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H a lloween Issue The

Henry W. Grady High School October 2011


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Photo. Erin Scott shares her cinematic shot of an intimate moment from her summer in San Francisco. Catch the shutterbug on pages 4-5. Visual. Grady students love bringing new meaning to the word diversity. Read about our Knights’ spectrum of spectacular plumage on page 6. Audio. After a five-year absence, Music Midtown returned to Piedmont Park with acts such as Coldplay and The Black Keys. Get into the groove on page 9. Arena. Say goodbye to Blueland. The Thrashers fly North forever as Atlanta loses its second NHL team to its Canadian neighbors. Get the full story on page 12. Feature. Nexus is getting festive for the fall issue! Before you venture out into the night of ghoulish ghosts and precocious preteens, don't forget to read up on your guide to a sweet Halloween, starting on page 14. Cuisine. A.J. Chong brings fresh fusion food to the eclectic neighborhood of Little Five Points with his food-truck inspired restaurant on page 20. Couture. Looking for some pointers on how to apply make-up like a master? Stay easy, breezy, and beautiful with some expert advice on page 23. Rostrum. Trailers have taken over the upper field! But are they “suite”ning our intruction? Get the teacher’s opinions on their double-wide classrooms on page 27. Menagerie. AuthorJ.K.Rowling returns with yet another magical masterpiece. For the inside scoop on the virtual Potterhead paradise, check page 30.


Halloween for high schoolers This issue, the Nexus staff is paying tribute to the holiday revered by children across the country. Before they don their wooly winter coats and comfy caps, they get one more chance to frolic in the autumn leaves, while adults get a chance to embrace their inner child. But what about us? Somewhere among the piles of schoolwork and midsemester stress, adolescents have lost their Halloween spirit. But here at Nexus, we’re hoping to change that with a series of stories to reawaken the kid in even the Halloween humbugs at Grady High School. So dust off those crazy costumes and old Halloween decorations, because we have the perfect way to make your Halloween this year one to remember. From haunted houses to horror movies, our Halloween veterans on the Nexus staff want to help you have a fantastically frightful Halloween, just like the good old days.

Nexus 2011 Staff: Danielle Aldred, Michael Baer, Eboni Booker, Austin Burch, Amelia Christopher, Jack Douglas, Victoria Dragstedt, Chris Drayton, Grayson Garrett, Maragh Girvan, Jakara Griffin, Frederick Harris Jr., Claire Hasson, Jordan Holiman, Devina Jones-Vargas, Nycole Key, April King, Sam Lowe, Valentina Makrides, Courtney Marshall, Tamara Mason, Sanjida Mowla, James Moy, Abby Orlansky, Austin Planer, Thomas Ruder, Nara Smith, Diamond Stewart, Laura Streib, Kate Taber, Lotin Tandongfor, McKenzie Taylor, Lily Trapkin, Ruben Velez, Luke Webster, and Talore Williams. Managing Editor: Maragh Girvan Adviser (of the Year): Dave Winter Design Editor: Sam Lowe Printer: Florida Sun Press Advertising: Nexus is a nonprofit organization that relies on advertising and on the generous support of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction to generate revenue to cover printing and maintenance cost. Nexus is read by approximately 2,000 people and is a great way to publicize your business. If you would like to advertise with and/or distribute Nexus, please contact us at nexusghs@gmail.com Submissions: Nexus accepts and welcome submissions of stories and photos. Submissions should be submitted to Mr. Winter in room E113, or to any Nexus staffer. They can also be e-mailed to us at nexusghs@gmail. com. Nexus is a bimonthly publication of: Henry W. Grady High School 929 Charles Allen Drive NE Atlanta, GA 30309


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I spent five weeks of this past summer in San Francisco for a PreCollege program for photography. While some friends and I were on the way home, I saw two fellow students sharing this intimate moment on the bus. The image is very cinematic, and I love the fact that it kind of reminds me what photography is about: capturing moments. Photo by senior Erin Scott


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Grady in living color

“My hair individualizes my personality,” -junior Lauren Kwon

“I have wanted my hair to be turquoise since I was young,” sophomore Zonnique Pullins said.

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“My hair shows that I am a bright and colorful person,” senior Antaurtiouz Gilmar said.

“My hair shows my fiesty personality,” senior Hollie McWhorter said.

Photos by Diamond Stewart

When you think about diversity in a community, you usually think of skin color, but at Grady the real variety can be found in hair color. Walking down the hallway in Grady, you see a cornucopia of hairstyles, from blue hair to spiked hair to rainbow hair. Unlike skin color, hair color and style is a choice, and many Grady students want to stand out. “My hair shows my fiesty personality,” senior Hollie McWhorter said. The new hairstyle trends around Grady range from Mohawks, shaved sides, pink hair, and the classic colors, like blonde and auburn. “My hair shows that I rebel against rules,” freshman Chloe Walker said. The cost for getting hair done and colored professionally has gone up to as high as $500, but many people still pay to get their hair done in a salon. Many Grady students do it themselves, however. It can be significantly cheaper to buy a box of $10 hair dye and style it in the comfort of your own home. Not every bold hair experiment is a success, but even when a hair-do becomes a hair don’t, it still can express a student’s unique personality. “My hair individualizes my personality,” junior Lauren Kwon said. “My hair shows that I am a bright and colorful person,” senior Antaurtiouz Gilmar said. Some students have always wanted their hair to be a certain color from a young age, like sophomore Zonnique Pullins, who longed for the turquoise tresses she wears today. Others colored their hair to match their favorite color because of some other external inspiration. -Diamond Stewart


‘Hilarity Ensues’ in Pirates Take a huge swashbuckling sword fight in the style of Pirates of the Caribbean. Now add in 6-year-olds, a swing set, monkey bars and … opera? This situation is the premise of Grady’s fall musical, The Pirates of Penzance. This operetta, written by Arthur Sullivan and W.S. Gilbert in 1879, demonstrates the sea-faring life of a pirate king and his men. “The Pirates of Penzance is about a boy named Frederic and his maid Ruth who get roped into living on a ship with a bunch of pirates for a few years,” says senior Caitlin Wade, who plays Ruth. “Frederic then realizes he wants a wife and [eventually] is torn between his duty to The Pirate King and his love for Mabel. Hilarity ensues.” While sophomore Preston Choi, who plays Major-General Stanley, said this may be “the oldest thing done by Grady besides Shakespeare,” director Lee Pope added a modern twist: setting the story in the make-believe pirate games of a bunch of kids on the playground. “We’re apparently going to have merry-go-rounds and a giant ship and

swing set,” Wade said. “It should be awesome.” This, however, isn’t the only change being made to this antique operetta. The cast has had to cut down the play from two hours to one hour to accommodate the one-act plays being performed along with it. Besides these changes, the lyrics and dialogue will remain unchanged. “Gilbert and Sullivan is definitely way off Grady’s norm because it’s operatic and its so old,” says junior Lucy Bradley, who plays Frederic’s love interest Mabel. “We’re a little more new-age around here, so this is a totally different direction.” Some performers said the most difficult part of performing the opera will be singing the opera itself. While this won’t be a problem for Bradley, who takes lessons and is a high soprano, it will be a welcomed challenge for the other actors. “The music is very difficult to sing since it’s an operetta,” says sophomore Deya Bowers, who is a member of the pirate chorus. “I have no singing experience, so it’s incredibly difficult to follow the sheet music.” Choi agreed, but is

optimistic about his opera expertise. “I have little to no singing experience,” says Choi, “but I’m practicing and hoping to get better.” Perhaps the strangest and most amusing part of this year’s production is the casting of the lovers Frederic and Mabel. By strange coincidence or maybe a planned publicity stunt, Lucy Bradley will be playing Mabel to her brother, senior Will Bradley’s Frederic. “Apparently Will, Lucy, Joe [younger brother] and their mother were riding in the car when [Lucy] told Joe the news of Will and Lucy playing love interests,” says Bowers, “and Joe said, ‘So who’s dropping out of the play?’” The news didn’t faze Lucy, however, who notes that the situation is awkward, but says that “it’s not like we have to do anything weird.” Wade has confidence in her castmates professionalism and thinks they will pull it off just fine. The Pirates of Penzance will hopefully be a play to go down in Grady history as the antique play that made waves on the stage. The play premiered Oct. 21. -Maragh Girvan

Photos by Maragh Girvan

ABOVE: Major-General Stanley, played by sophomore Preston Choi, feels the love of his adoring daughters. BELOW: The Pirate King, played by senior Malik Grant, laments his orphan past with the rest of the cast.

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‘Cook’ing up some sound

He raises his hands up to his chest, in preparation. The students, placed in lines before him, quietly raise their instruments to their mouths in response. His hands begin to wave towards and away from each other as he taps his feet. He then counts “1, 2, 3 and...” The band begins to play in unison and then stretches out and harmonizes. Sounds of different chords from percussion, brass and woodwind instruments blast throughout the Grady Stadium. His hands continue to move towards and away from each other, helping conduct the musical piece. These hands belong to Grady High School’s new band director, Mr. Cook. Brian Cook was born in Miami, where he grew up around the musical influences of his family. As a child, he repeatedly toured around with musicians and bands with which his family interacted. His mother, Emily Cook, was in a local R&B group, named the Marbellas. Cook also had many relatives who played multiple instruments such as trumpet and bass. Cook began playing music at a young age. He taught himself to read sheet music and play instruments through instructional books and pamphlets. He also studied music theory to learn to write his own arrangements of music. While in high school, Cook was in a group called Mantra. They opened up for Lionel Hampton, Dizzy Gillespie and Ramsey Lewis. Cook attained a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Florida Memorial University, but while in college he abandoned engineering in favor of music. Cook also attended Miami Dade Community College and Eastman School of Music where he continued practicing music. He also helped teach music theory classes and played with some college groups like the Saxophone Ensemble. He also all Marsh urtney by Co Photo

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taught children at Miami Dade how to play instruments both by ear and notes. A flute teacher, by the name of Dr. Anita Kaplin, who taught at Miami Dade Community College, persuaded Cook to pursue a career in teaching music to kids. From observations of him working with kids, she believed he would be a great candidate. Cook took Dr. Caplin’s suggestion into consideration and started a career in school music departments. Cook spent time as the assistant director at Miami Northwestern High School, and as the director of arts and music at Parks and Recreation of Miami Dade County, and the band director at Walker Elementary School of the Arts for 10 years. Reminiscing about this decade of his profesional life, Cook laughed and exclaimed, “Home of the Marching Wildcats!” Years later, Cook moved north to Atlanta for a change of scenery. He began directing at Brown Middle School and was transferred to Grady High School this summer. C o o k has a previous record of being very serious and passionate about the knowledge and practice of music. “He’s something we’re not used to,” junior

Chassidy Mitchell said. “He’s nice, but he means business. He came to do something and he’s going to accomplish it.” “I believe in stuff being done and respecting space and giving 100 percent in what you do,” Cook said. Mr. Cook’s objective for his students is to help his juniors and seniors receive scholarships by spending more time stressing sound, technique, tone color and interpretation of the pieces the students play. As for the freshman and sophomores, Cook wants to help them expand their horizons to all types of music and instruments. He plans on taking the jazz and marching band to Georgia Music Educators Associaption festival and national competitions. Cook has a strong interest in jazz, R&B and classical music. His favorite musicians include Stevie Wonder, Earth Wind and Fire, and Mint Condition. “When I like a song or I believe it’s just right, I get goose bumps up and down my arm and I’ll just sit back and smile”, said Cook, “I won’t say a word. I’ll just sit there and smile.” Mr. Cook is also the new instructor of the Grady marching band, the Knights of Sound. Mr. Cook began working with the band two weeks before the start of school. “Over the summer, there was more order, more quality in the music and more passion in the band”, said senior Kenneth Cochran, Grady’s drum major. “I’m confident that the band will get to a superior level.” The marching band is still improving on its sound and will be playing traditional songs and some of Cook’s arrangements during this 2011 football season. - Courtney Marshall

Mr. Cook instructs juniors Chassidy Michell and Akasha Lawrence how to play a measure with the flute.


