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HENRY W. GRADY HIGH SCHOOL, ATLANTA

VOLUME LXVI, NUMBER 8

May 15, 2013

SLC STRUGGLES TO CREATE NEW LAW PATHWAYS O

By Isabelle Taft n the first day of the 2010-2011 school year, four new small learning communities opened their doors to Grady freshmen. On its first day, however, the Public Policy & Justice Academy had a problem: it was required to offer students a choice of two “pathway” courses, sequences designed to give students skills they can apply to particular careers or fields of study. APS, however, had not hired a teacher with a background in law or public policy to teach those classes. Instead, Mary Carter Van Atta, a world geography and civics teacher, was forced to teach introductory courses for the law-based pathway. “It was very demanding because I’m not a lawyer, so I had to rely on a lot of outside sources,” Van Atta said. “It was an intro class so it wasn’t a big deal, but it would have been a big deal had I had to do anything with the more advanced classes.” The following school year, APS hired a trained lawyer to teach the law pathway courses. But academy leader Russell Plasczyk said hiring pathways teachers has continued to be a problem, with significant turnover in the law-pathways teacher position. Since the public policy pathway has not materialized, the academy was renamed Law and Leadership this year. Instead of a complete second pathway, Law and see PATHWAYS, page 7

GRADY COMMUNITY MOURNS LOSS OF OUTDOOR-LOVING, ALWAYS-SMILING ALEC BRUNO Students, teachers and members of the community were shocked to learn of the sudden passing of junior Alec Bruno. Immediately following his death, students and community members planned to hold ceremonies and gatherings in Bruno’s memory. Haygood United Methodist Church held a candelight vigil on April 24. Grady students, faculty and staff attended. His funeral was held on April 25 at the Catholic Shrine of Immaculate Conception. See related story, page 12

Fallout from cheating scandal evident in 2013 tests By Quinn Mulholland nyone who observed an APS school in late April and early May might have noticed something unusual: empty hallways, patrolling administrators and focused students filling in small bubbles on mass-produced answering documents. Across APS, April 23 to May 13 is the three-week period designated for students to stop learning, for teachers to stop teaching, and for standardized tests to be administered. Although APS has administered the Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests to third- through eighth-graders and the End of Course Tests to high schoolers since 2000, this year’s testing period was different. A month removed from the indictment of former Superintendent Beverly Hall, as well as 34 other APS educators, and two years removed from the investigation that found that 44 out of the 56 APS schools in the district had cheated on the CRCT, the implementation of the tests

faced heightened scrutiny.

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Over 1,400 people volunteered for a Starbucks-sponsored service day, called You + 2 = Project Together, at Grady on Saturday, April 27.

Campbell has been at Grady for six years, and has observed the transition from of Hall to FROM HALL TO DAVIS current superintendent Erroll Davis. “The test proceOne of Beverly dures have become a Hall’s defining charlot more formalized,” 1. How much did APS spend on remediation acteristics during her Campbell said. “In programs for those affected by the scandal? tenure as APS superterms of standardizedintendent was her de- A $4 million B $500,000 test pressure, I have mand for improved 2. How many educators accused of cheating never felt that here.” were removed following the scandal? test scores, with the Russell Plasczyk, threat of unemploy- A 35 B Over 180 C 3,000 Law and Leadership ment looming for 3. How many APS principals were replaced Academy leader, said those principals and the emphasis on testing after the cheating scandal? administrators who is the biggest A 1% B 40% C 60% D 50% security failed to meet perprocedural change. 4. How much do standardized test scores formance targets. In “Everything now count for in the new teacher evaluations? fact, according to has to be locked up,” The New York Times, A 5% B 10% C 40% D 50% Plasczyk said. According to The during her tenure, 90 Atlanta Journal-Constitution, APS has crepercent of APS principals were replaced. AP World History and AP Compara- ated double-locked “safe rooms,” accessible tive Government and Politics teacher James only by principals and testing coordinators,

BY THE NUMBERS

11 lifestyle

Get the scoop just in time for summer vacation on all the best ice cream, frozen yogurt and other sweet treats around Atlanta.

and monitored by video surveillance, to store test materials in every school. Furthermore, according to an editorial by Superintendent Erroll Davis in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, APS has “set trigger points that will result in automatic investigations of schools where test scores show larger-than-normal year-over-year changes.” Another measure APS has taken since the cheating scandal is remediation programs for those directly affected by the scandal, which have cost $4 million so far, according to the Associated Press, as well as mandatory ethics training for all APS employees. Furthermore, according to the Associated Press, every APS school now has an “ethics advocate” to help employees resolve ethical issues. In a letter released to APS students, parents, employees and partners the day of the indictment of 35 APS educators, Davis said see TESTING, page 6

13 thesoutherneronline.com

This year’s senior class has chosen English teacher of 18 years Larry McCurdy as the recipient of The Southerner’s Marion P. Kelly Award.

Senior Patrick Scollard is one step closer to his dream of being a sea captain with his recent admission to the Merchant Marines Academy and Coast Guard.


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comment Editorial Board

the Southerner

J.D. Capelouto Mary Condolora Caroline Morris Ben Searles Ryan Switzer Alex Wolfe

Year bonds school

Everyone always said junior year would be the toughest. SATs, rigorous coursework and the terror of our looming futures were imminent, but no one could predict the year we experienced. It was a year that shattered our expectations in the worst possible way. As national debates over education and gun control raged in Washington, we were unfortunate enough to receive first-hand experience in the affairs. It has always been a general consensus that Grady isn’t the most secure campus, but none of us knew how to react when a gun discharged in our own courtyard. We all knew about the cheating that had occurred in our school system’s middle and elementary schools, but when Beverley Hall and other APS officials were indicted, we took pause. Because of these events, Grady simultaneously became a point of and participant in conversation. But should we be surprised? Our school prides itself on its diversity (something many other APS schools lack), and therefore serves as a microcosm of the world we live in. Students of various levels of intelligence, differing socioeconomic status and contrasting ambitions are present within our gates. People carry stolen guns and cheat in the real world: as they do at Grady and in APS. These events threatened to tear apart our already strained community. The laws of physics take over at this point. As Mr. Cramer teaches us, every action has an equal and opposite reaction. As our friends have left us and our district is torn apart, we are brought together. The trials we have faced this year, we have faced as a community, and were able to find the silver linings. We took pride in our school as we partnered up with Starbucks to give Grady a face-lift. Our whole school attentded Joe’s Big Hug, bringing all four classes together in a time of tragedy. As we enter the 2013-2014 school year, it is imperative that we remember these silver linings. Let’s never forget the time we all held hands in the stadium, united because—as it has become glaringly apparent—we really are all we got. p

Over the course of my four years at Grady, I admit I have made some enemies. I have clashed with teachers and held grudges for years. But looking back, none of this was worth my time. Even when I feel like an assignment is useless or an entire class is irrelevant to my Lauren Ogg life, it is important to understand the value of every single course. In retrospect, each teacher and class I have had taught me important skills that four years later, I finally recognize. It all started freshman year. I was a naive 15-yearold in Mrs. Kendall’s Computer Applications class. All my friends were in this class, seeing as it was a mandatory introductory Magnet class. We were all used to talking during class, passing notes and texting, so it was a huge wakeup call when Mrs. Kendall told us to place our bags at the front of the room and rearranged our seating, breaking up friends. Naturally, I was turned off and tuned out. I didn’t pay attention and gave only about 50 percent of my energy to my assignments. This behavior continued junior year when I signed up for AP Language and Composition. I was on board with the curriculum until I started to get behind in our reading. Once I was past the point of no return, I felt like there was no use in trying to read Ms. Willoughby’s novels. I didn’t understand the importance of her choices of reading and, frankly, didn’t care.

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This attitude significantly lowered my participation and, in turn, my grade. Now, seeing trailers for The Great Gatsby makes me wish I had actually taken the time to read in Ms. Willoughby’s class. Struggling with Adobe InDesign now makes me hit myself on the head for not caring in Mrs. Kendall’s class. I missed many great opportunities to learn new skills and knowledge, all because I held grudges against teachers. As a second semester senior only a couple days away from graduation, I am telling you that picking unnecessary quarrels with teachers is not worth it. When you butt heads with a teacher, brush it off your shoulder. No matter how hard this is to visualize, in hindsight it will be clear. Our teachers are qualified individuals that are here to educate us. No matter how useless a lesson might seem, one day there will be a purpose for it. Even if you never think that knowing who the 27th president was or how to use a quadratic equation will be useful, there will come a time when you will be thankful for your teachers. I can fully appreciate what my teachers have offered me over the course of my high school career and hope that you will understand this too. Becoming aware of the positive in a seemingly negative situation is a trait that should be sought-after and valued from the start. For those who are a little late with making peace, it is time to start now. Go do that “useless” assignment sitting in the front pocket of your binder and think about the grudges you’ve held against a teacher. Now, make them disappear. I promise, it’s all worth it. p

uestion

No fun-ding for us While we were absorbed with the challenging process of producing the paper you now hold in your hands, Carrie MacBrien, communications and journalism academy leader, learned that APS had decided to cut funding for Grady publications, The Southerner, Nexus and The Unmasking. Apparently, the best way to balance the district’s budget is to eliminate the $15,000 that helps provide students with real-world journalism experience via nationally recognized and celebrated publications. According to an APS official, the funds were cut because other schools do not receive similar funding and the APS budget is particularly tight for the upcoming year. We cannot speak for Nexus and The Unmasking, but without funding, The Southerner will be forced to drastically scale back our print edition, or sell more advertisements to raise revenue. Either of these outcomes would make it harder for us to spend time producing high quality journalism. We think that the $15,000 required to produce three valuable publications is something APS should work hard to find. It is important to preserve the contributions these publications make to Grady and the surrounding communities. These print publications are often the only chance high school students have to explore the world of journalism. In addition to providing a creative outlet, participants learn valuable, marketable skills through learning how to professionally write, design and coordinate everything that goes into a publication. Often we are the first to provide accurate information after an incident occurs on Grady’s campus or in the neighborhood. In many cases, we have been the only group who notified the Grady community about events, performances and assemblies on campus. Our coverage of Grady students’ interactions with the greater community further serves to strengthen the tie between the school and its neighborhoods. Although we will prepare for the worst, we hope that APS will find more funding before next year for the invaluable print journalism program. p

May 15, 2013

What summer activities are you looking foward to?

Staff: Emma Aberle-Grasse, Rachel Citrin, Sammi Dean, Zachary Garrett Kate de Give, Jolie Jones, Troy Kleber, Olivia Kleinman, Joe Lavine, Ciena Leshley, Simon McLane, Lauren Ogg, Grace Power, Diana Powers, Megan Prendergast, Hunter Rust, Carson Shadwell, Alex Stearns-Bernhart, Will Staples, Isabelle Taft, Olivia Veira, Gracie White

The beach, no more Mr. Howard for two months.”

Going to Minnesota.”

Alex Fairley, sophomore

Traveling the world.”

Alan Michael Goens, junior

Southerner Staff 2012-2013 Comment/Sports Editors: J.D. Capelouto, Mary Condolora, Caroline Morris, Ben Searles, Ryan Switzer, Alex Wolfe News Editors: Ryan Bolton, Archie Kinnane, Eli Mansbach, Allison Rapoport, Josh Weinstock A&E/Lifestyle Editors: Hanna Brown, Zac Carter, Declan Farrisee, Orli Hendler, Axel Olson Doubletruck Editors: Riley Erickson, Ansley Marks, Rebecca Martin, Quinn Mulholland, Olivia Volkert

f the month

Joe Bradley, sophomore

College. I’m going to Morehouse over the summer, meeting new people.” Grady Roberts, senior

An upbeat paper for a downtown school Advisers: Kate Carter, Dave Winter

To our readers,

The Southerner, a member of GSPA, SIPA, CSPA and NSPA, is a monthly student publication of: Henry W. Grady High School 929 Charles Allen Drive NE, Atlanta, GA 30309

The Southerner welcomes submissions, which may be edited for grammar, inappropriate language and length. Please place submissions in Mr. Winter or Ms. Carter's box in the main office. Subscriptions are also available. For more information, please contact Mr. Winter, Ms. Carter or a member of the staff.


