in the Old Mill Ward, 925 Deseret Drive,West Kaysville. SISTER KELLY Sister Megan Kelly, daughter of Steven and Stacey Kelly, has been called to serve in the Finland Helsinki Mission. She will speak Jan. 25 at 9 a.m. in the Woodbriar Ward, 900 Eaglepointe Dr., North Salt Lake.

SISTER LEMPERLE Sister Fran Lemperle, daughter of Sherice and David Lemperle, has been called to serve in the Australia Melbourne Mission. She will speak Jan. 25 at 12:30 p.m. in the Deuel Creek Ward, 690 N. 400 W., Centerville. ELDER LEMPERLE Elder Philip Lemperle, son of Sherice and David Lemperle, has been called to serve in the Washington Kennewick Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 12:30 p.m. in the Deuel C r e e k Ward,690 N.400 W.,Centerville. ELDER MURRI Elder Jason Rex Murri, son of Ken and Becky Murri, has been called to serve in the Argentina Resistencia Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 12:50 p.m. in the Oakhills Ward, 455 South 1200 East, Bountiful. ELDER NAEGLE Elder Nathan Naegle,son of Will and Marsha Naegle, has been called to serve in the Columbia Bogota North Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 2:50 p.m. in the Bountiful 34th Ward, 540 North 1200 East,Bountiful. ELDER NELSON Elder Todd Nelson, son of Rella and Fred Nelson,has been called to serve in the Bulgaria Sofia Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 2:50 p.m. in the Centerville 9th Ward, 1475 North 50 East, Centerville. ELDER SMOUSE Elder Marco Smouse, son of Liliana Smouse and Russell Smouse, has been called to serve in the Argentina Resistencia Mission. He will speak Jan.25 at 9 a.m. in the Orchard 9th Ward, 155 Coventry Lane, North Salt Lake.

ELDER WELCH Elder Matthew Welch,son of Paul Welch and Denise Welch, has been called to serve in the West Indies Mission. He will speak Jan.25 at 11 a.m. in the Farmington 1st Ward, Rock Chapel, Main Street,Farmington. ELDER TAYLOR Elder Stephen E. Taylor, son of Mike and Rosalie Taylor, has been called to serve in the California Fresno Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 12:50 p.m. in the Centerville 8th Ward, 2110 N.Main,Centerville. ELDER EVANS Elder Michael Eric Evans, son of Eric and Barbara Evans, has been called to serve in the New York, New York South Spanish Speaking Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 11 a.m. in the Ricks Creek Ward,1461 N.Main St.,Centerville.

Returned home ELDER MILLARD Elder Mark Millard, son of Carolyn Millard and the late Kenneth R. Millard, has returned home after successfully serving in the Florida Tampa Mission. He will speak Jan.25 at 12:30 p.m. in the Orchard 11th Ward, 155 Coventry Way,North Salt Lake. ELDER WALL Elder Mark Wall, son of David and Holly Wall, has returned home after successfully serving in the Oklahoma Oklahoma City Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 12:50 p.m. in the Woods Cross 3rd Ward,1450 South 350 West,Bountiful.

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Thursday, January 22, 2009

A4

Daz celebrates 55 years BY CHRIS YOUNG Clipper Correspondent BOUNTIFUL — Msgr. Rudolph Daz, pastor of Saint Olaf Parish celebrates his 55 years of priestly ordination on Jan. 24. He started to think about becoming a priest after he received his First Holy Communion in the second grade. “Then I really started thinking concretely about becoming a priest in the 10th grade while at Ogden High School,” said Daz. “I talked with Sister Iris Imelda in Ogden and she said I should talk to then Father Mark O. Benvegnu, which I did. Father Benvegnu told me to go home and tell my parents. I went home and told my mother, and she hit the ceiling because I was the only boy in an Italian family.” Benvegnu told Daz about Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, Calif., which at the time leased buildings to Navy preflighters and there were only 125 students in the college. “They sent two Christian brothers out to recruit students, and they came to Ogden,” said Daz.“Very wisely Father Benvegnu brought them to our home. The proposal was if you had 17 years of credits and were 16 years old, they would accept you as a freshman in college. My parents talked it over and they thought allowing me to go would get the idea out off my chest. So I went to Saint Mary’s for a year in Moraga as a freshman.After that, they decided to let me go. From there, Daz spent three years at Saint Joseph College in Mountain View, Calif. before coming back to Utah to work summers the local railroads and at Hill Air Force Base as a “yardsman,” mowing lawns and taking care of the yards. “I went to Saint Patrick’s Seminary in Menlo Park, Calif., where I studied two years of philosophy and four years of theolog,” he said. “Bishop Duane G. Hunt of the Diocese of Salt Lake City, at that time, asked me to come home early.” It was shortly thereafter, on Jan. 24, 1954, that Daz was ordained by Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Lennox Federal. “I was the first diocesan priest Bishop Federal ordained,” Daz said. “He became the bishop of the diocese in 1960.” Daz said his first assignment was Saint Marguerite

Chris Young

Davis County Clipper

MSGR. RUDOLPH DAZ celebrates Mass at St. Olaf Catholic Church. He’s been at the parish 21 of his 55 years as priest. Parish in Tooele, and he was there for two and a half years. He served a number of parishes, all in Utah before coming to Saint Olaf in Bountiful in 1987. “I have been here for 21 years,” he said. In 2001, Daz was named a monsignor in a profoundly prayerful and playful ceremony in the Cathedral of the Madeleine June 28. During the ceremony, Diocesan Vicar General Msgr. J. Terrence Fitzgerald formally read the papal bull (document), which announced the creation of the monsignors (five total) and one protonotary apostolic. At the event, Bishop George Niederauer of the Diocese of Salt Lake City, now Archbishop of San Francisco, said the ceremony was intended to recognize the time and energy men like Daz devoted to service. “We gather because our Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, has chosen to honor these men for their priestly service all these many years,” Niederauer said. “It has not been a walk in the park, but long, generous, faithful service. Much of what priests do is invisible in its effects, and not measurable in its outcomes.” Recognizing the challenges that come with aging, Daz said he is grateful to those who have helped him along the way. “Now I am 80 years old,” Daz said,“and still able to get out of bed in the morning, stand up, and put my clothes on, so the Most. Rev. John C. Wester, Bishop of the Diocese of Salt Lake City, lets me stay here.” Daz said his role as pastor is to oversee and do “the essential things a priest does,”

namely, to celebrate Mass, preach and make himself available to those who require his services. “When you get old, you find out you need exercise, otherwise you lose your energy,” he said. “So my favorite exercise is swimming.You use all your muscles without the resistance that can harm your joints. So I swim everyday to stay in shape. Daz said his other tactics for staying sharp include a good diet, regular exercise, and plenty of sleep. “But it is by the benevolent providence of God that I was accepted into the seminary, finished my studies, and why those professors ever passed me, I don’t know, but they did, and the bishop ordained me. It was the benevolent providence of God that I accomplished all that, and it keeps me going at the present time too. God has been very good to me and I am grateful for all of his gifts. Maintaining a close relationship with Jesus is how Daz said he develops his spirituality. “I also pray the rosary every day. I don’t pray it contemplatively like I could. But I pray it when I am driving, walking, and so on. I say all 20 decades of the rosary every day,” he said. Daz said one of the more important roles in the minstry is to be there for the people. “My ministry is basically presence, availability, trust in God; the main things a priest does which are to celebrate Mass, the sacraments, and be present when people need a priest,” said Msgr. Daz. “God takes very good care of everything.”

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ELDER THOMPSON Elder Jeff S. Thompson, son of Scott and Kathleen Thompson, has been called to serve in the Oklahoma Tulsa Mission. He will speak Jan. 25 at 11 a.m. in the Mueller Park 5th Ward, 1320 East, 1975 South, Bountiful.

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Davis Horizons

Davis County Clipper

Obituaries 1949-2009 Our dear Mike passed away suddenly on January 18, 2009. Born July 20, 1949, to Jack and JoAnne McLelland. He married his eternal love, Cheryl Borup, on March 20, 1969 in the Salt L a k e Te m p l e . Mike was an excellent salesman for Quoizel Lighting and an author who enjoyed his family,

Virgie Mae Love Rose Aug. 8, 1926-Jan. 19, 2009 Our beloved wife, mother, grandmother and friend Virgie Mae Love Rose passed away January 19, 2009, in Bountiful, Utah. Virgie was born August 8, 1926 in LaBelle, Idaho to John H and Veda M a e Ringle L o v e . Virgie married Clayton S. R o s e December 3, 1947 in the Idaho Falls Temple. Together they raised four children. Marc C. (Karen), Dennis L. (Nannett), Janalee Munro (Jerry) and Rodney K.

A. Jeanne Miller 1923-2009 Jeanne Miller passed away the morning of January 19, 2009 due to cancer at her home in Bountiful, Utah. She was surrounded by her family and was 85 years old. S h e was born November 10, 1923 in Hoquiam, Washington to L l o y d E l e r y Miller and Bessie R a l l Couch. She grew up on the beaches of Seaside, Oregon and Santa Cruz, California, of which she had many fond memories. She graduated from Fremont High School in Oakland, California where she played in the band and performed in the Rose Bowl Parade. She met the love of her life, Orville Oliver Miller at a USO Dance. They were married January 27, 1946 in Oakland, California and spent close to 49 years together before Dad passed away December 14, 1994. They have four children. Mom had an equal love of the beaches and the mountains. She

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Sept. 10 gala planning continues BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor

Michael James McLelland

Thursday, January 22, 2009

music, golfing, skiing, popcorn and serving in the LDS church. He graduated from Granite H.S. and the U of U. He is survived by his wife, parents, children; Dave (Rhoda), Jen (Mike) Frampton, Ben (Natalie), Kelli (Nigel) Tandy, dogs; Chip and Salsa, uncles; Don McLelland and Bob Fouyer, siblings; Mary Jo (Steve), Kathy (Roger), Mark (Dawn), Bruce (Debbie), 20 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Thursday, January 22, 2009, at 12 Noon at the Ridge Top Ward, 900 Eagle Pointe Drive in North Salt Lake. Viewing will be Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. and one hour prior to services all at the ward. Funeral Directors: Wasatch Lawn Mortuary. Interment: Lakeview Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please donate to Primary Children’s Hospital in Mike’s name.

(Monica). She was an active member of the LDS Church serving faithfully in many callings including the Bountiful Temple. Virgie was a wonderful homemaker and loved gardening. She is survived by her husband and children, 18 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, two sisters, Margaret Free of Lorenzo, Idaho and Patricia Morse of Ammon, Idaho. She was preceded in death by her parents and one brother, Jack Love, and one great-granddaughter. Funeral Services under the direction of Russon Brothers Farmington Mortuary will be held Friday, January 23, in the Farmington 10th Ward Chapel, 850 North 300 West (Compton Bench) at 11 a.m. Friends may call Thursday 6-8 p.m. at the Mortuary 1941 North Main Farmington (across from Cherry Hills) and from 9:45-10:45 a.m. prior to services at the church. Interment will be at the Farmington City Cemetery. Online guest book and condolences at www.russonmortuary.com

and Dad were able to retire to their dream home in the Sierra Foothills of Sonora, California where they spent many wonderful years. In 1995, after Dad passed away, Mom moved to Bountiful, Utah. She loved to read, knit, vacation and sight-see, and later in life loved her bus trips to Wendover with the Senior Center. She always had a knack for coming home a winner. Mom's greatest love was camping and fishing with her family. Many wonderful weeks and/or weekends were spent on the bank of a river with a fishing pole in her hand surrounded by Dad, the kids and grandkids, as well as her brother and his wife. Mom sacrificed much in behalf of her kids and grandkids. She was the greatest example of unselfishness and her kids and grandkids always knew they came first. She is survived by her four children: Gilbert Miller, Boise, ID; Lonn (Lorie) Miller, Hayward, CA; Timothy Miller, Bountiful, UT; and Kimberly (Trevor) Austin, Bountiful, UT; one brother Dale (Audrey) Miller, Sonora, CA; 12 grandchildren; and 5 great-grandchildren. Many heartfelt thanks to Applegate Home Care and Hospice for their loving care and concern for our Mom. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, January 23, 2009 at Russon Brothers Mortuary, 295 North Main, Bountiful, Utah. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com.

FARMINGTON — Within the next few weeks, this year’s Davis County Gala should be announced in royal fashion – as it usually is. “I think we’re a step ahead of last year,” as far as the planning process, said Diane Townsend, who is co-chairing the event again this year with County Commissioner Louenda Downs. The gala is planned for Sept. 10 at the Davis Conference Center in Layton.An announcement should be made within the next few weeks outlining the theme and agency that will benefit from contributions. “I’m really excited. It’s going to be good, especially going into these rocky economic times,” Townsend said. She is business development director for Davis Hospital and former Davis Chamber of Commerce CEO. “I know it will be for a really great

cause, will be really good for Davis County,” Downs said. “Last year, having the homeless as our charity focus really brought a recognition to a problem most people didn’t think existed in our county,” she said. After expenses, $40,000 was raised from last year’s gala. It is being distributed through Davis Behavioral Health, which is working to create a homeless facility in North Davis. Other agencies and programs to benefit the homeless are also being assisted with those funds. A homeless coordinating committee, co-chaired by Downs and MaryAnn Nielson from Davis School District, has been established which meets monthly to discuss, plan and coordinate ways to assist in fighting homelessness. “Because of the difference they’ve (galas) made in the human service arena throughout the county, we’re

looking to go in that direction again,” Downs said. “We’re looking for ways we can make a difference, like with the Children’s Justice Center (which benefited one year), our homeless, and with Hill Air Force Base (where funds went to buy fitness equipment for the new fitness center).” She emphasized that agencies benefited are one component of the galas. “We are able, through Davis County government, to collectively celebrate the good things that are going on, and have an opportunity to annually come together in the Conference Center that came about because of some hard work by individuals in county leadership,” Downs continued. “It’s a good way to annually bring to light another area in the county that could use additional support and attention.” tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

Moratorium placed in W. Bountiful BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Staff Writer WEST BOUNTIFUL — The west side of West Bountiful from 500 South to 1200 North along 1100 West won’t see a lot of new construction soon. “In an effort to be more pro-active, we have placed a

six-month moratorium on issuing building permits along that area,” said West Bountiful Mayor James Behunin in the city’s quarterly newsletter. “The purpose of the moratorium is to enable the planning commission and city council to review current ordinances and land use in that area so

we can correlate planning of that area with neighboring Woods Cross. “We also want to make sure that the last bit of land left in West Bountiful on the west side of town is carefully planned and well thought out as to develop the area according to what will best benefit the city and its citi-

zens.” The moratorium was passed during West Bountiful’s Jan. 6 city council meeting. Behunin is asking that residents attend planning and zoning meetings in order to help planning of the area. The next Planning and Zoning Commission meeting will be held Tuesday, Jan. 28.

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Discussion turns lively at Town Hall meeting Continued from p. A1 as Meals-on-Wheels. But newly elected Sen. Dan Liljenquist, R-Bountiful, flanked by Rep. Becky Edwards, RNorth Salt Lake and Rep. Sheryl Allen, R-Bountiful, told the crowd that using the rainy day fund wasn’t that simple. “When we talk about using rainy day funds we have to realize we are already half way through the fiscal year which ends on July 1, 2009,” said Liljenquist. “We’re already $16 million over budget. When we talk about rainy day funds, in my opinion, it’s already been used. We’re not trying to battle the governor, we’re trying to be wise. It’s a give and take.” Other concerns over cuts to the Health and Human Services included programs for preschool intervention for autistic children. “We have an autism crisis,” said resident Holly Rechis, who with her son Jed, gave the legislators material on the subject. “I’ve been working with my son Jed for the past year. There are treatments available. Please co-sponsor the autism bill.” Another mother also pleaded with the legislators not to cut autism services. “My son is a result of the lack of early intervention,” she said. “He’s 12 and he can’t be fixed. We can’t cut these services. One year is a lifetime for autism.” Liljenquist is currently serving on the committee making decisions about cuts to the Health and Human Services programs and assured the crowd of some 120 people that decisions would not be made lightly. “I’ve spent about 40 hours on this committee and we’ve set up a framework to look at Health and Human Services,” said Liljenquist. “We’ll be looking at the structure to see if there is any extra we can cut from that before cutting programs. We’re hoping the drastic cuts discussed early on won’t need to go that far.” Other concerns addressed the issue of illegal immigration and whether money was being taken from other programs to fund illegals. But Allen reminded the

group that Utah needs immigrants to work in some of the service industries such as hotels and ski resorts. However, Allen pointed out that for the most part those workers are here legally with visas. “But some of them can’t even stay the whole ski season,” said Allen. “We need to find a way to keep them here.” The legislators all agreed that Salt Lake County’s guest worker program might be the answer on a state level for what they said is really a federal issue. “We have a significant amount of minorities who are legal,” said Edwards. “It is easy to jump on the band wagon, but they are here to stay. They are critical to our growth. That’s the beauty of Salt Lake’s plan.” Other questions came up about bonuses given to employees of the trustlands, but a representative from the PTA, Natalie Gordon, assured them that the lands are making money and benefitting the schools. “The land made $164 million for the state and $28 million came to our schools,” said Gordon. “The Constitution prohibits us from using it as a rainy day fund. Every school gets to use the money as they see fit.” Gordon said the bonuses are a small portion in light of the money the lands are bringing in and she asked the legislators to leave it the way it is. Edwards said there will be some tug and pull between the governor and the Legislature. “It is critical to keep in mind three groups — the least, the last and the lost — when making these decisions,” she said. “The least are the children, the last are the elderly and the lost are the disabled and mentally challenged.” As the meeting wound down the inevitable questions about ethics and gift taking surfaced, with one resident demanding the legislators look at their own spending and ethics. “Be the point of the spear for ethics,” he said. “I’ve already been the point of the spear,” quipped Allen.

Davis holds first summit Continued from p. A1 Roberts taught one of many break-out sessions Davis teachers attended. He told teachers to not use negative reinforcement, but redirect behavior and help students learn. He had teachers participate in role-playing activities on re-directing behavior and seeing if students could come up with solutions to problems on their own. “We’re really good at telling kids what to do,” he said. “But we need to see if they know how to handle situations.” Other break-out sessions came about as a result of teachers requesting to be able to share their ideas. “What our focus now is how to catch failing students and help them graduate and continue their education,” said Nielson. “Teachers asked to be able to teach others the ideas they have. “It would be really easy for us at the district level to tell teachers what they need to be doing,” said Nielson. “But we’re not in the class-

room now, they are.” Teachers taught each other how to build connections, develop a sense of responsibility in students, teacher collaboration and more. Nielson said the district has noticed a change in students, their behavior and their academic work. The small learning communities program allows a student to stay focused on what he or she wants to accomplish in life. “They pretty much know what they want to do,” said Nielson. Small learning communities are changing the way teachers teach from giving out subject matter and hoping students learn it to asking questions. What is a student learning? How have they learned it? If they haven’t learned, what do I do as a teacher to change that? “If there’s a model for continuous improvement, it’s small learning communities,” said Davis School District director of staff development Dr. E.Ann Adams.“I love the conversations teachers are having with each other.”