Attendees frolicking at the Black Keys. Right: Grady aluma Eva Dines and senior Andrew Cleveland pose during a concert break. Color-drenched, laser-streaming light shows, inflatable dreamcatchers 40 feet in circumference, highly intoxicated singers jumping from stage, crowds close to 50,000 all singing as one, all just across the street from Grady. After six years of absence, the Atlanta music festival, Music Midtown, returned to Piedmont Park on Saturday Sept. 24, boasting 10 bands split between two enormous black stages for a day full of ear-splitting, and at times majestic, rock ‘n’ roll. The festival, not held since 2005, due to drops in ticket sales, was shortened to one day in an effort to rejuvenate the event without committing the park to three days of music. The 10 bands played back to back in sets ranging from 45 minutes to two and a half hours starting at 1 p.m. and not ending until after 11:30 p.m. Bands included many up-and-coming acts such as Band of Skulls, Joy Formidable, Young The Giant, and Manchester Orchestra, as well as the headlining acts Cage the Elephant, The Black Keys and Coldplay. Many Grady students attended the event, some for the entire day migrating from stage to stage to see every band, others joining the crowd later in the day to see the headlining acts. Some students

even managed to get into some of the festival for free as tired ticket holders left the concert early giving their tickets to eager fans waiting outside the gates. Seniors Eve Brown, Molly Daniel, and Sydney Kruszewski, were some of the lucky students who attended for free. “We just stood outside the gates asking each person who left,” Daniel said. “Eventually we each got a ticket and got in 10 minutes before Coldplay started. It was a fantastic experience just seeing one of the bands after listening from outside all night.” The major success of the event this year has guaranteed the return of Music Midtown in 2012. The festival will also be adding a second day, guaranteeing more bands in hopes of gaining even higher attendance. “The festival was fantastically fun and musically incredible,” said senior Jack Webster, who attended for most of the day. “My only problem with the event management was how little production value and time was given to the lesser known bands compared to the headliner, Coldplay. I hope that the rising bands will get more effort put into their shows when the event expands next year.” -Jack Douglas

Photos by Alix Youngbood

Music returns to Midtown

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Frusciante departs, but Chili Peppers remain funky, soulful and fresh Despite loss of guitarist, legendary band still impresses with latest release I’m With You.

The 10th and latest Red Hot Chili Peppers album, I’m With You, is an interesting mixture of a brand new style blended with trademark funk. Released Aug. 30, this album debuts RHCP’s newest member, guitarist Josh Klinghoffer. Former guitarist John Frusciante left the band in 2009 to pursue a solo career. This split could have meant the end of the band, but the Chili Peppers retooled and reformed their sound and released yet another enjoyable album. Frusciante’s absence is immediately apparent on the album’s opening track, “Monarchy of Roses.” There is no guitar until about 30 seconds into the song, and even then it is regulated to rhythm duty, synchronizing with the drums and bass. The gaps between lyric stanzas and the space where guitar solos should be are filled instead with non-invasive riffing and very simple notes augmented heavily to take up space. Had Frusciante been playing, those gaps would be filled with wailing, heaven-sent solos. Sadly, this is not the case. That isn’t to say that Klinghoffer doesn’t have his moments. Some

songs, like the fast-paced “Goodbye Hooray,” feature the guitar much more heavily and even include some soloing chops by the band’s newest member. Unfortunately for Klinghoffer, this type of song is the exception not the rule of this album. Because he is the “new guy” and doesn’t have as strong of a musical bond with the rest of the members, his style influences the band less than Frusciante’s once did. His personal style is more rhythmic than melodic; therefore, the guitar is

far less important in this album than in any other album since Frusciante’s first return in Californication (Frusciante left the band in 1990 before leaving again in 2009). The drums and bass, played respectively by Chad Smith and Michael “Flea” Balzary, really drive this album forward. As with most Red Hot Chili Peppers albums, skillful drum breaks and rich funky bass lines permeate all of the songs on this album. This groovy soulful progression, accompanied by Anthony Kiedis’s signature voice and deep colorful lyrics are part of the classic RHCP sound, and they definitely still have it. The Chili Peppers retain their signature style while also adding a new element. Josh Klinghoffer, is no John Frusciante, but he brings something fresh to the band. The mixture of fast and slow songs, as well as the unique sound and story of each number, remain central elements of the band’s identity. Twenty-eight years since their start in 1983, and many members later, the Red Hot Chili Peppers continue to make amazing original music. -Ruben Velez

The name ‘Wayne’ carries fame It all started with Tha Carter. From there it glided to Tha Carter II and Tha Carter III, each album significantly progressing, but with a more unique and creative sound each time. On Aug 29, fans eagerly anticipated the scheduled release of Tha Cater IV. The album had been pushed back from its original release date, May 16, and set to June 21. It was then once again delayed and its final release date was set for Aug. 29. Unfortunately, the album was leaked before its official release date. After Tha Carter IV’s final release, there were many reviews written on the album, many of which were not positive. “Weezy doesn’t have that same demon intensity he had five years

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ago,” wrote Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone Magazine. “He’s just as casual and sloppy about his approach to official album releases.” Although Sheffield was more positive than negative in his assessment, other reviewers dismissed the album. Despite the mixed reviews, Tha Carter IV sold more than twice as many copies as Kanye West’s and Jay Z’s Watch The Throne. According to Billboard.com, Tha Carter IV sold 964,000 copies in the first week while Watch The Throne sold only 436,000. “It’s not really the substance of the music, it’s the brand,” Senior Thomas Cox said. “It’s only because he’s Wayne.” Other Grady students feel the same way: even though Lil Wayne’s album

was not the best, it sold twice as many copies, simply because he’s Wayne. -Eboni Booker


Shows

Jay Z and Kanye West Oct. 28, Philips Arena Guns N’ Roses Nov. 2, Philips Arena Feist Nov. 6, Tabernacle Lucero Nov. 10, Masquerade Warren Haynes Nov. 10, Tabernacle Brandi Carlile Nov. 12, Buckhead Theatre The Raconteurs Nov. 13, Tabernacle Mac Miller Nov. 26, Tabernacle The Whigs Nov. 27, Variety Playhouse

Releases

Oct. 25—Kelly Clarkston, Stronger Oct. 25—Coldplay, My Xyloto Oct. 25—Yelawolf, Radioactive Nov. 1—Justin Beiber, Under the Mistletoe Nov. 15— Drake, Take Care Nov. 21—Rihanna, Talk That Talk Nov. 30—B.o.B, Stange Clouds Dec. 6—The Black Keys, El Camino

Grady’s Royal Playlists

Erin Gore Ms. Auxiliary Beyoncè “End of Time” Rihanna “Skin” Beyoncè “Love on Top” Ce-lo Green “Fool For You”

Armani Owens Mr. 12th Grade Beyoncè “Love on Top” Jay-Z and Kanye West “N***** in Paris” Ce-lo Green “Fool For You” Jay-Z and Kanye West “Lift Off”

Kiera Hicks Ms. Grady Runner-up Beyoncè “Party” Jay-Z and kanye West “Made in America” Adele “Rolling in The Deep” Travis Porter “Chevela”

Aja Blair Ms. Grady Beyoncè “Countdown” LMFAO “Party Rock Anthem” Jay-Z and Kanye West “Otis” Atid “You Don’t Wanna Dance”

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Dec. 12, 2010, Philips Arena — Brian Little streams down the right flank with the puck, glances misleadingly to the left, then tilts his hands slightly and puts the puck through the now undressed defenseman’s legs. Retrieving the puck on the other side Little has no one to beat but the goalie now. It happens fast, the goal horn sounds, and Declan Farrisee is on his feet immediately. “My favorite player last year had to be Brian Little,” Farrisee said. “He’s a great player who skates fast and is impressively strong for his size.” Farrisee will no longer be able to see Little and his Thrasher teammates because the NHL team that Farrisee and his family has supported with season tickets for five of the eleven years the team was in Atlanta has moved to Winnipeg. The team formerly known as the Thrashers has resurrected the name that the prior Winnipeg NHL team used. The Jets moniker is appropriate if only for the amount of flying the team will be doing in order to face to its division rivals in North Carolina, Florida, and Washington D.C. It’s not the first time Atlanta hockey has been extinguished by its neighbors in the far north. In 1980 the Atlanta Flames were sold and relocated to Calgary. The team, the Calgary Flames, still exists and thrives in its Canadian home. The Flames were sold because Omni Sports Group who owned the team was losing money quickly because of the drop in ticket sales, the increase in operating expenses, and the lack of a major TV deal. Similar circumstances led the Atlanta Spirit to sell the Thrashers. Unlike the Thrashers though, the Flames made the playoffs in six of the team’s eight seasons in Atlanta. According to the Thrashers’ many critics, another key difference is that unlike the Flames, the Thrashers were poorly managed. “The whole thing was definitely premeditated,” junior and Thrasher fan Simon McLane said. “They were trying to sell them publicly, but the Atlanta Spirit [claim that they were] trying to keep them in the city was b.s.”