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May 8, 2013

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Take time to enjoy life’s little benefits It was the first Saturday morning of spring break. I was at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, beginning a journey to New York City. The airport was buzzing with people anticipating vacation getaways and business meetings. It was more crowded than I had ever seen it. After getting through the unusually long security lines, I was finally Darriea Clark able to go to my gate. When I reached the bottom of the elevator that leads to the concourses, I was surprised to see the crowd waiting for the train. While waiting for my delayed departure, I looked to my left and noticed moving sidewalks connecting the concourses. As I moved away from the trains and toward to the aisles, I saw a museum exhibit about Zimbabwe. There were 20 stone sculptures of families and spirits made by Zimbabwean men. I wondered how long it took to craft these massive sculptures. The men took inspiration from their lives and cultures to create truly impressive handiwork. Aside from the artwork on the ground, mounted on the walls were

beautiful photographs of Zimbabwe. There were pictures of lions, zebras, huts and life in Zimbabwe. Men, dressed in loincloths and body paints, were drumming and looked as if they were truly enjoying life. The pictures made Zimbabwe look like paradise, and as I looked at pictures of vast fields and landscape, I started to plan my own trip to Zimbabwe. I was mentally estimating how I could fit plane tickets into my college budget when a man with a suitcase hurriedly brushed past me. Snapped out of my daydreaming, I saw the many air passengers who overlooked the artwork and beauty surrounding them. I was annoyed. Moreover, I felt sorry that they did not see what I saw. Life is always moving, and there are always tasks to be done. Going into spring break, I had tons of homework, tests and other responsibilities to complete. But when life puts me in front of something worth stopping for, I like to take the liberty to enjoy it. I took the mental stress from the work and pushed it aside, and I think it’s important for others to do the same. So, rather than rush to the closest train, take a stroll. If you have your head stuck only in work, you’ll look up and see that you’ve wasted your life away. p

Our school is greater than advertised

Axel Olson

A parent of a middleschool student m a d e a comm e n t Troy Kleber to me a while ago about the lack of persuasion on Grady’s website for parents to send their children to our school. This parent was considering moving to another neighborhood and was researching the educational opportunities present all around Atlanta. This surprised me for a few reasons. First of all, I never realized people actually visited Grady’s website. And second, I had no idea our school did such a poor job of advertising itself. We’re certainly not trying to hide anything, are we? After this conversation, I went home and opened our website. Well, as it turns out, this is the first message you receive when accessing our site: “If You See Something, Say Something!” And then you are given the phone numbers of both of our assistant principals. This didn’t seem like a good persuasion teachnique to me. I have, therefore, taken it upon myself to assist these prospective high school students’ families in their decisions. Here are the top five reasons why you should go to Grady. Reason No. 1: You become a part of a very diverse student body. This point is evident at any large assembly of Grady’s student body. Students can be categorized into those who spend their entire time socializing; those who are sarcastically commenting on the speaker’s words; those who are in the process of starting and finishing homework due next period; those who are falling asleep and those who never showed up in

the first place. Sure, you may say this variety in a student body is present at any high school, but what makes Grady unique at these events is that the student body still unites in a common attitude—all of us really don’t care about whatever this assembly is about. Reason No. 2: Every lunch is well-balanced. Let’s be clear, though. This is not a compliment of the cafeteria meals, although my sources say they are “alright … I guess.” When I say “well-balanced,” I am referring to the placement of each grade around the courtyard in order to maintain the natural and necessary balance in a high school environment. The freshmen are in a corner, huddling together for warmth and comfort; the sophomores are close by … but not too close; the juniors are split up into clans and cliques; and the seniors are on top of the hill. Every class is where it is supposed to be. Reason No. 3: You get to in-

teract with a lot of awesome people. Regardless of whether you want to, Grady’s hallways force you to get to know some interesting people. While walking down the hallway, you will often and very suddenly find yourself face-planted into the backpack of a student in front of you who has inexplicably halted abruptly. In response to this impact from behind, the student will likely exclaim, “Watch where you’re going!” or “Move it!” Don’t read these messages the wrong way. This student is simply greeting you as a fellow Grady student and, of course, as a new friend. Reason No. 4: You learn many skills that will be very important for your future. You learn how to sleep only enough so that you are still able to recognize when someone calls your name. You learn how to wash your hands when no soap is available or, in rare cases, when no sink is present. You learn how to have both

one eye on your phone and one eye on the class so you seem attentive. You learn how to write well. You learn how to shoot half a sandwich into the opening of a trash can from 20 feet away (after 20 or so misses). Grady gives you all the skills needed for success, and more. Reason No. 5: You have an overall great experience. Whether you are laughing about the latest crazy statement Dr. Propst made, or watching live entertainment of students fighting or sliding down the grass slope in Piedmont Park, you will have fun at Grady. There are so many experiences to be had and memories to be made here. Coming from a senior who is about to graduate, it is honestly heartbreaking to have to leave this place, a school that has really become my second home these last four years. Despite its minimal shortcomings, I have enjoyed my time here. You certainly will too. p

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ALEX Mentor’s advice helpful while in perilous situations By Alex Stearns-Bernhart In the past 14 “Nature with Alex” columns, I have touched on many subjects varying from run-ins with bears to useful plants, with numerous topics in between. Through all of this, there is a subject i have not yet mentioned that can be helpful to aspiring woodsmen and woodswomen: the importance of finding a mentor. I found my mentor when I was a young, antsy 12-year-old. His name is Nathan Roark. Since the day that I met him, my life has only changed for the better. I knew that I wanted to try to make my life in the forest, but many people had told me that it couldn’t be done. Nathan showed me that it could. He has been patient in dealing with my constant stream of questions for the past six years, without so much as a complaint. He taught me almost everything I know about the woods (everything from how to sharpen a knife to the difference between the paddling strokes sweep and cross-bow draw). He first introduced me to a career option that would allow me to work outside doing what I love. Most of all he has been the closest thing to a father that I have ever had. I am honored and proud to call Nathan Roark my mentor. While Nathan has been one of the biggest influences in my life, there have been many others along the way. Some of them include Mark Kessler, Paul Landowne and Dan Horseman. Although they would never admit it, each one of them has taught me many lessons on how to live life to the fullest. Mentors come in all shapes, sizes and occupations. They always seem to come into your life at a time when you are truly in need of a strong teacher and positive role model. It is impossible to describe how much these people have done for me. To those of you out there who currently­­ have mentors, you will understand when I say the only way to fully comprehend what I am talking about is to find a mentor of your own. Through these past two years and 15 columns (including this one), I have talked about many adventures and experiences I have had in the backcountry. Some have been good and some have been bad, but I have always lived to tell the tale. Hopefully y’all have learned from the multitude of mistakes I have made and later written about, so you won’t be put into some of the situations that I have encountered. And for those who don’t find themselves in the woods, I have tried to make this a column that everyone can benefit from. I hope all of you have benefited and enjoyed reading this column. Don’t think that just because you are not a outdoor enthusiast that a mentor is not for you. I have not met anyone yet, including myself, who could not benefit from some wise words from a good teacher. p

EXCLUSIVELY @ theSoutherneronline.com Motive of Boston bombers most shocking part of incident

J Tom Morgan’s representation of Hall unethical, hypcritical

It wasn’t the three dead, 17 in critical condition, and the more than 100 injured. It wasn’t the hellish and gory atmosphere depicted by quotes from witnesses of the event. It wasn’t the citywide manhunt that followed. And it wasn’t even the killing of the first ...

As this year comes to an end we are once again reminded of our national obsession with standardized testing. As we complete the Georgia Graduation Tests and End-of-Course Tests and approach AP Tests, our school is thrown into the test-taking zone, where ...


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‘Taboo’ year-round schedule aids kids

Traditional calendar benefits students by Carter Guensler

by Chris Brown

Usually, when students hear about a “year-round” school calendar, they immediately conjure up nightmarish thoughts of summer days spent in classrooms and little to no days off during the school year. This is because the phrase “year-round” conveys a misleading impression of what is actually brought to the table by the year-round school calendar. Although many students may have misgivings about the plan, I know from experience that the year-round calendar is a beneficial alternative to the traditional calendar. During my last two years of elementary school, I attended Centennial Place Elementary School, one of only three schools in all of APS that is currently on a year-round schedule. The transition from a traditional calendar to a year-round one was initially difficult, since the school year began earlier and ended later than I was used to. What I didn’t realize, however, was the year-round school calendar has the same number of school days as the traditional one. The main difference is that these days are divided into blocks, with more frequent breaks. In fact, year-round students actually end up spending more time outside of school than traditional students do. The way the year-round calendar disperses school days helps students to not become overwhelmed or restless during long periods of school. The year-round schedule provides students with the time to periodically regroup themselves, physically and mentally. This allows students to be better prepared for the rigors of school, and not become inundated by the daily hassles it sometimes presents. And while the year-round calendar prevents students from being overwhelmed by being in school for too long, it simultaneously protects students from the loss of knowledge that can occur after long breaks. In the traditional calendar, students are given 11 weeks of summer vacation. This is almost twice as long as the six weeks year-round students are given. This massive increase in the time spent away from a learning environment adds to the amount of knowledge a student can forget or misremember during the break. One of the most beneficial features of the year-round calendar is intersessions. Intersessions are short periods that take place during the school year in which students are given intensive help and remediation in specific areas. These periods typically last for a week, and allow students to concentrate on the areas of their education in which they are struggling most. Intersessions also give students recreational time during half of the day, providing students with a break from their work. While intersession can serve as a chance to progress some students, it also serves as an opportunity to review for others. Students can focus on concepts they’ve yet to fully grasp or catch up on work they’ve missed. All in all, these periods serve as an academically driven break, and benefit students greatly. I can understand how the phrase “year-round school” could be regarded as taboo, but I believe that when you look at the facts, they really are the best plan for APS. Grady could greatly benefit from more breaks and more enrichment opportunities, and I hope that we start to consider implementing the non-traditional calendar across APS. p

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May 15, 2013

The school year seems to last forever, but summer is just around the corner, which means 11 weeks of sweet, sweet freedom for Grady students. These final weeks of class have made us anxious; we dream of sleeping, beaches, blue skies, sleeping, concerts, short shorts, sleeping, bonfires and life without school. But as the remaining days of class dwindle, we must look ahead to next year and the years that follow, to see if changing the school calendar to a year-round schedule is right for Grady ... and it isn’t. Not only does the traditional calendar provide a much-needed break from the hum-drum routine of school life, but a yearround schedule interrupts learning and places even more restrictions on an already angsty, teenage population. Obviously, we need to stick with what we have. The biggest advantage of a traditional schedule is summer vacation. Every day during the school year, students have to deal with great stress. Needless to say, this whole situation can be extremely tiring, so it is only natural for students to demand a break. The 11 weeks of summer vacation give us relief from the challenges of education. It’s important that we recharge, so when we come back for our next year of school, we can face the grueling work with newfound vigor (or at least manage our work without exhaustion). Many proponents of a year-round schedule assure us that such a calendar will reduce the academic losses of youth over the summer, and while this is true on some level, the simple fact of the matter is research on year-round schools has never provided a clear consensus on the relationship between school calendar and student achievement. In fact, two recent studies of year-round schools in California reported negative effects on academic success. What most people don’t understand is the year-round schedule has the exact same number of days as a traditional calendar. Why is this bad? Well, instead of a single, fun-filled break, vacation days are spread out across the year in three-week intervals. This means for every couple months of school, there’s a hiatus of learning, which can throw off curriculums. Year-round schools are also more expensive on average. Air-conditioning, buses and other expenses rack up the bill. Plus, it’s harder to make repairs when classrooms are always occupied. Those nasty ceiling tiles and broken sinks? Those would never be fixed. With a year-round schedule, students also miss the chance to spend real time with friends, eat stuff and do something crazy. If we give students free rein during the summer, then they are more likely to buckle down during the year, motivated by the prospect of freedom. With administrators divided in their preferences and conflicting research results, the debate over which calendar is best may come down to the way Churchill put it: “A love for tradition has never weakened a nation, indeed it has strengthened nations in their hour of peril.” Obviously, Grady is not a nation, but we should stand together for our rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of a lengthy summer vacation. So do whatever you want; this is your summer. p

STUDENT

Stance

Which is more beneficial: a year-round school calendar or the traditional school calendar?