Locking up gangs should be crime focus The views expressed in this column are the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the ownership or management of this newspaper. visitor from Washington, D.C. was surprised last week when I told him not to worry about locking my home if he left. “You feel safe leaving your front door unlocked?”he said. “Hey, in my neighborhood, the worst thing that could happen would be an intruder barging into my kitchen and leaving a casserole,” I said. “Granted, I normally lock the door, but I feel generally safe. Unlike some Utahns who are arming themselves faster than you can say ‘Obama,’ I have a greater urgency for chocolate than a concealed carry permit.” Most of you probably feel the same. We’re not immune to crime in Davis County, but neither do we scan the ads for specials on body armor. Along the Wasatch Front, the two biggest threats are white-collar scam artists and

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Cyclops By Bryan Gray

violent gangs. The white-collar scams would cease immediately if Utahns got their financial tips from someone other than their friendly neighbor in church. Gangs, on the other hand, create a more complex problem. Hardly a day goes by that we don’t read of a gang-related knifing, shooting or home invasion. Generally, the incidents occur in a handful of ZIP codes in western Salt Lake County. That might be the problem. If you don’t feel threatened in Fruit Heights or West Bountiful, you don’t realize the extent of the problem. I’m not a cop. Neither am I closely acquainted with the criminal element. The only

bank robber I personally knew was a bank officer who owned an ice cream parlor, not an outwardly scary person. But even though I’m not an expert on law enforcement strategy, it seems to me that a greater focus could be placed on locking up gang members. I assume that local police officers know them by name. It’s simply a matter of putting them out of action. Follow them, stalk them, hassle them, do everything to keep them away from recruiting younger members, and find every reason—citation by citation—to separate them from the rest of us. One legislator has proposed a bill prohibiting “free association” among gang

members. The ACLU will spit and stomp, but I’m for passing it and letting the courts sort it out. Pres. Obama should increase funds for community policing. The Utah Legislature should look at the economics of having private firms construct and operate jails to incarcerate violent offenders. Gangs revel in their status as street-wise renegades. But they don’t seem quite as renegade-like when they are housed for 10 years in dank, cement cubbyholes. Gang life doesn’t seem too romantic when the biggest thing to look forward to is a monthly pizza night. It would take a combined effort of police, elected officials and judges, but I believe Utah could do a better job of eliminating gangs. Stop worrying about the college kid who smoked a joint; focus on the locally-born street terrorists who peddle the meth. And if some defense lawyer whimpers about the unfairness, put in earplugs!

Refinery fire exposes communication flaws Continued from p. A1 Benoit and Timothy Harter, both contractors with Elite Insulation were released from the University of Utah Medical Center’s burn unit. The Two Silver Eagle employees, Phillip McSwain and Alex Bloomfield remain in serious condition. Investigators from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration are on site at the refinery, determining the cause of the tank explosion. Rampton said his department will review the incident. “The top thing is that the communications went wrong.” He told council members the decision was initially made to voluntarily evacuate residents within a quartermile of the refinery. They were asked to go to an LDS Ward house which was just outside the perimeters. Later, that was expanded to onehalf mile, and residents were then told to go to Wood Cross High School, because the ward house was within the half-mile range.

Davis County Clipper Clipper Publishing Co., Inc. Circulation Department: 295-2251 ext. 119 or 120 Volume 117 Number 101 January 22, 2009 THE DAVIS COUNTY CLIPPER (ISSN 1061-1223) is published each Tuesday and Thursday for $35 per year by Clipper Publishing Co. 1370 South 500 West, Bountiful, UT 84011-0267. Periodicals Postage Paid at Bountiful, UT and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Davis County Clipper, Circulation Department, P.O. Box No. 267, Bountiful, UT 84011.

One of the problems came with residents being unclear as to where they were being evacuated to, as news reports differed on the evacuation area. There was also some confusion as to whether the evacuation was mandatory or not.The evacuation remained voluntary. The problem was exacerbated by a snafu with the Citywatch reverse 9-11 system, which was notifying people outside the evacuation zone they had to leave. “We know there are problems with the system,” Rampton said. For one thing, it isn’t updated as often as it should be, meaning that if a person moves, but keeps the same telephone number, they may get a call even though they no longer live in the area. But the problem seemed to go beyond that, as some people in one area received calls, while others didn’t. Davis County Search and Rescue personnel were sent into some neighborhoods to knock on doors to let residents know about the evacuation, but council member Jill Evans said the person who

came to her house couldn’t answer her questions about the situation. Rampton said that Davis County has received a grant from the federal Homeland Security office for an AM radio station which is now being installed. Rampton wasn’t sure if the station would have helped in the Silver Eagle incident, saying “We may want our own (radio station) in the south end.” But he added, “It may be one of our best options in getting information to people in real time.” Another idea Rampton proposed was an emergency operations manager, which may be part of an interlocal agreement between the south Davis cities, whose duty it would be to have plans in place for such emergencies and be able to activate them. Another option discussed was using the CERT-trained members of the community more, or engaging a neighborhood watch-type program, in which LDS Ward boundaries could be used, with one person designated to keep residents informed. Council

member David Hill said that program worked well during the floods of 1983, when neighborhoods in Bountiful were mobilized to sandbag runoff from area canyons. Evans asked if certain buildings couldn’t be designated as evacuation sites in cases of emergency. Rampton said that every incident is different. In the case of a refinery tank burning, the location people should be evacuated to would depend on which tank it was and the wind direction, so that would figure into where residents would be evacuated. Rampton said that improving communications will be an ongoing process. “We’re learning, and there are improvements we can make.” City administrator Gary Uresk praised the fire agency for its response. “Your people did a tremendous job dealing with a lot of things going on.” Rampton said national inspectors who are investigating the tank explosion said the fire could have easily gone on for two or three days. “They’re telling us it shouldn’t have gone out like it did.”

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Davis County Clipper

Landslide issues go downhill Continued from p. A1 Current focus, however, is on the Springhill landslide, which started moving in 1997 and is expected to move at least seven inches in 2009 at the most optimistic estimate. “I was up here five work days ago, and the street wasn’t as crumpled as it is now,” said Ashland. The Springhill landslide, covering Springhill Drive and Springhill Circle, affects approximately 13 to 15 homes. “I don’t think it’s going to start moving feet per hour, but the cumulative effect over several years would be massive.” When asked about the cause of the landslides, he said that the increasingly wet years that have hit Utah since the 1960s have triggered and increased the movement of landslides all over the valley, with more movement happening in the last decade due to the back-to-back wet years coming closer together and the cumulative increases of the water table. The water soaks into the clay located beneath the soil, which gets more and more saturated until it slides across the top of the rock level located beneath.

could take the necessary measures to protect their utility lines. Though none of the company representatives seemed concerned, Questar has said that they planned to examine the area for gas leaks. Stabilization possibilities were also brought up, but rough estimates for any technique that might be effective averaged at $1 million or more. Beyond that, city officials are gathering more information as to what can be done about the Springhill landslide, as well as for the undeveloped private property located on the larger landslide. Currently, the city requires that developers hire a private geotechnical firm to survey the area and turn in a report that is then checked by the city’s consultant, but the city is looking into other possible areas including a hazard ordinance and including a note on the plat. The problem, Ashland cautioned, will not go away. “This landslide will continue to move,” he said. “It will probably still be moving when I’m dead.” jwardell@davisclipper.com

“Utah sits on some of the weakest geologic material in the world,” said Ashland. A full PDF version of his presentation will be made available on the North Salt Lake website, www.nslcity.org, and questions can be answered by e-mail at francisashland@utah.gov. “We [the UGS] have been monitoring landslides since 1997, and now we’re just throwing darts at a map trying to find one that isn’t moving.” Though several Springhill area homeowners have pointed to surrounding construction as the cause of most of the significant movement, Ashland said that there’s no evidence for that. “This landslide behaves just like the one on the other side of the ridge,” said Ashland. He did, however, add that the gravel pit that the Springhill homes were originally built on could possibly be a factor. “The landslide has no idea that there are homes located above it.” North Salt Lake City council members held an information meeting with area utility providers earlier on Jan. 20, informing them of the new movement so they

Behunin not sure plant can be halted Continued from p. A1 in the facility.” Behunin also said that the agreement that was signed with the refinery was done before the city’s most recent zoning ordinances were passed. “That agreement allows Holly to build a co-gen plant as part of a larger upgrade to the facility,” he said. Council member Debbie McKean said that the city has very little information about the plant either, making it difficult to make a decision at the moment. “We don’t even know what they want to do over there,” she said. “We haven’t been approached with any plans for the plant either. I understand that this is a concern, but we’re saying that we’re going to turn this plant down even before we’re approached about it.”

The plant is being planned by Consolidated Energy Systems, a Salt Lake-based company that “is unique in the energy business by focusing solely on making environmentally responsible use of opportunity fuels,” according to their website www.conenersys.com. “These fuels are derived from the process of refining crude oil stocks and bio-fuels from organic materials which are harvested from non-food related crops.” Despite their mission statement, residents in the surrounding cities are still voicing their concerns over the air quality they say will deteriorate even further if the cogeneration plant were built in or near the refinery. “The studies by the Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment say that it will ‘only affect the air by as much

as one percent,’ according to the Division of Air Quality,” said Anne Richardson, a Woods Cross resident who attended the city council meeting. “But for the people who live in the surrounding area of the plant, it may as well be 40 percent or higher.” Behunin said afterward that the city is going to do everything in its power to not allow the plant to be built near the refinery, and is asking for more vocal support when the city decides to confront DAQ on the matter. “We have worked hard to get the Holly refinery to improve their emissions so that they will comply with EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards,” he said. “However, it will help to have other voices present and we are asking for all the help we can get right now.” sgillet@davisclipper.com

Davis Beat

critical for a child’s brain development to have the air as clean as possible. “We know through our studies that at least 20,000 pounds are going to be released from that plant if it’s built there,” he said. “That’s like putting an extra 10,000 cars on the freeway every day.” Moench also said that eco-

nomically the plant doesn’t make sense either, as a loss of $1 billion could be had over the next 50 years. “The residents of the surrounding cities are not going to benefit from this,” he said. “They won’t get a penny from that plant, regardless of what the refinery does.”

Continued from p. A1 released into the air by that plant are not easy to get rid of,” he said. “Arsenic, lead, chromium, all those chemicals stay in the air for a very long time, reiterating what Dr. Hurst had to say about these affects on our children.” He said that hazardous air pollutants (HAP’s) such as those mentioned have put some of the local school’s children “in danger of contracting some kind of physical illness during their lifetime. “I have asthma and I go running everyday,” he said. “Normally I can go a couple of miles before I have to use my inhaler. “But with the air even the way it is right now, I can’t go three quarters or even half a mile of running before my asthma acts up. That’s never happened to me before.” Dr. Brian Moench, the president of UPHE, said it is

sgillet@davisclipper.com

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Davis County Clipper

MARK MILLER SUBARU

Introducing the New Car Club from Davis County’s hometown dealership.

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SportsWeek Sonic Youth Weekend

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 2009

Shooting

from the hip

n A few random

asketball is such an interesting game. Whether it’s a fast break or a half court set, it’s interesting to watch a group of guys or girls work together on a common goal. I enjoy watching it and wish I could play it. What I’ve noticed after half the season SCOTT SCHULTE has been Sports Editor played is that Region 1 and Region 5 basketball is as different as it can be. Both are fun and include spirited contests with great coaching and passionate play by the players. Fans are fun to watch and listen to, but there still remains a significant difference. Region 5 reminds me of what I’ve come to expect in the western style of basketball. It’s pretty, fast, and filled with finesse. On the other hand, Region 1 reminds me of the style I grew up with on the east coast. Each game seems to be a grind-it-out, physical, punishing style of play. Both styles work, both styles are entertaining, but I can’t for the life of me figure out how Bountiful and Woods Cross could play a style so incredibly different than the teams from Davis and Viewmont. These kids all play together in the summer and many are friends and in some cases are even related. *** Believe it or not, the beginning of the end of the winter season is just around the corner. In a week, Region 1 and Region 5 will have swimming championships. There are several local swimmers who should excel in this meet and the state meets that follow. I’ve watched these swimmers when I’ve been at the rec center and I’ve come to the conclusion that there must be a very unique brain capacity to be a swimmer. I for one can hardly do the doggy paddle and it’s pathetic since I grew up on the water with Long Island Sound just to the south and the Housatonic River to the west. I guess staying above the water always was the goal. These kids are completely crazy. They train in chlorinated water for hours on end and have been doing so since October. Most of these athletes swim year round and I am truly impressed. *** Another group of nutty people are hockey players. I’ve enjoyed getting more familiar with the local teams and have some friends who have kids who play this sport that is basically violence with

B

Wilkinson helps Vikings take out Silverwolves

BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor BOUNTIFUL — Blake Wilkinson is a good basketball player with loads of potential. The Viewmont sophomore center has been an unexpected shot in the arm for the Vikings and on Tuesday night his coach let him know just how much he respected the young man by way of a tongue lashing. “I lit him up pretty good at half time,” said Viewmont coach Jeff Emery. “I was not real happy with certain aspects of his game and I let him know. I knew I could lean on Blake and that he would respond in a positive way.” Vikings Wilkinson did just that. 65 In the third quarter Wilkinson S. Wolves grabbed a rebound out of the gate and 55 put the shot back up, had a quick block and, along with his teammates, put away Fremont, 65-55. The win improved Viewmont to 4-0 in Region 1 with a showdown with three-time defending Region champion Davis looming Friday. “Coach was not happy with my play and he let me know it,” Wilkinson said. “He was right. I wasn’t playing the way I should.” “I told Blake if he wanted to play varsity ball he needed to play like it and in the second half he did that and it was a big part of the reason we won,” Emery said. Wilkinson finished the night with 16 points, six rebounds and one block in 25 minutes. Viewmont co-captain Chase Christensen who was a perfect 12 for 12 from the foul line (20 points and nine assists) said Wilkinson’s play has been vital for the team’s success. “Blake is one of the big reasons for our success,” Christensen said. “He plays very good offense and in the second half his defense picked up and really helped us out.” Wilkinson noted the maturity of his teammates as a major aspect of his improvement and growing confidence. “Nick Rizzley has been a huge help to me,” Wilkinson said. “He has been real supportive of me and has helped me learn. He is the ultimate team person. He wants n See “WILKINSON,” p. B2

Ron L. Brown

sports thoughts

BLAKE WILKINSON, a sophomore, has become a major player for the Viewmont Vikings this year. (Inset) Kyle DeHart has been a tough player this season.

Lady Titans shoot down Darts, 67-49 BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor

Ron L. Brown

n See “SHOOTING,” p. B2

Inside

KAYSVILLE — Syracuse went into Davis High Tuesday night and handed the Lady Darts a tough 67-49 loss. Syracuse took an early

lead 11-1 before the Darts closed the first quarter gap to just 16-15. Davis owned most of the second quarter until the turnover bug hit and Syracuse climbed back in to tie the game at the break, 29-29. “I thought we did a good job getting post McKayla Williams in foul trouble,” said Davis coach Amy Wright. She spent most of the first half on the bench.” “I also thought we had crisp passing and our offense was productive.” Davis missed eight free n See “LADY,” p. B2

B3

Titans

67 Darts

49 Ice queens

DAVIS COACH AMY Wright watches as her team plays against Syracuse.


B2

Davis Sports

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis County Clipper

Wilkinson helps Vikes take out Silverwolves

Ron L. Brown

Continued from p. B1

CHASE CHRISTENSEN goes up for two of his points.

the team and each of us to be successful and he’ll do whatever is asked for that. He’s a huge example to me.” Emery agreed. “We have about four seniors who have seen their numbers drop due to things we are doing and I just can’t give them enough credit,” he said. “They come every day to practice and go hard and never complain about minutes. They push people like Blake and make the team better. If it wasn’t for those guys who the starters play against every day we would not be winning.” In the victory, Travis Frey continued to play strong as he finished with 12 points and eight rebounds. Kyle DeHart was a defensive menace picking up three steals to go along with three points and five rebounds. Cole Jones had seven points, three rebounds and a steal. The Vikings did lose Spencer Jensen who left the game with what appeared to be a serious mouth injury. He was taken from the gym with a large amount of blood coming from his mouth. No word on his availability. “We’re just taking things one game at a time and of course we hope to have Spencer with us Friday,” Emery said. “We’re all concerned about him.” sschulte@davisclipper.com

Something on your mind?

18795

contact: letters@davisclipper.com

Lady Titans shoot down Darts, 67-49 Continued from p. B1 throws in the third period which allowed Syracuse to open a slim lead. Down 43-45 going into the 4th, Syracuse grabbed a couple of easy looks and started to build a lead. The Titan lead went from two and quickly ballooned to seven points. “We had to play catch up and that proved to be unproductive as Syracuse scored 25 points in that quarter,” Wright said. Jen Hazlett of Syracuse gave Davis fits all night finishing with 29 points while Davis’ Christine Taylor had 13, Alli Blake finished with 10 and Mckenzie Garrett led her team with 17.

CLEANING SUPPLIES

Continued from p. B1 grace. Here is another group of devoted people willing to train whenever it is possible. This means early in the morning and late into the night. I’ve sat with some of these parents who wait for the practices to end and they pass time doing a variety of things. One woman quilted, while another knitted. Another parent read a book and another brought treats for the devoted parents. I give credit to anyone who is willing to make that kind of sacrifice for a sport they love. I’m real glad my son wrestles in the winter. *** The good news about this time of year is that Spring is just roughly eight weeks away. I am ready for the warm weather, leaves on the trees and saying goodbye to the inversion. Maybe then I can actually breathe. Is that too much to ask? sschulte@davisclipper.com

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Shooting

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Davis County Clipper

Davis Sports

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Ice Queens

B3

Photos by Lynn Bettridge

THE SOUTH DAVIS REC CENTER was one of the host sites to a girls hockey tournament. Several teams played games throughout the weekend. Girls hockey is just catching on here but is popular in other parts of the country.


B4

Sports Weekend

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis County Clipper

Hart takes Rocky Mountain Rumble BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor OREM — Another tournament, another championship for Davis High’s Braiden Hart. Hart, the 140 pound standout for the Darts, captured the 64 team Rocky Mountain Rumble at Utah Valley University’s McKay Events Center. Hart stopped Justin Penn of Delta in his final, 5-2. This came after a thrilling 5-4 victory over Idaho Falls’ Jordan Cox.

“That is the best I’ve seen Braiden wrestle,” said Davis coach Neal Porter. “He had good balance and just went after things this weekend.” Porter believes Hart’s loss to Viewmont’s Ikeru Abe at the Bobcat Brawl has helped push his star even harder. “Sometimes a loss can do that for a wrestler,” Porter said.“I think that loss to Ikeru lit fire under Braiden.” “He’s been working even harder since that loss.” Dart 119 pounder Zak Baker finished second, drop-

ping a hard fought match to Kasey Bertagnolli of Rock Springs, WY. “Zak ran into a very good wrestler and it was just one of those matches,” Porter said. “He is doing a great job.” The Darts finished a very impressive fifth place in the largest tournament in Utah. “I think we did a lot of good things here,” Porter said. “Placing fifth out of 64 teams is good for us and shows that we’re a good team. “We still have places where we need to improve

and I didn’t think we wrestled all that great in some places. But we’re definitely making progress.” The Darts had two 103 pound wrestlers place in the top 10, although only one could score team points. In addition, Davis competed in this tournament without the services of standout 275 pounder John Lindsay who just began training this week after suffering a serious knee injury in December. sschulte@davisclipper.com

Bankowski, Woods Cross sink Lakers BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor OGDEN — Sophomore Austin Bankowski scored 19 points as a balanced attack helped Woods Cross wipe out Bonneville 61-44 on the road Tuesday night. The sophomore has been part of the starting rotation and was not ready to take any personal credit for the road win. “We played as a complete team tonight,” Bankowski

said. “We had a real balanced attack and we hit our free throws down the stretch and that was the big difference.” The Wildcats improved to 2-1 in Region 5 play and 8-4 overall after the route. “The guys played real well tonight,” said Woods Cross coach Todd Street. “I thought this was Bankowski’s best game so far.” The Wildcats opened a 2418 half time lead and clung to a 36-29 lead heading into the

fourth quarter. Woods Cross then took off and outscored the Lakers 25-15 in the final eight minutes to get the win. The Wildcats were also carried by the team effort. Tyler Stahle continued his ways with 16 points. Jason West also had 16 points. Bankowski credited his teammates with his development. “I dressed varsity last year and I really got to know the

guys on the team,” he said. “Then this summer we all worked out and played together and it made a big difference in our team.” “I learn a lot from people like Tyler Stahle. He and I worked out a lot this summer and he’s a great player.” In the win, Tyler Hall owned the glass with eight rebounds to go with his four points. “Tyler was huge on the boards for us,” said Street.