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Photo by Jordan Holiman

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Winnipeg jets away with Atlanta’s Thrash

Sophomore Declan Farrisee towers over his favorite Thrasher’s memorabilia. Farrisee had equally harsh words for the Atlanta Spirit, the business group, which included investors in Washington D.C., Atlanta, New York, and California. “They suck.”

“Imagine someone selling your religion to another country because they didn’t care.”

He then supplied a rationale to his seemingly seething statement. “They admitted that they care more about the Hawks than the Thrashers,” Farrisee said. “They wouldn’t spend money to keep our good players and improve our team. They made bad trades year-round and would not do anything about it.” McLane even supplied a dramatic analogy to compare to the Thrasher’s departure. “Imagine someone selling your religion to another country because they didn’t care,” McLane said. Losing two NHL teams makes Atlanta the only city to have been jilted twice. Winnipeg’s population is 633,451; Calgary’s, 988,193. Losing

hockey teams to cities at least five times smaller than Atlanta looks very bad. Even former Thrasher players have made quips about Atlanta’s lack of hockey passion. But the city supported the team in its early years. In the team’s inaugural season, the Thrashers sold every season ticket. The team, however, performed poorly year after year, mainly, critics say, due to the mismanagement of the Atlanta Spirit. Then in 2006-2007, the Thrashers captured the Southeast Division title, and attendance skyrocketed once again as the team experienced some success. In the team’s lone playoff series, the Thrashers were unceremoniously swept by the New York Rangers in four games. The playoff appearance and the promise of a return to the playoffs are all gone now, flown up north forever. Never again will a hockey game be played in Philips Arena. In fact, because of the probable NBA lockout this season, the only thing stomping on the burial grounds of Blueland will be the Atlanta Dream, Atlanta’s WNBA team, and a variety of concerts. They used to “believe in Blueland,” but now Atlanta hockey fans are just plain blue. -Jordan Holiman


With the NBA season up in the air, no one knows whether or not there will be a 2011-2012 season. The fate of the season lies in the hands of the players’ union representatives and the owners’ committee. The debate is over whether or not there will be a hard salary cap or a soft cap for the upcoming season. Owners are pulling for a hard cap where players will be paid significantly less then they have been paid in the past. Take Kobe Bryant for example; last year he made $21.26 million, but with a hard cap he would only make half that amount. Not many workers would accept a 50 percent pay cut. While the NFL lockout caught most by surprise, NBA owners and players have known for almost two years now that there was going to be a lockout if the collective bargaining agreement wasn’t changed. “It’s just plain sad,” said Austin Williams, a die-hard Lakers fan who follows the NBA season with much enthusiasm. If a deal is not agreed upon not only will Philips Arena not host a hockey team, it would also lose its big money maker in the Hawks for the next year. Ryon Nick states “ I would really miss the noise and intensity the arena gets to during big games and the playoffs.” While it may seem all hope is lost, Philips Arena is also home to the Atlanta Dream one of the WNBA’s

Photo by Dave Winter

Catcher Brian McCann preserves win against the Diamondbacks at home.

Photo by Thomas Ruder

NBA attempts to box out the lockout

Blake Griffin won’t be able to slama jama the rock with a net like this. top teams. The Dream advanced to the WNBA Finals before falling to the eventual champion the Minnesota Lynx. The initial start of the NBA preseason was set for Oct. 5, but things don’t seem like they can be fixed with the flick of a wand. For many who don’t remember there was a lockout in the 1998-1999 season where owners and players couldn’t come to an

agreement until days before the cancellation of the entire season. With an agreement settled upon, the NBA held a compacted season of a mere 50 games. For now, fans will just have to hope for a speedy deal to be made so they can kick back on the couch or head to the Arena to see their teams play. -Thomas Ruder

Braves fail to make save My heart sank. It was 12:30 at night as I was watching the fatal game on Sept 28 between the Atlanta Braves and the Philadelphia Phillies. It was the bottom of the 13th inning as I watched Freddie Freeman hit into a double play to end what was once a promising and playoffs-bound season for the Atlanta Braves, quickly becoming one of the most monumental September collapses baseball has ever seen. In the final stretch of the Braves regular season, they lost eight of their last 10 games, squandering what was on Sept. 1 a 10 ½ game

lead over the St. Louis Cardinals for the National League wildcard spot in the playoffs. The end of the season was one of the hardest to watch as a Braves fan, especially considering that they had such an excellent season prior to the month of September. With an all-star line up of rookies and veterans to the game, the Braves were at one point among the best teams in the National League.Though the season ended in disappointment, I can only look forward to the Braves coming back and dominating the 2012 season. -Luke Webster

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FRIGHT Photo courtesy of Meghan Smith


T N K IGH S Welcome to the Halloween Issue,

where you will find Your worst nightmare. Enter Fright knights if you dare.


Halloween is the one day of the year where you can dress up as whatever your heart desires and not get judged for it. Picking out the perfect costume is a process that can take all 364 days leading up to the big day. When we were little kids, picking out a costume was simple and usually varied between a princess and Pocahontas for girls, and a pirate or a Power Ranger for boys. As our ages have increased, so have our demands for the perfect costume. This year, just like every other, picking out your costume will be a challenge. First, you have to review where you will be going in said costume. If you’re going out trick-or-treating for the 14th-18th time in your life, you’ll want to wear something comfortable and warm enough for the brisk weather that comes with fall. On the other hand, if you’re going to a Halloween party where you will be dancing and trying to pick up someone of the opposite sex, you’re going to want to show off what you’ve got and go all out. The form of your costume must follow its intended function.

Places to Go

many others. If you’re looking for a creamier, caramel treat, there is always Milky Way, Rolo, Lindt Truffles and Twix. There are thousands of other choices for the chocolate lovers who enjoy a little extra flare that isn’t offered in the generic brand name candies. Since chocolate isn’t some people’s cup of tea, there are so many other varieties of candies to choose from. For the hard candy lovers, there are Jolly Ranchers, lollipops and Jaw Breakers. If you’re in the chewing mood, you can gnash on a Now & Later, Starburst, or Skittles. Candies these days are made for your convenience, so this Halloween, try something new and see if it makes your taste buds tingle.

Halloween Safety

We’ve all heard Halloween horror stories, from razors being put in apples to children getting snatched up by a man dressed up as a clown. There are some spine-chilling things that bad people might do, but there are a lot of ways to prevent these unspeakable things from happening to you. Here is a list to help you have a safe but fun Halloween.

If you’re going to be canvassing the neighborhood for candy on Halloween night, there are a few places that you won’t want to miss. Ansley Park families with big houses don’t mind giving Mack Daddy candy bars to trick-or-treaters, which makes the neighborhood a mandatory stop on your Halloween adventure. For folks who don’t live near Ansley, there’s always Candler Park and Inman Park. Both of these neighborhoods are filled with young kids so residents know how to stock up and spread out the best Halloween treats.

1.

Best Candy

4.

For those of you who have your eye set on chocolate, you have a variety of delicious, sugary delights to choose from. There’s always the classic, pure Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bar. If you’re feeling a little nutty, you can delve into the chocolatey goodness of Snickers, Hershey’s with almonds, Ferrero Rocher, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, plus

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2.

3.

5.

Your parents always told you, never accept anything from strangers, especially food that has obviously been opened. It’s dangerous and could harm upon you or others. Always stay with a buddy, just to be safe. Wandering off on your own may seem cool, but you could end up in a sticky situation. Don’t drive if you’re under the fluence of any illegal substance or alcohol. You could be putting your life in danger as well as many children who will be frolicking the streets that night. Never get into a stranger’s car. Walking around at night can be a magnet for menacing predators, so steer clear of stepping into any unfamiliar motor vehicles. Keep a flashlight with you just in case you are in a dark space with limited visibility, or if you’re out in the shadows of the night. -Lily Trapkin

Enter at your own risk Georgia is home to some of the scariest Haunted Houses in the country, so this Halloween make sure you don’t miss out. From chainsaws to zombies to creatures of all kinds, you’re sure to experience the fright of your life. Just a short 30 minutes from Grady High School, in Norcross, sits the nationally known Netherworld. Netherworld is a walkthrough house with monsters, live actors and creatures around every corner. It features a different theme each year in two frightening houses. Each house has its own spooky feel. While waiting in line, which can be very long, you are approached by all kinds of creatures who will come as close to you as legally possible. Once inside the house there is a scare in every direction you look. There are more than 100 actors who are paid to make you scream. Overall it takes about 20 minutes to go through the first house and a little less time for the second. There are several rooms and corridors with state-of-the-art technology and special effects, making it a truly unnerving experience. “My favorite part was seeing all the boys scream,” sophomore Emily Ferris said. The Atlanta Zombie Apocalypse is another local haunted event not to be missed. The Zombie Apocalypse sits just off of Moreland Avenue and features 90,000 square feet of fright. Several Grady students work as actors in the haunted house giving you another reason to visit.” The walk-through is the main attraction at the apocalypse, and for good reason,” junior Charlie Dentons said. Upon entering, guests are separated into small groups and led through by a trained professional. Once inside you should be prepared to run away if a zombie should chase you. This attraction is by far the goriest experience. The apocalypse features one main attraction and a zombie shooting range. The main tour takes you through an abandoned truck stop, a two-story motel, scary buildings, then up and down stairs to escape the zombies. It truly sets up an apocalyptic scene. After going through the main attraction, you can visit the zombie shooting range. “Anybody can pay $15 to charge, guns blazing, into a paintball arena crawling with zombies,“ Denton said. Another unique haunted house in our area is the 13 Stories Haunted House, about 40 minutes away from the Midtown area in Kennesaw. Before entering, guests are asked, but not required, to sign a waiver allowing them to enter. The house is not literally 13 stories tall, the inside creates that illusion. You do board an eleva-

Netherworld Dates: Oct. 1 - 30 Hours: Mon-Thur 7:30p.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday 7-Midnight Sunday 7-11 Halloween 7-Midnight Address: 6624 Dawson Blvd. Norcross, GA 30093 Answer: John Brandhorst

Costumes

Can You guess whiich grady teacher this is?

Price: $22-$28

tor once, but other than that you remain on the same level. The attraction features two houses full of scares. Once inside, it is said that you may come across live snakes or rats, and you might want to watch your step in case of trap doors. “I didn’t see any snakes or rats,” junior Jolie Jones said. “Overall it was not what I expected,” Each event has its own unique twist that will be sure to haunt you this Halloween. Some are scarier than others, and they are each vastly different and spooky in their own ways. These houses will definitely add to your overall Halloween experience and haunt you for years to come! You only have so many hours of Halloween that can be haunted, so choose yours carefully because every knight has a right to a night of fright. -Amelia Christopher Photo courtesy of Meghan Smith

A guide to a gleeful Halloween

A man is scared into the arms of his girlfriend at Netherworld.