Alum experiences Boston violence, feels city’s unity As I marched off the field with the band at a Grady football game freshman year, I heard fireworks in the parking lot. Thinking nothing of it, I continued to march, only to be tackled by a fellow band member yelling “Get down!” They weren’t fireworks; they were gunshots. On Patriot’s Day, as I walked with hoards of Red Sox fans towards the Erin Bailie finish of the Boston Marathon in Copley Square, I heard the U.S.S. Constitution fire its cannons twice in celebration of the day. Or so I thought. When I saw police officers linking arms to stop the marathon, I realized the Constitution sat miles away, too far away for me to hear its cannons. A familiar sense of dread steered me away from the finish line and back towards MIT. The days that followed were a numb blur. I couldn’t fathom that Copley Square, the place where I went to pick up prescriptions and share end-of-term dinners with friends, was the same Copley I now saw on TV. The store fronts and street signs looked the same, but the Copley on

TV was a ghost of the Copley I knew. Three days after the bombings, I walked back to my dormitory from the robotics lab. Having spent all evening in the lab, I decided to swing by 7-Eleven to pick up a quick snack. I then walked back to my dormitory through the Stata Center courtyard. As he was most nights, I saw friendly Officer Sean Collier parked in his cruiser, keeping an eye on things around campus. I stopped at his car, wished him a good evening, and we shared a quick smile. Twenty minutes later, the 7-Eleven was robbed at gunpoint; 30 minutes later, Sean Collier was dead. That night was my first all-nighter at college. I spent it crowded onto a futon in a friend’s room with 20 others. We turned on police radios and newscasts, and as sirens moved upriver towards Harvard, my first instinct was to text my Grady classmates there. As engineers, we are information junkies; keeping tabs on the situation unfolding in our backyard helped us to stay calm. The days that followed were even more blurred and numb than before. But instead of brushing off our fears, we finally took the time to process the events that occurred. Though MIT is often seen as an impersonal land of long hours and complex equations, the community response has been one of overwhelming humanity (that being said, my friend described

the situation as a delta function: “integrate over enough of a time sample, and it’s just a little speed bump”). Housemasters and deans alike have opened their doors, welcoming students into their homes. Professors have canceled assignments and exams. The administration haulted classes to allow students to attend Sean’s service. In the wake of all of this, there are still so many unanswered questions. Will my children learn about this in their AP U.S. History class – and if they do, will I tell them that I was there? Next year, on Patriot’s Day, will I have the courage to walk across the river to cheer for the runners? Despite all of the unknown, I know this: we are Boston strong, and I am Grady strong. I have received calls and texts from people who I haven’t spoke to in almost four years, and that has been more comforting than I can put into words. A week after Boston’s lockdown, MIT celebrated “Unity Day,” an impromptu holiday to celebrate the communities that make each of us feel as though we belong. I wore an MIT sweatshirt with many of my classmates, but few of them knew that beneath it was a t-shirt from The Flying Biscuit. I may only be in Atlanta a few weeks a year, but it will always be my home. p


News Briefs On the Capitol Avenue exit off I-20, an APS bus and a taxi crashed when the taxi reportedly pulled out in front of the bus after the traffic light changed. Grady Memorial Hospital admitted eight Grady students with minor injuries. Taxi driver Mensur Ahmmed was charged with an improper turn and failing to yield. The bus driver, Tamika Render-Pate, was charged with driving without a license.

One-acts presented by Senior directors On May 3 and 4, seniors from Lisa Willoughby’s advanced drama projects class put on student-directed plays known as the Senior One Acts. The four male and four female directors presented a variety of plays from original dramas to slapstick comedies. Both nights, the cast and directors enjoyed a nearly full house. After the end of the second night, Willoughby handed out roses to the cast and crew, and gave out awards to a few actors and directors for their hard work.

Obama to deliver speech at Morehouse On May 19, President Barack Obama will give the commencement adress at Morehouse College’s graduation. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., who previously worked in the White House, recently took the position as Morehouse president. This year’s commencement address is also historically significant, as 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech and the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. For a more detailed story, visit www.thesoutherneronline.com.

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May 8, 2013

Campus shines after Starbucks work day By Archie Kinnane With raucous cheers of “Project” and “Together,” a Starbuckssponsored service day at Grady began at 10 a.m. on April 27. The 1,404 workers who volunteered painted and remodeled large sections of the school, including the courtyard and bathrooms. Terri Vish, a Starbucks district manager who was largely responsible for organizing the project, said she and her team prioritized the bathrooms based on a student survey, which revealed the majority of students hoped to see bathroom improvements. Volunteers painted the walls of the bathroom and plan to return to install new sinks. The volunteers covered the upper courtyard with pine straw, started to sod the courtyard hill, and worked on the senior patio steps. “We wanted the courtyard [to be a place] to set you guys off in lunch time and have a place to congregate,” Vish said. Vish said they accomplished nearly everything they wished. “Our essentials were completed,” she said. Vish said the workers plan to return to finish laying down sod and cementing the steps on May 11. Because of the unexpected number of volunteers – she was only expecting 700 – Vish said they ran out of food for the workers. Apart from the food shortage, Vish said the day went very smoothly. “We didn’t have anything we had to redo or undo,” she said. “Nobody got hurt which is always a good sign. Really, it was a good group of volunteers. We didn’t have any mishaps like you would think with that amount of people.” Students, parents and members of the community volunteered at the service day. Students who attended the day will receive 10

WAN TO HELP: (Above) Atlanta City Councilmember Alex Wan speaks at the opening ceremony of Project Together—a day of service to beautify Grady’s campus ,sponsored by Starbucks. (Far left) A volunteer digs up old sod from a hill in the courtyard. (Left) Senior prom king De’Avis Willingham paints a yellow wall gray, in line with school colors.

Photos by RYAN SWITZER

Students injured on bus bound to Grady

the Southerner

news

hours of community service. Annie Huff, who graduated Grady in 1981, was one of those who volunteered. Huff was a student at Grady when Eddie Henderson, the coach to whom the Grady stadium is now dedicated, reigned over the athletic department. She heard about the event through the Knee Benders Christian Motorcycle Association. Huff said when she arrived at the school in the morning on April 27, Grady had already changed significantly. “It’s not the same place,” Huff said. “The front is all I recognize.” Huff worked to paint the railings of the stairs she walked up and down more than 30 years ago.

While the service day was proceeding, Kids & Pros, a partner of Starbucks which works to inspire young people, put on a football clinic for young men and a basketball clinic for young women in Henderson Stadium and Coach Slade Gym, respectively. Buddy Curry, executive director of Kids & Pros and a former Falcons player, said 75 boys atended the clinic for three hours. “We had NFL players and also high school coaches teaching them the fundamentals of the game of football,” Curry said. “We also taught them life lessons in addition to introducing the Heads Up tackling initiative by the NFL and USA football.”

The Heads Up tackling initiative was created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to promote concussion awareness and safety in young athletes. NFL players in attendance included former Minnesota Viking Earthwind Moreland, who graduated Grady in the mid-1990s, Michael Harris of the San Diego Chargers, and others. In the gym, 50 girls participated in a basketball clinic. Sharon Powell, regional vice-president of Starbucks, said everyone who participated left with a reminder of Starbucks’ mission statement. “[Our mission is] to inspire and nurture the human spirit,” Powell said. p

By Eli Mansbach Math teacher Linda Brasher was instructing her class one day when fellow faculty members Elizabeth Mohanan, Malik Bostic and James Campbell walked into her classroom and told her that she was selected as one of five finalists to be the 2012-2013 Teacher of the Year. “I got a little emotional because my students joined in on the congratulations,” Brasher admitted. “I feel it is a great honor because there are so many great teachers at Grady.” Brasher started teaching seven years ago when she left her job as the Metro Atlanta YMCA director to pursue a degree in education. Since earning her degree, she has taught at Rockdale County for two years and at Grady for five years. “The two aspects of the [YMCA] job that I loved were working with teenagers and training,” Brasher said. “I was at a point in my career that in order to advance I needed to move out of state. I am a Georgia girl and my family was here, so I decided to go back to school and get my teaching certificate. It was the best decision I could have made.” Sophomore Jennifer Steckl, who had Brasher for Math I as a freshman, said Brasher was an exemplary teacher who pre-

Eli Mansbach

Brasher wins 2013-2014 Teacher of the Year award

GOING THE DISTANCE: Brasher shows her Accelerated Math class how to solve problems using the distance equation. pared her well for Math II. award,” Brown said. “I went to a few of her “She gave me all the utilities to help me tutorial sessions, and whenever I was there I succeed in math,” Steckl said. “She gave us saw and experienced her helping out so many her phone number if we needed to call her, kids that were having trouble with math. I and we could text her if we didn’t under- think that is why she became a teacher.” stand something.” Brasher engages herself in several extraAnother of Brasher’s former students, curriculars. For the past three years, Brashsophomore Robert Brown, described er has coached the golf team. She also has Brasher as an honest and focused teacher. worked with the robotics team, Math SucSteckl and Brown agree that Brasher is a cess Program and Saturday school. Brasher committed and hardworking teacher. currently serves as the faculty adviser of the “I think that she deserves to win this National Honor Society.

In an effort to become a better teacher, Brasher attended a few teacher conferences where she learned about new teaching and motivational methods. Brasher also changed a couple of aspects of her room to make it a better learning environment. “I did try a flipped classroom (a method of teaching where the teacher creates a video of the lesson and for homework, the students watch the video, take notes and do the example problems) at the beginning of the year, but it proved to be unsuccessful so I changed my teaching method,” Brasher said. “I am a strong believer of, ‘If it’s not working, change it.’ I also worked hard this year to build an encouraging culture in the classroom.” Part of the reason she won this award, Brasher said, was due to the support and help of academy leader Raymond Dawson and the rest of the faculty, who voted for the award on an online survey. Even though Brasher won, she still strives to be a better teacher. “I feel as a teacher you always have room to improve,” she said. “Unless 100 percent of your students pass, you can do better. In all honesty, this can be a very defeating profession so receiving a pat on the back is very motivational.” p


news

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May 15th, 2013

APS educators indicted on cheating charges Local attorney to represent ‘underdog’ Beverly Hall

FIRED

APS termintaed the employees. Those who were fired had the option to appeal the termination.

The governor conducted a preliminary investigation that was continued by the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office.

HALL ABOARD: Decatur attorney J. Tom Morgan shares a word with former APS Superintendent and client, Beverly Hall. Hall was indicted on March 29. the right decision. Teens need to have an open conversation to know what kind of trouble they can get in by having sex with a 15-year-old or an open-container violation.” Nationally recognized as an expert on the prosecution of crimes against children, Morgan has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show and CNN. It was not acclaim, however, but criticism that Morgan received when appearing on 11-Alive, CBS-Atlanta and other local Atlanta stations that Thursday in April. “We are very confident that there is nothing linking Dr. Hall to any of the crimes to this indictment,” Morgan said to the cameras as he stood by Hall’s side. Many have reacted with surprise to Hall’s representation. "Watching the news last night, my jaw literally dropped when the anchor announced that Beverly Hall is being represented by J. Tom Morgan,” Grady parent Tamara Lopat said. “I was shocked that someone who is a passionate childadvocate could represent someone who was involved in damaging the futures of hundreds of APS students.” Such resentment of Hall exists throughout the city as demonstrated by her status as the 2011 No. 1 “Person You Love to Hate” according to Creative Loafing. “I’m a private lawyer, and I represent clients charged with crimes,” Morgan said, “It’s how I make a living. Some attorney somewhere will have to represent the Boston bomber, and our code of ethics requires the best legal representation for any client.” Morgan’s “code of ethics” extends beyond the courtroom. As a child growing up during the Civil Rights Movement in rural Albany, Morgan observed oppressed African-Americans wanting “a place at the table.” He saw injustice in the law then and he still observes it today. “I have always had the tendency to fight for the underdog,” he said. p

S

ES C O R P T N E E INDICTM

TH David Tullis/Associated Press

By Ryan Switzer On a sunny April Tuesday, in a procession of unnecessary black umbrellas and hidden faces, 35 former APS employees filed into the Fulton County Courthouse. This parade consisted of teachers, administrators and other officials indicted in the largest standardized-test cheating scandal in U.S. history. The story grabbed national headlines since 2009, bringing embarrassment to a school district once renowned for its dramatic improvement on test scores. After a slight lull in media coverage, the march of indicted educators brought the story back to life. Around 7 p.m., the media stationed outside the jail finally caught a glimpse of the parade’s grand marshall. As former APS superintendent Beverly Hall exited her car, she was promptly swarmed by cameramen. The 66-year-old, accused of charges ranging from racketeering to theft, refused to answer any questions. A lawyer, very familiar to Grady students, spoke on her behalf. J. Tom Morgan, sporting his signature bow tie, calmly answered questions before members of the press. Several hours previously, the attorney announced that he would be representing Hall, the controversial former National Superintendent of the Year. As a litigator, Morgan is highly renowned throughout Georgia for his legal savvy and impressive prosecution record. He worked in the DeKalb County district attorney’s office for 21 years and served as the district attorney for 12 of them. As DA, he became the first American prosecutor to be awarded the Special Achievement Award from the International Association of Prosecutors. Currently, he describes himself as “a private lawyer located in Decatur, specializing in criminal defense,” but most Grady students know Morgan from his popular speeches concerning youth rights and the arbitrary laws that govern how young people in Georgia live. Only six days prior to announcing his defense of Hall, Morgan gave one of these speeches to juniors and seniors in the Grady gymnasium. This speech was one of 200 that he has given to tens of thousands of teens and adults. These speeches inform young people of their rights, specifically concerning alcohol, drugs and sex. “As DA, I was frequently asked to come speak to kids,” Morgan said in an interview with The Southerner. “I had prosecuted young people before, but I had never worked with them until the book came out.” The book to which Morgan referred is Ignorance is No Defense: A Teenager’s Guide to Georgia Law. The 200-page volume outlines a Georgia youth’s rights (and where they lack them) by discussing real cases he has dealt with in his time as a defense attorney. “I [wrote this book] to raise awareness on legal issues,” Morgan said. “Most people, if they think about it, will make

Attorney Bob Rubin explains...

Prosecutors presented the evidence and charges to 25 citizens called a grand jury, who decided whether or not to proceed.

Since the grand jury found that there was enough evidence to proceed with the trial, the former employees were arrested.

$

All of the indicted officials have posted bond and are out of jail. Several of them negotiated to have their bonds lowered.

At the arraignment, the judge read the list of charges and the employees pleaded not guilty.

The attorneys on both sides of the case make motions to exclude certian pieces of evidence at the trial.