Davis County

The Sportsplex’s Youth Basketball Super League is currently accepting registration of students in grades 4th through 12th. The cost is $425, with 10 games guaranteed (double elimination playoffs). Games are Monday or Wednesday evenings starting Feb. 2. The Sportsplex is also accepting registration for their Adult Basketball League, which plays Wednesday evenings starting in mid February. The cost is $425, and nine games are guaranteed. To register or for more information on either league, please call 544-7539 or visit the Sportsplex at 1188 Sportsplex Dr. in Kaysville.

Ballroom dance classes

Want a great date night idea that’s cheaper than dinner and a movie? Bring your sweetheart / favorite dance partner and join us for a fun evening of ballroom, swing, and Latin dancing starting on Jan 9 from 7:30 - 10:00 p.m. Got two left feet? Don’t know how to dance? No worry! The evening will include a dance lesson from 7:30 8:30 p.m. Lessons will include the elegant waltz, stylish fox trot, energetic swing, flirta-

Other games: DHS wins BY SCOTT SCHULTE Clipper Sports Editor SYRACUSE — Davis High’s boys basketball team prepared for its showdown with rival Viewmont by whipping up on Syracuse Tuesday night, 67-49. The game was actually just a one point contest entering the fourth quarter, but the Darts exploded and outscored the host Titans 3013 in the final eight minutes. Tyler Daniels led the Darts with 20 points. Davis is 4-0 in Region1 play. Lady Cats: 49 Bonneville: 25

SPORTS BRIEFS Sportsplex events

BRAIDEN HART of Davis captured the Rocky Moutain Rumble. The 64 team tournament is one of the largest in the country.

Aarika Andersen poured in 11 points and Nikki Fer-

tious cha cha, romantic nightclub two-step, passionate tango, and many more. The cost is only $7 per couple for residents, or $10.00 for non-residents, if pre-registered, includes the dance lesson. Or if you want an added savings, you can sign up for all eight classes for only $50 resident and $70 non-resident. Register at the Parks and Recreation Office at 720 W. 100 N. Ballroom dance classes are, Jan. 9 & 23, Feb. 13 & 27, March 6 & 20, and April 3 & 17 from 7:30 - 10 p.m. at the Farmington Community Center (120 S. Main, Farmington)

South Davis road runners

The South Davis Road Runners is a local volunteer driven adult running group. Group runs are held every Saturday morning at various locations throughout the Davis County area.

Your best source of local news.

The group runs vary in length, generally between three and 14 miles, with loop or out-and-back routes to allow runners to shorten or lengthen the run as needed. Quarterly education clinics and other benefits are offered to members. To learn more contact Lora Erickson at 299-1601 lora@blonderunner.com or visit www.sdroadrunners.com. All fitness levels are invited to participate. Beginners welcome.

Youth snowmobile

(801) 295-2251

Clearfield hoops

The Youth Competition Basketball League is for boys and girls in fifth through tenth grades. Individual leagues include fifth/sixth grade boys or girls, seventh/eighth grade boys or girls, and ninth/10th grade boys or girls. Teams must provide the players with a number-matching jersey and an adult coach.

Box Elder: 50 Lady Braves: 38 The Box Elder girls basketball team turned a one point halftime deficit into a 12 point victory in Brigham City Tuesday night. Chelsea Walton and Brooke Furmanski each scored 10 points for Bountiful. The Lady Braves dropped to 0-5 in Region 5 play. sschulte@davisclipper.com

Sports Photos by Photojournalist

Ron L. Brown as seen in the Clipper

Available online at:

www.ronbrownphotos.com

Utah State Parks and Recreation offer Know Before You Go! Snowmobile Education Courses in Davis, Salt Lake, and Weber Counties. Students must pre-register for classes and are notified of the course time and location upon registering. Children age 8 to 16 are required by state law to take a safety class prior to operating snowmobiles on public lands or trails.To pre-register or for

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Legislative Profiles

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, January 22, 2009

B5

Paul Ray

Curtis Oda

Douglas Aagard

Roger Barrus

Sheryl Allen

Becky Edwards

House District 13

House District 14

House District 15

House District 18

House District 19

House District 20

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? We need ethics reform. I support the Republican package being presented.

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? It depends on which bill we are talking about. Obviously everybody wants ethics reform but I think mostly people have been creating traps. I don’t know of anybody in the Legislature who is unethical.

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? There clearly needs to be changes, the least of which would be to clarify the current rules as to what behavior is acceptable and what is not. I believe that good changes will occur.

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? There will be several bills this year addressing ethics reform. I support each one of them. I believe they will bring meaningful change to some areas that need it. It’s too bad, however, that all legislators have been painted by the media with the same broad ethics brush. The change the ethics bills bring will address some important issues, but I believe they won’t have a significant impact on most legislators because most don’t get involved in things for which the Legislature is criticized.

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? I support campaign finance reform, a ban on all gifts, and an independent ethics commission. Yes, the legislature can accomplish some of these goals.

1. Where do you stand on ethics reform? We will see ethics reform this year in some form and my hope is that it is substantive and will make a meaningful impact. Many legislative campaigns, including my own, included this priority as a reflection of overwhelming public concern. I support reforms which will ban gifts and favors, clarify and restrict use of campaign funds for retiring legislators, as well as establishing an independent ethics process.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? We need to increase access to health care.We must take a long hard look at insurance availability and affordability.We will make some headway but this is not an issue that can be completed in one or two years.We also need personal responsibility, people have to exercise, eat right and quit smoking.

3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? We must cut spending and plan ahead. Bonding for roads and buildings need to be considered. It will sustain construction jobs that have been the foundation of our economy. What do you really see ahead? I expect to hit bottom this summer.We should start feeling the resurgence in early 2010.

4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? I’m not sure what chance they have. It depends on the language in the bills. I do not support giving one population elevated rights over everyone else. I do not like how the gay community has singled out individuals for exercising their constitutional rights. It’s going to be a hard sell to get a yes vote from me. Is the LDS Church signaling a willingness to cooperate here? It’s not about the church, I haven’t had any discussions with representatives from the church. It’s about my district and the citizens I represent. If the LDS Church came out against these measures, would the Legislature still pass them? Again, it depends on my constituents. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? I’m willing to look at them. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? The voucher issue is dead.

7. With the changes in leadership in both houses, has the Legislature moved farther away or closer to rightwing extremism? There are a few right- wing extremist and a few left-wing extremist, most fall somewhere in the middle. I believe the House has very strong leadership teams on both sides of the isle.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? I think they are going the wrong direction with health care reform. We need to control costs first and make insurance the bottom line. 3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? For one thing we need to be more optimistic. Utah will rebound much faster than other states. We can’t be cutting budgets in areas which bring in big returns. Maybe it’s a good time to do bonding. It might be a good time to strengthen the infrastructure while construction costs are lower. 4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? I don’t think the bills will have much of a chance in any session. I see some serious issues. Some of the things they are looking for they already have the right to do with a written contract. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? Many of his ideas I’m all for. We need to get rid of the private club law because it does nothing to stop kids. It is an emotional argument. I do insurance for clubs and I see the problem is we are going after the wrong people. We need to place blame where it belongs. It is an emotional issue. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? I haven’t heard a word. 7. With the changes in leadership in both houses, has the Legislature moved farther away or closer to right-wing extremism? Ridiculous question.

Meet your legislators What do they have in mind? What are their positions on key issues that will face the 2009 Utah Legislature? Find the answers on this page for members of the House of Representatives. For Davis County’s Senators, see the Tuesday, January 20, issue of the Clipper.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? We need to look for better ways to deliver health care but I can’t say what is possible at this point. Most of the attention will be on dealing with budget cuts. I believe there are things we can do now to bring more efficiency to the industry. 3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? I believe we are heading toward some very difficult times which have occurred largely because we have gotten away from sound economic principles. Current federal stimulus packages are funded by debt. This will be a tremendous burden on the taxpayer and on future generations and it could lead to hyper inflation. Hopefully it will stimulate the economy enough to get our economic house in order. If it gives us the stimulus we need and we as a people, along with the government don’t take the opportunity to get our houses in order, we will have compounded our economic problems. 4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? Everything has a chance even if it is a slim chance. I don’t believe it matters what the LDS Church does on this because the legislature will support what they think the voter wants and what they feel is the right thing to do for the state. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? I feel ok with the liquor laws the way they are presently. I would have to look more closely at the final proposals when they come out as to whether they have much of a chance. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? I have not heard of any. I think many legislators feel like this issue has been dealt with and it is time to move on. 7. With the changes in leadership in both houses, has the Legislature moved farther away or closer to right-wing extremism? Leadership is made up of several people with diverse views. They represent the will of those who elected them. As the general thought of the body does not seem to have changed that much in my view, I would have to assume that the Legislature will continue managing the state in a conservative way thus continuing to keep us as one of the best managed states in the union.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? There will be three bills from the task force introduced in this legislative session that will make significant improvement to the healthcare system. They are a good beginning to healthcare reform that will take a few years to complete. A new, less expensive health insurance product will also be introduced that will help many families be able to afford a basic healthcare insurance policy. An electronic portal is being built so consumers can shop for the coverage that suits them best. They will eventually be able to see the costs of medical procedures and hospital costs and be able to make choices. 3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? I don’t have a crystal ball, but those who have the tools to predict our economic future tell us we’ll probably be on the skids for a couple of more years. However, I see a bright shortterm and long-term future for Utahns because our state is fiscally sound, we don’t have significant debt that would require a tax increase, we still have an economy better than much of the nation and an entrepreneurial spirit that will help sustain our economy. 4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? I think gay rights issues will be decided by what our constituents feel about them, not by what the LDS Church signals one way or another. The sanctity of marriage and the traditional family are very important to most Utahns. I have committed that I will oppose attempts to redefine the institution of traditional marriage. I believe that some of the gay rights bills before the legislature this year are an attempt to do just that. Each bill will be weighed on its intent to protect civil rights versus extending additional or special rights that could lead courts to redefine marriage. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? There is usually some give and take in these matters, but the sentiment is that liquor laws are fine as they now stand. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? There is still strong support for vouchers because of the opportunity they offer to stretch public education dollars, especially in our tight economy. I personally haven’t heard of efforts to bring voucher legislation up in this session. 7. With the changes in leadership in both houses, has the Legislature moved farther away or closer to rightwing extremism? If it weren’t for the conservative leadership in our state, Utah would not be considered the best managed state in the nation with one of the best economies, even in these challenging economic times. I believe you will see the new leadership continue to stay the course.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? Healthcare reform will be challenging because of the downturn in the state budget. However, the legislature can certainly continue health care reform. Utah will continue to work towards efficient and effective health care that is consumer driven and that uses Internet technology to provide information to consumers. Progress will be made in ensuring transparency of cost and quality so consumers and providers can make better informed choices. A continuing goal will be to provide all consumers access to portable, tax-deductible health care plans. 3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? The crystal ball to answer the question on economic recovery is challenging. Utah should continue to use effective economic development incentives. The state should consider bonding to build needed infrastructure. Interest rates are lower, construction costs are lower, and bonding would provide a boost to the construction industry which has taken a severe hit. 4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? Each and every bill should be considered on its merits of protecting human rights. I do not know if the LDS Church is supporting or opposing any bills at this time. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? Within the past few days the Republican leadership of the Utah Senate has said it will not support changes to Utah's liquor laws. Unless a compromise is reached, there will probably be no changes. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? Currently there are no efforts to reconsider vouchers or a similar program called tuition tax credits for private school enrollment. I do think that in future years this subject will emerge again. 7. With the changes in leadership in both houses, has the Utah Legislature moved farther away or closer to right-wing extremism? Both the Senate and the House have elected outstanding, capable leaders. It is too early to interpret the political leaning of leadership or of the Legislature as a whole.

2. Where do you stand on healthcare reform? We must make progress on health care reform this session and some good work has come from the Health Care Task Force that will empower consumers. We need to push for increased efficiency, transparency, and accountability in all aspects of the system, simplification of applications and forms, increased policy portability from job to job, healthy lifestyles incentives, and continue to work for an affordable medical product for citizens. 3. What can the Legislature do about economic conditions? The state legislature should support long term policies that are economic friendly for businesses located in Utah. Affordable housing, investment in transportation, and cultivating an educated workforce ready to fill jobs with family sustaining wages are all part of a package that will build a stronger economy even in challenging times. 4. There are bills submitted to protect gay rights. Do they have a chance? Is the LDS Church willing to cooperate? While I am confident that no one in the legislature can speak for the LDS church, we know from earlier statements made by the Church that,“the Church does not object to rights for same-sex couples regarding hospitalization and medical care, fair housing and employment rights, or probate rights, so long as these do not infringe on the integrity of the traditional family or the constitutional rights of churches.” That statement, coupled with the Utah Constitutional Amendment 3 that passed in 2004 that reads, “marriage consists only of the legal union between a man and a woman,” will certainly provide backdrop and perspective. 5. What are your views about the governor's less restrictive liquor laws? While parents and families have the primary role in teaching children about the perils of underage drinking and overconsumption of liquor, regulations currently in place have created the lowest DUI fatality rates in the country. No one is in favor of a proposal that loosens access to alcohol by minors or endangers public safety. I am confident a compromise between Gov. Huntsman’s proposal and the legislature will be found. 6. Is the voucher issue still circulating on the hill? Citizens of District 20 reflected the will of the majority of Utahns in the referendum vote in 2007 that defeated vouchers. I do not think any movement to revive vouchers would be successful. 7. Has the Legislature moved farther away or closer to right-wing extremism? As a newly elected Representative I am perhaps not in the best position to compare. My experience during the campaign process and interacting with folks in District 20 since the election has proven that the majority of us remain balanced and fair in our approach to issues we face.


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Thursday, January 22, 2009

LEGAL NOTICES

UPAXLP

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 08-324-0110 Trust No. 117286807 Ref: Wendy B Gardner TRA: Loan No. xxxxxxxxxxx138x. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 18, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 17, 2009, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, Trustee James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded August 04, 2006, as Instrument No. 2190206, in Book 4089, Page 875-880, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Wendy B. Gardner, Wife Michael A. Gardner, Husband, Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Situated in the city of kaysville, county of Davis and state of Utah: all of lot 110, quail crossing no. 1b, a cluster subdivision, kaysville city, davis county, utah, according to the official plat thereof.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 2246 S 200 E Kaysville Ut 84037. Estimated Total Debt as of February 17, 2009 is $39,298.59. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Keybank National Association. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Michael A. Gardner and Wendy B. Gardner. Dated: January 22, 2009. James H. Woodall, Trustee James H. Woodall 10653 River Front Parkway, Suite 290 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)254-9450 (800)2451886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall, Trustee James H. Woodall R-217625 01/22/09, 01/29/09, 02/05/09 C-4398 PUBLIC NOTICE Pursuant to UCA 52-4-6, the City of Bountiful hereby gives public notice of its annual meeting schedule for 2009. Regular meetings of the City Council shall take place the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. All City Council meetings shall be held in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 790 South 100 East, Bountiful, Utah, unless otherwise advertised. The meetings will begin promptly at 7 p.m. The City Council may meet as a Redevelopment Agency Board of Directors. These meetings shall take place in the City Council Chambers at City Hall, and shall begin at 6:45 p.m., before City Council meetings as needed, unless otherwise advertised. All meetings of the City Council shall be open to the public, and the public is invited to attend the meetings of the City Council and the Redevelopment Agency, except where the City Council or Redevelopment Agency Board meet in Closed Session upon proper public notice and for the purposes outlined in UCA 52-4-5. In addition to the above scheduled regular meetings, the City Council may, from time to time, meet in special session as needed, and such meetings will be advertised by legal notice to the public in accordance with UCA 52-4-6. Dated this 13th day of January, 2009.

THOMAS R. HARDY City Manager

C-4402 1/22

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING UTAH TRANSIT AUTHORITY I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Utah Transit Authority Wednesday, February 4, 2009 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Bountiful City Hall, 790 South 100 East, Bountiful, in the City Council Chambers. This hearing is held for the purpose of giving information and receiving comments on the following proposed transit service changes. II. Description of Proposed Changes for April 2009: UTA announces the public hearing for the re-alignment of local bus service routes serving the South Davis County area. Routes included in this re-alignment are routes 460, 461, 463, and 471. The public hearing is to explain proposed bus service changes in the affected area. The objective is to increase ridership by providing new service in North Salt Lake area, providing better connections to and from Frontrunner, increasing travel destinations, and making routes more direct and reliable. Following is a brief description of the proposed changes: Combining the current routes 460 and 463 into one route (463) serving the communities of West

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Bountiful, Woods Cross, and North Salt Lake, primarily along the 800 West corridor, and along Main St. in North Salt Lake. Extending the route 461 north and west to include service along 500 South between the Frontrunner Station and Orchard Dr., along with service along 400 North, 900 East, 900 North, and 1000 East in Bountiful. Moving two morning and two evening route 471 trips to serve the 400 West (Centerville) and 200 West (Bountiful) corridors. The remaining 3 morning and 3 evening trips will continue their current routing along 400 East / Orchard Dr. and will be called a route 455, running between the Farmington Frontrunner Station and the University of Utah. Schedule times may be adjusted to manage passenger loads. Making the route 460 a bi-directional shuttle service between the Woods Cross Frontrunner Station and the intersection of Highway 89 and Center St. in North Salt Lake. This shuttle will provide service to the business park in North Salt Lake and the Foxboro subdivision. III. At the hearing, the Utah Transit Authority will afford an opportunity for interested citizens, private transportation providers, and locally elected officials to comment on the proposed changes. IV. To assure full participation at this hearing, accommodations for effective communication, such as sign language interpreters or printed materials in alternate formats, must be requested at least five (5) working days prior to the date of the scheduled event. Direct requests for accommodations to the UTA ADA Compliance Officer at (801) 2873536. Dial 711 to make a relay call. To request a language interpreter, please call Steve Swan at 801-287-2351. V. Written comments about the proposals should be sent to Steve Swan, Central Business Unit, Utah Transit Authority, P.O. Box 30810, Salt Lake City, Utah 84130-0810. All comments postmarked by February 9, 2009 will become part of the official public hearing record. Comments may also be given by e-mail at: HYP E R L I N K “ h t t p : / / w w w. r i d e u t a . c o m / ” www.rideuta.com. VI. Relevant information about the proposed changes is available from the Customer Service Department at UTA at (801)-RIDEUTA (743-3882), or at the UTA website at: HYPERLINK “ h t t p : / / w w w. r i d e u t a . c o m / ” www.rideuta.com.

John M. Inglish General Manager Utah Transit Authority C-4399 1/20 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex Court Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, UT 84025, on February 18, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated June 9, 2006, and executed by GABRIELA CEJA, as Trustor, in favor of ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on July 3, 2006, as Entry No. 2181455, in Book 4068, at Page 522, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 2662 North 1500 West, Clinton, Utah 84015 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: A PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, U.S. SURVEY; BEGINNING AT A POINT 743.73 FEET SOUTH AND 24.75 FEET EAST FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, SALT LAKE MERIDIAN, IN THE CITY OF CLINTON, AND RUNNING THENCE EAST 525 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 77 FEET, THENCE WEST 525 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax ID: 13-052-0003 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF ARGENT MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC. ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M2 UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF AUGUST 1, 2006, WITHOUT RECOURSE, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is GABRIELA CEJA. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier's check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: January 16, 2009.

LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Paula Maughan its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 07-1000 C-4403 1/22-2/5

UPAXLP

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Clipper Classiads LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated September 5, 2007 and executed by MATTHEW VINCENT AND TIFFANY VINCENT, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 534, FOXBORO PLAT 5, NORTH SALT LAKE CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 013000534 The address of the property is purported to be 1006 OLDHAM DR, NORTH SALT LAKE, UT 84054-6009. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be MATTHEW VINCENT AND TIFFANY VINCENT, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 19, 2009 By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0105760 C-4404 1/22-2/5 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 28, 2005 and executed by DAVID A COFFIN, AN UNMARRIED MAN, AND SARA A. HARVEY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 224, OUTWEST SUBDIVISION PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 12-552-0224 The address of the property is purported to be 2618 WEST 2225 SOUTH, SYRACUSE, UT 84075. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be DAVID A COFFIN, AN UNMARRIED MAN, AND SARA A. HARVEY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to

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LEGAL NOTICES

the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 19, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0105972 C-4405 1/22-2/5 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated August 16, 2007 and executed by PATRICIA A YOUNG, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 15, HILLSIDE OAKS SUBDIVISION NO. 1 AMENDED, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTION 12 AND PART OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE MERIDIAN, IN THE CITY OF NORTH SALT LAKE, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 01-114-0015 The address of the property is purported to be 703 HILLSIDE OAK CIR, NORTH SALT LAKE, UT 84054-1533. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be PATRICIA A YOUNG, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 19, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0106503 C-4406 1/22-2/5 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated December 27, 2007

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Davis County Clipper

LEGAL NOTICES

and executed by VALERIE JOY ABELE, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 55, ROSEWOOD SUBDIVISION NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DAVIS COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 11-072-0055 The address of the property is purported to be 438 SOUTH 725 EAST, LAYTON, UT 84041. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be VALERIE JOY ABELE. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 19, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0106504 C-4407 1/22-2/5

Classifieds 295-2251

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 17, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 1, 2007 and executed by BRIAN DONALD SWETEL, A MARRIED MAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 303, BRIDGEWAY ISLAND SUBDIVISION PHASE 3, SYRACUSE CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 12-659-0303 The address of the property is purported to be 1340 S 4125 W, SYRACUSE, UT 84075-6894. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be BRIAN DONALD SWETEL, A MARRIED MAN. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 19, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0106493 C-4408 1/22-2/5


Davis County Clipper

Everyday Davis

Thursday, January 22, 2009

B7

ASHLEY COOK Volunteers to read for toddler story time at the Bountiful Library. Story time is held at 20 different times a month and is staffed completely by volunteers.

LEAGUE OF UTAH WRITERS holds its monthly meetings at the Bountiful Davis Art Center. Here writers hone their skills and share new work and self assignments.

CARSON PEERY, MICHAEL MCNEAL, AND RYAN AVERY play a makeshift game of hockey at the Kaysville ponds Tuesday.

BOUNTIFUL REALLY DOES HAVE A NIGHT LIFE, just come to the art center and see! Oil painting instructor Dianne Turner, right, helps artists work on paintings at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center.

WHO SAID OIL AND WATER don't mix? Robert Gordon holds up a picture of Max the dog he is painting in the watercolor class next door to the oil painting class at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center on Tuesday nights.

Photos by Ron L.Brown


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Homeless to be counted Jan. 28

Davis News

Thursday, January 22, 2009 BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor FARMINGTON — A “Point in Time” count will be taken Jan. 28 of those who are considered homeless. The annual count, conducted yearly in Utah, involves trying to determine how many people are homeless to the extent they may be sleeping in cars. Law enforcement agencies will

check those places where they usually spot people considered homeless, while other agencies will also be involved. For example, the county jail and hospitals will be asked to determine who would be considered homeless that night who has been in their emergency rooms or incarcerated. Lloyd Pendleton of Bountiful, who heads the state’s homelessness reduction effort, said chronic homeless num-

Davis County Clipper bers are down 28 percent nationally. In Utah, meanwhile, they’ve dipped 3 percent. These figures don’t necessarily take into account the economic downturn which might mean numbers have moved up, recently. “The Road Home (Salt Lake City homeless shelter) is housing about 200 more people per night than a year ago,” Pendleton said.

“In Tooele, they are housing nine to 15 more per night than previously,” he said. The national downturn may be due, in part, to “a lot of effort” that has seen the increase of housing to house the homeless by 140,000 units, he said. New homeless housing units have also been opened in Salt Lake City, with an effort under way for a complex to open in Davis County, as well.

.com “the last of the little guys”

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DavisLife

Inside Weddings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C2 Wedding show . . . . . . . . . C3-5 Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C7 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C8

In praise of reality

stock photo

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 2009 • C1

THE CONTEST is open to photographers ages five through 12.

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL — If children can make magic with just a crayon and a piece of paper, how much more can they do with cameras in their hands? That’s the question being asked by the Bountiful/Davis Art Center (BDAC) and the Joy Foundation, who teamed up to create a photo contest for children in kindergarten through sixth grade. The theme for the contest is “So This Is Love,” and the contest winners will be announced on Valentine’s Day. “We’re excited to see the children’s fresh approach to the theme,” said BDAC Director Emma Dugal.“We thought that this would be a great way to get them more involved in photography.” The contest is only open to children ages five through 12, with a $50 grand prize and merit ribbons awarded to those whose photos show the best composition, theme, technique, and skill for the age. Only one 5x7 entry is allowed per child (either vertical or horizontal) and the photos must be composed and taken by the child. Photos need to be delivered to the Bountiful/Davis Art Center (745 S. Main) by Feb. 7. There is a $5 entry fee, which will go to fund programs at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center — including the center’s art classes and events such as Family Encounters of the Art Kind— and the Joy Foundation. The Joy Foundation is a Davis County organization which uses the power of art to reach out to at-risk youth. The group, which is located in the same building as the BDAC, allows these kids to explore everything from painting to filmmaking thanks to the help of professional artists and volunteers. The foundation also coordinates Davis County’s annual “Magic on the Sidewalk” chalk art festival, held each May in Bountiful. During last year’s event, nearly 100 amateur and professional artists decorated Bountiful’s sidewalks with everything from dragons to landscapes. Professional artist Ruby Chacon, a painter from Salt Lake City, was the festival’s featured artist for 2008. “It’s really fun,” said Jane Joy, who helped found the Joy Foundation and organizes the chalk festival every year.“Everyone’s raising the bar every year.” Donations to the Joy Foundation can be made by going online to the group’s website at www.kidsfindjoy.org. For more information about making donations to the Bountiful/Davis Art Center, please call 292-0367. jwardell@davisclipper.com

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL — Classic art is full of elegant people and lush, rolling countrysides, but that’s not the world most people see in front of them. For two artists currently on display at the Bountiful/ Davis Art Center, however, the opposite is true. Aaron Bushnell and Christopher Thornock, whose work will be on display now through Feb. 16, both use traditional subjects (landscape and portraiture) to capture the very real world around them. Technically, Bushnell paints outdoor scenes, but the only trees that make it into his work are those survivors that exist on streetcorners and parking strips. The world he celebrates is the place where city meets suburbia, where gleaming skyscrapers are hard to find but there are miles and miles of parking lots. Bushnell, magically, makes that world seem almost beautiful. Like the people who frequent the blacktop he has a definite preference for night scenes, with deep shadows continually both enriched and defeated by the glow of streetlights, neon signs, and industrial flames. All of that glow, however, is slightly off-kilter, as if quickly glanced at by someone hurrying on their way to somewhere else. Some, like “Yellow Shazaam,” go so far as to turn the lights into the long, blurred streaks seen from a car window speeding past, giving viewers an almost visceral feel of living in the world being captured. Thornock, on the other hand, focus on the people that live in Bushnell’s world, normal people like the kind you might find on any streetcorner. His paintings are, quite simply, studies of the human

face and body, all fully closed and standing as completely straight and expressionless as possible. Though you can occasionally tell a setting — one boy is lying in bed, while another girl is standing in front of a fridge, most of the backgrounds are blank walls that have no chance of distracting the eye. On one level, the lack of body positioning and expression is almost unnerving — they’re the cues that we use to tell what our fellow humans are thinking and feeling, and without them it’s as if we’re suddenly missing our roadmap. On another level, however, the paintings almost seem like memorials to the very physical nature of our human bodies. Every crease beside a nose and every wrinkle in a shirt has been recorded, each with a real weight and solidity that make the people in the paintings almost as threedimensional as the people standing next to you. jwardell@davisclipper.com

Photos by Ron L. Brown

Contest gives kids the camera

THE REAL WORLD Clockwise from top: Christopher Thornock’s “Sophia,” Aaron Bushnell’s “Big Green Street,” Thornock’s “Two Girls,” Bushnell’s “I Love My Car, You?” and Bushnell’s “So Hot.” All pieces shown are currently on display at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center.


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Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis Horizons

Birthday

Wedding

80th: Durrant

WadeOlson

The children of Anna Durrant, in celebration of her life, are hosting an open house in honor of her 80th birthday. It will be held from 2 - 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 24, 2009, in the Kaysville East Stake Center, 201 South 600 East, Kaysville. She requests no gifts please — just your presence is enough.

Anna Durrant

1st Birthday Brookie Sage Parkin

Brookie Sage Parkin

Dollar saving tips

Vinegar in Your Laundry If you use liquid fabric softener in your clothes, try this tip. Mix your favorite softener half and half with white vinegar.Vinegar helps to kill germs and lingering odors in your clothes. Also, if you happen to be out of fabric softener, vinegar helps cut down on static cling.

Kids Enjoying Veggies? My husband and I are trying to eat healthier and save money at the same time. Not an easy task. So we bought an electric wok. For the past several nights, we have chosen a type of protein (chicken, pork, or shrimp) plus a huge selection of veggies (snap peas, green peppers, green onions, broccoli, etc.) and cooked a small amount of rice to go with the dinner. We are eating better and having fun cooking the meal together. Our kids are actually eating a lot of veggies, and we have considerably lowered our food bill. By using the meats and veggies bought on sale, and going a little lighter on the meat portions, we are saving quite a bit

Anniversary 60th: Crockett

Megan Wade and Austin Chad Olson will be married January 23, 2009, at the Bountiful LDS Temple. A reception will be held that evening from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Oakridge Country Club. Megan is the daughter of Tammy and Blake Wade. She is a 2007 graduate of the University of Utah in business administration. Megan is employed at Zions Bancorporation. Austin is the son of Carrie and Chad Olson.He served in the Nashville Tennessee Mission and is a 2006 graduate in business finance from Brigham Young University.

Megan Wade Austin Chad Olson He is employed at Primary Residential Mortgage. Following a Western Caribbean cruise, they will make their home in Salt Lake City.

Smouse earns Venturing Leadership Award

Brookie Sage Parkin, daughter of Craig Parkin and Lindsey Parkin; granddaughter of Steve and Helen Parkin and Steve and Cheryl Lauder, celebrated her first birthday January 18, 2009.

on our food budget. An extra bonus is that the cleanup is easy and fast. Easy Winter Curtains Fleece makes excellent curtains! First of all, they do not need to be hemmed, so if you don't own a sewing machine, you can just cut to size and then pin up. You can even glue decorations to the pins to spice things up. I used chunks of mirror, or faux flowers would be nice. Secondly, the material is a great insulation to help with utility bills. They keep the heat in during winter, and you can open them to let in sunlight for a little free heat. Know Your Cords When you get a new "toy" that has a USB cord (or anything else with a detachable cord), the first thing to do is to take a piece of masking tape, write the name of the toy on it, and wrap it around the cord, leaving a little tab sticking out that shows the name. No more wondering what cord goes to what!

Davis County Clipper

Marco Smouse, an active Venture for three years, has earned nearly e v e r y award and rank available to youth in Scouting. An Eagle Scout with 16 palms (103 merit badges), he has also earned the highest award in Cub Scouts (the Arrow of Light), Varsity Scouts (Denali Award), and Venturing (Silver Award). Along the way, he earned three Varsity Letters, Four of the five Venturing Bronze Awards, Venturing Trust Award, Venturing Ranger Award, Historic Trails Award, World Conservation Award, and his church’s religious awards – On My Honor and Duty to God. He has displayed his leadership in his crew, serving as President,Vice President, Secretary, and Activity Chairman. He has provided leadership and example to younger scouts as Den Chief, as a District Leave No Trace Instructor, and as a staff member for Venturing Leadership Skills Course, and Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills. He has also showed his leadership and capacity to help others in volunteer work for Rogers Memorial Theater and the Utah State Division

Classifieds

of Wildlife Resources “Get Wild” program. He has taught art classes for the Bountiful Arts Center. He completed an internship in the Radiology Department of Lakeview Hospital. The Great Salt Lake Council, Boy Scouts of America, is pleased to present the Venturing Leadership Award to Marco Alexander Smouse.

DeRay and Cleo Crockett DeRay and Cleo recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary, a feat not accomplished by many. They were married on January 4, 1949. They have three children: Gary Crockett, Valerie Mudrow and Anthony Crockett.They have been blessed by six grandchildren: Jacob Crockett, Brett Crockett, Katie Gough, Dallas Mudrow, Tyler Mudrow and Kym Mudrow.They have two sweet great-grandchildren: Noah and Logan. A family dinner was held at the Lion House in their honor on January 3. A

Wedding Deadline: Monday and Thursday, 5 p.m.

great time was had by all as we learned about their growing up years and their courtship. Their family wants to thank them for being wonderful parents, grandparents and greatgrandparents and for always setting an example of love and service. Happy 60th Anniversary.We love you!

Come Visit Us! Monday-Saturday 10:00-6:00

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Supplement to the Davis County Clipper

Thursday, January 22, 2009

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Special Pull-out Section

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the

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Supplement to the Davis County Clipper

BOLD& BEAUTIFULWedding Show

Saturday, January 24, 12-4 p.m.

hosted by The Canterbury Place

197 East 500 South, Bountiful

And the date of the big event is... By Tresa Erickson e just put the engagement ring on your finger and already you're dreaming about the type of wedding you would like to have. Before you get too far into the wedding planning, you might want to sit down with your fiance and determine a date for the big event. Most of the major decisions you will make from this point on about your wedding will hinge on that, so you want to select the right date. Selecting the right wedding date requires more than whipping out a calendar and pointing to a date at random. You probably already have some idea of the general time frame in which you would like to get married. Most couples prefer the spring and sum-

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mer months over the fall and winter months due to the warmer weather. If you don’t have a seasonal preference, then perhaps you have a holiday preference. Some couples look forward to getting married around Valentine’s Day, while others look forward to getting married around Halloween. You might even have a personal preference. Some couples focus on a particular time period because it reflects the birthday or anniversary of an important person or event. Along with preference, the climate of the region in which you live may factor in on your decision. In the Northeast, winters can be bitterly cold and make having a wedding there during that time difficult, while on the coast, hurricane season can make

having a wedding there during late summer and fall risky. If you live in a warmer region like the Southwest, you may have more options. However,

Ready, set, go! Fun games for your reception By Tresa Erickson ou've been planning your wedding for months, and now that everything is nearly complete, you are working on those special touches that will personalize the event and allow guests to remember it for years to come. One of the ways that you can go about this is to have some games at your reception. Most wedding receptions are full of activity from dining to dancing. While tossing the bouquet, removing the garter and cutting the cake are important traditions, they are not the only things you can include in your reception. You can also offer a number of games for your guests to play. Some possibilities include: • Bride and Groom Q&A For this game, a list of questions pertaining to the history of the bride and groom is created. Guests are then divided into teams and each is given five minutes to answer a question from the list. If their answer is correct, the team receives a point. The team with the most points at the end of the game is declared the winner. • Memory For this game, a list of questions pertaining to the bride and groom and their ceremony is created. The bride and groom then leave the room while the questions are read aloud and guests answer them on pen and paper. The correct answers are provided and the guest with the most correct answers is declared the winner. • Musical Laps For this game, guests are divided into two groups, one with one less person

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than the other. The smaller group gathers in a circle and kneels down on one knee. The larger group gathers outside of them. The music is started and guests in the larger group must move around the circle until it stops. Then they must scramble to find a knee to sit on. The guest without a seat is eliminated, along with any pairs that fall over. The couple remaining at the end is declared the winner. • Scavenger Hunt For this game, several lists of objects that can be found in the room are created. Objects may run the gambit from a cake cutter to a shoe worn by a particular guest. Select guests are then divided into teams, handed a list and given 15 minutes to find all of the objects on it. The team with the most items found when the time expires is declared the winner. • Whatcha Wearing? For this game, a list of descriptions pertaining to what guests are wearing is

created. Guests are then divided into teams and descriptions are read aloud, such as “wearing pink nail polish.” Any guest matching that description runs to the front of the room and receives a point for their team. The team with the most points at the end of the game is declared the winner. These are just five possibilities. There are hundreds more out there. For further ideas, conduct a search at your library or local bookstore or online.

you will probably want to avoid mid-winter and late summer, when temperatures are at their worst. Culture and religion may also affect your deci-

sion. Certain cultures and religions prohibit marriage on certain days or times of years. Getting married on holy days, for example, is forbidden in some religions. Make sure you check with your family and officiant regarding what is appropriate for your culture and religion. Budget may be a factor as well. If you are on a tight budget, then you may want to focus on the off-season when prices will be lower and vendors will be more willing to strike a deal. If that is not possible, then you may want to focus on weekdays rather than weekends, when prices will be higher. In order to make your decision, these are just some of the factors you will have to consider. After you have narrowed your choice of dates to a

select few, the schedules of those attending as well as the availability of the venue where you would like to be married may be the deciding factors. In addition to your own schedules, you will have to check the schedules of all parents, grandparents and attendants as well as anyone else you would like to be in attendance and make sure they are free on the dates you have chosen. If you have your heart set on a particular location, you will also have to check with officials there to ensure it has not been booked on the dates you have in mind. Once you have completed this final step, a final date will probably emerge. If not, feel free to select the date that appeals to you most. Make sure you have a backup date, however, just in case conflict arises.

What’s the fuss about cutting the cake? By Tresa Erickson You’ve attended countless weddings in the past six months, and now that your own is coming up, you’re starting to rethink certain aspects, in particular, the cake-cutting ceremony. At every wedding you have attended thus far, the bride and groom have cut the cake, shared a piece, posed for a picture, and that’s that.What is all of the fuss about? Well, although it may not be as well known now, there is a significance of the cake-cutting ceremony. As far back as Roman times, cake has been part of weddings. The first wedding cakes were made of barley or wheat and resembled loaves. The groom would eat part of the loaf and then break the remainder over his bride's head. Guests would scramble to get to the crumbs, which symbolized fertility. In Medieval times, the barley or wheat cake evolved into small sweet buns, which were stacked

into a large pile in front of the bride and groom. The couple would attempt to kiss over the pile, and if they succeeded, there would be many children in their future. By the late 19th century, wedding cakes had become very popular and today take center stage at most wedding receptions. Traditionally, the cake-cutting ceremony is the first task that the bride and groom perform together as husband and wife. It symbolizes their commitment to provide for one another. Cutting the cake together unifies the couple and feeding each other symbolizes their commitment. Who knew? There is a purpose to the whole cake-cutting ceremony, after all. If you enjoy the symbolism of the ceremony, then you may want to include it in your ceremony. If you still think that there is little point to it, then go ahead and skip it. Don’t be surprised, though, if your decision raises a few eyebrows.

The Wight House can handle all your reception needs at up to

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Supplement to the Davis County Clipper

the

Thursday, January 22, 2009

C5

BOLD& BEAUTIFULWedding Show hosted by The Canterbury Place

Saturday, January 24, 12-4 p.m.