13 Stories Haunted House

Atlanta Zombie Apocalypse

Dates: Sept. 23 - Nov. 5

Dates: Sept. 30- Oct. 31

Hours: Monday-Thursday & Sun Dark- 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday Dark- Midnight

Hours: Sunday-Friday 7:30 p.m. - Midnight

Address: 2975 Ring Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Price: $22

Address: 4215 Thurman Road Conley, GA 30288 Price: $15-$30


Halloween is the one day of the year where you can dress up as whatever your heart desires and not get judged for it. Picking out the perfect costume is a process that can take all 364 days leading up to the big day. When we were little kids, picking out a costume was simple and usually varied between a princess and Pocahontas for girls, and a pirate or a Power Ranger for boys. As our ages have increased, so have our demands for the perfect costume. This year, just like every other, picking out your costume will be a challenge. First, you have to review where you will be going in said costume. If you’re going out trick-or-treating for the 14th-18th time in your life, you’ll want to wear something comfortable and warm enough for the brisk weather that comes with fall. On the other hand, if you’re going to a Halloween party where you will be dancing and trying to pick up someone of the opposite sex, you’re going to want to show off what you’ve got and go all out. The form of your costume must follow its intended function.

Places to Go

many others. If you’re looking for a creamier, caramel treat, there is always Milky Way, Rolo, Lindt Truffles and Twix. There are thousands of other choices for the chocolate lovers who enjoy a little extra flare that isn’t offered in the generic brand name candies. Since chocolate isn’t some people’s cup of tea, there are so many other varieties of candies to choose from. For the hard candy lovers, there are Jolly Ranchers, lollipops and Jaw Breakers. If you’re in the chewing mood, you can gnash on a Now & Later, Starburst, or Skittles. Candies these days are made for your convenience, so this Halloween, try something new and see if it makes your taste buds tingle.

Halloween Safety

We’ve all heard Halloween horror stories, from razors being put in apples to children getting snatched up by a man dressed up as a clown. There are some spine-chilling things that bad people might do, but there are a lot of ways to prevent these unspeakable things from happening to you. Here is a list to help you have a safe but fun Halloween.

If you’re going to be canvassing the neighborhood for candy on Halloween night, there are a few places that you won’t want to miss. Ansley Park families with big houses don’t mind giving Mack Daddy candy bars to trick-or-treaters, which makes the neighborhood a mandatory stop on your Halloween adventure. For folks who don’t live near Ansley, there’s always Candler Park and Inman Park. Both of these neighborhoods are filled with young kids so residents know how to stock up and spread out the best Halloween treats.

1.

Best Candy

4.

For those of you who have your eye set on chocolate, you have a variety of delicious, sugary delights to choose from. There’s always the classic, pure Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bar. If you’re feeling a little nutty, you can delve into the chocolatey goodness of Snickers, Hershey’s with almonds, Ferrero Rocher, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, plus

16

2.

3.

5.

Your parents always told you, never accept anything from strangers, especially food that has obviously been opened. It’s dangerous and could harm upon you or others. Always stay with a buddy, just to be safe. Wandering off on your own may seem cool, but you could end up in a sticky situation. Don’t drive if you’re under the fluence of any illegal substance or alcohol. You could be putting your life in danger as well as many children who will be frolicking the streets that night. Never get into a stranger’s car. Walking around at night can be a magnet for menacing predators, so steer clear of stepping into any unfamiliar motor vehicles. Keep a flashlight with you just in case you are in a dark space with limited visibility, or if you’re out in the shadows of the night. -Lily Trapkin

Enter at your own risk Georgia is home to some of the scariest Haunted Houses in the country, so this Halloween make sure you don’t miss out. From chainsaws to zombies to creatures of all kinds, you’re sure to experience the fright of your life. Just a short 30 minutes from Grady High School, in Norcross, sits the nationally known Netherworld. Netherworld is a walkthrough house with monsters, live actors and creatures around every corner. It features a different theme each year in two frightening houses. Each house has its own spooky feel. While waiting in line, which can be very long, you are approached by all kinds of creatures who will come as close to you as legally possible. Once inside the house there is a scare in every direction you look. There are more than 100 actors who are paid to make you scream. Overall it takes about 20 minutes to go through the first house and a little less time for the second. There are several rooms and corridors with state-of-the-art technology and special effects, making it a truly unnerving experience. “My favorite part was seeing all the boys scream,” sophomore Emily Ferris said. The Atlanta Zombie Apocalypse is another local haunted event not to be missed. The Zombie Apocalypse sits just off of Moreland Avenue and features 90,000 square feet of fright. Several Grady students work as actors in the haunted house giving you another reason to visit.” The walk-through is the main attraction at the apocalypse, and for good reason,” junior Charlie Dentons said. Upon entering, guests are separated into small groups and led through by a trained professional. Once inside you should be prepared to run away if a zombie should chase you. This attraction is by far the goriest experience. The apocalypse features one main attraction and a zombie shooting range. The main tour takes you through an abandoned truck stop, a two-story motel, scary buildings, then up and down stairs to escape the zombies. It truly sets up an apocalyptic scene. After going through the main attraction, you can visit the zombie shooting range. “Anybody can pay $15 to charge, guns blazing, into a paintball arena crawling with zombies,“ Denton said. Another unique haunted house in our area is the 13 Stories Haunted House, about 40 minutes away from the Midtown area in Kennesaw. Before entering, guests are asked, but not required, to sign a waiver allowing them to enter. The house is not literally 13 stories tall, the inside creates that illusion. You do board an eleva-

Netherworld Dates: Oct. 1 - 30 Hours: Mon-Thur 7:30p.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday 7-Midnight Sunday 7-11 Halloween 7-Midnight Address: 6624 Dawson Blvd. Norcross, GA 30093 Answer: John Brandhorst

Costumes

Can You guess whiich grady teacher this is?

Price: $22-$28

tor once, but other than that you remain on the same level. The attraction features two houses full of scares. Once inside, it is said that you may come across live snakes or rats, and you might want to watch your step in case of trap doors. “I didn’t see any snakes or rats,” junior Jolie Jones said. “Overall it was not what I expected,” Each event has its own unique twist that will be sure to haunt you this Halloween. Some are scarier than others, and they are each vastly different and spooky in their own ways. These houses will definitely add to your overall Halloween experience and haunt you for years to come! You only have so many hours of Halloween that can be haunted, so choose yours carefully because every knight has a right to a night of fright. -Amelia Christopher Photo courtesy of Meghan Smith

A guide to a gleeful Halloween

A man is scared into the arms of his girlfriend at Netherworld.

13 Stories Haunted House

Atlanta Zombie Apocalypse

Dates: Sept. 23 - Nov. 5

Dates: Sept. 30- Oct. 31

Hours: Monday-Thursday & Sun Dark- 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday Dark- Midnight

Hours: Sunday-Friday 7:30 p.m. - Midnight

Address: 2975 Ring Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Price: $22

Address: 4215 Thurman Road Conley, GA 30288 Price: $15-$30


amara Mason and Courtney Marshall

Nightmare on 10th Street It’s that time of year again, when horror lurks in every dark shadow and behind every “Jason” mask is a child hungry for sweets. While teenagers are plotting their Halloween fiascos and the screen writers of Halloween are debating whether or not to bring Michael Meyers back in his billionth sequel, we have decided to give you our ratings of some classic horror flicks of the past. Grady students suggested a list of movies, and then we picked the ones we had never seen before, watched them, and gave them a rating on a scale of 1-5. 1. Halloween (1978) The first appearance of Michael Meyers goes back to his first killing at the tender age of 5 and his incarceration in an escape from a mental ward. For the most part the movie was filled with him peeking out from behind the bushes or standing in between a clothesline, scaring poor Jamie Lee Curtis out of her blonde mind. Not only did the plot take forever to develop, but the use of the same song every time Meyers was either in the scene or about to enter the scene took away from the overall horror experience. The audience is stuck between watching Meyers watching other people and listening to Jamie and her friends complain about babysitting. The movie also lacked background and leaves viewers with unanswered questions like, why did he kill his sister? Why is he killing these random teenagers? And why is he wearing that stupid mask? During its time this movie was probably considered scary but for the modern connoisseur of horror this movie was downright hilarious, so this movie was rated

1. LOL We laughed so hard I forgot this was a scary movie.

2. Friday the 13th (1980) The movie starts off with a group of teen camp counselors preparing for the arrival of kids at Camp Crystal Lake. What they don’t know is that the lake has a hidden past. Why does every ‘70s and ‘80s horror flick center around a group of teenagers that looks like it just parked and exited the Scooby-Doo mystery van? The original Friday the 13th focused less on the killings and more on the surprises and plot twist at the end. From old crazy men coming out of closets to deranged psycho babbling mothers, this movie had everything, except Jason, who makes a brief appearance in the last three seconds of the film. It kept the audience somewhat glued to its seats. While this movie wasn’t as scary as we hoped it would be, it definitely deserved a higher rating than Halloween, so we deemed it a 2. Really??? 3. Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) “1, 2 Freddie’s coming for you; 3, 4 you better shut your door; 5, 6 grab your crucifix; 7, 8 stay up late; 9, 10 never sleep again,” so the jump rope rhyme goes. Fred Krueger, a devious figure, lurks in the dreams of five teenagers, where he hunts them down until they wake up. What the teenagers start to realize is that Krueger is more than just a figment of their imagination. Nightmare on Elm Street is one of those movies that makes its audience terrified no matter how many times they watch it. Fred Krueger has become a likeable killer, even though I doubt the audience would want to shake hands with him. His funny puns and his creative killings left the audience in shock. The movie’s quality was good, some of the acting was a little unrealistic, but Johnny Depp in the ‘80s definitely makes up for it. We rated this a

Spook Scale 4. We slept with our parents that night.