The case will go to trial in about a year. If the accused are found guilty, they can be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison. Illustration by allison rapoport

TESTING, one, two, three: procedures face increased scrutiny continued from front page APS is “ready to put this troubling episode behind us.” In the letter to parents, Davis writes, “From requiring all employees to complete annual ethics training as a condition of employment to strengthening safeguards on test materials, we have done considerable work both to prevent and to punish cheating.” TEACHER KEYS = KEY TO SUCCESS? Georgia was granted $400 million from Race to the Top, President Obama’s education initiative, to implement a new teacher evaluation system called the Teacher Keys Evaluation System. The system, which is expected to be implemented in every district by the 20142015 school year, will be based half on student performance on standardized tests and half on other things, like student surveys and classroom observations. Business and Entrepreneurship Academy leader Willie Vincent said that the Race to the Top funds required participating districts to “create some innovative way of assessing teaching and learning.” For the 26 districts, including APS, that have already adopted TKES, that innovative method is the Student Learning

Objectives assessments. and then, just as quickly, abandoned. The SLO assessments, which were first implemented at Grady this school year, aim to WHICH CAME FIRST: THE TEST OR THE CHEATING? measure student growth by “value-added,” or how much the student has improved throughThe massive cheating scandal, though it out the school year. The first round of SLO as- didn’t directly affect Grady, sparked a national sessments was administered in October 2012, debate about the use of high-stakes standardand the second round in March 2013. ized testing. This testing had been a key comThe admnistration of the SLO assessments ponent of two major educational initiatives, at Grady drew criticism. World geography and former President George W. Bush’s No Child American government teacher Susan Salvesen Left Behind and President Obama’s Race to the said the rubric she reTop. As a result of these ceived to grade the asprograms, Georgia EXCLUSIVELY @ sessments was flawed. schools were pressured theSoutherneronline.com: Other teachers didn’t Delve deeper into the indictment with to increase their scores like the fact that they the full versions of both stories on this and faced sanctions if were required to grade page, as well as interactive graphics. they failed to do so. the tests. Some, including “I think teachers are Willoughby, argued incredibly uncomfortable with being asked to that this pressure was what led some Atlanta grade a test that will then be a basis for their educators to change their students’ answers on evaluation,” AP English Language and Com- the CRCT during the cheating scandal. position teacher Lisa Willoughby said. “I think that when you have monetary inVincent, however, is confident that the cre- centives attached to student achievement on ators of the SLO assessments are “still working tests that that incentivizes cheating and there’s out the bugs.” a ton of empirical examples that that’s true,” AP U.S. History teacher Lee Pope expanded Willoughby said. on that sentiment, saying some policy changes Campbell also disagrees with the increased are just ephemeral fads that are like the “flavor use of standardized testing. of the week.” He said they are implemented, “I suppose there is inherently a flaw with

asking any teacher or any student to be judged by one single day,” Campbell said. Pope, however, thinks standardized tests are valuable because they reveal information about students’ knowledge and his teaching abilities. “I think testing is important to judge the knowledge of a child,” Pope said. “I think that it is important to judge my ability as a teacher.” Michael J. Feuer, professor of education policy and the dean of the graduate school of education and human development at George Washington University, wrote in an op-ed for Education Week that standardized tests “help gauge individual learning, give teachers additional information about their students’ progress, provide objective indicators of student achievement and expose inequalities in the allocation of educational resources.” Although the cheating scandal is now in the rearview mirror of APS (if not the 35 educators who were indicted), the question of the role of standardized testing in schools remains at the forefront. While Campbell is willing to “accept the idea that a good test exists,” he said the way they are implemented now is problematic. “The tests we have now are flawed,” Campbell said. “Perhaps all tests are flawed, but these are flawed in a way that not all tests are flawed.” p


news

May 8, 2013

7

FORCE OF ABBOTT: (Above) Deedee Abbott prepares to open a box with copies of The Unmasking for the unveiling of the lit mag at the AP Art Show.(Right) Abbott sings in Grady’s2011 production of Hairspray to the main character of the show, Tracy Turnblad, played by Promise Hartung (Class of 2011). Abbott was among five teachers that were cast in the play. how to do better.” Abbott plans to advise The Unmasking next year and volunteer in the Writing Center. Junior Rachel Klika, who had classes with Abbott for ninth grade journalism, 10th-grade literature and lit mag, is one of the many students who will miss Abbott. “This year Ms. Abbott has been great as the lit mag advisor,” Klika said. “She brought in a bunch of poems from outside that we have never read, and we would do these class discussions and some of them were really funny.” Klika said that she would especially miss the fun and hands-on nature of Abbott’s classes were.

Mary Gazaway

By Eli Mansbach After teaching for the past seven years, Deedee Abbott is leaving Grady to take care of her daughter Flora, 11, son Finn, 7 and dog Minnie. “Nobody is doing it at this point, and somebody’s got to do it,” Abbott said. “I am going to be a class parent and be able to take care of my children when they are sick. I am going to facilitate them while they are young and will still let me.” During her tenure at Grady, Abbott was involved in many extracurricular activities including debate and drama. In Grady’s 2011 production of Hairspray, Abbott played Velma Von Tussle, the mother of the antagonist in the play. In the school’s most recent musical, Anything Goes, Abbott portrayed a celebrity-crazed old lady in a wheelchair. Abbott said she thoroughly enjoyed acting in these productions. “[The productions] may have been some of my favorite experiences [at Grady] because I got to see how hard the kids worked to put on the show,” Abbott said. “It gave me new appreciation for our extracurriculars and made me value what kids can learn from doing them.” This past year, Abbott became the advisor of The Unmasking, Grady’s literary magazine, after Scott Stephens retired last year. “I have loved looking for creative writing prompts, and we have some really amazing creative writers,” Abbott said. Abbott said she loved being involved in the lit mag, despite the challenges of the magazine’s diorganization. “I am going to be involved next year, and I already have a written document of

Dave Winter

Beloved literature teacher Abbott to depart school

“When you have been having a bad day, you go into her class and can’t be in a bad mood,” Klika said. “It’s hard to be in a bad mood in her class because she is fun, and she will do something more upbeat. She makes sure that the class is having a good time.” Abbott said there would be many things that she will miss about Grady, but she will especially miss the staff and students. “I am going to miss my faculty friends, and I am going to miss being involved with the students,” Abbott said. “I didn’t know that I would like it so much. I just like watching [the students] grow up. It is interesting and fascinating and cute.”

One of Abbott’s close faculty friends is environmental science teacher Kori Ellis, who has known Abbott well for five years. The two teachers became friends when Abbott moved to the classroom adjacent to Ellis’s. “[Abbott] brings her own personal spin to everything,” Ellis said. “Her classroom, her style. She is a very unique individual, and I have a lot of respect for her and she is fun to be with.” Ellis said that she will miss having fun with Abbott, like when they would dance to the final scene of Slumdog Millionaire in class. “I’m sad that I won’t be able to visit her,” Ellis said. “But I am happy for her.” p

PATHWAY problems, community bias plague SLC continued from front page calls “one-and-a-half pathways.” Plasczyk said he hopes to develop a second curricular pathway, but since hiring a teacher continues to pose problems, JROTC is the best alternative. He recognizes, however, that it lacks the broad appeal of a pathway unique to the academy. “[APS] said they’re going to roll out four equal academies, but you can’t be equal if one has no pathways,” Plasczyk said. LOSING THEIR PATHWAYS The groundwork for each SLC was laid more than three years ago by committees of teachers, parents and students, with input from APS officials. The reorganization was part of a systemwide transition to the small-school model; Grady was one of the last to make the switch. Each academy was designed to offer students a choice of “career, technical and agricultural education” pathways to prepare them for college and the work force. The C&J academy, closely modeled on the defunct magnet program, has three pathways and offers additional options within each pathway. The Biomedical Sciences and Engineering academy has two pathways, one of which has existed at Grady for years as the HOSA program. The Business and Entrepreneurship academy offers three pathways, building off a fashion program and courses in business principles. Plasczyk said APS should have allocated resources to provide more support for academies, including L&L, which were starting without older programs to build upon. “I think someone would say, look at the academies, look at the pathways, and if you have an academy without pathways, put money there,” Plasczyk said. Carrie MacBrien, C&J academy leader, also led the former communications magnet. MacBrien listed seven faculty members who teach pathways classes, often in addition to core classes or other electives, for a total of nearly 20 class periods offered as pathway courses and electives to C&J students. Classes in the law pathway are taught by Henry Bowden, a Grady parent with a background in law who has been hired as a long-term substitute to replace Calethea Barbour. Bowden, who is currently serving as a municipal judge in East Point, replaced Barbour at the beginning of the second semester. “We discuss the law via applications to the real world, kind of open it up to the real world experience,” Bowden said. Bowden teaches three pathways courses. With just six class periods exclusive to L&L and more than 300 students in the academy,  space in the pathways classes is tight and more stu-

dents are forced into the JROTC pathway.  L&L sophomore Javarius Sawyer said many of his friends have joined JROTC to complete their pathway requirement. “I just wasn’t interested in it,” Sawyer said. “I think it would only appeal to a certain subset. A lot of people I know that are in JROTC, they want to go into the military or the army.” Former social studies teacher George Darden served as interim academy leader during the 2009-2010 school year and presided over the committee that planned the academy’s guiding principles and curricular offerings. The committee made numerous proposals that were rejected by the district, some of which might have enabled the academy to offer public policy experiences without hiring two full-time pathways teachers. One idea was to have a community congress, composed of students and teachers, to make decisions for the academy. “It was going to be a microcosm of a democracy, an opportunity for them to actually practice democracy, to hash out policy and see it in action. That was shot down [by APS officials].” Plasczyk said the academy’s initial challenges have continued to tarnish its reputation in the Grady community. “That also created a lot of resistance the first year,” Plasczyk said. “Parents wanted to get out the first year once they realized we had no pathways.” SEPARATE AND UNEQUAL Plasczyk attributes his academy’s recruitment difficulties to the lack of pathway options. During the 2010-2011 school year, however, some parents demonstrated that they had formed their opinions about the academy long before confronting the lack of pathways. Darden said many parents assumed the C&J academy would be stronger than the others. “We talked about for a year that if one of the four academies is communications and journalism, that’s the one that all the Inman parents are going to want to put their kids into, and it’s not because there’s a major interest in the Inman community in communications and journalism, it’s because that’s the one that’s well-known and established,” Darden said. Plasczyk gave The Southerner a copy of an email that circulated in March 2011 among the parents of Inman eighth graders who were to become the second class at Grady to choose academies. The email, written by a parent, urged other parents to encourage their children to choose the C&J academy. “There are really only two options,” the parent wrote. “A college-prep track with other Inman students in Communications or ‘Other.’” The parent wrote that her neighbor, an unnamed teacher at

Grady, said C&J and the BS&E academies were the only two that Inman students should consider. “He said the other two academies are where the non-Inman students go and they are very different from Inman students,” the parent wrote. Although redistricting has made Inman the only feeder middle school for Grady, clear racial and socioeconomic divisions persist between the academies. Overall, Grady is 71 percent non-white. The C&J academy, however, is 64 percent white. Just seven precent of L&L students are white. Van Atta noticed the differences during the first year of the academies in particular. “It was like, ‘Wow,’” Van Atta said. “Suddenly in a school where it was not 98 percent free or reduced lunch, our academy had 98 percent free or reduced lunch.” Junior Sam Heller, who attended Inman and was among the first class to select an academy, started his freshman year in the PP&J academy. He said he chose the academy based on his interest in politics. “I did not consult other people, so I didn’t figure out that literally everyone except me and like three other people [at Inman] were picking communications or technology,” Heller said. Heller said he felt his core classes were unequal to the classes offered in other academies; to take accelerated math and honors courses, he had to go to a different academy. At the beginning of his sophomore year, he switched into the BS&E academy. “I think if the administration had fairly apportioned students, the [Law and Leadership] academy could be much stronger,” Heller said. MAKING PROGRESS Although L&L lacks the pathway options of other academies, Plasczyk and academy teachers have offered students field trips, internships, college tours and guest speakers. Sawyer, who hopes to open a business and sees the Law and Leadership academy as a good way to learn about the legal system as it relates to entrepreneurs, said field trips have expanded his horizons and put him in contact with legal professionals. Van Atta said she is proud of the accomplishments of Law and Leadership students and appreciates that the academy model allows teachers to work with smaller groups of students. The academies, however, haven’t changed the way she does her job. “All I know is, when kids walk through my door I educate them,” Van Atta said. “I don’t care who they are, what their income is. It doesn’t matter what the flavor of the month is in terms of education policy.” p