197 East 500 South, Bountiful

And the colors are ... By Tresa Erickson ou got engaged recently, and everyone is clamoring to know what kind of wedding you’re going to have. Home or destination? Large or small? Formal or informal? These are just some of the issues you may find yourself wrangling with over the next few months. Another issue you will have to decide on is your wedding colors. There are hundreds of colors beyond the basics found in every eight-count crayon box, any of which may serve as your wedding colors. For some brides, the decision is easy. They have a favorite color or have imagined their wedding being such and such color, and there is no other choice. For other brides, it’s a struggle. If you find yourself in this category, don’t despair. Here are some tips to help you get over the hump. First, sit down and make a list of your favorite colors, keeping in mind that the more specific you are, the better. Don’t just write down “blue” when everyone knows that you love cornflower blue. Cornflower blue looks a whole lot different than baby blue, navy blue and royal blue. Be specific in your color favorites. Review your list and cross off any that you know for certain will not work for your wedding. Neon green and yellow, for example, may not be the best choices for a wedding, unless of course, you are going for

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the that glow-in-the-dark look. Even then, you will probably have trouble finding apparel and accessories for your wedding in those colors. Once you have narrowed your color favorites, do some research and find out what kind of tones they set. Silver, for example, often invokes an air of sophistication, whereas pale pink invokes a sense of playfulness. Cross off any colors from your list that conflict with the tone you hope to set for your wedding. Consider the time and venue of your wedding as well. An evening wedding at a swanky hotel during the winter may call for a different color palette than an afternoon wedding poolside in the dead of summer. You might choose darker, richer colors for the former, and brighter, lighter colors for the latter. Theme, too, can dictate your color choices. Hot pink and lime green might work

Wedding Show The Canterbury Place hosted by

well for a tropical-inspired summer wedding, but not so much for a serene spring garden-themed wedding. For that, you might want to go with a paler shade of pink and green. These are just some of the factors that might influence your color choices. Keep in mind that availability may have a bearing on your decision as well. You might have your heart set on a ruby-red and gray wedding until you discover that the style of bridesmaid dresses you want doesn’t come in either of those colors. Rather than search for new dresses, you might find it easier to change your color palette. Be flexible. You might start out with a silver and white palette and end up with a silvery-white and dark purple palette after spying the purplish flowers of your dreams at the florist’s.

Participating Vendors Visit the show and see what they have to offer!

Scoopology Gallery Photography Shanks Floral Keith Barlow Videography All Occasion Linens 5th Avenue Tuxedos Nathan Pickett Videography American Laser Center JCR Disc Jockey Gifford Photography Polka Dots & Daisies Ambrosia Wedding Cakes Alicia Bills & Jamie Prince Laughing Gravy Phiz Photography CH Bagpiping Emily Bailey Smile Now Photo Booth Flower Patch Still Light Photography Specialty Linens

Time to open those gifts By Tresa Erickson ou’ve been planning your wedding for months now, and you’re finally ready to send out the invitations. That means you may start receiving some gifts soon. The region where you live will play into the number of gifts you receive. While it is customary in some regions to send gifts prior to the wedding, in others, guests may send gifts before or after the wedding or bring them to the wedding. Tradition used to dictate that gifts be sent before the wedding, allowing couples to open them immediately and send thank-you notes. In many regions of the country today, however, couples are now providing tables at their reception for guests to place gifts. While a couple may be inclined to open the gifts during the reception, experts advise against this simply because it moves the focus away from the couple to the gifts themselves. It may also put pressure on the couple to show equal delight with every gift, and make guests in general feel uncomfortable, especially those whose gifts pale in comparison to others. Of course, waiting to open the gifts brings up the question of when? That is entirely up to the couple. If they are leaving straight from the reception for their honeymoon, they may wait to open the gifts until after they return. If they are not going on their honeymoon immediately, they may open the gifts at the end of the

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reception when only close friends and family remain or at home sometime afterwards. They can even turn the gift opening into an event and hold a day-after brunch where they open the gifts in front of their close friends and family. This will require some planning, though, and again, there is the risk of guests being embarrassed by what they did or did not give. These are some of the more common options for opening gifts. Keep in mind that you will probably receive several gifts prior to your wedding, and to pre-

BOLD& BEAUTIFUL

vent guests from wondering about them, you should open them immediately and send out thank-you notes. As for any gifts you receive at the wedding, be careful how you proceed to open them. Do your best not to make anyone feel uncomfortable. After all, it is the thought that counts.

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Calendar

EVENTS C6

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis County Clipper

On display now

The work of Aaron Bushnell and Christopher Thornock is on display now through Feb. 16 at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center. Both use traditional subjects (landscape and portraiture) to capture the very real world around them.

Jan. 24 Jr. Ranger Program: Antelope Island State Park, Syracuse. Everyone knows plants go dormant in the winter, but what does that really mean? Join the park naturalist for a closer look into the life of plants during the cold winter months. Meet at the visitor center at 11 a.m. Activity intended for children ages 6-12 but all ages welcome. 721-9569. Hike with a naturalist: Join the park naturalist for a discussion on winter adaptations of life on Antelope Island. This is a short hike, approximately one hour, great for families. Meet at Buffalo Point trailhead at 2 p.m. 721-9569.

Thursday-Friday

STAGE Jan. 9-Feb. 7 The Wizard of Oz, Rodgers Memorial Theatre, 292 E. Pages Lane, Centerville. 2981302

Jan. 15-17, 22-24 Pinnacle Acting Company presents, “Rabbit Hole,” at the Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center Street (7720 So.), Midvale, 7:30 p.m. www.pinnacleactingcompany.org.

February 7

Through Jan. 24

February 8 The Interfaith Music Tribute to the Human Spirit returns to Temple Square, celebrating its eighth year of commemorating global goodwill and peace, 5 p.m. in the Tabernacle. Tickets are required and can be obtained by calling 5700080 or at www.lds.org (events page).

February 13 Temple Square Performances: Cultural Arts Submission Presentation, Joseph Smith Memorial Building Chapel, 7:30 p.m. Evening of poetry reading and a readers’ theater script presentation of works recognized from the annual Church Cultural Arts Submission. Open to all ages.

February 14 The Utah Youth Symphony, under the direction of Barbara Scowcroft, will perform in the Tabernacle on Temple Square at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are required and can be obtained by calling 570-0080 or at www.lds.org (events page).

Da v i s m o v i e s GATEWAY 8 CINEMA 206 South 625 West West Bountiful • 292-7979 • Listings for Jan. 22, 2009 Hotel for Dogs (PG) 2:20, 4:45, 7, 9:20 pm My Bloody Valentine (R) 2:30, 4:55, 7:30, 9:50 pm Bride Wars (PG) 1:30, 3:50, 6:30, 9:30 pm The Unborn (PG-13) 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10 pm Bedtime Stories (PG) 2:10, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 pm Marley & Me (PG) 2, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 pm The Tale of Despereaux (G) 1:50 pm Gran Torino (R) 1:40, 4:15, 7:20, 9:55 pm Twilight (PG-13) 4, 6:40, 9:25 pm

The Ultimate Health Workshop. Free class to educate and inform about new natural treatments for the vast array of health issues confronting our world today. Demonstrations and health info. 7 p.m. Lloyd Natural Healing @ 543-4325 to reserve your seat.

The American Lung Association of Utah offers classes to help smokers become nonsmokers. Hypnosis clinics are held from 6-8 p.m., 1930 S. 1100 E., SLC. Call 484-4456.

Temple Square Performances: American Piano duo Jeffrey Shumway and Del Parkinson, 7:30 p.m., Conference Center Theater.

Temple Square Performances: Christopher Holmes, baritone, 7:30 p.m., Conference Center Theater.

2nd and 4th Thursday

Fourth Thursday

Jan. 31

February 6

Davis County LP meetings, 7 p.m. at 1617 N. 350 E., Layton. Brent at BDZ132@yahoo.com or 773-4162.

Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets at 6 p.m., at the CAMT Building (Neurology Clinic) at 729 Arapeen Drive, SLC (in U of U Research Park). Monthly informative presentations to educate newly diagnosed and established PD patients, family members and friends, parent/caregiver forums. 2921023.

Morris Murdock Travelshow, SouthTowne Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Jan. 30 3-8 p.m. and Jan. 31, 10-4. ww.morrismurdock.com

CONCERTS

Second Thursday

Third Thursdays

Jan. 30-31

Jr. Ranger Program: Antelope Island State Park, Syracuse. During the winter months plants and animals adapt to harsh conditions to survive. Learn more about these adaptations. Meet at the visitor center at 10 a.m. Activity intended for children ages 6-12, however all ages welcome. 721-9569. Hike with a naturalist: Join the park naturalist on a tracking adventure. Dress for weather conditions, bring water, sturdy shoes and meet at White Rock Bay trailhead, 2 p.m. Plan approximately 2 hours for this program. 721-9569.

525-4625 for questions and reservations. Seating is limited.

The Yellow Leaf, M-Th, 7:30 p.m., F-S, 8 p.m., Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 E., SLC, 581-6961, www.pioneertheatre.org

CLASSES Jan. 31

Culinary kids, hands on class, $15 11:30.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801-866-1111.

Feb. 14 Crepes for all occasions, $15 11:30 a.m. www.fykitchen.com, classes @fykitchen.com, 801866-1111.

Tuesday and Saturday Cooking classes. Peruvian and Vegan cuisine, low fat and no trans fat. In Bountiful. Learn how to use new herbs and spices in your food. For information call 397-5222.

Farmington Recreation Ceramics Wednesdays, third sessions, Feb. 4., 4-5 p.m., ages 6 and older. $40 residents, non-resi-

KAYSVILLE THEATER 21 N. Main,Kaysville • 546-3400 •Listings for Jan. 23-29 *No passes or special offers accepted High School Musical 3 (G)* Fri: 4:30, 7:15 pm Sat: 12:15, 2:30, 7:15 pm Mon-Thurs: 7:15 pm Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (PG) Fri: 4:45, 7:30 pm Sat: 12:45, 2:40, 7:30 pm Mon-Thurs: 7:30 pm Quantum of Solace (PG-13) Fri: 9:25 pm Sat: 4:35, 9:25 pm Mon-Thur: 9:15 pm Forever Strong (PG-13) Fri: 4:35, 7 pm Sat: 12, 2:15, 7 pm Mon-Thurs: 7 pm Four Christmases (PG-13) Fri: 9:30 pm Sat: 4:45, 9:30 pm Mon-Thurs: 9:20 pm The Secret Life of Bees (PG13) Fri: 9:20 pm

Above: Christopher Thornock’s “Sophia.”

dents, $50. Men’s Basketball Comp League Cost is $350 per team, team registration only. Games start in January. Register at Farmington City Parks and Recreation office, 720 W. 100 N. or www.farmington.utah.gov. 451-0953.

Jan. 29-31 Marriage Enrichment Seminar, in Provo, www.marriageenrichment.org. For info call Victor and Lois Cline, 801-2786831 or Dean and Joan Connolly, 801-583-8371.

Saturdays The South Davis Road Runners is a local volunteer driven adult running group. Group runs are held every Saturday morning at various locations throughout the Davis County area. The group runs vary in length, generally between 3 and 14 miles, with loop or out-and-back routes to allow runners to shorten or lengthen the run as needed. Quarterly education clinics and other benefits are offered to members. To learn more contact Lora Erickson at 299-1601 lora@blonderunner.com or visit www.sdroadrunners.com. All fitness levels are invited to participate. Beginners welcome.

Saturdays Stop worrying about money. Learn to improve your financial conditions or help others improve theirs. Maintain your lifestyle while controlling spending, eliminating debt and finding more money in your current budget. Free public service 90-minute class in Bountiful. 8:30-10 a.m. You must pre-register. No sales pitches presented. 294-7040.

Tuesdays Safe Harbor Crisis Center’s Domestic Violence Outreach Program offers weekly support groups for domestic violence victims. Groups held at 6 p.m. 444-3191. Groups free/confidential.

Sat: 4:30, 9:20 pm Mon-Thurs: 9:10 pm

LOEW’S LAYTON HILLS 9 728 W. 1425 North • 774-0800 • Listings for Jan. 23 Bride Wars (PG) 2:10, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30 pm Hotel for Dogs (PG) 1:50, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45 pm My Bloody Valentine (R) 1:20, 6:50 pm Defiance (R) 1:35, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25 pm Inkheart (PG) 2, 4:30, 7:20, 10 pm Underworld: Rise of the Lycans (R) 1:20, 1:45, 3:40, 4:15, 6:10, 6:30, 8:30, 9 pm Seven Pounds (PG-13) 3:50, 9:15 pm Last Chance Harvey (PG-13) 1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10 pm Gran Torino (R) 1:30, 4:20, 7, 9:40 pm

TINSELTOWN USA LAYTON Layton HIlls Mall Ring Rd. • 546-3582

Tuesdays Safe Harbor Crisis Center’s Rape Recovery Program offers weekly support groups for survivors of rape/sexual assault, family members and friends, 7 p.m. at Safe Harbor. 444-3191. Groups free/confidential.

Jan. 21 Restoring Emotional Wellness: A course in overcoming depression and anxiety, 6:308:30 p.m. at Bountiful High School, room 301. Taught by Dave Larsen, Alzheimer’s Association; Jacob Z. Hess, Ph.D., candidate, Ed Fila, DDS, president, Innovations in Populations Health Management. The class is open to anyone interested in better understanding these problems (whether faced by you or a loved one). Attend the first session free or register by calling 402-3990. Bountiful High Community Education, Dave 529-8238 or Jacob 712-1346.

Feb. 11 Free Self-Esteem Seminar. Call 801-295-1038, 801-755-7706 to reserve your seat. Come learn how the mind governs self esteem, the power of our thoughts, learn to implement action-power phrases, change thinking to more productive ways to enhance success and feel happy with higher levels of self-esteem.

Wednesdays Learn how to get out of debt and make more money! 7:30 p.m., Money Mastery, 1403 S. 600 West, Suite A, Bountiful. Register 292-1099.

Wednesday Spanish classes, in Bountiful. Call 397-5222.

Wednesdays Lose your fear of public speaking! Local Toastmasters group meets at 7 p.m. in the Deseret First Credit Union building. Email Victor.Hernandez1@atk.com for details.

Second Wednesday

• Listings for Jan. 23 Bedtime Stories (PG) 12:40, 3:20, 6:35, 8:40 pm Hotel for Dogs (PG) 11:30 am, 2:05, 4:30, 7, 9:30 pm My Bloody Valentine 3-D (R) 11:35 am, 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:15 pm Marley & Me (PG) 3:15, 8:55 pm The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (PG-13) 11 am, 2:35, 6:10, 9:40 pm Bride Wars (PG) 12, 1, 2:20, 4:35, 6:05, 7, 9:20 pm Valkyrie (PG-13) 11:15 am, 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10 pm Yes Man (PG-13) 11:40 am, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 pm Notorious (R) 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10 pm The Unborn (PG-13) 12:45, 3, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55 pm Paul Blart: Mall Cop (PG) 11:45 am, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 pm Twilight (PG-13) 1:05, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20 pm Gran Torino (R)

Monthly support group meeting held for all weight-loss surgery patients, and those interested in learning more about the surgical treatment of obesity, 6:30 p.m. Davis Medical Center Classroom 1, 1600 Antelope Dr., Layton. tbartz@bariatricsupportcenter.com

Third Wednesday MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Support group will meet at the Bountiful Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Julie 292-6040 or Sandi 543-1915.

Third Wednesday Brain Injury Support Group, 7 p.m. Skyroom at South Davis Community Hospital. All those touched by brain injury are invited to join for support, informal discussion and sharing. Louise or Corrine, 295-2361.

Thursdays TOPS Club weight loss support group meets every Thursday at 5 p.m. in the Episcopal Church, 1131 South Main, Centerville (use East entrance). www.tops.org.

Come dance to a live band at the Golden Years Activity Center, 726 South 100 East, Bountiful from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. every Thursday and Friday morning.

Saturdays The Health & Wellness Clinic will hold an acupuncture support group for weight loss, 11 a.m.-12 noon. Four needles are placed in the ear that help regulate appetite, decrease cravings and stimulate metabolism. Along with acupuncture therapy the group will discuss weight loss ideas and host a guest speaker each week. Cost is $25 per session. 544-4333

Ongoing Healing Arts Associates is offering a new ongoing education program. Well Being and Chronic Conditions is available to patients, families and health professionals who live with chronic illnesses, conditions and stress-related health problems. 801-583-7204 or 801-558-5715.

Wednesday Heart t’ Heart addiction recovery meeting, a 12-step recovery program. 12-1 p.m., 1582 N. 150 West, Bountiful. Richard 292-8046.

Sundays

Single Swingers Square Dance, 975 Wall Ave., Ogden, (back door Eagle Lodge), 78:30 p.m., $4/night. Carol 2921354, Irene 479-4555.

Non-denominational self help group formed for Christians with mental illness or depression. 2:30 p.m., Clearfield Church, 200 S. 500 E., Clearfield.

Thursdays

Ongoing

Thursdays

Alzheimer Support Group Thursdays, 3 p.m., Orchard Cove Alzheimer Community, 485 E. 500 S., Bountiful. 2924800 for more info. Free day care while attending the support group.

Thursdays Free health education classes. Dr. Lloyd of Lloyd Natural Healing in Layton is offering free health seminars to educate the public about nutrition and common health concerns. These one hour classes are held Thursdays @ 7p.m. 1-2 times a month and are open to the public but require reservations to assure seating. Please call 801-

11:25 am, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25 pm Defiance (R) 12:35, 3:45, 6:55, 10:05 pm Inkheart (PG) 11:05 am, 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40 pm Revolutionary Road (R) 11:15 am, 2, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20 Frost/Nixon (R) 1, 3:55, 6:50, 9:50 pm

SALT LAKE CITY MEGAPLEX 12/ GATEWAY 165 S. Rio Grande St. (801) 304-4636 • Listings for Jan. 22 Bedtime Stories (PG) 12:40, 2:55, 5:20, 7:40 pm The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (PG-13) 2:45, 6:10, 9:35 pm Marley & Me (PG) 1:20, 4:10, 7, 9:45 pm Hotel for Dogs (PG) 1:25, 3:40, 6, 8:20 pm Valkyrie (PG-13) 1:15, 4, 6:40, 9:40 pm

The South Davis Recovery Club meets at Colonial Square, (above Spanky’s), 567 W. 2600 S., Bountiful, 397-0450. Meetings for AA and Al-Anon.

Ongoing Come play bridge at the Golden Years Activity Center, 726 South 100 East in Bountiful in the afternoons. Beginner to advanced. Call 295-3479.

Mon-Wed-Fri To learn the new Dr. John Gray, Bounce and Shake Exercise routine for fat burning, 9:15 a.m., Golden Years Center, Linda 292-3636.