3. We almost peed our pants.

2. REALLY!?!?

1. LOL We laughed so hard we forgot it was a scary movie.

4. We slept with our parents that night.

- Tamara Mason and Courtney Marshall

What’s your favorite scary movie? Quarantine

“I remember seeing it and literally jumping out of my seat.... next to my older brother.” Senior Jordan Polk

Hide and Seek

“You’re all like ugh, because you don’t know who’s killing everyone,” but it’s the dad.” Junior Lauren Kwon

Child’s Play

“Because it’s hilarious.” Junior Rod Contreras


Very superstitious

When the month of October arrives, Halloween is on everyone’s minds. Imagine vivid candle-lit pumpkins and piles of bright and sticky candy strewn all across the living room. Down the street, you watch the lights flicker as a black cat jumps across your vision. There’s the all-out creepy and presumably frightening, or the little-kid friendly version to the holiday. If you like to focus on the eerie side, and scare yourself every once in while, scary stories are the way to go. Here’s to you, Grady students sharing Halloween superstitions at their best. When parents decided that it’s still OK to give rules even on Halloween, they warned you about the dangers and made sure you didn’t eat the opened candy. There was a little fright instilled in all of us, but strangely since fear is the theme of Halloween, these dangers also added to the fun. Many agree that Halloween was a much different experience as a child. There was greater build-up and more time to prepare, more time to get excited and less shame in being frightened by the extra bloody costumes. Thanks to Mom and Dad, there were a few more reasons to be scared as well. “My family never lit candles on Halloween because my mom said a ghost would stick around to blow them out.” junior Diana Powers said. “We didn’t even light our pumpkins.” There are several different versions of this superstition floating around. Some say that when a candle’s flame turns blue, then a ghost or spirit is very nearby. Others contend that burning new candles on Halloween night ensures good luck, but never the same candle again, or the luck shall be reversed. Powers also explained an ominous house in her neighborhood that was abandoned for several years. While

she was trick-or-treating each year, she would turn her pockets inside out when she passed by the house or even close to it. “So I wouldn’t bring home the ghosts in my pocket.” The “pocket trick” was her intuitive grandfather’s guide to staying clear of bad spirits. For junior Rex Petersen, the holiday’s excitement and satisfaction always depended on the costume. It was not so much the scarier the better, but the more fun. He realizes now that the ghosts and demons he would see floating around on Halloween night, are not so demonic but your average adult who consumed a few too many spirits. He was always afraid of his mother’s warnings, not to eat anything raw, or cooked. There could be razors blades or poison in your juicy red apple. When it comes to black cats, Peterson says he’s “allergic and definitely, afraid.” Axel Olson, sophomore, continues a special tradition every Halloween. “Well my friends and I believe that on Halloween night, if we all do a tumble roll over a grave in the cemetery, the corpse below will become alive and begin to wail.” A tumble roll is just your ordinary somersault or forward roll, but a very specific part of his sequence of hearing the dead. Thinking they were listening to the sounds of those below, Olson and company, sophomores Ben Searles and Fritz Mienert, were too scared to continue on. Many frightening stories are shared during childhood. Innocence is formed easily around things that scare us. Some hold on to those fears, maybe adjusting them in odd ways, and continue to believe them. They are the superstitious, the ones who dare to be scared, and the true Halloween fanatics. October brings out the best and the worst in all of us. - Nara Smith

To trick or not to trick?

Halloween is right around the corner, and once again, you’re faced with a decision. Should you trick or treat, or go to Halloween parties? It might seem like a very clear decision for a high schooler to make, but both options have clear advantages. It turns out that Grady isn’t sure which option is the trick and which is the treat. Many Grady students have been to Halloween parties before this year. These events feature costumed partygoers, Halloween-themed food, and dancing. Advocates of the hearty party consider this to be the more adult way to spend Halloween. You can stay inside and just have fun with

all of your friends instead of going in smaller groups for trick or treating. You still get to dress up in costumes. “Parties are just more fun,” senior Danny Baggerman said. “Why walk to get candy when you can buy it?” Senior Myers Pierce concurred, saying, “I don’t trick or treat because I can go to parties,” senior Myers Pierce said. But other Grady students would rather take their Halloween celebration to the streets. Trick-or-treating is the classic choice for Halloween. The candy, costumes, and running around with your friends are all awesome. The only downer seems to be that Grady kids seem too old to be roaming around

neighborhoods in search of candy. “They shouldn’t be trick-or-treating if they are over 10,” Grady science teacher Jeff Cramer said. “I wouldn’t give candy to someone I think is over 14.” If people start denying older trickor-treaters candy, trick-or-treating might become more like the Inquisition than a Halloween tradition. Trick-ortreating is just school age fun that can be enjoyed just as much as any “grown-up” option. No matter what you plan on doing this Halloween, you’ll probably be having fun and eating candy with your friends, and which teenager wouldn’t want free candy? -Austin Burch 19


Industrial furniture and locally commissioned art make the street food experience authentic.

20

Photos by James Moy

Those who frequent the streets of Little Five Points, the artsy alternative shopping district sandwiched between the Candler and Inman Park neighborhoods, may have noticed the arrival of a trendy-looking new restaurant at the corner of Euclid Avenue and Colquitt. While eccentric eateries aren’t exactly beyond the norm in Little Five, (take, for example, The Vortex and Savage Pizza) the restaurant’s name certainly aroused some curiosity. OMG Taco, a Korean-Mexican fusion restaurant inspired by the Los Angeles food truck scene, opened on July 29, bringing Atlantans the taste and feel of street food in an indoor setting. OMG, rather than meaning “Oh my God!”, stands for “Oh! Mmm, Gogi!”, a phrase coined to describe the sensory experience of entering the building. Funky art, furnishings, and music collide with savory tastes and smells, such as Gogi, the Korean soy-sauce marinated beef and namesake of the establishment, to create a unique dining experience. The unlikely culture clash started as a part of the food truck fad in Los Angeles and was brought to the East Coast by OMG Taco owner, founder, and president A.J. Chong. Inspired by L.A. street food, Chong, a San Diego native, international business marketing major, and 8-year hibachi chef hoped to open his own food truck in Atlanta. “I’ve lived off of food trucks all my life,” Chong said, “[but] it feels like it’s hard to access them.” Stricter regulations

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is in e cu

Food truck-inspired restaurant gives customers funky surroundings, savory food

Chong brings the scenery of the streets indoors with a food-truck façade. and the less accessible nature of food simultaneously captured the style of trucks drove Chong to “take that street the neighborhood. “Little Five Points is a very artsy concept and bring it to the store front” neighborhood,” White said. “We tried rather than vice versa. Chong walked the streets of Little to cater to that.” Starting with a blank canvas, White Five Points for six months prior to the opening in an effort to understand the collaborated with local artists to make OMG Taco what it is today. vibrant culture. “When I look for art, I look for “It’s the murals, the stickers, and the street art that I want to incorporate,” he individuality,” White said. “What I’m trying to do is create a collective said. “If you go out and eat street food, where [artists] could all exist in you’re walking by these every “No one one space and be respected day.” An essential part of the feels excluded; equally.” street-food experience, he no one is sitting, White says he wants said, is the local art. “Food saying, ‘Oh my God, to “keep offering that is my art.” The art and food aren’t I shouldn’t be here.’” comfortable vibe that doesn’t exclude anyone.” all that bring the street-OMG Taco art director In the spirit of the district, food experience indoors, Reveal White White takes pride in the fact however. Everything from that anybody can feel welcome the textured metal finish of the counters, to the authentic murals on in the open atmosphere. “No one feels excluded; no one is every wall, to the prominent, realistic food-truck façade that houses the cash sitting, saying, ‘Oh my God, I shouldn’t register is reminiscent of the outdoor be here,’” White said, “because something caters to every last one of urban dining experience. While Chong and his team of chefs them.” Supplying tastes from around the created the tastes of OMG Taco, the sights and sounds are all thanks to the world and beautiful art from around the corner, OMG Taco takes the restaurant’s art director, Reveal White. When it came time to begin designing experiences of street food and street OMG Taco, as well as selecting local art to an affordable indoor setting art and artists to feature, Chong asked where everyone is welcome. With an eclectic combination like around, and was directed to White. White was tasked with developing that, the name OMG Taco couldn’t be a unique feel for the restaurant that more fitting. - James Moy

OMG Taco: 1126 Euclid Avenue Atlanta, Georgia 30307


Rice Box gets reality check According to the Rice Box website, the restaurant offers “popular Chinese dishes that are always fresh and cooked to order.” According to Grady students, however, that is not the case. Many Grady students go to the popular Midtown Promenade restaurant before Friday night football games, before late-night sessions at school for a publication, or after an extracurricular club meeting to catch up with friends and eat something that is supposed to be quick and easy. Recently, however, the number of Grady students frequenting Rice Box has rapidly declined. Throughout brief Nexus survey of the student body reveals that the same complaints kept coming up regarding Rice Box: slow service, rude employees, being kicked out of the restaurant for minor offenses, and even the occasional unwanted visitor in their food. “Once they got my order completely wrong and refused to reimburse me or fix my order,” said junior Connor Singh, who got kicked out of the restaurant after protesting. “They are still customers who paid,” Junior Lauren Ogg said.

Two years ago a student was dared to try to pay for her meal with counterfeit money. Needless to say, her scheme failed, and she and her friends were kicked out. But Grady students say she was just one bad grain in a large bag of rice. All too often students say Rice Box’s employees are quick to kick Grady customers out for such trivial things such as getting soda when they paid for water. The restaurant now makes customers pay for a water cup, which used to be free. Many students now view the once booming restaurant teeming with Grady students from 3:30-6:30 p.m, as a grimy Chinese joint with a rude staff and a bad reputation. Rice Box declined to be interviewed or to respond to the accusations of Grady students. Overall, Grady’s students rated Rice Box at a 4 on a scale of 1-10. Not a top pick for anyone, Grady student or not. The current health inspection test score is a 98 out of 100 as of May 2011. The health score has turned around. Maybe the relationship with Grady students can, too. -Valentina Makrides

The fading take out box on Rice Box’s sign provides for a good symbol of their next to nothing business.

Yoforia serves up teen-friendly environment

Photo by Laura Streib

Yoforia’s new location across from Grady High School offers inside and outside seating.