10

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Grady

...on my mind

GHS 2013

Quirky valedictorian finds success in many activities She is also known for her help in organizing a debate tournament hosted by Grady in her capacity as president of the speech and debate team this year. “She is in her very nature a leader,” Herrera said. “She does not demand respect; she gets it because of who she is.” Taft said one of the most rewarding parts of being on the debate team was serving as a role model for the underclassmen, particularly in her own event. Sophomore Ben Simonds-Malamud said he is very lucky to have worked with one of the most decorated high school speakers in the nation. Her curious nature about the world and leadership abilities are also exemplified by her involvement in The Southerner, during which she reported on stories about freshman hazing, the impact of CRCT cheating, the murder of an alumnus and the political affiliations of the student body and the implementation of SLCs. “[My favorite part of Southerner] was gradually uncovering the nuances of a story when reporting on it,” Taft said. She was named both Junior and Senior Champion Journalist of the Year and won multiple awards for her news stories from the Georgia Scholastic Press Association and other organizations. When she isn’t winning national debate titles or reporting the newest groundbreaking event, Taft likes to eat ethnic foods, really all types of food,

experiment with cooking microwaveable food with her younger brother Will and work it all off by running on her own. Not surprisingly, Taft has become a source of inspiration for many of her friends and for Will. “Sometimes people expect a certain amount from me before they’ve really met me or they assume a lot of things, which can be good or bad,” Will Taft said. “I kind of like having that because it’s something to look up to, and I feel like I’ll end up better as long as I’m trying to emulate her.” In spite of all that she has accomplished, Taft’s friends and family overwhelmingly concluded that she remains humble. In fact, Taft said she would attribute all of her success thus far to “luck and having a planner.” “When you’re leaps and bounds smarter than most of the people in your class including your close peers, for a lot of people that can go to their head, but Isabelle is never like that,” senior Lucy Bradley said. Taft has decided she will attend Yale College in the fall. “I don’t think there’s ever an endpoint for her,” Lisa Taft said. p

By Olivia Volkert After four years of navigating the hallways of Grady and 17 years of dealing with four siblings, senior Troy Kleber has risen through the ranks to become the salutatorian of the Class of 2013. “I think it’s awesome that we got this honor back-to-back,” brother and salutatorian of the Class of 2012 Shaun Kleber said. “He clearly deserves it, and I think it’s great that I have a brother right behind me to give me a run for my money.” The two eldest Klebers also share the accomplishments of serving as comanaging editors of The Southerner, captains of the four-time state winning mock trial team and members of the swim and water polo teams. Despite their similar accomplishments in school and their extra-curricular activities, however, Shaun said he and his brother are very different. One difference he said was that Troy has never had to stay up late to finish work while he had many late nights while in high school. “Maybe we’re just a demonstration of evolution--he has figured out how to do what I did, but better,” Shaun said. In addition to being second in his class, Kleber is a four-sport athlete, with varsity cross-country runner and tennis player as his third and fourth sports. He created a first place winning science fair project, captured multiple Georgia Mock Trial Outstanding Attorney awards, earned runner-up honors in the Georgia Scholastic Press Association’s Junior Champion Journalist of the Year award and was the recipient of the APS Superintendent’s Sport award, meaning he had the highest GPA of any APS student who plays two or more varsity sports. One might wonder how he does it.

FULTON

“I just don’t waste time,” Kleber said. “One of the things that my mom always tells me is the more you have to do, the more you get done. I’m efficient.” His friends and family attribute his successes to his work ethic and determination to do the best he can do in everything, rather than any parental pressure to do so. “His record is not really something that he aspires to and something that we care much about,” Dr. Scott Kleber, Troy’s father, said. “We don’t really pay attention to the end result of what our kids’ work is; it’s the process.” Kleber, despite his busy schedule, manages to balance his schoolwork and extracurricular activities with his social life. “I don’t think there is anyone who he is friends with who doesn’t think he is a very good friend to them, and that’s not something that everyone who is one of the top students can say,” senior Jeffrey Cox said. Kleber is also known amongst his peers for his enthusiasm, easy-going personality and widespread catch phrases like “go in” and “that’s how they getcha!” “When you’re not at school with Troy, you would think he’s the most immature person in the world,” senior Samuel Holder said. Senior Justin Williams said he is very approachable and despite their friend group’s academic motivation, there is very little competition amongst them. “We’re good friends, but a lot of the time we’re competing for the same things and he is always very graceful about it,” Williams said. According to his mother Nancy Habif, at home Kleber serves

as a “calming influence” in his household of seven. “He’s willing to defer his gratification for the immediate because he’s got a little bit longer of a view of things,” Dr. Kleber said. “He doesn’t always have to be the first or have the first in the house.” Kleber cites the support of his coaches as the main reason he has been able to accomplish all that he has. In mock trial, for example, his time has been a “growing experience as both a team member and as a person” due to his coaches Carl Gebo, Trinh Huynh and teacher sponsor Brian Leahy. “Mock trial has made me more selfcomfortable,” Kleber said. “I was not one of the people that had the natural public speaking talent.” He has also taken inspiration from his teachers and Southerner advisers, who, he said, have presented him with opportunities to do things that he wouldn’t otherwise get to do, such as reporting about the Occupy Atlanta movement or designing a website. Kleber has not only been inspired by others to accomplish great things, but has also inspired others to do the same. “He inspired me by showing me that

success can come through putting a lot of work into something,” sophomore Griffin Kish said. “He is a great example of what I want to be in mock trial.” His mother said because he’s so inclusive, people rally around him and he is able to entitle and empower them. “It’s not always easy to live up to everything else he does, but he’s a good inspiration and motivation,” sophomore and brother Brandon Kleber said. He received the Ramsey Scholarship to the University of Georgia, for which scholars receive a $5,250 annual stipend along with the HOPE Scholarship, but has recently committed to Georgia Tech with the Zell Miller scholarship to pursue engineering. To use his own catch phrase, “He goes in,” Cox said. p

Howard University • Johnny Jones- Georgia Southern University • Jolie Jones- Georgia College and State University • Kionina Jones- Atlanta Technical College • Devina JonesVargas- Georgia State University • Lydia Justice- Georgia State University • Kareena Kimber- Georgia Perimeter College • Shaunsey King- Art Institute of Atlanta • Troy KleberGeorgia Institute of Technology • Olivia Kleinman- University of Georgia • Octavia KnightGeorgia Southern University • Royce Knight- Georgia Southern University • Miller Lansing- Agnes Scott College • Tonez Langford- Georgia Perimeter College • Joe Lavine- University of Georgia • Akasha Lawrence- University of West Georgia • Mikyra Lee- Georgia State University • Reilley Lerner- University of Georgia • Ciena Leshley- New York University • George Lowring- Earlham College • Valentina Makrides- University of Alabama • Kate Marani- Miami University of Ohio • Andre Marshall- Georgia State University • Gage Martin- St. Edward’s University • George Martin- Georgia Gwinnett College • Kaylen Martin- Miles University • Sophie MaschinotUniversity of Georgia • Ishaka Maskey- Georgia State University • Tamara Mason- Emory University • Simon McLane- Guilford College • Diamond McWilliams- West Georgia University • Hannah MeachinGeorgia State University • James Meier- Georgia State University • Sigele Messiah- Georgia State University • Chassidy Mitchell- Spelman College • Jennifer Moody- Georgia Institute of Technology • James Moy- University of Georgia • Alex Munger- Georgia Institute of Technology • Talua Muttett- Valdosta State University • Lauren Ogg- University of Alabama • Abby Orlansky- University of Georgia • Luke PaddockGeorgia College and State University • Zavier ParksGeorgia Perimeter College • Travis PatrickMilitary • Jamie Perez- Georgia State University • Henry Peteet- Georgia Institute of Technology • Corey Peterson- Savannah Technical College • Rex Petersen- Georgia State University • Preston Pettigrew- Georgia Southern University • Destiny Ponder- Georgia Perimeter College • Grace Power- University of Georgia • Diana Powers- College of Wooster • Megan PrendergastUniversity of Texas at Austin • Tonje Randolph- West Georgia • Alexander Realff- Georgia Institute of Technology • Erika Reyes- Wesleyan College • Cameron Richardson- Clayton State University • Autumn Rivers- Bard College • Demontre Rivers- American Musical and Dramatic Academy • Jasmine Rivers- Emory University • Ujima Rivers- Howard University • Jamesia Robinson- Georgia Perimeter College • Morgan Robinson- Spelman College • Dominic Romeo- Georgia State University • Nicholas Rucker- Georgia State University • Hunter Rust- Tulane University • Sydney Savage- Agnes Scott College • Tai Savage- Georgia State University • Patrick Scollard- US Merchant Marine Academy • Carson Shadwell- University of Georgia • Katherine Sherwood- University of Arizona • Jori ShortsGeorgia State University • Khari Siebie- Auburn University • Sophia Sifnaios- Georgia College and State University • Omar Skandari- Georgia State University • Charley Smith- North Carolina A&T State University • Lameisha Smith- Georgia Southern University • Nara Smith- University of North Carolina at Asheville • Ezequiel Soto- Georgia State University • Cassidy Sparks- Howard University • Imani Standard- University of Maryland • Will Staples- Guilford College • Phillip Steadman- Georgia Perimeter College • Alex StearnsBernhart-Warren Wilson College • Sharri Stepp- Clayton State University • Diamond Stewart- Western Kentucky University • Laura Streib- Georgia State University • Kate Taber- University of Georgia • Isabelle Taft- Yale College • Aaizia Taylor- Agnes Scott College • Kivon Taylor- University of Connecticut • Mckenzie Taylor- Meredith College • Lillian Teffere- Georgia State University • Jamail Thomas- Savannah State University • Taylor Thomas- University of Florida • Kevin Thompson- Gwinnett College • Kiambi Thompson- Georgia State • Madison Thompson- Kennesaw State University • Gregory Tillman- Marine Corps • Nia Tippett- Georgia State University • Lily Trapkin- Hamilton College • Kayla Valley- Florida A&M University • Bilal Vaughn- Syracuse University • Olivia Veira- Brown University • Shaundrea Vereen- Georgia Perimeter College • Cydney Walker- University of Florida • Elijah Waters- Art Institute of Atlanta • Luke Webster- University of Georgia • De’Ais Wellingham- Clark Atlanta University • Brianna Wesco- Savannah State University • Gracie White- University of Georgia • Justin Williams- Georgia Institute of Technology • Marietta Williams- Xavier University of Louisiana • Chad Winfrey- Georgia State University • Collin Wilson- Georgia Southern University • Natasha Wilson- Spelman College • Patrick Wise- University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • Talethea Wright- Alabama State University

ist Lisa Taft said that she and her husband never had expectations or requirements for Taft to do so well and just wanted her to find something she is passionate about. They fostered a desire to learn and succeed in Taft, however, from an early age. She started reading The New York Times in the sixth grade and strived to win competitions like the spelling and geography bees in elementary school and middle school, respectively. “We basically just stand back and scratch our heads because she’s always been very, very self-motivated,” Taft said. “We just provide the logistical support by driving her around.” In accordance to her mother’s wishes of working towards her interests and passions, during her four years on the debate team, she has won six state titles (a precedent in state history), second place at the 2013 Harvard Tournament, seventh at the National Forensic League Tournament, third place at the National Catholic Forensic League Tournament, second at the Montgomery Bell Academy Southern Bell Forum, first at the Wake Forest University Tournament and first at the George Mason University Tournament, to name just a few. She participates in extemporaneous speaking, an event in which the speaker gets 30 minutes to write and memorize a seven-minute speech that answers a particular question about international or domestic policies. “She knows so much about the world and yet she’s also still a teenager, and I never in my 20 years as a coach have had an individual who is able to balance a thing like that,” Herrera said. “It’s a remarkable thing to witness.” Taft is often seen around school printing out articles to highlight them for debate.