Seven Pounds (PG-13) 12:35, 10:35 pm My Bloody Valentine 3-D (R) 12:30, 2:30, 5:10, 7:55, 10:30 pm Yes Man (PG-13) 12:20, 3:10, 10:05 pm Notorious (R) 2:40, 5:30, 8:05, 10:45 pm Paul Blart: Mall Cop (PG) 12:25, 3:15, 8:15, 10:40 pm The Unborn (PG-13) 1:40, 3:50, 6:05, 10:25 pm Bride Wars (PG) 1, 5:25, 7:50, 10:15 pm Gran Torino (R) 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10 pm Defiance (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:50 pm

IMAX THEATRE AT THE CLARK PLANETARIUM 110 S. 40 W., SLC • (801) 532-7827 • Listings for Jan. 22, 2009 Fly Me to the Moon 3-D (G) 2:45, 7:30 pm Dinosaurs 3D: Giants of Patagonia (NR) 1:15, 6 pm Space Station 3-D (NR) 12, 2, 8:45 pm


Youth/Education

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, January 22, 2009

C7

Orchard eagles learn about birds

n Tolman presents quilts BOUNTIFUL — Fifth and sixth-grade special education students at the Tolman Elementary learning center tied two quilts before Christmas to donate to The Road Home shelter. The students will be taking a field trip to donate the quilts, towels and blankets donated by the students’ families today. The students will also tour the facility from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. before going to Welfare Square for a tour. Bountiful Police Officer Dave Edwards is providing lunch for the students at McDonald’s and transporting three students in his police car. Contact teacher Don Gibb at 402-1942 for more information.

n W.P. to hold science night

WEST POINT — West Point Elementary is hosting a science night from 6 to 7:30 p.m. tonight. Students will have the opportunity to share their science fair projects and learn about the different experiments the teachers conduct. Contact Rachel Hamblin at 402-2789 for more information.

n Holbrook welcomes jumpers

BOUNTIFUL — A national award-winning jump rope team from Idaho will be at Holbrook Elementary performing at 12:30 p.m. tomorrow. The fun-filled, high-energy assembly is designed to help encourage student physical activity and exercise. Stress-reduction techniques are also included in the fast-paced assembly. Contact Principal Shauna Lund at 402-1450 for more information.

n Knowlton celebrates new year FARMINGTON — Third-grade students at Knowlton Elementary are celebrating the Chinese New Year a few days early. Students will parade down the halls of the school Friday afternoon. The parade will include four dragons, noisemakers and more. The Riverdale Panda Express will bring the students fried rice and teach them to use chopsticks. Contact music specialist Martha Avant at 402-3000 for more information.

www.davisclipper.com

BY SHALYN ROBERTS Clipper Staff Writer NORTH SALT LAKE — The Orchard Elementary eagles got a chance to learn about real birds of prey and how reading books can change their lives. Jason Jones, owner and founder of Eagle Vision in Layton and West Point, got himself through college by giving bird presentations all over Utah. Jones has been working with and raising birds of prey since he was about 15 years old. A hobby he mostly taught himself, Jones got his information, history and instructions from books. “Do you know how I learned all this?” he asked Orchard Elementary students in an assembly. “From books. I used to browse through all the books the library had on hawks and falcons.” Jones is now an attorney in Ogden, but Eagle Visions is where he likes to spend his time. He raises hawks, falcons, eagles and owls. In whatever spare time he has, he still gives presentations to local schools. He brought two falcons, a hawk, an owl and a parrot to show Orchard Elementary students the differences in the birds. Jones talked about the birds’ eye-sight, talons and beak being used for hunting. He also told students where they could be found. He let some birds loose in the gym so students could see how they fly.Then the birds would return to Jones with the use of a lure. “People used to use birds of prey to hunt,” Jones told students. “Now it’s mainly just a hobby for people to raise them.” Eagle Vision has more

*Limited to stock on hand

Photos by Shalyn Roberts

High Notes

ORCHARD ELEMENTARY STUDENTS (top) held their breath before Jones’ falcon took off and circled the room. JASON JONES (right) lets the students see how the wings and tail of a great barn owl look before the owl takes off. than 70 birds and spends upward of $100 a day on food for them. The company has breeding, outreach and education programs to share with students, the community and anyone interested in these birds.

“There just aren’t a lot of people who still do this,” said Jones. “What I learned about (the birds), I learned from books.”

P Energy efficient water P Natural gas fireheaters, furnaces, places, humidifiers & air conditioners, air cleaners. boilers, and in-floor P Earthquake shut off heat. valves (gas line), plumbing, heating, P Bathroom remodels, and air conditioning garage heaters. service.

• Service All Makes & Models • 24 Hour Emergency Service

133 N. Main Street Bountiful

(801) 298-4777

www.murphysguitars.com

801-295-7989

17213


C8

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Davis County Clipper

‘Tweak’ PSC rules, RMP asks BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper News Editor LAYTON — Rocky Mountain Power officials are going to ask legislators to “tweak the rules” under which the Public Service Commission operates. That’s in the hope that rate increases will better reflect expenses the utility is making to upgrade lines and other services, says Steve Rush, RMP’s community manager. “We are spending billions of dollars on new construction that drives rates, but there’s not enough money (to pay for it) when a 2 1/2 percent rate hike” over the past two years is all that’s been approved. He said the “real number” to pay for those costs would be at least a rate hike double that amount. “We’re allowed (by law) a 10 1/2 percent profit or rate of

return,” Rush said. “This is a shortfall. We can’t borrow” to make up the difference, he said. “All we’re trying to do is receive a reasonable rate of return,” he said, citing far more favorable rate situations (for the company) in Idaho and Wyoming. Of the 8.6 percent hike being sought currently, RMP public relations director Dave Eskelsen said, “the company seldom gets everything we ask for.” The firm has tried to economize, streamline where possible, Eskelsen said. Although power demands and expenditures have been dramatic since 1986, when he came to work for what is now RMP, employee numbers have shrunk.There were 9,000-plus employees with Utah Power alone, then, and now the sixstate utility has less than 6,500

employees. “We believe it is a fair increase for the level of investment we’re making now, particularly with wind power and power generation investments of other kinds we’ve made,” he said. “We’re just after a rate level that will satisfy the cost of providing service and enable the company to earn its authorized rate of return,” Eskelsen said. The rate case is currently in “discovery” currently, with hearings to be scheduled in March. The case should be resolved, a decision made, in May, he said. The approved rate hike would likely take effect almost immediately, because the statutory limit will have been reached for a ruling, if it’s in May, Eskelsen said. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

Tax preparation help available DAVIS COUNTY — If it’s January it must be the start of income tax season. There is help – more of it this year – for low and moderate-income taxpayers. The Volunteer Income Tax Program provides free preparation service at several sites across the county. Terri Boam of Barnes Banking Company and Elizabeth Robins, with the Uniting Neighbor program, are coordinating this year’s effort. Income limits apply. For more information,visit the Web at www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=107626,00.html. Sites in the county, with times and days include: • Bountiful Community Church, 150 N. 400 E., Gathering Room East, Tuesdays, Feb. 3 and Feb. 24 and March 31, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. • North Salt Lake City Hall, 20 S. U.S. Highway 89, Wednesdays, Feb. 11, Feb. 25, March 18, March 25 and April 8, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. • Fruit Heights City Hall, 910 S. Mountain Road, Wednesdays, Feb. 11 and March

11, 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. • Family Enrichment Center, 320 S. 500 E., Kaysville, Thursdays, Feb. 5April 9, 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. •Francis Peak View Apartments, 600 W. Mutton Hollow Road, Community Center, Kaysville, Monday, Feb. 23, 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Monday, April 6, noon to 3:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, Feb. 3, Feb. 17, March 17 and March 31, noon to 3:30 p.m.;Wednesdays, Feb. 11 and March 4, 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. • Clearfield Municipal Center, 55 S. State Street, Applications Room, Wednesdays, Feb. 4-March 8, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. • Northridge High School, 2430 N. Hill Field Road, Room 212, Layton, Wednesdays, Feb. 4-April 15, closed April 8, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays, Feb. 5-April 9, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. • Pioneer Adult Rehabilitation Center, 485 PARC Circle (about 500 S. Main Street), Clearfield, Tuesdays, Feb. 2Feb. 24, March 10, March 24,

April 7 and April 14, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Thursdays, Feb. 526, March 5, March 19,April 2 and April 9, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays, Feb. 7, Feb. 21 and April 11, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Wasatch Community Learning Center, 270 E. Center Street (portables), Clearfield, Thursdays, Feb. 19 and Feb. 26, March 5, 19 and April 2, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Tuesday, April 14, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

1-866-558-0308

Kaysville getting federal funds JENNIFER BECKSTRAND Clipper Correspondent KAYSVILLE— Since $147,000 in federal funds will soon be available to Kaysville City for the future Heritage Park, the city council has approved another design for the park that utilizes the federal money but puts other park improvements on hold until other funds are available. Earlier this year, the ambitious plans for Heritage Park had to be delayed when significantly lower revenue from new single family home impact fees created a budget shortfall. The city’s money budgeted for the park was reallocated to other more pressing needs. Although the two acre park with all of its unique features will not be completed for quite some time, council member Lynn Galbraith says the city’s plan for use of the

federal funds “is really a great step forward.” The money will enable the city to make several necessary infrastructure-type improvements such as installation of a sprinkler system, storm drain piping, walkway lighting, grass seed, and the purchase of 17 trees. Heritage Park will be developed on the old Clover Club property at the southwest corner of Fairfield Road and Crestwood Road. It has been envisioned as a place to include features besides what is available in most parks. That includes reflecting the historic nature of the area, which had an old mill at one time, for example. Public input was sought to provide design ideas for the downtown area park. Although delayed, the city is still committed to the project, city officials said. “We want Disneyland, and we’re getting grass seed,” said Mayor Neka Roundy.

Police officer honored WEST BOUNTIFUL — West Bountiful officer Trent Wass was all smiles Tuesday afternoon. That’s because he was honored as West Bountiful’s “officer of the year” by Police Chief Randy Lloyd. The initial announcement was made during West Bountiful city council’s Jan. 6 meeting; however, he was formerly honored Tuesday. “He’s been a great officer for the city,” said Lloyd. “It was difficult to make a decision because we had so many police officers with good stats

in the city, but he is as deserving as any of the other officers we have.” According to Lloyd, he was the officer who apprehended the Bountiful bank robber just weeks ago. He has also been able to solve a few cases of his own, which stood out as part of the final decision for Lloyd. “We’re really proud to have him,” said Lloyd. “We’re proud of all the officers we have here. They do a great job in keeping this city safe.” sgillet@davisclipper.com

AVAILABLE AT THIS STORE LOCATION ONLY

CLINTON HOMETOWN STORE Clinton Pines Shopping Center 1803 W. 1800 N., G-3 Monday thru Saturday 9 am to 9 pm • Sunday 10 am to 5 pm 17218


Clipper Classiads

Davis County Clipper

Thursday, January 22, 2009

D1

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

Do You Have The World’s Cutest Baby?

CNA CLASSES Become a certified nurse assistant in just 6 weeks! Classes held Tues & Thurs from 6:30 pm- 10 pm & Sat 8 am - noon. Call for future class dates. All classes are held at Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful. For more information, or to register, call Janice at the NURSING EDUCATION CENTER

P/T RECEPTIONIST needed for busy physical therapy office. M-F 10am-2pm. Fax resume to 295-3599 or call 295-3553

Part Time Accounts Payable/Receivable Clerk Part Time Accounts Payable/Receivable Clerk needed for design company. 20-25 hrs/week. Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable and other general accounting duties. Need to be proficient in Microsoft Office (Excel/Word etc) Interpersonal skills and demonstrated skill of meeting deadlines a plus. MAS 200 Software experience a plus but not required. Competitive wage. Send resume to debbiejohnson@durhamenterpr- ises.com or fax to 801.908.8120 call 801.908.8111 x208.

UTAH’S Leading

CARRIAGE FOR HIRE Horse drawn carriage drivers needed. 21 or older w/valid Ut drivers license. Call Rob Mon & Thurs from9-5 or Fri 1-5. 3638687

801-274-3377 17372

Bridal Consultant WANTED! Energetic AND FUN Consultants who enjoy working with women are needed for our Bridal and Social Occasion Store located in Davis County. Responsibilities include selling of Bridal gowns, Bridesmaid dresses , MOB gowns and Prom/dance dresses. You will also display and arrange clothing for selling purposes, assist in stocking, steaming and the arranging of merchandise. Must have computer experience and be able to learn computer programs to ring up sales and receive merchandise. Must have one-year retail experience and verifiable references pertaining to your retail experience. You must be able to work Saturdays as well as week days. Store hours are weekdays 10-6pm and Saturday 10-5pm. You will be required to arrive by 9am and will leave at approximately 1 hour after closing. Must be in extremely good health and able to lift 30lbs and be on your feet all day. Must LOVE being with people and have excellent selling skills. A trial period of one month will be required at minimum wage. Then the salary after trial period will be based on your experience, sales history and contribution to the shop. We are looking for applicants who need to work between 20-35 hours per week. We also are looking for individuals who are interested in a long term relationship with our company. Please do not apply if you do not plan on working with us for at least 2 years or more. We are closed on most major holidays and Sundays. Benefits apply to full-time positions only. Email cover letter and resume to jisan4kodomo@mstar2.net CAREGIVER SUPPORT Network Home Health & Hospice is seeking dependable home health aides. Flexible schedule. Good pay and benefits. Call 547-0060 or fax resume to 547-0301 COMFORT KEEPERS IS Looking for caring and dependable caregivers to assist seniors in their homes with general homemaking and personal care in Davis and Weber counties. Live in and hourly shifts available. Call Mon-Fri after 9 am 801629-4663 or 800-593-6808. CNA’s SOUTH DAVIS Community Hospital is seeking P/T and F/T day shift Certified Nursing Assistants. We offer extremely competitive pay and flexible scheduling including 4 and 8 hour shifts. Apply online at www,sdch.com EOE

TEACHERS NEEDED Bryden Academy is looking for a full-time Infant Teacher. • Willing to train Call Denise at 397-0937

17394

or visit www.cnacareers.com

CNA’S HOME HEALTH and HOSPICE South Davis Community Hospital’s Home Health and Hospice department is seeking a P/T CNA. Apply online at www,sdch.com EOE MEDICAL SECRETARY for busy Orthopedic office in Bountiful. Fax resume to 2954930. COOK F/T Relief Some Mornings, Some Afternoons, Cooking experience preferred, Company Benefits avail. Apply in person Life Care of Bountiful 460 W. 2600 S.

UTAH’S #1 Booking Agency is expanding our children’s division. Auditions are being held NOW! Call

801-274-3377. 17372

Dental Assisting Assist to Assisting Succeed Dental School 11 week Saturday course. call 292-1990 EXPERIENCED DOG BATHER, Energetic, long term, Training involved, Only Serious applicants call The Dog Room, Cntvl Megan 294-7109 KEY POSITION in billing and Eligibility, Local Dental Insurance Co. Has Position for an individual with human resource and customer care experience.Position requires dedication, accuracy and knowledge of . Salary and Benefits are commenserate with skills and experience. Please submit your resume to pete@usdentistdirect.com 801-292-0100

GOOD P/T Positions Immediate Openings in Davis County For Routes Delivering Deseret News and Tribune Papers. Positions Fill Quickly. Earn Up to $800 Monthly Call 204-6770 ext. 3501.

Want to be in Movies, Commercials & Print Ads?

ROBINTINO’S Restaurant Bussers, Cashiers, Line Cooks Lunch/Eves. Evenings pizza cooks and dinner cooks. Apply in person . See Joy or Ryan. P/T DATA entry position in busy physical therapy clinic. Must be very organized and have 10key skills. M-F 11am3pm. Please fax resume to 2953599 or call 295-3553

The Best Job Ever!!! Wholesale company of electronic goods seeking eager eBay Power Sellers. Must be experienced on eBay with at least 2 years selling power and must have minimum 60 feedback points. Great pay/ Great hours. APPLY NOW!

1-800-680-9084 EXT 104

or email resumes2k9.aed@gmail.com Please, serious inquiries only! 17385

www.davisclipper.com

Davis County Sales Executive Opportunity! Are you driven by meeting and exceeding goals? Do you want to work with local businesses to maximize their 2009 Revenue? Join us and connect businesses with the Davis Clipper’s online readership! B2B and/or Outside Sales experience a plus!

Email resume to jennifer.jackenthal@matchbin.com or call 801-797-8322 with any and all questions.

Booking Agency is looking for individuals for Sundance Film Festival.

Call 801-274-3377. 17372

************************** *********** CLIPPER ROUTES AVAIL ABLE! CARRIERS NEED ED!!! (AGES 10-16) ************************** *********** BOUNTIFUL ROUTE CB03 MILLBROOK WAY & NORTH/ WOODMOOR DRIVE STARTS AT $40.00/MO **PLUS RAISES AND TIPS** ************************** ************************** ******************** CALL JORGINA 916-4109 ************************** *********

All looks / all ages needed! 17372

Call

589-2597

17355

We need you for Catalogs!

EASY OUT Going Phone Work AM/PAm Sifts avail. Starts $8$10 hour, plus bonus. For interview call 298-9507

Audition today! Call 801-274-3377

CLASSIADS 295-2251

ASSISTING PEOPLE w/mild disabilities in their homes, employment, and communities. Positions available in Salt Lake & Davis Counties. Training provided. HR 801-8254535, fax to 801-825-8281, or e-mail gracet@phoenixservices.org DENTAL LAB driver M-F, must be 21 or older, good driving record. No smoking environment. Call 292-7522 STYLIST WANTED Full time and Part time positions available. Call 292-8400 StylezSalonAndDaySpa.com TALENT NEEDED!Actors, models, extras. $10 to $95/hrly, No experience needed, 801438-0067 SEEKING SELF MOTIVATED individuals For F/T position, Must Type 65 wpm, Hiring for day shifts, email resumes to hr@creditrights.org. Please specify that you are applying for Data Entry Position.


Clipper Classiads

WORK FROM HOME and Love it. Investor seeking Reps, 1K-5K per month. 801-721-0639

120 SERVICES MICHELLE’S FLOORING Affordable quotes!!!! Seams comming apart? We will fix it. Dirty Stairs? We will replace them. Dangerous loose carpet? We will stretch it. 801-7979581 or 801-232-9098 JORDAN BATSELL Cleaning Service, floor maint., office cleaning general janitorial services. Excellent service, reasonable rates, experienced, references. Call for free estimate 294-0118. ARE ALL THOSE SMALL JOBS BECOMING DIFFICULT TO KEEP UP WITH? Your Girl Friday is ready to vacuum, do dishes, laundry, ironing, general cleaning, organizing, what ever you need done. Call Angela at 801-831-2978 Highly Experienced Piano Teacher Available Piano Performance degree from the University of Utah. Teacher of all levels and ages from beginning to highly advanced. Available to travel to your home. Offering the very best training possible. Kelsie 801-808-2134 Payroll/Bookkeeping Specialized payroll and bookkeeping services. Contact Rachel at 444-2634 HOME REMODELING/REPAIR Finish Basements, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Painting, Drywall/Patching, Finish Carpentry, Small Jobs OK, Licensed/Insured. Call Kevin 801-541-6195 HANDY ANDY’S Landscaping and Hauling. We do it all. Clean and Haul. Free estimates. Call 296-1396 IN-HOME DAY CARE A Happy Place. Over 20yrs experiences, indoor and outdoor playground, 6 play areas in our home. We offer Dance lessons, Music and Preschool. 1 Full and 1 PT openings for girls ages 2kindergarten. West Bntfl Call Kari 295-2853 GARAGE DOORS & Openers Repairs on all makes & models, Broken springs, free est on new doors. Mountain West Doors 451-0534, 294-4636. HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE Are you looking for someone to clean your home? Let us do it for you! We do excellent work. Sr. Citizen dis count. 295-8095 or 7557706 BASEMENT FINISHES, concrete tear out & replacement, RV pads, decks, patios, remodeling. quality work guaranteed. RJ 4512641 SPLIT FIREWOOD $140-$180 per cord. Delivery or pick-up available, Call 801-295-8907

HANDY MAN Services, New, remodel, framing, dry wall, electrical, plumbing, concrete, title, paint etc. 447-3437, or 3476518 CLEANING LADY Consistently Dependable. thorough, Licensed. Bonded. Insured. Call Style Cleaning Services. 2957895 Basement Finishing From $12.00 a Ft. Experianced Contractor, Licensed, Insured 628-0207 HOUSEHOLD REPAIRS Repair most anything. Electrical, will help you finish bath. Bedrooms, paint, hang light fixtures, sheet rock, very professional. Fair prices 801-631-3822 CEILINGS/PAINTING, SPRAY texture removal, custom textures, water damage repair, sheetrock, finishing, interior/exterior painting. 25yrs exp. 726-0192 **BEST WEST** Contractor, basement finishing, framing, drywall hang and finish, paint, Electrical, tile, roofing, hauling & demolition. Licensed & Insured 558-2015 STEPHEN WRAY PAINTING Services. Small or Lrg Jobs. Licensed and Insured. In business over 30 yrs ,295-2514 REMODELING all types Large, Small, Kitchens, Basements, Baths, Cement wk, New Homes, Licenced & Insured 347-2921 MR G. Handyman tiles, Roofing, Carpeting, painting, Elect, All repairs, clean houses, Licensed. Call free estimate 503-1381 FURNITURE RE-FINISH ING Change appearance or restore to original. Newby Custom Finish 295-2946 *PROFESSIONAL* PAINTER 25 yrs. exp. Free Estimates. Call Scott Wray 699-1942.