Yoforia first opened in 2007 and has 18 stores and seven coming soon in two countries. It is still only one of the new frozen yogurt chains, however, in a city teeming with them. One of Yoforia’s new locations is right across the street from Grady’s stadium. It is being opened by Candy Wooten, along with her husband and son, who also own the Yoforia on Howell Mill Road. Wooten was first introduced to Yoforia’s frozen yogurt when her four children all told her that it was something she must try. She quickly fell in love with the product, and because she was searching for something to do she decided to become a Yoforia franchisee. “Yoforia uses organic nonfat milk, organic nonfat yogurt, and all the fruit used for toppings is fresh and cut daily,” Wooten said. “Most the other frozen yogurt stores use mixes.” This particular Yoforia location

will also be different from Yoforia corporate locations. Flavors will be rotated, and there are 30 toppings and 15 fresh fruits, compared to the only 10 fruit toppings required by the company. “Everything is run by young adults,” said Elizabeth Hibbard, a key holder and shift leader at the Midtown location. “It’s very friendly with older teens or college kids,” said senior Lee Johnson, a new Yoforia employee. Wooten already plans to have the new location work closely with the surrounding community, especially Grady. She has already spoken to teachers about having student reward cards, teacher appreciation, and spirit days. Yoforia’s slogan is “Rediscover Yogurt,” and considering all the other frozen yogurt stores and Yoforia locations in Atlanta, it’s clear that Atlantans are doing just that. -Laura Streib

Yoforia: 985 Monroe Drive Atlanta, GA 30309 21


is in e cu

Truckloads of tasty treats tantalize the ATL

At a food-truck event you may find five to six different trucks selling anything from classic cantina-inspired tacos to popsicles made just for your dog. Food-trucks have been taking Atlanta by storm and turning people’s heads in neighborhoods throughout the city. Once or twice a week you may see a large, lavishly decorated food-truck in traffic on its way to a foodtruck gathering. This was not the case a few months ago, when food-trucks were still having trouble finding places to set up and sell their products. Nowadays you can find a food-truck event almost every day of the week for lunch or dinner at various locations across Atlanta. “I like that there’s a big variety and all kinds of food,” junior Madison Rubio said. “I tried the Asian Fusion Chicken Slider from the Slider U truck and it was really good. There’s a little something for everyone.” Aside from the authentic, mouth-watering food, there is another side to the foodtrucks that customers might not know about. The Atlanta Street Food Coalition works for safe, affordable, and

Recent college grads serve up smiles and sliders cheerfully from the Slider U food truck at the Buckhead Theatre parking lot.

legal access to street food in Atlanta. The key word here is “legal.” Street food may not seem like a legal issue at all; vendors envelop the streets of New York and other major cities, but there is a long process that each truck must go through in order to legally serve appetizing and affordable food. Jackson Smith, a coowner of the food-truck Honeysuckle Gelato, explains that there are several different governmental bodies involved in permitting and licensing. “It’s such a new thing that nobody knows one step to

Loyal Customers fill the parking lots where the food-trucks dish out everything from gourmet popsicles to Texas-style tacos.

22

Photos by Mckenzie Taylor

the next, so you have to figure it out on your own,” Smith said. The food-trucks share the same goal: to produce quality food that entices people to follow them into the many neighborhoods of Atlanta. At any of these weekly food-truck events you can find families, friends, and people of all ages and ethnicities socializing and enjoying some of the great food Atlanta has to offer. “Our goal is to possibly have more food-trucks, but more importantly just to make sure we’re selling good quality food,” said Jobe Gruber, co-owner of

the Fry Guy food-truck. Because a majority of the food-trucks use seasonal and local foods, customers can rest assured that they are indulging in something that is not only delicious but also fresh. As a high school student you may find that the biggest perk to the foodtrucks is the price. Whether it’s for seasoned fries from “The Fry Guy,” mini sliders from Slider U, or a refreshing scoop of southern-inspired gelato from Honeysuckle Gelato, a satisfying meal can be bought for under $10. New food-trucks are always emerging and testing out their ideas at food-truck events. No matter what neighborhood you’re in, there’s more than likely a food-truck gathering near you. These events happen all over Atlanta throughout the week and each food-truck has a Twitter and Facebook page, so you can always be in the know. The next time you’re craving something new, cheap, and local, remember your fellow food-trucks. They’ll always be pleased to serve you something delectable. -Mckenzie Taylor


Trashy to classy: makeup tips - Devina Jones-Vargas

Junior Sofia Sifnaios

NEVER use too much mascara. It cause clumping. Use eyeshadows that highlight your eye color and don’t take away from it.

Don’t apply a darker lipliner than lip shade. Don’t use too much blush. ALWAYS: Blend, blend, and more BLEND. Play up your eyes or

Don’t let your eyebrows overgrow. Need more LENGTH? Try wiggling the mascara brush at the base of your eyelashes to give them the illusion of length.

mouth, but not both.

Freshman Angelique Dale

Senior Emma Jackson

Senior Elizabeth Nace

Ways To Make Skin Look Radiant: ALWAYS wash makeup off before going to sleep. Treat skin differently depending on season. TRY clay masks for spring and summer to absorb excess oil and for winter and fall. TRY a hydrating mask and make sure to emphasize lip care. To AVOID shiny skin, use cleansers with olive oil to cut grease and to soften skin. **ON-THE-GO: TRY oil blotting papers to wipe the shine away.** 23 Source: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/Adams31.html


co ut ur e

Prelude to the runway

This year’s senior designers discuss their lines, inspirations, and future plans.

Tenè Lewis

Goal for this year: “I just want both ideas to be shown, for things to run smoothly. [I want] to learn.” Where do you draw your inspiration? “[I draw inspiration from] patterns, like tribal-type clothing.” What are you working on as of now? “We are casting for models, looking for people who fit our idea.” What kind of style are you imagining for this line? “It will be ready to wear, and of all spectrums loose, tight and comfortable.” What is your actual career goal? “Maybe a fashion magazine editor.”

Brandon Edmonson

Nona Morris What is your style? “[My style] doesn’t really have a label. I’m just comfortable…just chill.” Goal for this year: “Hard work, energy and effort. I plan on being very serious and spending a lot of time on it.” Where do you draw your inspiration? “Mainly from highfashion designers like Lanvin and Michael Kors. They’re the best place to look to for trends and inspirations.” Did you do any sewing prior to taking this class? “I’ve been sewing since I was 12. I taught myself to do small things, and when I was 12 my mom got me a teacher and a [sewing] machine.” What kind of style are you imagining for this line? “It will be epic!”

What is your style? “Depends on the day. Some days I’m relaxed and simple, other days I wanna’ throw on my 5-inch heels.” Goal for this year: “[I want] to design clothes to look good on the person wearing them, not just a pretty dress.” Where do you draw your inspiration? “I’m [really] inspired by a very feminine silhouette and cutesy clothing. ” What are you working on as of now? “[We are] watching old UrbanCouture shows, designing and planning for our collections.” Did you do any sewing prior to taking this class? : “I had a few lessons, but I got most of my skills from UrbanCouture.” Who’s your target audience? “Young adults, maybe between 18 and 25. I’m designing for the average model. Not all sizes, because you use more fabric and thing become a lot more complicated.”

Eve Brown

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What is your style? “I kind of wear whatever. Sometimes I feel like a dress and heels.” Goal for this year: “I want to start soon. I don’t want to procrastinate.” Where do you draw your inspiration? “I’m a painter, and I draw, not much of a designer. I draw inspiration from everything in everyday life.” What are you working on as of now? “We’re working on models and preliminary sketches.” Name your line right here on the spot: “Mythical creatures or Splendid Visions.” What kind of style are you imagining for this line? “Something that would look more visual than ready-to-wear. More art to look at. I want my models to be tall and slender.” Who’s your target audience? “It’s not really meant to be fashion.” Interviews and photos by Nycole Key


Style Profiles:

Maegan Carnley and Jalen Gregory Do you have a style icon? “I love the way Zooey Deschanel dresses. I look for inspiration in fashion blogs like lookbook.nu.” What are your favorite stores to shop at? “I love thrift stores and Forever 21.”

Brillante touches up Thrasher’s hair in his bathroom.

8th grader cuts hair Brillante-ly

When do you feel most stylish? “I feel most stylish going to concerts. You can really let go and dress as edgy as you want.”

photos by Mckenzie Taylor

You don’t meet too many 13-year-olds who could cut your hair based on pure talent and no training, but Inman eighthgrader Skylar Brillante has been cutting hair for a year now, and his customers are more than happy. “I started getting kind of interested in keeping my hair looking good in seventh grade or so,” Brillante said. “I started taking notes in my head of all these little details about people’s hair.” One day he got the opportunity to put his ideas into practice when his friend Claudia Thrasher wanted a haircut and suggested that he do the honors. Next thing he knew, Thrasher had a pair of scissors in her hand extended out to him. “It was definitely a spur-of-the-moment thing,” Thrasher said. “The whole time I was a little freaked because so much hair was leaving me!” Even Brillante had his apprehensions. “I was kind of scared at first because I didn’t know how I’d start and how it would look in the end,” Brillante said. “But after I started and got a feel for it I was pretty positive about it.” Thrasher was pleased, especially since it was Brillante’s first time cutting someone’s hair. “I wasn’t the happiest I’d ever been, but I thought it looked good and so did everybody else,” Thrasher said. Since then, Brillante has devised his own process for giving a haircut. He starts at the front, cutting the bangs and slowly works his way through the rest of the hair. His most recent subject, Zoë Zingeser, visited Atlanta this summer from Rome, Italy, and needed a haircut. “I was over at his house, and he asked if I wanted it done right then.” Zingeser said. “I said sure and left his house with a bag of hair and not so much on my head.” Zingeser admires Brilliante’s professionalism. “He washed it, conditioned it, and did everything else I would have expected a salon to do.” A couple weeks later, Zingeser went to get it cleaned up again. The woman at the salon didn’t know what to do with it because it had been cut perfectly. “If I was in their situation, I would definitely be nervous about it,” Brillante said, “but for some reason none of my friends have ever really been scared about it. ... At least, they haven’t showed any nervousness about it.” Skylar sees himself pursuing a career in music, but said, “If that fails or if need some extra money on the side, then I think I would probably turn to hair-cutting.” -Kate Taber

What is an ideal outfit for you? “I love long, flowy skirts with a tank top and wedges. It’s so comfortable and easy.”

Do you have a style icon? “The only guy that I kind of look to as a fashionable individual for men is maybe Kanye West, but I look to the ‘70s and ‘80s for fashion inspiration.” What are your favorite stores to shop at? “Urban Outfitters, Stefan’s, Rag-o-Rama, Forever 21, Macy’s, and random thrift stores for sweaters only!” What is your favorite item of clothing? “All of my sweaters.” If you had to live in one outfit for the rest of your life, what would it be? “Black, jeans, desert boots, jean jacket, graphic tee...probably.” -Mckenzie Taylor

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co ut ur e

Doggies on the Catwalk’s 2010 show had a large turnout and proved to be successful.