Emma Aberle-Grasse- University of Texas at Austin • Mona Adams- University of Georgia Lauren Alford- Agnes Scott College • Nico Allen- Georgia State University • Aeron Attwooll- Georgia College and State University • Deshawn Benton- East Carolina University • Aman Bilel- Georgia State University • Jonathan BoatnerBenedict College • Perri Bonner- University of North Carolina at Charlotte • David Bowden- Georgia Perimeter College • Tekeller Boyd- Savannah State University • Lucy Bradley- Rhodes College • Gracie Bray- Georgia State University • Jawayln Brooks- Texas Southern University • Arriana Brown- military • Lyah Brown- University of West Georgia • David Bryant- University of North Georgia • Sophia Buscaglia- Georgia College and State University • Zac Caldwell- US Navy • David Carlock- Georgia Institute of Technology • Patrick Carroll- Georgia Southern University • Christopher Carson- University of Georgia • Cory Carswell- Enterprise State Community College • Rachel Citrin- Emory University • Olivia Clay- University of Alabama • Amethyst Clifton- University of Georgia • Channing Cloud- Arizona State University • Christina Conner- Georgia Perimeter College • Rod Contreras- Georgia State University • Arielle Conway- Georgia Southern University • Sumer Cooper- University of West Georgia • Jeffrey Cox- New England Conservatory of Music • Quianna Crane- Savannah State University • Madison D’Alesio- Georgia Southern University • Cole Davies- Clemson University • Samantha Dean- University of Chicago • Kate de Give- Georgia Institute of Technology • Austen • Denneny- Georgia State University • Alyecia Denson- Georgia Gwinnett College • Kishan Desci- Southern Polytechnic State University • Aliyah Dumas- Military • Sofia Economou- University of Georgia • Jonathan Edwards- Georgia Southern University • Katie Faulk- Georgia Southern University • Akia FeltonGeorgia Perimeter College • Sawyer Folks- Georgia College and State University • Josiah Garrett- University of Georgia • Giorgi Gazashvili- Georgia State University • Afi Goggins- Fisk University • LaShaunya Grant- University of West Georgia • Jalen J.D. Capelouto Gregory- Undecided • Jakara GriffinEmory University • Njvon HarrisJacksonville State University • Olivia Hart- Kennesaw State University • Claire Hasson- Elon University • Tylah Herndon-Hardeman- Georgia Southern University • Kyle Hill- Georgia State University • Samuel Holder- Rhodes College • Jordan Holiman- University of North Texas • Kelsey Hubbard- Emory and Henry College • Matthew Hubbell- San Francisco State University • Charisse Hughes- Syracuse University • Davis Jackson- Georgia Southern University • Frederick Jackson- Savannah State University • Kentavious JacksonArmstrong Atlantic State University • Morgan Jackson- Savannah College of Art and Design • Taylor Jackson- Albany State University • Margie Johnson- Airforce • Barri Jones-

By Olivia Volkert Valedictorian for the class of 2013, Isabelle Taft has accomplished more in four years than most high schoolers. Taft is president of the Jesters, Grady’s nationally recognized speech and debate team, a highly-decorated, nationally-ranked member in extemporaneous and impromptu speaking herself, the editor-in-chief of The Southerner, a four-year varsity cross country runner and founder of the Democratic Youth of Grady High School. “[Isabelle] is an individual who loves learning and has fun in that process,” journalism teacher, debate coach and STAR teacher Mario Herrera said. “She has a very inquisitive mind and perhaps her biggest strength is pursuing answers to questions.” Taft’s many triumphs have been ascribed to her sheer drive and intelligence. “If she’s going to express an interest in something, whether academic or some strange obsession with General Sherman, she goes 100 percent,” senior Sammi Dean said. Similarly, once Taft has her mind on something, there is nothing stopping her. Her goal-oriented nature has attracted her to activities like cross-country and has been a large part of her success, she said. “I think the really cool thing about running is that if you set a goal for yourself and then create a realistic plan for how to achieve that goal, you can do it,” Taft said. Taft’s mother and media center special-

Talented saludatorian urges peers to succeed, ‘go in’

SUCCESS AHEAD


10

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...on my mind

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Quirky valedictorian finds success in many activities She is also known for her help in organizing a debate tournament hosted by Grady in her capacity as president of the speech and debate team this year. “She is in her very nature a leader,” Herrera said. “She does not demand respect; she gets it because of who she is.” Taft said one of the most rewarding parts of being on the debate team was serving as a role model for the underclassmen, particularly in her own event. Sophomore Ben Simonds-Malamud said he is very lucky to have worked with one of the most decorated high school speakers in the nation. Her curious nature about the world and leadership abilities are also exemplified by her involvement in The Southerner, during which she reported on stories about freshman hazing, the impact of CRCT cheating, the murder of an alumnus and the political affiliations of the student body and the implementation of SLCs. “[My favorite part of Southerner] was gradually uncovering the nuances of a story when reporting on it,” Taft said. She was named both Junior and Senior Champion Journalist of the Year and won multiple awards for her news stories from the Georgia Scholastic Press Association and other organizations. When she isn’t winning national debate titles or reporting the newest groundbreaking event, Taft likes to eat ethnic foods, really all types of food,

experiment with cooking microwaveable food with her younger brother Will and work it all off by running on her own. Not surprisingly, Taft has become a source of inspiration for many of her friends and for Will. “Sometimes people expect a certain amount from me before they’ve really met me or they assume a lot of things, which can be good or bad,” Will Taft said. “I kind of like having that because it’s something to look up to, and I feel like I’ll end up better as long as I’m trying to emulate her.” In spite of all that she has accomplished, Taft’s friends and family overwhelmingly concluded that she remains humble. In fact, Taft said she would attribute all of her success thus far to “luck and having a planner.” “When you’re leaps and bounds smarter than most of the people in your class including your close peers, for a lot of people that can go to their head, but Isabelle is never like that,” senior Lucy Bradley said. Taft has decided she will attend Yale College in the fall. “I don’t think there’s ever an endpoint for her,” Lisa Taft said. p

By Olivia Volkert After four years of navigating the hallways of Grady and 17 years of dealing with four siblings, senior Troy Kleber has risen through the ranks to become the salutatorian of the Class of 2013. “I think it’s awesome that we got this honor back-to-back,” brother and salutatorian of the Class of 2012 Shaun Kleber said. “He clearly deserves it, and I think it’s great that I have a brother right behind me to give me a run for my money.” The two eldest Klebers also share the accomplishments of serving as comanaging editors of The Southerner, captains of the four-time state winning mock trial team and members of the swim and water polo teams. Despite their similar accomplishments in school and their extra-curricular activities, however, Shaun said he and his brother are very different. One difference he said was that Troy has never had to stay up late to finish work while he had many late nights while in high school. “Maybe we’re just a demonstration of evolution--he has figured out how to do what I did, but better,” Shaun said. In addition to being second in his class, Kleber is a four-sport athlete, with varsity cross-country runner and tennis player as his third and fourth sports. He created a first place winning science fair project, captured multiple Georgia Mock Trial Outstanding Attorney awards, earned runner-up honors in the Georgia Scholastic Press Association’s Junior Champion Journalist of the Year award and was the recipient of the APS Superintendent’s Sport award, meaning he had the highest GPA of any APS student who plays two or more varsity sports. One might wonder how he does it.

FULTON

“I just don’t waste time,” Kleber said. “One of the things that my mom always tells me is the more you have to do, the more you get done. I’m efficient.” His friends and family attribute his successes to his work ethic and determination to do the best he can do in everything, rather than any parental pressure to do so. “His record is not really something that he aspires to and something that we care much about,” Dr. Scott Kleber, Troy’s father, said. “We don’t really pay attention to the end result of what our kids’ work is; it’s the process.” Kleber, despite his busy schedule, manages to balance his schoolwork and extracurricular activities with his social life. “I don’t think there is anyone who he is friends with who doesn’t think he is a very good friend to them, and that’s not something that everyone who is one of the top students can say,” senior Jeffrey Cox said. Kleber is also known amongst his peers for his enthusiasm, easy-going personality and widespread catch phrases like “go in” and “that’s how they getcha!” “When you’re not at school with Troy, you would think he’s the most immature person in the world,” senior Samuel Holder said. Senior Justin Williams said he is very approachable and despite their friend group’s academic motivation, there is very little competition amongst them. “We’re good friends, but a lot of the time we’re competing for the same things and he is always very graceful about it,” Williams said. According to his mother Nancy Habif, at home Kleber serves

as a “calming influence” in his household of seven. “He’s willing to defer his gratification for the immediate because he’s got a little bit longer of a view of things,” Dr. Kleber said. “He doesn’t always have to be the first or have the first in the house.” Kleber cites the support of his coaches as the main reason he has been able to accomplish all that he has. In mock trial, for example, his time has been a “growing experience as both a team member and as a person” due to his coaches Carl Gebo, Trinh Huynh and teacher sponsor Brian Leahy. “Mock trial has made me more selfcomfortable,” Kleber said. “I was not one of the people that had the natural public speaking talent.” He has also taken inspiration from his teachers and Southerner advisers, who, he said, have presented him with opportunities to do things that he wouldn’t otherwise get to do, such as reporting about the Occupy Atlanta movement or designing a website. Kleber has not only been inspired by others to accomplish great things, but has also inspired others to do the same. “He inspired me by showing me that

success can come through putting a lot of work into something,” sophomore Griffin Kish said. “He is a great example of what I want to be in mock trial.” His mother said because he’s so inclusive, people rally around him and he is able to entitle and empower them. “It’s not always easy to live up to everything else he does, but he’s a good inspiration and motivation,” sophomore and brother Brandon Kleber said. He received the Ramsey Scholarship to the University of Georgia, for which scholars receive a $5,250 annual stipend along with the HOPE Scholarship, but has recently committed to Georgia Tech with the Zell Miller scholarship to pursue engineering. To use his own catch phrase, “He goes in,” Cox said. p

Howard University • Johnny Jones- Georgia Southern University • Jolie Jones- Georgia College and State University • Kionina Jones- Atlanta Technical College • Devina JonesVargas- Georgia State University • Lydia Justice- Georgia State University • Kareena Kimber- Georgia Perimeter College • Shaunsey King- Art Institute of Atlanta • Troy KleberGeorgia Institute of Technology • Olivia Kleinman- University of Georgia • Octavia KnightGeorgia Southern University • Royce Knight- Georgia Southern University • Miller Lansing- Agnes Scott College • Tonez Langford- Georgia Perimeter College • Joe Lavine- University of Georgia • Akasha Lawrence- University of West Georgia • Mikyra Lee- Georgia State University • Reilley Lerner- University of Georgia • Ciena Leshley- New York University • George Lowring- Earlham College • Valentina Makrides- University of Alabama • Kate Marani- Miami University of Ohio • Andre Marshall- Georgia State University • Gage Martin- St. Edward’s University • George Martin- Georgia Gwinnett College • Kaylen Martin- Miles University • Sophie MaschinotUniversity of Georgia • Ishaka Maskey- Georgia State University • Tamara Mason- Emory University • Simon McLane- Guilford College • Diamond McWilliams- West Georgia University • Hannah MeachinGeorgia State University • James Meier- Georgia State University • Sigele Messiah- Georgia State University • Chassidy Mitchell- Spelman College • Jennifer Moody- Georgia Institute of Technology • James Moy- University of Georgia • Alex Munger- Georgia Institute of Technology • Talua Muttett- Valdosta State University • Lauren Ogg- University of Alabama • Abby Orlansky- University of Georgia • Luke PaddockGeorgia College and State University • Zavier ParksGeorgia Perimeter College • Travis PatrickMilitary • Jamie Perez- Georgia State University • Henry Peteet- Georgia Institute of Technology • Corey Peterson- Savannah Technical College • Rex Petersen- Georgia State University • Preston Pettigrew- Georgia Southern University • Destiny Ponder- Georgia Perimeter College • Grace Power- University of Georgia • Diana Powers- College of Wooster • Megan PrendergastUniversity of Texas at Austin • Tonje Randolph- West Georgia • Alexander Realff- Georgia Institute of Technology • Erika Reyes- Wesleyan College • Cameron Richardson- Clayton State University • Autumn Rivers- Bard College • Demontre Rivers- American Musical and Dramatic Academy • Jasmine Rivers- Emory University • Ujima Rivers- Howard University • Jamesia Robinson- Georgia Perimeter College • Morgan Robinson- Spelman College • Dominic Romeo- Georgia State University • Nicholas Rucker- Georgia State University • Hunter Rust- Tulane University • Sydney Savage- Agnes Scott College • Tai Savage- Georgia State University • Patrick Scollard- US Merchant Marine Academy • Carson Shadwell- University of Georgia • Katherine Sherwood- University of Arizona • Jori ShortsGeorgia State University • Khari Siebie- Auburn University • Sophia Sifnaios- Georgia College and State University • Omar Skandari- Georgia State University • Charley Smith- North Carolina A&T State University • Lameisha Smith- Georgia Southern University • Nara Smith- University of North Carolina at Asheville • Ezequiel Soto- Georgia State University • Cassidy Sparks- Howard University • Imani Standard- University of Maryland • Will Staples- Guilford College • Phillip Steadman- Georgia Perimeter College • Alex StearnsBernhart-Warren Wilson College • Sharri Stepp- Clayton State University • Diamond Stewart- Western Kentucky University • Laura Streib- Georgia State University • Kate Taber- University of Georgia • Isabelle Taft- Yale College • Aaizia Taylor- Agnes Scott College • Kivon Taylor- University of Connecticut • Mckenzie Taylor- Meredith College • Lillian Teffere- Georgia State University • Jamail Thomas- Savannah State University • Taylor Thomas- University of Florida • Kevin Thompson- Gwinnett College • Kiambi Thompson- Georgia State • Madison Thompson- Kennesaw State University • Gregory Tillman- Marine Corps • Nia Tippett- Georgia State University • Lily Trapkin- Hamilton College • Kayla Valley- Florida A&M University • Bilal Vaughn- Syracuse University • Olivia Veira- Brown University • Shaundrea Vereen- Georgia Perimeter College • Cydney Walker- University of Florida • Elijah Waters- Art Institute of Atlanta • Luke Webster- University of Georgia • De’Ais Wellingham- Clark Atlanta University • Brianna Wesco- Savannah State University • Gracie White- University of Georgia • Justin Williams- Georgia Institute of Technology • Marietta Williams- Xavier University of Louisiana • Chad Winfrey- Georgia State University • Collin Wilson- Georgia Southern University • Natasha Wilson- Spelman College • Patrick Wise- University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • Talethea Wright- Alabama State University

ist Lisa Taft said that she and her husband never had expectations or requirements for Taft to do so well and just wanted her to find something she is passionate about. They fostered a desire to learn and succeed in Taft, however, from an early age. She started reading The New York Times in the sixth grade and strived to win competitions like the spelling and geography bees in elementary school and middle school, respectively. “We basically just stand back and scratch our heads because she’s always been very, very self-motivated,” Taft said. “We just provide the logistical support by driving her around.” In accordance to her mother’s wishes of working towards her interests and passions, during her four years on the debate team, she has won six state titles (a precedent in state history), second place at the 2013 Harvard Tournament, seventh at the National Forensic League Tournament, third place at the National Catholic Forensic League Tournament, second at the Montgomery Bell Academy Southern Bell Forum, first at the Wake Forest University Tournament and first at the George Mason University Tournament, to name just a few. She participates in extemporaneous speaking, an event in which the speaker gets 30 minutes to write and memorize a seven-minute speech that answers a particular question about international or domestic policies. “She knows so much about the world and yet she’s also still a teenager, and I never in my 20 years as a coach have had an individual who is able to balance a thing like that,” Herrera said. “It’s a remarkable thing to witness.” Taft is often seen around school printing out articles to highlight them for debate.