120 SERVICES

220 MISCELLANEOUS

330 AUTOS FOR SALE

*WELDING ENGLISH MIKE’S* Decor/Railings, Cust. front/ back decks/stairs/landings /gates & garden arches 801-633-7947

WANTED LUMBER ETC. used lumber 2x4’s, 2x6’s doors, toilet, shhe rock. Will remove building. Call 631-3822

2000 MAROON OLDSMOBILE ALERO AUTOMATIC, 4 DOOR, LEATHER INTERIOR, POWER DOORS, POWER WINDOWS, CD & CASSETTE STEREO $2500.00 FRONT WHEEL DRIVE. CALL MITCHELL @ 801808-5583 WILLING TO NEGOTIATE PRICE.

UPGRADE YOUR SPACE 949-3411 Kitchen Bath Basement Remodel. Inside or out. Make the details count. Lic/Insured. Blosch Building. ACCOUNTING AND PAY ROLL help for small businesses. 10 years experience. Call today! 628-7811 TREE’S TRIMMING & Pruning Hauling, Retaining Wall, Cement Drive Way. Call 801-259-0781 CLUTTER CONTROL! I can clean and organize ANY area! I also do junk removal. Jared 801-652-3028 DRYER VENT CLEANING Prevents fires and overheating. $29.00 limited time offer. Quality service since 1983. Call 5108181 CONCEALED FIREARMS PERMIT training $50. Call Stephen 801-647-2884 Joint and ladies class available. GROCERY DELIVERY affordable rates. 801-232-0512 or info@fsdutah.com DRYWALL HANG & tape New house or remodeling or basement 40 yrs experience Licensed/ Insured Call Phill 8350414.

121 CLEANING SERVICES Housecleaning Services Gral.,deep cleaning, laundry, etc, no job to big or small. Honest, hardworking, reliable, 8 yrs experience, references. rate start$50. Call Lucy 801-3360980/801-776-9035

125 SNOW REMOVAL “BOUNTIFUL AREA SNOW REMOVAL” Commercial and Residence-Reasonable Prices also Hauling and Landscape Maintenance, Sprinklers. Call Karl at 604-9795

130 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to save and make money. Great opportunity, work either part or full time. Call 801-618-8297 for details and to schedule an appointment. Real Estate Investor Expanding Business-Seeking 3 Trainable- Earn 5-10K per month while you Learn! Call: Steve (801)643-3172

BLACK AND DECKER 10INCH TABLE SAW Little use 1 yr old $75.00 801-403-2193

235 COMPUTERS COMPUTER PROBLEMS? Got a virus, pop ups, need an upgrade or a new custom built machine? I know computers inside out. Call Erich at 801688-4983 $40/hr

***RENT 2 OWN*** Cars, Trucks, Vans $500 deposit, drive today no credit required. View inventory @ www.rent2ownauto.com K & J Auto (801) 298-5820

240 FOR SALE IGNITE STATIONARY BIKE $400 LESS THAN 1 YR OLD. HOME GYM $125. MASSAGING FOOTSTOOL $50 OR OBO CALL TERRY 801-336-7232 MAPLE SLIDING Glass Door Curio (dark finish) 4 adjustable glass shelves, ball foot engraved detailing exterior lighting 81x40x15. Antique bronze finish mirror w/beveled edge holly leaf design frame 42x30 Call 294-4641 SNOW BLOWER 20” Ariens self propelled electric start excellent condition $200. Call 397-3943 48X96 SOLID Oak table with 6 padded solid Oak Chairs on casters . Asking $500.00 Call 292-4830 FIRE WOOD, SPLIT, DELEVERED and STACKED 512-3114 2005 MENGDELI Chopper Bike, Hardly used, 2 cycle, new battery, new tune up, $400 OBO, 544-5077

270 WANT TO BUY

2004 Ford Focus Excellent condition,34mpg,77,000 miles,$6600 801-292-3558

www.KandJauto.com

RENT TO OWN Cars • Trucks • Vans

$500 Deposit, NO CREDIT Drive Today! REQUIRED!

801-298-5820 310 S. Main, Bountiful K & J Auto

1988 LINCOLN TOWNCAR Runs good, low mileage, specialty rims, 2 sets of near new tires, 4 door, Good interior, 5445077

400 TRUCKS FOR SALE ‘04 FORD F-150 Heritage P/U Super Cab XLT short bed, 2wd, V8, Auto Trans, Loaded, matching shell, Towing Pkg. Only 53,000/mls. Must sell this week, No Reasonable Offer Refused. 698-4959 or 2984260.

520 INSTRUCTION/ TUTORING

BOOKS WANTED! I pay cash for old LDS & other books. Also old photos & historical memorabilia Call 800823-9124.

SELF ESTEEM Workshops available in your area. Call 801755-7706 for workshop description and details.

290 HOME FURNISHINGS

MOTIVATIONAL CLASSES available in your area. Call 801755-7706 for class description and details.

OUR WINTER CLEARANCE SALE IS A GREAT TIME TO SAVE!

SUNRISE MONTESSORI Preschool Kindergarten & Elementary Bountiful 295-9802, Layton546-4343 http://web.mac.com/sunrise school.

168 Contemporary $ 2 pc Sofa & Love 599 Plasma TV Stand $ 239 with Storage Light Dining $ 5 pc Set Ashley 299 5 Drawer Chest $ All Wood & Assembled

KINDERMUSIK Early Childhood Music and Movement classes. Age-appropriate programs from newborn to age 7, including Baby Sign Language. Maestro Program with 14 yrs exp now Registering. Limited openings Call Anne: 295-2458 or visit: kidsandkeys.kindermusik.net GUITAR LESSONS! All levels, learn your favorite songs. Excellent instructor. Call 230-1553

199 530 CHILD CARE Love Seat Only $299 $ INFANT CARE Area 5 Foot Rugs 149 SPOTS OPEN! 6 Foot Oak Book $ 99 Bryden Academy currently has Case infant care spots available. $ Don’t miss out! Ashley Recliner 289 Call Denise today All New Merchandise $ 35 (801) 397-0937 Ashley Lamps 5 Foot Crazy Sac

$

Assembled

17395

105 JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Davis County Clipper

135 PERSONAL Widowed? Local author seeking input and suggestions for forthcoming book on healing from grief. Email author@roslynreynolds.com to participate.

140 HEALTH NUTRITION Elderly Day Care and Assisted Living Country Oaks Assisted Living on Medical Drive. Adult day Care $35/day 8am-6pm and residents $2,200/month. 801-529-5712 or 294-6088 RN/LPN Private Duty Nursing Maxim Healthcare is looking for RN/LPN’s for Private Duty Nursing in the Davis County Area. Interested applicants please contact Jacob Barham @ (801)685-7070

210 PETS 10 YEAR OLD MALE MINI TURE SCHNAUZER, Salt & Pepper, Loves Kids and People in general, House broken, does lots of tricks, great lap dog, doesn’t shed. FREE to a really good loving home. Call 419-2313 Lab puppies for sale Only two left! One black female and one yellow male. Eight weeks old, first shots and dew claws removed. Asking $200 Contact Tammy at 510-3337.

AFFORDABLE LIVING Day Care. Licensed with lots of fun activities and dance. Meals and snacks included. Call 936-1648

MATTRESS & FURNITURE

40 W. 500 S., Bountiful across from Dee’s locally owned & operated

COUCH WITH love seat, rocking chair, end table, good condition $250 for all. 801-209-9572

300 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS GUITAR LESSONS, Beginner to advanced. All ages, and types of music. Experienced teacher. Call 419-1794

*JAMIE TURNER DAY CARE* Hi My name is Jamie Turner I live in Farmington. Child care has been part of my family for many years. I soon realize I wanted to do the same. The ages that I provide for are 0-5 years, slots available but do vary. The rate I charge is $22.00 per day for every age. Any further questions please call 801451-2612

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE

320 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 98 HONDA FOREMAN 450 ES 4 Wheeler, Green, Excellent Condition, $3,200. 292-3816 or 898-8031

ST. GEORGE luxury home 1/5th share w/pool, view + extra lot. Next to Sunbrook. Call Vicor 292-2882- $125K.

• AC/GAS FURNACE INSTALLATION • ELECTRICAL REPAIRS, REMODELS, NEW CONSTRUCTION Most Major Brands of Energy Efficient Furnaces Available

FREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured

CALL ALAN 688-7118

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE FABULOUS SAN DEIGO beach Condo on the sand. 2bd, 2bth, 2 balconies over looking the beach 3 TV’s, DVD’s VCR’s, full kitchen. Sea World and Zoo 15 mins. 801-859-8473 or 888203-9484. sdoceans.com SOUTH GATE GOLF COURSE in St George Time Share Avail, 1/30-2/6, 2 brdms, 2 baths ,Call 801-295-1990

550 CONDO FOR RENT ATTRACTIVE 3 Bdrm 2.5 ba, W/D hkups, Tile & carpet,1 garage, includes appliances. Patio, No smoking/pets $895/mo + deposit. Call 292-2160 Great Centerville Condo 2 BD/BR, 2 car garage 1700 sq ft condo. New SS appliances, carpet and paint. Ready to move in at $1,000 per month. Deposit required. Call 801-499-7363 for more information. CENTERVILLE 2 Bdrm, 1.5 bth, Townhse, Amenities, W/D incld, $750/mo, No Pet/smoking, 88 West 50 So. M-6 Cedar Springs Condos. Davidson Realty 801-466-5078 Centerville townhouse 2 BR 1 1/2 bath townhouse in Cedar Springs, covered parking, pool. $750 rent, $400 deposit. Carol 856.0740 2 BDRM 2 BATH CONDO, Covered parking, close to U of U, Avail. Feb. 1st, $725/mo. 801-292-5927 WONDERFUL BOUNTIFUL High Pointe Condo, 4 bdrm, 3 bath, deck off Master, 2 car garage. Over 2400sqft. $1350/mo. 801-910-8221 SO. FARMINGTON, 2 BDRM, 2 BTH, 2 car gar, fully remodeled, Gas frpl, Jetted tub, wk in Closet. No smoke/pets $1075/mo $650 dep. 540-2924

570 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

on Main Street • Spectacular Mountain Views • Individually Controlled HVAC • Interior Heated Pool • Whirlpool Spa • Large Activities Room with a Big Screen T.V. and Kitchen • Fitness Center • Library • Picnic and BBQ Area • Patio or Balcony with Every Unit • Storage Units Available • Controlled Entry Card Access • Elevator Access to All Floors • Washer/Dryer Hookups • Reserved Covered Parking • Modern Appliances • Convenient Laundry Rooms • Qualified Pets Permitted • Luxurious Interior Appointments • All Units Handicap Adaptable • State-of-the-Art Telecommunications • Spacious Sundeck/Patio • Professional On-Site Management

1525 N. Main Street Bountiful Utah, 84010 (801) 298-9500 www.senioroutlook.com/ villageonmain www.villageonmainstreet.com

18798

Thursday, January 22, 2009

17409

D2

One bedroom apartment $525.00, nice neighborhood, Woods Cross. No pets, no smoking, covered parking, coin operated laundry, Steve 2592678, 295-9111. **MUST SEE TO BELIEVE! Spacious, quiet, 2bd W/D hookups, Patio, Covered parking, air, storage. No pets/smoking.Bountiful. 5778754. A GREAT QUIET PLACE Bountiful 2 bed, 1 bath, firepl., A/C, pool. New carpet/tile. $695., $300. dep. 639 S. Main. 298-0687 DELIGHTFUL 1BD apt. in upscale Centerville, nbr’hd. Private entrance, includes utilitlies $625/mo, No smoking/pets Call 298-2222 Avail now. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH,

560 ROOMS FOR RENT

Newer Paint and carpet, $665/mo, $500/dep. 801-259-5505

ROOMS FOR RENT Bntfl 2 rooms $350/mo Farmington 1 room $350/mo Each includes utilities. Own entry. 299-0599

NEWLY REMODELED 2 bdrm, New Carpet, Paint, Furnace, W/D Hookups, YES! TO PETS 167 N. HWY 89 NSL 801-809-7228


Clipper Classiads

570 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

570 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

610 CONDOS FOR SALE

NORTH SALT LAKE – $625/mo Large, luxurious, spacious, clean 2 bedroom. Fireplace. Covered parking. Great, quiet location. Easy access to I-15 and Highway 89. Located between Orchard Dr. and Highway 89. FREE ONSITE LAUNDRY. NO SMOKERS. NO PETS. Hidden Villa – Resident Manager in Apt. #1 at 290 E. Odell Lane (100 North). 801-292-6415 or 801-486-4148.

SUPER NICE Newly remodeled 2bd apt. Davis Co. with w/d hook-ups,. $675/mo, No smoking/pets. Call 860-4850

NSL 2BD, 2.5bth, 1 car garage, fireplace, very nice and clean. $170K. JADA PROPERTIES 801-573-5330

SYRACUSE LARGE 2 Bdrm 1 Bth, W/D, New remodeled No smoking/Pets $545/mo, 801550-1185

750 OFFICE SPACERENT

PERFECTLY PRICED, PERFECTLY PLACED! 1 Bdrm. 1 Ba *$635 2 Bdrm. 1 Ba *$730

LARGE 2 BDRM, 1 BATH Good NSL location. W/D hookups. dishwasher, A/C, Carport. No pets/smoke $630/mo 718-2234 BNTFL 2 BDRM 1 BTH, Quiet, Great Area, Hkhup’s, No Smoker/Pets, $625/mo, $300/dep, 801-295-4781

2 Bdrm. 2 Ba *$770 or $780

575 DUPLEXES FOR RENT

• Pets Welcome (35 lbs.) • Call for availability

CENTERVILLE CONDO Large 3 bdrm, 2 bath, double garage, full kitchen, Laundry hkups, C/A $1085/mo 635-7709, 628-6113

$400 Deposit!

298-2835

Carrington Place 830 N. 500 W. Bountiful

*Prices are subject to change

17278

Quiet NSL apartments w/d hookups, free cable, pool, covered parking, close to downtown, no smoking, no pets (801)298-8764 3 Bdrm Bntfl Apt, cv’rd prkg, w.d hook-ups, berber carpet, ceramnic tile WOW! updated kitchen, On quiet circle, walkway to school, New paint. Nice! 882 W 4100 S. No pets/smoking $825/mo, $400/dep. 801-6719698 NSL LARGE very clean 2bd, 1bth, dishwasher, disposal, hook ups, A/C. No smoking No pets. $525/mo Call 801-859-8475 237 EAST 300 NORTH BNTFL, Apt #1, 1Bdrm, 1 bath, covered parking, rent $495/mo dep $430 + utils. 530-5005 BOUNTIFUL LG 1200 sq.ft., 2bdrm,1.5 bath, Townhouse Apt. New paint, carpet, apps. & fixtures. Quiet, central air, cv’d pkg, patio,w/d, hk’ups, dish washer, satellite/cable hk’ups. No smoking/pets, $895/mo $450/dep 292-1774 APARTMENT FOR RENT IN FARMINGTON, Avail. NOW, Cute 1 bdrm on a half acre lot, plenty of play room. 163 S. 200 E. $475/mo. Call 451-2922 BOUNTIFUL 1bd 280 S 425 W 535/mo, $400/dep. W/D hookups, hardwood floor. No smoking/pets. 801-698-7170 LAYTON Gorgeous 3 bedroom townhome, amazing move in special! King-sized 3 bdrm 1 and 1/2 bath townhome! $345 OFF FIRST MONTHS RENT! Private laundry w/ hook-ups, front and back entry, newer paint, sunny and bright, dishwasher, disposal, swamp cooler, covered parking, extra storage closet inc., on-site playground! $745 PARTLOW RENTS! 801484-4446 FOR RENT: Nice Bountiful 2bdrm, 1-bath, in duplex, Downstairs apartment. $625/mo, $350/dep. plus gas/electric. No pets/smokers. Great location, good conditions. 2233 S. 200 W. Bntfl. Call Rich: 635-6545 HUGE 2 and 3 Bedroom Townhomes 1100sqft & 1600sqft, 1.5 bath Town homes in NSL. 2 carports, lots of storage, w/d hook-ups, dishwasher. No pets, No smoking $770 & $960/mo ***Great Specials*** 6710303. BOUNTIFUL 2bd, 1bth, huge and very clean. W/D, A/C. Covered parking, storage. No Smoking/pets. $675/mo 801898-0098 2BDRM BOUNTIFUL w/d included, dishwasher, tile, slate, travertime, $725/mo No smoke/pets Call 801-440-5887. ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT, $700/mo. W/D Provided, Cable and Internet. Very clean. 292-4558 CLEARFIELD/SYRACUSE: STUDIOS $480 includes TV and all utilities, Antelope Dr. can walk to Freeport. Laundromate & storage: smoking/pets ok. Ugly outside, Nice inside 801860-2409

FARMINGTON EAST side 4bd, 1bth, 2 liv rm., frpl, great neighborhood. No smoke/pets, Credit check. Refs. $775/mo 698-8404

580 HOMES FOR RENT FARMINGTON LARGE 4bd, 2bth, family room, new paint, new carpet, double garage, fenced yard. No pets/smoking. Bonded Realty 359-7979 KAYSVILLE RAMBLER, 3 bdrm, 1 bth, $1095/mo, 462 North 400 East, Miller & Co. 801-566-7922 5BD, 3BTH, loft/study area W/D Hk’up, 2car, convenient to fwy, rural setting, no smkng, $1500 + deposit. Dave or Stuart, Adam Co. 801-546-6000 BOUNTIFUL 4BD, 3bth, 2 family rooms, car port, fenced yard. No pets/smoking. 610 E 650 N. $1095/mo. Avail. Nov 1st. Bonded Realty 801-3597979 LAYTON RAMBLER, 3bdrm, 1.5bath, carport, $1050/mo 702 North Colonial (725 E.) Miller & Co. 801-566-7922 BOUNTIFUL 3BD, 2bth, 2 car garage, A/C No smokers/pets. Call 397-1688 4 bedroom home in Bountiful Large 4 bdrm. 3.5 ba. Big liv and family rooms, office, 2-car garage. $1295 ledprop.com 801-293-1830 WEST BOUNTIFUL Twin Home 3bdrm 1.75ba, No pets/smoking 868 W. 1000 N. Bonded Realty $1150/mo 801359-7979 BRAND NEW Luxury Home, 4bdrm, 2.5bth, 3 car garage, Full bsmt, No Pets/smokers. $2500/mo. Option Lease to buy avail. 292-3816, 898-8031 BOUNTIFUL 4Bdrm, 2bath, 3280 sq.ft. Dble gar, New carpet fencedyrd, walkout bsmnt, No smoke, $1395/mo. 801-7031129 WX TOWNHOME for sale/rent Mt view. 3bd, 3bth, 1920sqft. 100% finished. Blt 2005. W/D, parking for 2cars. $1200/mo or $184,900. No smoking/pets. Call Joshua 801-634-9839

Ideal office space in BOUNTIFUL Remodeled office-ideal location 88 W 500 S. Lrg. backlit sign @ corner of 500 S 100 W. 1,350 sq ft. Addtl. space avail. $1,800 per month full service. Contact Laura @ 450-6517 *CALL NOW FOR 1 MONTH FREE RENT!* View online: http://bountifulofficespace.blogspot.com OFFICE SPACE for lease. Only one left, includes utilities, Main St. in Bountiful, $275/month. Call Brad 792-8894 Great office space in BOUNTIFUL We will beat any comparable deal. East side of 100 W between 400 and 500 S. large & small office space. From 340 sq ft to 1050 sq ft. Up to date look. Some space with possible signage viewable from 500 S. Contact Laura @ 450-6517 *One month of free rent!* VIEW ONLINE: http://bountifulofficespace- .blogspot.com SAVE GAS! Move your office to Bountiful. Space located high traffic on 5th South #1 Single Office - 150sqft #2 6500sqft by I-15 @ 700 West #3 505 S 100 W BT.Great for Attorney, Engineers, Real Estate Some w/shared secretarial 292-2882 or 244-2400

810 COMMERICAL PROPERTY BOUNTIFUL HIGH VISI BILITY Commercial-Office warehouse. Great location. 500 S. 1100 W. 3700sqft. 898-0098

Thursday, January 22, 2009

MIKE COTTLE 808-1735

mike@comehomeutah.com 17413

W. BNTFL HORSE PROPERTY JUST LISTED FOR $299,900! This home offers 6 Beds and 3 Baths and is in mint condition. The home has been remodeled and has two kitchens! MLS# 856126.