Dogg i es walk the catwalk no more The UrbanCouture fashion program at Grady has gotten the attention of many people, and is made possible by Mr. Vincent Martinez. In 2010, Mr. Martinez was one of the award winners for the Atlanta Families’ Awards for Excellence in Education. His hard work and timely manner pay off in the annual fashion shows recognized around the state. One of the numerous fashion shows Grady High School’s senior designers participate in is Doggies on the Catwalk, a fashion show in which celebrities and their dogs model clothes made by Grady’s senior designers. This year’s Doggies, however, will be in a completely different location, run by Savannah College of Art and Design. Doggies on the Catwalk is a fundraiser for Pets Are Loving Support (PALS), an organization where money goes towards helping elderly people with illnesses to keep their pets, regardless of their medical or financial changes. Grady all of the profits from the event to PALS. At each fashion show, every celebrity model has a dog companion that wears a matching outfit. Mr. Martinez says that he either knows the celebrities personally, or his publicist gets in touch with them. The models have to show up to Grady to get fitted for their outfit, and Mr. Martinez

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describes the experience as inconvenient. “We’re very slow about it,” Mr. Martinez said about the process of completing the outfits. Two months is usually the time span for a finished outfit. Lindy Menefee, senior designer in 2011, designed for Doggies in 2011 with her partner, Anisha Patel.

“I think that doggies on the catwalk is and should always be a Grady event.” “Anisha and I put in massive amounts of hours to make sure each outfit was perfect and would not settle if it was not fully complete,” Menefee said. Although each year has been a success with Grady’s designers, Mr. Martinez is changing things up for this year’s show. Instead of being a Grady function, Doggies on the Catwalk will take place at Savannah College of Art and Design, without the senior designers.

“I understand that he puts a lot of work into each of the shows he has and that he feels under appreciated by getting a pay cut,” said Menefee, “but I feel bad for the students who have to suffer because of his decisions. I could not imagine not having that experience.” Menefee’s favorite part of Doggies was being able to work with her models. “Both Anisha and I really loved Reggie [Walker] because he was super east to work with and he had a fantastic style that we were excited to design for.” Mr. Martinez’s decision to make this year’s event a more “grown up” event might create controversy between UC’s 2012 Senior Designers. “I wish I had the experience for doing it, but I think that it will give us a bigger time slot for our senior designs,” said current Senior Designer, Verity Lister. Lister and other Senior Designers were told by Mr. Martinez that he was just taking it out of Grady for reasons he could not discuss. Saying goodbye won’t be easy, but it’s a professional and personal decision Mr. Martinez had to make. “I think that doggies on the catwalk is a Grady event and should always be a grady event,” said Menefee, “It does not seem right to take something that is a school wide tradition and just give it to SCAD.”


A trailer by any other name is still a suite After watching the trailers being built on the practice fields since the end of last school year, students have finally found out their purpose. The administration finished off last school year with a faculty meeting informing the teachers that all modern languages and some other teachers would be transferred to the trailers, which were to be called “instructional suites.” Many of the trailers are mainly for foreign languages because of the transformation phase Grady is going through. All academies have their specific classes, and because the majority of students take a foreign language, they had to group them together. On the first day of school, students were confused when they saw classrooms labeled “IS.” Once they were directed to their trailers, many students were not pleased to see that their classes had moved halfway across the campus. Students, however, are not as affected by the suites as the teachers, some of whom had to give up their old classrooms. A total of 10 teachers were moved to the trailers, eight of them teaching foreign languages. Until this school year, Spanish teacher Enoch Gill resided in his old classroom in the far end of the Eighth Street building for seven years. “[My students] think I’m sad, but I’m really not,” Mr. Gill said. “I just like having a place to keep my things.” Although he had a great location and loved the room, he has no negative feelings and is doing his best to make the trailer his own classroom. On a similar note, for five of the teachers who were previously floating, like Latin teacher Scott Allen, the trailers were a great way to start the year. “I was very happy to have a place to call my own,” says Mr. Allen, who has been floating since his arrival at Grady last year. Many teachers share the same opinions on the trailers. They are just glad to have a room in which to teach. They also share similar opinions on other aspects of the trailers. All of the teachers agree that the trailers were a great Photos by Sanjida Mowla

Students walk from the secluded trailers to lunch.

The splintery hallway of the infamous “instructional suites.” way to allow more teachers to have their own classrooms. The student population at Grady has been growing for years and the current population of the school is around 1,500 students. Teachers who are now teaching in the trailers realized that because they are so far away from the main building, there aren’t many disruptions for the students. French teacher, Mme Monye, says that the students in her class are more focused because other students aren’t distracting them. There aren’t students knocking on teachers’ doors or the noisy lunch crowd that sidetracks students. The main disadvantage that all the teachers heard the students complain about is the distance of the trailers from the main building, which is where the nearest restrooms are. Teachers also have had to adjust to the loss of technology in their classrooms. “They spoiled me in the last few years with all the stuff I had in my classroom,” Mr. Gill said. Throughout the first few days, students expressed more negative than positive opinions about the trailers. It just seemed so far away from the school, friends and everyone else. But as the weeks passed on, the trailers became part of their daily routine. “Most at this point have accepted the trailers as a part of everyday Grady life,” Mr. Allen said. Many students have not shown negative attitudes towards the trailers. Junior Jessie Black says that the trailers have fewer distractions and that although the trailers aren’t as nice as regular classrooms, she doesn’t mind them. On the other hand, others have complained about the freezing room temperatures, the long walks to the bathroom and feeling closed in. Surprisingly and fortunately, the trailers have not made that big of a stir besides the small glitches that occurred in them at the beginning of school. The instructional suites are a decent way for Grady to accommodate its vast amount of students. This is just one of the many changes Grady has been and will undergo through in the next few years few years. 27 -Sanjida Mowla


How much is too much? When can you tell when you have too much work, too many extracurricular activities, and not enough time? Grady has a very strong AP program. In fact, Grady’s AP program was recently ranked fourth in the nation. It is because of this high expectation to exceed that many students may find that they have taken on too much work, but it’s not always obvious to them. It’s easy to see when someone has far too much work, but it’s harder to see when someone has just slightly more than they can handle. So what could be classified as too much work? Is it two AP classes and multiple other honors classes? Is it four AP classes? Some students are even taking eight AP classes, journalism publications, and other extracurricular clubs, sports, and other activities. For most students, this is very obviously too much, but for those who have taken on this challenge, this extreme involvement may be just the right amount to challenge them and help them make as much of their high school experience as possible.

Illustration by Sam Lowe

ro st ru m

A.P. or A-plus?

Every student has different limitations, and there is no number of AP classes, amount of work, or any other indicator that can be an arbitrary cutoff point of too much work, because not everyone has the same limitations. It’s important to challenge yourself and always do your best in any class you take, but it’s equally important to know your own limitations, and what is too much for you. -Grayson Garrett

Classes packed, hallways congested, staff concerned With the Grady population bursting at the seems over the past two years, you would think the registration would stop accepting new students, but that is not the case. The School Population is increasing as time goes by and the “instructional suites” and ubiquitous overcrowded hallways. The senior class is able to fill up one side of the gym bleachers by itself. Before Grady split its student population into small learning communities, students from all over Atlanta and even out of Atlanta ttend the school as part of the Communications Magnet program. Now that the school has been divided into small learning communities, this means that only those living in the Grady zone are able to attend Grady, and those not in the Grady zone will have to go to their zone school. Even when students were coming from all over to attend Grady, it was not as crowded as it is now. The number of students attending Grady last year was about 1,424 and the number of students this year as of Sept. 15th was about 1,522. These are estimates because everyday you have people enrolling and being withdrawn. 28 “Well, it is a good thing

having students want to come here and more people moving into the school zone,” said Mrs. Sheila Oliver, one of the school counselors. “There is still a lot of work to do, like making sure students are placed in the right classes and have the right schedules.” The student population has increased

“...That means crowded classes, more work for teachers and less attention on students.” tremendously and that means crowded classes, more work for teachers and less individual attention for students who would like to have one-on-one time with their teachers. Although the large classes are posing problems for some students, some actually prefer it this way. “Even though my classes are extremely crowded to the point where we have to bring in desks from other

classes, I love it because to me, it is like college,” senior Briana Parks said. “It gets you prepared for college and how it is going to be.” On top of the crowded classes meaning more work for the teachers, some teachers have been given new subjects to teach because of the lack of sufficient teachers at school. “I am teaching world history, which is new to me and that is a little stressful,” Mrs. Millicent Green said. With the large population, some family members are unsure if Grady is going to perform as well as it has been or is known to. “I think our teachers can meet the challenge,” said Green, who rejects the view that the population is going to adversly affect Grady’s academic performance. From the look of things now, who knows how Grady is going to be next year? There is still work to be done like getting new teachers, getting students’ schedules fixed, and just getting everything in general intact. There is little time but a lot to be done. Is the Grady staff up to the challenge as Ms. Green said earlier, or have they have bitten off more than they can chew? -Lotin Tandongfor


As fares rise, so does rider ire Last October, MARTA significantly increased fares. The price of a single round trip went from $1.50 to $2. Along with rising fares, they have also eliminated a large amount of bus routes and altered others. These policies changed in order to save money, yet MARTA riders are paying higher fares for fewer accommodations. On Oct.2, MARTA again increased fares from $2 for a single trip to $2.50. Round-trip tickets will increase from $4 to $5, 10-trip tickets will increase from $20 to $25, one-day passes will increase from $7 to $9, seven-day passes will increase from $17 to $23.75, and monthly MARTA cards will increase from $68 to $95.00. The price hikes have many frequent MARTA customers rethinking their usual means of transportation. “I usually buy a monthly” said Taylor

McWhorter, a Grady senior and frequent MARTA rider. “Now it’s probably cheaper for my grandma to just bring me to school.” McWhorter isn't alone among Grady students. Even with high gas prices, it will still be a lot cheaper to drive to local places rather than to catch public transportation. Some MARTA customers are even talking about

1. Duck Brand Duct Tape Stuck on Prom Contest—This scholarship is awarded to the couple that creates the best duct-tape prom outfit. The winners of this contest receive $5,000 scholarships, and $5,000 goes to the winning students’ high school. In order to win this scholarship one of the participants has to join the Duck Tape Club, then the couple has to create and wear their duct-tape outfit to their school’s prom. You have to submit visual proof of your outfits at StuckAtProm.com: may the best outfit win. 2. Sophie Major Memorial Duck Calling Contest— If duct isn’t your thing perhaps ducks are. This scholarship is awarded to the student with the best duck call. The contest is open to all current high school seniors and winners of this contest can win a $2,000 scholarship. For more information visit stuttgartarkansas.org and attend the duck festival. 3. Carnegie Mellon University Bagpipe Scholarship—Here’s a scholarship that’s in the bag. Bagpipes that is. This really odd scholarship offers $7,000 yearly to bagpipe majors. As you may suspect, this scholarship is not very competitive; in fact, there is only one student in America that is currently

majoring in bagpipes at Carnegie University. 4. Excellence in Predicting the Future Award—To win this scholarship you don’t have to have super powers or be a fortune teller, you just need to be good at predicting changes in the stock market and like economics. 5. Left-Handed Scholarship—As the name suggests, this scholarship is awarded to left-handed students attending a specific college. The actual name of this scholarship is the “Frederick and Mary F. Beckley Scholarship,” and this scholarship is only available for left-handed students who attend or plan on attending Juniata College in Huntington, PA. 6. Starfleet Academy Scholarship— The Starfleet Academy is based on the hit show Star Trek offers a $500 scholarship to members of the organization. The only requirements are that you have to be a member of the club and be majoring in one of the required fields of study. For more information, visit their website at academy.sfi.org. 7. Society of Vacuum Coaters Foundation Scholarship—This scholarship is available to students who plan on studying in a field relating to vacuum coating technology. More information