Emma Aberle-Grasse- University of Texas at Austin • Mona Adams- University of Georgia Lauren Alford- Agnes Scott College • Nico Allen- Georgia State University • Aeron Attwooll- Georgia College and State University • Deshawn Benton- East Carolina University • Aman Bilel- Georgia State University • Jonathan BoatnerBenedict College • Perri Bonner- University of North Carolina at Charlotte • David Bowden- Georgia Perimeter College • Tekeller Boyd- Savannah State University • Lucy Bradley- Rhodes College • Gracie Bray- Georgia State University • Jawayln Brooks- Texas Southern University • Arriana Brown- military • Lyah Brown- University of West Georgia • David Bryant- University of North Georgia • Sophia Buscaglia- Georgia College and State University • Zac Caldwell- US Navy • David Carlock- Georgia Institute of Technology • Patrick Carroll- Georgia Southern University • Christopher Carson- University of Georgia • Cory Carswell- Enterprise State Community College • Rachel Citrin- Emory University • Olivia Clay- University of Alabama • Amethyst Clifton- University of Georgia • Channing Cloud- Arizona State University • Christina Conner- Georgia Perimeter College • Rod Contreras- Georgia State University • Arielle Conway- Georgia Southern University • Sumer Cooper- University of West Georgia • Jeffrey Cox- New England Conservatory of Music • Quianna Crane- Savannah State University • Madison D’Alesio- Georgia Southern University • Cole Davies- Clemson University • Samantha Dean- University of Chicago • Kate de Give- Georgia Institute of Technology • Austen • Denneny- Georgia State University • Alyecia Denson- Georgia Gwinnett College • Kishan Desci- Southern Polytechnic State University • Aliyah Dumas- Military • Sofia Economou- University of Georgia • Jonathan Edwards- Georgia Southern University • Katie Faulk- Georgia Southern University • Akia FeltonGeorgia Perimeter College • Sawyer Folks- Georgia College and State University • Josiah Garrett- University of Georgia • Giorgi Gazashvili- Georgia State University • Afi Goggins- Fisk University • LaShaunya Grant- University of West Georgia • Jalen J.D. Capelouto Gregory- Undecided • Jakara GriffinEmory University • Njvon HarrisJacksonville State University • Olivia Hart- Kennesaw State University • Claire Hasson- Elon University • Tylah Herndon-Hardeman- Georgia Southern University • Kyle Hill- Georgia State University • Samuel Holder- Rhodes College • Jordan Holiman- University of North Texas • Kelsey Hubbard- Emory and Henry College • Matthew Hubbell- San Francisco State University • Charisse Hughes- Syracuse University • Davis Jackson- Georgia Southern University • Frederick Jackson- Savannah State University • Kentavious JacksonArmstrong Atlantic State University • Morgan Jackson- Savannah College of Art and Design • Taylor Jackson- Albany State University • Margie Johnson- Airforce • Barri Jones-

By Olivia Volkert Valedictorian for the class of 2013, Isabelle Taft has accomplished more in four years than most high schoolers. Taft is president of the Jesters, Grady’s nationally recognized speech and debate team, a highly-decorated, nationally-ranked member in extemporaneous and impromptu speaking herself, the editor-in-chief of The Southerner, a four-year varsity cross country runner and founder of the Democratic Youth of Grady High School. “[Isabelle] is an individual who loves learning and has fun in that process,” journalism teacher, debate coach and STAR teacher Mario Herrera said. “She has a very inquisitive mind and perhaps her biggest strength is pursuing answers to questions.” Taft’s many triumphs have been ascribed to her sheer drive and intelligence. “If she’s going to express an interest in something, whether academic or some strange obsession with General Sherman, she goes 100 percent,” senior Sammi Dean said. Similarly, once Taft has her mind on something, there is nothing stopping her. Her goal-oriented nature has attracted her to activities like cross-country and has been a large part of her success, she said. “I think the really cool thing about running is that if you set a goal for yourself and then create a realistic plan for how to achieve that goal, you can do it,” Taft said. Taft’s mother and media center special-

Talented saludatorian urges peers to succeed, ‘go in’

SUCCESS AHEAD


a & e Scheduling gets ‘minor’ change: new arts pathways 10

By Quinn Mulholland During Grady’s transformation to small learning communities three years ago, art teacher John Brandhorst, along with many other fine arts teachers at Grady, hoped that one of the academies would be an art academy. “I actually wrote my master’s thesis, my specialist’s thesis, based on the idea of developing an arts academy at Grady, so it’s been an idea to secure the arts here for a long, long time,” Brandhorst said. Although an art academy wasn’t one of the four Grady settled upon, the idea to bolster Grady’s fine arts program is finally coming to fruition. Next year, incoming freshmen will have the choice to add an arts minor, with seven different optional pathways: band, orchestra, chorus, visual art, photography, fashion and drama. “We wanted to find a way to get kids who are interested in the arts a clearer pathway to actually get scheduled into those courses,” Brandhorst said. As part of their minor, students who are interested in one of the seven art pathways will do four years of coursework in that field and a senior project relating to the field, according to chorus teacher Kevin Hill. “The point behind it is that it organizes the kids’ coursework for them, if they perceive that as an interest,” Hill said. Instructional coach Brandi Sabb said that, during the transition to small learning communities, those involved in creating the academies decided not to include an art academy to keep enrollment in arts classes open to all students. Faced with an abundance of new classes required by small learning communities, however, many students found they didn’t have room in their schedules for fine arts classes. “We felt that starting an arts minor, where we give priority and fidelity to a group of students who have committed to take a series of arts courses for four years, can better serve and grow that passion,” Sabb said. Many fine arts teachers, including band teacher Brian Cook and orchestra teacher Sergio Rodriguez, said enrollment in music classes has been down in recent years. “[Students] kind of get off track with [fine arts classes], and it’s very difficult to get kids back in, it seems, once they step out for a

May 15, 2013

little while,” Brandhorst said. Grady parent Nancy Habif had three children who were in the Grady jazz band in ninth grade but couldn’t fit it into their schedule in 10th grade, forcing them to quit. “You have to make a decision: which is more important, the arts or an AP class?” Habif said. Cook said Grady’s band has had to turn down invitations to play at several venues, including the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C., because it doesn’t have enough students. “We get offered stuff all the time, but if we don’t have enough students participating, I have to turn the offers down,” Cook said. Because of the minors program, Cook is optimistic that Grady’s band program will receive an influx of new students. He is already planning trips for the band to play at events in New York and London. Grady’s band is relatively smaller than the band at Inman Middle School, where many students elect to be in the band. The disparity prompted some parents to wonder why Grady’s program isn’t bigger. “If we have a very large band program at Inman, it would make sense that we should continue, those same kids should just come on to Grady and then they should stay for four years, but that’s not what has happened,” Habif said. Seeing that this was a problem, Habif and several other parents met with principal Vincent Murray to suggest an arts minor. Habif said Murray was very receptive to the idea. “He was all for it,” Habif said. “He was very interested

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and very quick to respond and said ‘No problem, this is what we’ll do.’” As a result, starting next year, students who express interest in the fine arts will be ensured four years of classes in the field of their choice. Whether they will be able to take the specific arts courses that they are interested in, however, hinges upon how many people sign up for the arts minor, Sabb said. “The more students that sign up and commit for the academy, the more discretion that we have in what we can offer and being able to ensure that those students will have those minor courses that we guarantee,” Sabb said. In the meantime, fine arts teachers at Grady are holding their breath, hoping the minor system will breathe new life into Grady’s multifaceted arts department. As Habif put it, “there’s definitely a buzz in the air.” “I think having students coming in in the ninth grade and establishing a commitment of study is hugely moving in the right direction,” Sabb said, “and I would just love to see the arts department continually grow and develop and expand because of it.” p

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S TAT E OF THE ARTS: With the new minors program, which starts next year, freshmen can choose from multiple ar t pathways, guaranteeing themselves four years of classes in that area.

UrbanCouture X-cites, designers display fashion lines

Photos by Olivia Veira

Lights glared, cameras flashed, fabric flared and models strutted. On Saturday, May 11, Grady designers exhibited their original creations at the 10th annual Urban Couture fashion show. Juniors Mary Condolora, Kelsey Wood and Leslie Lang, along with seniors Sophia Smith, Mckenzie Taylor, Lauren Ogg, Lauren Alford, Grace Power, Taylor Searcy, Chioma Aniagoh, Taylor Barnes, Bria Griffin and Mercedes Ringer were the last group of students to design for UrbanCouture, before the program undergoes a transformation and becomes Tres Belles Revolution.

ROCKING THE RUNWAY: Senior Alex Stearns-Bernhart (far left) walks in Grace Power’s line as the only male model in the show; junior Ellen Ericson (left) poses in Grace Power’s final dress; seniors Nara Smith and Perri Bonner (top right) lead Chioma Aniagoh’s models for a final walk; junior Mary Condolora’s model (bottom right) Kate Taber starts her walk down the runway.


dining

May 15, 2013

11

Get the scoop on summer’s most savory sweet treats We’re nearing that time of year again when the temperature is beginning to rise steadily and with it, the need for one thing: ice cream. We have officially reached the season when hot chocolate is traded in for refreshing and cool frozen yogurt, ice cream and popsicles. I consider myself to be something of an ice cream expert, so decided to scout out and preview some of the best sweet treats in Atlanta.

can also buy a shooter – a small waffle-cone shot cup – for only $3. I sampled chocolate, peach, stratiacella and orange blossom, all of which were rich, creamy and delicious. Yoforia The last word: an authentic Italian gelateria that is slightly pricy but offers a wide range of high quality desserts.

Alex Wolfe

Morelli’s Gourmet Ice Cream (1220 Caroline St. NE):

Yoforia (985 Monroe Drive) and Yogli Mogli (1002 N. Highland Ave.): Two frozen yogurt shops that any ice cream connoisseur must visit are Yoforia and Yogli Mogli. While the two fro-yo stores are similar in many aspects such as their color schemes (green and orange), general atmosphere (fun and familyMorelli’s Gourmet Ice Cream friendly) and serving design (do-it-yourself ), they differ in a few important respects. Yogli Mogli contains 16 different yogurt dispensers plus eight swirled flavors, while Yoforia only has 12 flavors at any given time. Both stores offer a variety of low-fat and nonfat flavors. Yoforia, however, has 46 different toppings (some of which are huge pieces of various cookies, candies and fruits) compared to Yogli Mogli’s 40 toppings. Also, Yoforia warms three of its seven syrups (marshmallow, chocolate fudge and butterscotch), while Yogli Mogli serves all of its syrups at room temperature. Yogli Mogli charges only 44 cents per ounce while Yoforia charges 49 cents per ounce plus a student discount of 10 percent. The cost of a reasonable amount of frozen yogurt, like the portion I bought which I filled about two thirds of the cup, is comparable at about $3.35. The last word: though both frozen yogurt shops cost about the same, affordable amount, go to Yogli Mogli if you prefer more options in yogurt flavors, or go to Yoforia if you prefer more options in toppings and syrups.