BOUNTIFUL STARTER LISTED FOR $204,900

LAYTON EAST BENCH TRI-MULTI LEVEL HOME Priced Reduced to only $179,900. Built in1985 and in great condition. Offers 3 beds and 1.75 baths, 2 car gar, large .25 acre fenced yard. Seller has taken very good care of this home and offers a 1 yr home warranty to the future buyer. MLS # 848241.

SUMMIT COUNTY CABIN $649,900 This cabin sits on 3.37 acres in the middle of pines and has an add’l 3.32 acre lot attached to build a 2nd cabin or keep for a large 6.69 acres. Located 30 mins south of Evanston in the Uinta Lands. Great access to snowmobiling and ATV trails. Built in 2000, offers jetted tub and is very secluded. Come enjoy the wildlife! MLS# 836047.

8 two bed units and 1 three bedr unit. Prop. is in excellent condition. Remodeled, newer double pane windows, furnaces & a/c’s, kitchens & baths with plumbing, cabinets and tile floor coverings. MLS #833250.

Free Information Utah Select Realty Inc.

Tony Reece 1-888-203-5035

17293

ext 510

************************************* BOUNTIFUL CLOSE to the TEMPLE. 4bd, 2.5 bth, wood floors, fireplace, W/D included, large yard. $1395/mo. No smoking. 801-390-7527

www.JudyAllen.com One Stop Shopping

SYRACUSE

CENTERVILLE

ROY 3BD, 2bth, 1700sqft new carpet throughout home in culde-sac, fenced yard. Great deal. A/C, Sprnk. sys., & recent updates $149,900 801-5488435

First Time Home Buyers Get $7500.00

For Virtual Tours and MORE...

WX RAMBLER REDUCED TO $239,900

820 HOME FOR SALE

EAST LAYTON, GEOR GOUS Home on cul-desac, 4-3, 2200 sqft. 2 full rock fireplaces, huge flat .38 arce lot Priced $209,900. 801-548-8435

597-5656

• 3 Car Garage • 2957 S. 1320 W. • 6 Bedrooms, 3 Bath • 2005, Rambler • 3408 Sq Ft • Cul-De-Sac www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

BOUNTIFUL 9 PLEX PRICE REDUCED TO $824,900

CLINTON 4 BED, 2 BATH, Beautiful family room. Large garage, fenced yard, new carpet, paint and bathrooms, Updated kitchen $149,900 801548-8435

Judy Allen

This 3 Bed, 1 Bath home has been completely remodeled. The seller is also selling an additional .66 acre bldg lot for $259,900. If a buyer wants both, seller will negotiate a lower price for the 2 props. MLS # 831841 & 831858.

Price Reduced! Built in 2000 this home is in MINT condition 10+! 3 beds, 2 full baths. New carpet & hardwood floor. Over 2600 sq ft. Fenced & full landscaped yard. MLS # 833128.

LAYTON CHARMER Price Reduced to $199,900! 4 beds and 3 baths. Seller has recently remodeled kitchen with granite cntrtops and new hardwd floor. This home has full fenced yard and RV parking with 2 car gar. Over 2100 sq ft. MLS# 849946 Seller is offering to credit buyer $2,000 for new carpet.

GREAT STARTER HOME IN SLC $32,000 UNDER APPRAISAL This is not a misprint! Listed for only $159,900. This home is in good condition and offers 4 beds and 1.5 baths, 2 car gar and 2 car carport. Sits on large lot of .41 acres. Located at 1439 S. 1000 W. Seller offers a 1 year home warranty and is including washer, dryer, microwave, refrigerator in the sale! MLS # 844589

BOUNTIFUL CONDO PRICE REDUCED! $144,900 This condo has 2 beds and 1.75 baths. New granite countertops and new bathroom fixtures, new floor coverings and is in excellent condition. Located in a no smoking & no pets complex. Ground level unit. Has swimming pool and club house and was built in 1984. HOA fee is $149. MLS # 854046

SMOOT FARMS • Pool, Slide, Diving Board • Backs Park & Tennis Court • 6 Car Garage • .29 Acre • 40 West 1500 N.

$399,000

www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

BOUNTIFUL • Custom Rambler • 5080 Sq Ft • 6 Bedroom • .41 Acre Lot • 4-5 Car Garage • 1343 E. 600 N. www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

CENTERVILLE MOUNTAIN RETREAT 712 N. Hillside Dr. (700 E.) • Unique, Views, Loft • 4 Bedrooms, Vaulted • .23 Acre Lot • Backs Forest Service

$334,900 www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

CENTERVILLE • 3 Car Garage • Rambler • 1422 N. Suncrest Cir • 5 Bed, 4 Baths • Cul-De-Sac .34 Acre Lot www.JudyAllen.com Virtual Tour

For more information visit us online at

www.JudyAllen.com

JUDY ALLEN

NEW PRICE!

It’s a great time to buy! Fabulous rates ... Wonderful inventory! NEW PRICE!

RARELY AVAILABLE DANBURY CONDO $279,000 Total remodel, finished up & down. Complete main floor living w/ no steps. Quiet end unit.

BOUNTIFUL 4BD, 1bth home 1000sqft. large fenced yard, auto sprinklers, A/C no pets/smoking $850/mo. 384 W 325 S Call 801-298-7018.

D3

17411

Davis County Clipper

STEP BACK IN TIME $259,900 Charm and character abound in this historic Bountiful home. 4 beds, 2 full baths, lots of updating.

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! NOW $289,900

Great value - east Bountiful. Beauty on gorgeous .35 acre cul-de-sac lot. Perfect inside & out!

SASSY! and CLASSY! $329,900

BARGAIN HUNTERS DELIGHT! $269,000 Bountiful east side rambler, 3200 sq ft. Lots of updating, gorgeous yard w/ large basketball court. Ready for you to move in!

Freshly decorated and well kept! 4 beds, 3 baths, main floor family room and laundry, formal dining, family room down w/ wet bar. Fully fenced manicured yard.

BOUNTIFUL UPSTAIR APT. For rent, 3 bdrm 2 bth, No/smokers/Pets, $1100/mo 898-4993 or 299-0177 CENTERVILLE 3BD 2bth, family rm, W/D hk’ups, lar yard. No smoker/pets. Avail Feb 1. 1095/mo, $650 Deposit. Call Becky 801-856-8566

Louise Gunther Andy Gunther 518-7000 541-6820 Visit our web site at www.searchforutahhomes.com 17412

Price Reduced to $57,500

801 North 500 West, Suite 100 Bountiful, Utah

(801) 295-2700

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• FHA Manufactured Home • Spacious 1600 Sq. Ft. • 3 Bedrooms • 2 Tiled Bathrooms • Central Air Conditioning

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(801) 856-1701

Bountiful - Spacious 4 Bedroom 3 Bath home w/ complete kitchen remodel. Enjoy stainless steel appliances, new countertops, cabinets & hardwood floor. Detached 4 car heated garage features 9 ft doors & tile floors. $300,000

Dan Nix (801) 898-4646


D4

9000

Thursday, January 22, 2009

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the North main entrance of the Courts Building, Davis Justice Center, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah, on February 3, 2009, at 12:00 p.m. of said day for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed dated October 29, 2003, executed by GARY G. HOWELL and SHARON D. HOWELL, Husband and Wife, as joint tenants, as Trustor(s), wherein JAX H. PETTEY, Attorney at Law, is the Successor Trustee, ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, is the Beneficiary, and which covers the following described real property situated in Davis County, State of Utah, more particularly described as: Lot 29, AMENDED PLAT OF PART OF BUENA VISTA SUBDIVISION, Sunset City, Davis County, Utah, according to the official plat thereof, on file and of record in the office of the Davis County Recorder. Serial No. 13-099-0029 The property address is purported to be 1458 North 300 West, Sunset, Utah. The undersigned disclaims any liability for errors in the address. Said Trust Deed was recorded November 4, 2003, as Entry No. 1929507 in Book 3410 at Page 1475 of Official Records. Notice of Default was dated October 3, 2007 and recorded October 3, 2007 as Entry No. 2310880, in Book 4380, at Page 515 of Official Records. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-W2 , and the record owner(s) of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are GARY G. HOWELL and SHARON D. HOWELL. The Sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances. Successful bidder must tender a cashier’s check for $5,000.00 to the trustee at the sale and a cashier’s check or wire transfer for the balance of the purchase price within 24 hours after the sale. Cash is not acceptable. This Trustee’s Sale is subject to payoff, reinstatement, bankruptcy filing, incorrect bidding instructions, or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Should any of these conditions exist, this sale shall be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the trustee and the beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for interest or any other damages. DATED this 30th day of December, 2008.

JAX H. PETTEY, Successor Trustee

881 West Baxter Drive, South Jordan, UT 84095 Office hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Telephone: (801) 748-0646 www.petteylegal.com P&A File No.: L27113 File Name: Howell THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. C-4353 1/8-22

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the time of sale at the North front entrance of the Second Judicial District Court located at 805 S. Main Street, Bountiful, Utah on February 16, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.; foreclosing a Trust Deed recorded August 17, 2006 executed by Marianne Yazzie, in favor of MERS as nominee for Aegis Funding Corp. and its successors and assigns, covering real property purportedly located in Davis County at 731 S. 1525 W., Syracuse, UT 84075, and described as follows: ALL OF LOT 2, ZIONS CROSSING SUBDIVISION, SYRACUSE CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is LaSalle Bank, N.A. as Trustee for the MLMI Trust Series 2007-HE3 and, as of the recording of the Notice of Default, the property was owned, according to record, by Marianne Yazzie. The sale is without any warranty and is voidable by the Trustee, without any liability, for any circumstance unknown to the Trustee affecting the validity of the sale. The successful bidder must provide certified funds to the Trustee within 24 hours of the sale. Dated January 21, 2009

/s/ David B. Boyce

Successor Trustee C-4401 1/22-2/5

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 18, 2004 and executed by LISA MARIE DAVIS, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County:

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

ALL OF LOT 53, MAPLEWOOD VILLAGE TOWNHOMES PHASE 2 A PLANNED RESIDENTIAL UNIT DEVELOPMENT, CLINTON CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. MORE CORRECTLY DESCRIBED AS ALL OF UNIT 53, MAPLEWOOD VILLAGE TOWNHOMES PHASE 2, A PLANNED RESIDENTIAL UNIT DEVELOPMENT, CLINTON CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 14-377-0053 The address of the property is purported to be 652 WEST 800 NORTH #53, OGDEN, UT 84015. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be LISA MARIE DAVIS, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: August 6, 2008

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0050185 C-4359 1/8-22 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the time of sale at the North front entrance of the Second Judicial District Court located at 805 S. Main Street, Bountiful, Utah on February 16, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.; foreclosing a Trust Deed recorded October 31, 2006 executed by Mark A. Berry and Cassandra F. Berry, in favor of MERS as nominee for Accredited Home Lenders, Inc. and its successors and assigns, covering real property purportedly located in Davis County at 256 W. 1525 N., Layton, UT 84041, and described as follows: LOT 1, WILLOWBROOK SUBDIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is HSBC Mortgage Services Inc. and, as of the recording of the Notice of Default, the property was owned, according to record, by Mark A. Berry and Cassandra F. Berry. The sale is without any warranty and is voidable by the Trustee, without any liability, for any circumstance unknown to the Trustee affecting the validity of the sale. The successful bidder must provide certified funds to the Trustee within 24 hours of the sale. Dated January 16, 2009

/s/ David B. Boyce

Successor Trustee C-4400 1/22-2/5 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 16, 2006 and executed by KAREN S NELSON A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 15, SUNCREST MEADOW CLUSTER SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all ease-

9000

Clipper Classiads LEGAL NOTICES

ments, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 083400015 The address of the property is purported to be 986 VIEWCREST LANE, KAYSVILLE, UT 84037. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be KAREN S NELSON A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 5, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0102353 C-4360 1/8-22 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 01-356-0005 T.S. NO. 708744 REF: TRA: LOAN NO. 2217090264 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 09/25/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 02/17/2009, at 10:30 A.M., James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded 10/03/2007, as Inst. No. 2310863, in Book 4380, at Page 418, of the official records of the County Recorder of Davis County, Utah, executed by Bryce B. Krogue, a married woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the Trustee at the time of sale with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the Office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the Davis County District Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street, Bountiful, UT, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: all of unit 19A of Edgewood Estates Phase 2, plat D a planned unit development, according to the record survey map filed for record as entry no. 2080433, in book 3807, of plats at page 877, together with the appurtenant undivided ownership interest in the "Common Areas", all of which are defined and described in the declaration of covenants, conditions, and restrictions of edgewood Estates and the Exhibits attached thereto, filed for record as entry no. 1889335 in book 3334, pages 426 through 460, of the official records of the Davis County Record. The street address and other common designation, of the real property described above is purported to be: 262 Edgemont Dr., North Salt Lake, UT 84054. Estimated Total Debt as of 02/17/2009 is $312,123.86. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Provident Funding Associates, L.P. The record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are: Bryce Krogue. Dated 01/14/2009 James H. Woodall Authorized Signature James H. Woodall 10653 River Front Parkway, Suite 290 South Jordan, Utah 84095 (801)2549450 (800) 245-1886 (hotline) Hours: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM 01/15/09, 01/22/09, 01/29/09 R215479 C-4371

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

UPAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated December 18, 2007 and executed by MIGUEL A GONZALEZ AND JOAQUINA M. VASQUEZ HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: LEGAL PARCEL 1: BEGINNING AT A POINT NORTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1400.73 FEET AND WEST 30 FEET FROM THE EAST QUARTER CORNER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, WHICH POINT IS NORTH 77.87 FEET AND WEST 30 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29, AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH 97.1 FEET; THENCE WEST 170 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 92.1 FEET; THENCE EAST 95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00°00’39" WEST 5.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH IS NORTH 89°59’22" WEST 75.0 FEET FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 89°59’22" EAST 75.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (ALSO KNOWN AS PART OF LOT 1, PARKER SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF.) ALSO: BEGINNING AT A POINT SOUTH 00°00’39" WEST 1150.72 FEET AND WEST 660 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, SALT LAKE MERIDIAN, AND RUNNING THENCE EAST 460 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00°00’39" WEST 92.10 FEET, THENCE WEST 460 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00°00’39" EAST 92.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 140340010 The address of the property is purported to be 2071 NORTH 3000 WEST, CLEARFIELD, UT 84015. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be MIGUEL A GONZALEZ AND JOAQUINA M. VASQUEZ HUSBAND AND WIFE. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 5, 2009

By: Meredith Hebenstreit, Assistant Secretary

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x8538 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0103780 C-4361 1/8-22

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 3, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated May 8, 2007 and executed by LARRY LANDERS, AN UNMARRIED MAN., as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary,

9000

Davis County Clipper

LEGAL NOTICES

covering the following real property located in Davis County: LOT 219, SCHICK FARM CLUSTER SUBDIVISION PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 115920219 The address of the property is purported to be 232 SOUTH WELLINGTON DRIVE, KAYSVILLE, UT 84037. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be LARRY LANDERS, AN UNMARRIED MAN.. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 5, 2009

By: Meredith Hebenstreit, Assistant Secretary

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x8538 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0104379 C-4362 1/8-22 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN 07-157-0610 Trustee Sale No. 708742 Loan No. 2217070209 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 713012007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/17/2009, at 10:30 AM, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded 8/3/2007, as Instrument No. 2294421, in Book 4338, Page 399, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah executed by Michael J. Ney and Noel1 P. Ncy, Husband and Wife WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER, PAYABLE M LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES AT THE TIME OF THE SALE. SUCCESSFUL BIDDERS MUST TENDER A DEPOSIT OF $5,000 IN CERTIFIED FUNDS TO THE TRUSTEE AT THE TIME OF SALE, WITH THE BALANCE DUE BY NOON THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS DAY, AT THE OFFICE OF THE TRUSTEE. At the Main Entrance of the Davis County District Court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street, Bountiful, UT. all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as : All of Lot 610, Cave Hollow Plat F, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of the Davis County Recorder. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 1191 South Sunrise Way, Farmington, UT 84025 Estimated Total Debt as of 2/17/2009, is $233,616,76 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principle sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is Provident Funding Associates, L.P. The record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are Michael Ney and Noell Ney DATED: 1/14/2009 A LAW OFFICE OF JAMES WOODALL 10653 RIVER FRONT PARKWAY, SUITE 290 SOUTH JORDAN, UT 8409 For bid information call (619) 5901221 01/15/09, 01/22/09, 01/29/09 R-215446 C-4370

UPAXLP

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the time of sale at the North front entrance of the Second Judicial District Court located at 805 S. Main Street, Bountiful, Utah on February 9, 2009 at 9:30 a.m.; foreclosing a Trust Deed recorded March 25, 2005 executed by Larry Joe Christiansen and Sarah Ilene Christiansen, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank of IN, covering real property purportedly located in Davis County at 299 West 90 North, Clearfield, Utah, and described as follows: ALL OF LOT 13, SADDLEWOOD SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, CLEARFIELD CITY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for the MLMI Trust Series 2005-FF6 and, as of the recording of the Notice of Default, the property was owned, according to record, by Larry Joe Christiansen and Sarah Ilene Christiansen. The sale is without any warranty and is voidable by the Trustee, without any liability, for any circumstance unknown to the Trustee affecting the validity of the sale. The successful bidder must provide certified funds to the Trustee within 24 hours of the sale. Dated January 9, 2009

/s/ David B. Boyce

Successor Trustee C-4377 1/15-29

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, "at the Main Entrance (public entry) Courts Building, Davis County Criminal Justice Complex, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah", on February 10, 2009, at 10:30 AM, of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated March 29, 2007 and executed by NANCY A BURRELL, as Trustor(s) in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County: ALL OF LOT 67, CHERRY FARM ESTATES NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. Tax Parcel No.: 13-149-0067 The address of the property is purported to be 2360 EAST 7975 SOUTH, SOUTH WEBER, UT 84405. The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is reported to be NANCY A BURRELL. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale and deliverable to: Matheson, Mortensen, et al., 648 East First South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or money order and made payable to RECONTRUST COMPANY, cash and Bank "Official Checks" are not acceptable. A trustee’s deed will be made available to the successful bidder within three business days following receipt of the bid amount. The sale is made without any warranty whatsoever, including but not limited to any warranty as to title, liens, possession, taxes, encumbrances, or condition of the property. The sale is subject to a workout reinstatement, payoff, sale cancellation or postponement, incorrect bidding instructions, bankruptcy, or any other circumstance of which the trustee is unaware. In the event any of the foregoing apply, the sale will be void and the successful bidder’s funds will be returned without any liability to the trustee or beneficiary for interest or any other damages. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RECONTRUST COMPANY IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, AND THAT THE DEBT MAY BE DISPUTED. Dated: January 12, 2009

By: Helen Hendriksen, Team Member

RECONTRUST COMPANY 2380 Performance Dr, RGV-D7-450 Richardson, TX 75082 (800) 281-8219 x4603 Regular Business Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m., Central Time TS#: 08 -0105378 C-4383 1/15-29

Legal deadline: Monday and Thursday, 5 p.m.


Davis Clipper January 22, 2009  

Davis Clipper January 22, 2009

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