Photo by Eboni Booker

MARTA price increases hit hard

petitioning and boycotting the buses because of the outrageous prices. Longtime MARTA customer Annie Scott, feels very strongly about the issue. “It’s ridiculous,” Scott said “We’re paying too much money and getting nothing out of the raised prices.” MARTA officials, however, say that customer petitions or boycotts will have no effect. Customers have become so dependent on MARTA that many people would not be able to boycott the buses, even if they wanted to. Many people will willingly or unwillingly submit to the raised fare prices. What's worse, the October fee hike might not be MARTA's last. With rising prices comes rising frustration among Atlanta's citizens, who must rely on the transit system for reliable transportation. -Eboni Booker

Eccentric scholarships offer Big dollars for odd scholars

about the Society of Vacuum Coaters Foundation can be found at their website: svcfoundation.org. 8. Potato Industry Scholarship—The National Potato Council offers a $5,000 scholarship to students studying Agribusiness, a major dedicated to agriculture, associated with potatoes. For more information on how to apply visit www.nationalpotatocouncil.org. 9. National Ice Cream Retailers Asociation Scholarships—Students employed at Kilwins or Yoforia you may be eligible to win a $1,000 scholarship for just being a hardworking employee. If your employer is a member of the NICRA, then your boss can nominate you for the Bryce Thomson Scholarship Award. The NICRA has the application form on their website available for download at www.nicra.org. 10. American Association of Candy Technologists Scholarship—The only thing sweeter than this association is its $5,000 scholarship available to students. To qualify, you need at least a 3.0 GPA and plan on majoring in food science, chemical science or other food/chemical related areas. Applications for this scholarship can be downloaded at aactcandy. org. -Christopher Drayton 29


m en ag

Rowling reinvents Hogwarts online

Alex Wolfe was tired as she prepared to turn off her computer and go to bed. As she began to log out of her email, however, something caught the sophmore’s eye. One new message had just appeared in her inbox. Curiously, she looked to the subject line and suddenly her exhaustion vanished. “I saw the word Pottermore, and I think I screamed,” remembers Wolfe, “then my sister ran in and we both started jumping up and down. We were freaking out, and I was like ‘Finally!’” Harry Potter fans across the globe are eager for the public release of Pottermore.com, a unique online reading experience where fans can rediscover the magical world of Harry Potter. Author J.K. Rowling created and designed the website to provide the “digital generation” with a new way to experience the books through interesting new facts, character back stories, and even a Hogwarts simulation in which readers can experience their own version of Harry’s story by becoming Hogwarts students. While Rowling has said that registration to the public will begin around the end of October and continue in phases throughout the rest of the year, early access to the site was granted to a few lucky fans in early August, through a process that sparked the excitement of “Potter heads” around the world, including those at Grady. These lucky fans were able to experience J.K. Rowling’s latest work of genius before it opened to the rest of the “Muggle” population. Over a seven-day period, excited applicants answered clues to find the “Magic Quill,” which finally led to the registration page, where only a limited number of fans could register each day. Grady alumnus and devout Potter fan Emma Powers was one of these lucky few. On the third day of early registration, Powers set her alarm for 5 a.m. so that she could be one of the first to apply. “It was like Christmas, waking up and seeing the clue, and trying to figure it out,” says Powers, who not only made an account for herself, but also for a few of her closest friends and fellow Potter lovers. After registering, applicants were told they would receive an email that would give them access to the site. Day after day, eager fans waited for the email. “Immediately after I applied, I was checking my email all the time really apprehensively, thinking ‘any day now,’” Wolfe said, “but I gave up after a week or two.” After weeks of anticipation, however, the long-awaited message finally arrived in her inbox. Around early September, Grady students and other applicants in the Atlanta area began receiving emails. “I think I probably squealed,” said Powers, one of the first Grady Potter heads to gain access to the site, “I don’t quite remember [what I did]. I was just so excited!” The email message provided a link where new members could log on and begin to explore the world of Pottermore. The website itself is made up of chapters from the books that each hold different activities based on information from the books and on newly provided

Photo by Claire Hassan

Freshman Hope Van Duyne and her friend wander around the new virtual world of of Pottermore. information from Rowling. Some of the most popular parts so far are the personalized wands and, of course, the sorting. For both of these, members fill out a detailed quiz and then are assigned a personalized wand and house. “There are lots of questions, and they’re all very good questions. They aren’t obvious,” Powers said. “You take other sorting quizzes [on fan websites online] and it’s like ‘What’s your favorite color? Red, green, yellow, or blue?’ and you’re like, ‘Come on! I’m not a Slytherin because I like green!” Powers was sorted into the Slytherin house and is very satisfied with her placement. “I’ve always secretly believed I was a Slytherin, even when my friends said I was a Ravenclaw. But the sorting hat knew.” Another unique part of Pottermore is the graphics. Each “moment” intricately illustrates a place or scene from straight out of the books. Some of them even move and have interactive qualities. “I think one of my favorite parts of the whole experience is just realizing that Harry Potter isn’t over, that there is this whole new world to explore,” Wolfe says. As Rowling says in her Pottermore announcement video, Pottermore is a gift to her fans, “an opportunity to say thank you, because no author could ask for a more wonderful, diverse, and loyal readership.” -Claire Hassan

“I’ve always secretly believed I was a Slytherin, even when my friends said I was a Ravenclaw. But the Sorting Hat knew.”

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Popular saga finally reached its Twilight

Photo by Jakara Griifin.

The time has come for Team Edward and Team Jacob fans to once again face off for the fourth and final Twilight Saga film, Breaking Dawn. The film is split into two parts, with part one coming to theatres on Nov. 18 and part two arriving nearly a full year later on Nov. 16, 2012. The main actors and new actors have joined the Breaking Dawn cast of vampires, including MyAnna During, Maggie Grace and Mia Maestro. Twilight, the first book in Stephanie Meyer’s runaway hit series, the Twilight Saga, was published in 2005, there have been Twi-hards at Grady and elsewhere who are hopelessly devoted to the series and its characters. “When I was in the seventh grade, my friend told me about the book and gave me the book, and I really liked it,” junior Charley Smith said. “After that, I read the entire series.” Junior Talethia Wright became a fan of the series a little later in her teenage life but is still equally enthusiastic. “I have been a fan of Twilight since my ninth grade year and have been hooked on it ever since,” Wright said. “I love all of the movies, especially the first movie. After I saw it in the movie theater after it went off, I felt empty. I was in the world with them.” With the new film coming to theatres soon, Grady Twilight fans reminisced on their favorite Twilight scenes.

“My fondest memory of Twilight was in the book New Moon when Edward left Bella,” senior Carmen Booker said. “It changed the whole book, and when Bella got close to Jacob, I felt sympathetic toward him. But I’m team Edward.” Since the movies have fared well at the box office Twilight earned $70 .5 million and Eclipse earned $175 million in the opening week there are great expectations for the final film. There are also great expectations that the movie portrayal of key scenes will live up to their portrayals in the book. “I think the wedding will be portrayed well because that’s not a difficult thing,” Booker said. “But the love scenes and when she has the child, and they yank the baby out of her. I don’t know how they are going to do that.” Because Breaking Dawn is hitting the big screen soon, excitement is in the air for die hard Twilighters around the world. “I have already reserved my tickets for the movie,” Wright said. “I’m stoked. I’m really anticipating this movie. I’m going to see it at midnight.” With the buzz on all things Twilight, Breaking Dawn is sure to fill the minds of the fans at Grady High as well as the rest of the world. -Jakara Griffin

There’s more to Volkert than lit and Latin Photo by Victoria Dragstedt

Mr. Volkert waves his hands frantically while explaining an important topic. A short round man with hazel eyes sits in the corner holding the book, Of Mice and Men. The room is dimly lit, with walls the color of paste. Students listen as one another read out loud. The passage ends. The mans head lifts up and suddenly asks, “Who likes cats?” His eyes glow with wonder. The class erupts in a chorus of responses. The teacher then starts describing his all-black, six-pound

“kitty.”Of all things in the world George Volkert could do, he decided to become a teacher. “I had really good teachers in high school and college,” Volkert said. “They were very patient and had great accessibility.” Back when Volkert was a student at Lovett High School, he was quite a busy man, running track, serving as the president of the Latin Club and the Community Training Program. The Community Training Program let students go to nursing homes and spend time with the senior citizens. Every Friday, Volkert and a group would go down and befriend the elderly. “I loved making connections with them,” Volkert said. “I found it very rewarding after.”Volkert also finds rewad in teaching. “I’d love to improve students’ writing skills and literacy,” He said. Volkert has been teaching for 21 years, and is starting his second year at Grady teaching English and Latin. Many students have a hard time believing their teachers have a life out-

side of school, but Volkert certainly does. His weekends are packed with everything from playing bridge to swimming. Most of all Volkert loves everything that can be considered a classic. Volkert loves watching silent and classic movies. His all-time favorite is Gone with the Wind. “He loves to be around old people, collect old antiques, and most of all he absolutely loves old movies,” said Volkert’s daughter Olivia. While the younger of the two Volkerts she confessed it is not ideal to attend a sophomore at Grady, the high school where your father teaches, she admitted that it is not the end of the world either. “It’s not as bad as everyone may think,” She said. “He respects my privacy, but definitely loves to embarrass me.” Students have described Mr. Volkert as big goofball. “Class is never boring,” said Walker Bolch, who took Volkert’s class last year. “I never regretted coming to class.” -Victoria Dragstedt

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October 21, 2011 Photo by Thomas Ruder

Nexus Magazine -- Volume 8, Number 1  

The first issue of the eighth volume of Nexus Magazine, the student cultural magazine of Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta.

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