Paolo’s Gelato Italiano (1025 Virginia Ave. NE):

Paolo’s Gelato Italiano

The doorway into Paolo’s Gelato Italiano is truly a portal into Italy. Authentic Italian cookies, candies and tchotchkes fill the multiple shelves while colorful masks adorn the walls. And in the middle of Yogli Mogli the homey little shop stands a great, gleaming freezer containing tubs of colorful, creamy gelato. Flavors range from traditional chocolate, caramel and lemon to Italian flavors such as stratiacella (chocolate chip) and zuppa inglese (custard-based trifle). Additionally, Paolo’s offers original vegetable and flower flavors of gelato such as carrot, basil, rose and jasmine, as well as cold drinks, coffees, hot chocolate and crepes. During my visit to the gelateria, I bought a small cup of gelato for $5, which got me four medium-sized scoops. If you are a little fazed by the price, you

I walked into Morelli’s, a reasonably sized ice cream shop in the Edgewood Retail District, expecting to be amazed by Atlanta’s best ice cream store from 2008 to 2011, according to Atlanta Magazine and Creative Loafing, in addition to America’s fourth best ice cream store, according to Bon Appetite Magazine in 2009. Just by stepping inside and seeing the cute décor, like a kids’ table, Oreo cookie bar stools and ice cream sandwich benches, I knew I would not be disappointed. Morelli’s boasted a wide range of unique and tasty flavors, such as Krispy Kreamier, ginger lavender and its most popular flavor, salted caramel. Additionally, Morelli’s produces and sells its own ice cream cakes through its website. I purchased a small cup of coffee ice cream for $3.38, and was rewarded with a smooth, flavorful spoonful. I also tasted the vanilla Oreo flavor, which had the perfect cookie-to-icecream ratio. For a little bit more money, you could try one of their specials, like a Mudslide Milkshake or a Chocolate Chimp, for between $5.40 and $10.80 depending on the size. The last word: a reasonably priced ice cream shop with distinctive, delectable and delicious flavors and specials.

Quick Cold Bites: If a straightforward ice cream shop isn’t your forte, then feel free to try your hand at any number of places. King of Pops, which sells gourmet popsicles with flavors like chocolate sea salt, banana pudding and Thin Mint, offers a delicious and refreshing treat that is now being sold at the Woody’s right by Grady for $3.25. Another great option is to grab a quick King of Pops milkshake or ice cream cone from local restaurants. Places like Zesto’s, Yeah! Burger and the Majestic Diner all offer a fine array of ice cream products that you can get after any meal. The last word: School is over soon, summer is beginning and it’s time to kick back, relax and enjoy a frozen delicacy! p

Cafe Jonah offers fresh food, ‘magical’ atmosphere By Megan Prendergast Two years ago, owner Jennifer Levison unveiled her second restaurant, Cafe Jonah and the Magical Attic. Named after her 9-year-old son Jonah, Levison wanted to open up a restaurant that gives back to the community and provides customers with local, fresh and organic food. The menu changes daily and reflects the produce in season. Open for breakfast, brunch and lunch Tuesday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., the cafe caters to the Buckhead community on Paces Ferry Place. The French toast casserole, made from locally sourced ingredients, is Levison’s favorite item. By buying locally, Levison aims to support local farmers and artisans. Highland Bakery pastries, Best Bread Baking Co. breads and Sally’s Bakery’s gluten-free products are only a small portion of the local goods served at Cafe Jonah.

“We do a lot of organic farm-to-table food,” Levison said. “At lunchtime we have organic, fresh salads [and] sandwiches, most of it locally sourced.” Paninis are grilled to order, and like the rest of the menu, the selection varies each day. A turkey panini served with smoked gouda, grilled asparagus, onion jam, sundried tomatoes and greens satisfies customers. Fresh salads tossed to order are served with flatbread or gluten-free crackers. Organic artisan greens and housemade lemon dressing and the coconut-curried tofu salad with red peppers and parsley are two salad options from which customers can choose. “It’s nice that they support local businesses,” senior Valentina Makrides said. “My favorite was the Highland Bakery cinnamon bun.” The quiche, the cafe’s most popular item, allows the chefs to get creative. Every day the filling ingredients change according to what is fresh on the market. One such quiche is filled with grilled asparagus, onions, sun-

dried tomatoes and cheddar cheese; another is filled with organic chicken sausage, fresh sage and cheddar cheese. For “Tea Time,” which is Tuesday through Friday after 2 p.m., customers may enjoy a plate of sweet and savory treats with endless tea and coffee in the cafe’s homey atmosphere. “I would describe it as having a meal in someone’s home,” Levison said. “It’s very cozy and comfortable. [It’s] authentic food, not too fancy.” Customers may also venture upstairs to explore the Magical Attic, which Levison describes as a combination of a gift shop and a metaphysical piece. The attic sells items such as candles, books, jewelry and aromatherapy oils and offers psychic readings, reflexology appointments and astrology sessions provided by the house psychics and the house astrologer, , who are on site daily. Additionally, every Wednesday and Saturday mornings Cafe Jonah offers free meditation.

Every Sunday, Cafe Jonah provides a “Pay What It Is Worth” brunch. The entire restaurant transforms. The foyer’s center table becomes loaded with baked goods, including doughnuts, biscuits, scones and muffins. The serving counter turns into a buffet featuring various thick warm quiches and seasoned frittatas. Customers may grab a plate and wander around the cafe, piling on whatever food appeals to them. After finishing, customers make their way to the counter to “pay what it is worth.” “It’s sort of a model that’s happening across the country right now,” Levison said. “Pay what it is worth” refers to Cafe Jonah’s policy of donating 10 percent of each day’s sales to three charities, which are chosen by the customers, and on Sunday 20 percent of the sales are donated. “I love the restaurant business,” Levison said. “I love being around people. 100 percent the best part [of my job] is I get to do what I chose to do everyday.” p


lifestyle

May 15, 2013

Ansley Marks

12

THE SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE: (Clockwise from top left) The Grady community remembers Alec Bruno with a chalk mural. He enjoyed rock climbing at Outdoor Academy, a semesterlong program that is located in the North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountians, where Bruno spent his first semester sophmore year . Bruno attended Grady's 2013 junior-senior prom with senior Kate Marani. Bruno always experienced the outdoors with excitement and joy.

Community and school mourn the loss of Alec Bruno By Olivia Veira vorite activity at camp was sailing,” Ruder said. “Every friends from Outdoor Academy. His classmates and teachOn April 23, dozens of people sported shirts with the day we had sailing we would be on a boat together just ers posted pictures, stories and sentiments on the page. Atlanta Braves logo on them. Not because there was a the two of us, so we would literally be out for about two “Alec was one of the most passionate people I have ever game that day or because of a new trend but because Alec hours, me and him on a boat.” had the luck to know,” Hawkins said. “He felt everything Bruno loved baseball. After their first summer, Bruno and Ruder returned to so intensely. His passion drew me to him and made me Junior Alec Bruno died on April 22. His death was suicide. Camp Thunderbird each summer for seven years. Bruno’s want to have a close friendship with him. His strong emoGrady students, many of whom knew Bruno since elementary love for the outdoors grew each summer. tions could fill a room. His happiness was contagious; I school, were shocked to hear the news of Bruno’s death. During the first semester of his sophomore year, Bruno spent felt his sadness in my bones; his rage made me angry.” Junior Graham Ruder, a close friend of Bruno, was pro- a semester at Outdoor Academy, an educational program for After going to Outdoor Academy, Renner said Bruno’s foundly shaken by the news and devastated by the loss of freshmen, sophomores and juniors in the Blue Ridge Mountains love for the outdoors grew immensely. his friend. of North Carolina. Bruno’s decision to attend Outdoor Acad“After OA he got into kayaking, specifically playboating, “He was reckless, but full of life and curiosity," Ruder emy came as a surprise to no one, junior Eliza Renner said. which are the super small kayaks where you do tricks,” said. "He came off rough to people who knew him just for “We found out about the program together and influenced Renner said. his surface, but when you got to each other's decisions," Renner Ruder also noticed Bruno’s fondness for kayaking, atknow him you could really see his Alec spoke his mind and he said said. “In middle school we started tributing it to three things. better qualities.” developing really similar interests “He's always been an outdoors person, someone who everything he felt ... and if he On April 24, Bruno’s friends and in the outdoors. Outdoor Acad- could never sit still,” Ruder said. “It was just something loved you he never hesitated to emy seemed like a really natural that clicked with Alec. It was a way of escape for him and family gathered at Haygood United Methodist Church for a candlefit for both of us.” it was just something he really liked.” say that.” light vigil. Each person walked into Bruno and Renner went on Ruder said Bruno began kayaking on a regular basis. Eliza Renner the Inman Outward Bound Haygood’s main gymnasium car“Me and Adrian D'Avanzo hated it,” Ruder said. “We rying a lit candle provided by the junior trip and Bruno's sister attended hated it when he went kayaking because he couldn’t hang church. Many searched for answers the same summer camp that out with us, but he really got into it. He would literally to questions left unanswered by Renner went to. go every single weekend he got a chance. He went with a Bruno’s death. Renner met Alec at daycare group of older guys 40- or 50-year-olds. Alec was just goCaroline Kasper, mother of junior Emma Kasper and when they were 3 years old. ing kayaking every weekend or every other weekend with family friend to the Brunos, was one of the first to speak “Through that our parents became friends, especially my these middle-aged men. We were happy for Alec because at Bruno's vigil. dad and his dad, so we became family friends,” Renner said. it was something he just loved to do. It’s ridiculous how “[Alec’s mother] just knows her boy decided to go be She remembers Alec as loving and funny. much he loved it.” with his daddy,” she said at the vigil. “Alec spoke his mind and he The day after Bruno’s death, Bruno's father died of cancer about a year ago. Ruder, said everything he felt, so, if that senior Joe Lavine rushed to find His strong emotions could fill a who spent time with Bruno and his father, said the two meant he disagreed with you or Principal Vincent Murray, hoproom. His happiness was conwere very close. he didn't like you he would come ing to make a proposal. tagious. I felt his sadness in my Church leaders and family friends spoke to the dozens of out and say that and if he loved When the bell rang for fourth community members, staff and students who knew Bruno. you he never hesitated to say that bones. His rage made me angry.” period on April 26, hundreds Bruno's funeral was on April 25 at the Catholic Shrine either,” Renner said. “He was an of students rushed to the stadiof Immaculate Conception. incredibly passionate guy.” um. Standing in a circle as large When she learned of Bruno's death, sophomore Faye Because their families were so Lea Hawkins as the football field, each stuWebster began to write a song in his memory. She sang close, Renner spent a lot of time wrapped arms around one junior, The Galloway School dent her original song titled "I Know I'll Find You One Day" with Bruno and his family. another to listen to Lavine’s at his funeral. “His older sister Madison, in words. Several students sang In addition to Webster's song, Bruno's friends and fam- the past couple years, has introduced me to her friends [by and read poetry. Among the singers were junior Ryan Bolily spoke of his genuine, caring personality and his love saying] ‘this is my future sister in law,' or ‘this is the girl ton who sang "The Climb" by Miley Cyrus, junior Sahara for baseball and the outdoors. Ruder was one of many Alec is going to marry,' and I would always get bright red Jiminez who sang "Thinking About You" by Frank Ocean speakers at the funeral. and laugh because it was such a silly thing to say," Renner and senior Olatunde Richardson, who sang an original Bruno and Ruder met in elementary school through said. "Alec and I would just laugh about it.” song titled 'Runaway.' their mothers. The boys were both in the third grade at During Outdoor Academy, Bruno became close friends "In the aftermath of the incident, I could just feel a Morningside and their mothers had signed them up for a with his classmates. After hearing of Bruno’s death, Lea melancholic blanket over the entire school," Lavine said. summer camp called Camp Thunderbird. Hawkins, a junior at The Galloway School, started a Fa- "I saw an opportunity to make something positive out of “Our camp was right on the lake, and Alec and I's fa- cebook group called “Remembering Alec Bruno,” for his the whole thing, and I took my chance." p


May 15, 2013

lifestyle

13

McCurdy honored for legacy of ‘captivating’ teaching

mallory mcFarlin

Southerner File Photo

By Olivia Volkert and regional competition over that span Josh Weinstock and won the state competition in As a freshman in 2004, Grady 2000 and 2005. alumnus Michael Harper walked “I remember Mr. McCurdy into literature teacher Larry Mc- working with students to prepare Curdy’s homeroom and sat down. for the AP English Lit Exam on McCurdy approached Harper and the bus on their way back from asked how many pushups he could [the] National [High School Mock do in a row. Trial Championship] in 2000 “So, as a 130-pound freshman, and 2005,” said Carl Gebo, who I pull up my sleeve and flexed,” coached with McCurdy on the Harper said. “He grabbed my mock trial team. skinny arm and nodded that unMcCurdy is known by current stumistakable nod.” dents and alumni alike McCurdy scowled for his down-to-earth at Harper and said he teaching style and ability was unimpressed with to connect with students Harper’s display. Mcon a personal level. Curdy then lifted up his “In class and around own sleeve and flexed his campus, we knew we muscles. had a true ally in McWINNER “‘You see that?’” Harper Curdy as someone who remembered McCurdy saying. “‘You would hear our side honestly while don’t wanna mess with me.’” Harper still holding each of us accountsaid McCurdy followed that up with able to an ethic that could not be another comment: “‘I’m just messing codified or strictly enforced,” 2004 with ya’ Mikey. You’re a strong lad, graduate Dominick Reuter said. but seriously, don’t mess with me.’” Both Harper and alumnus Perri McCurdy is the 2013 winner of Anne Campis remember how McThe Southerner’s Marion P. Kelly Curdy would play classics like The Award, named for former English Beatles, Widespread Panic or James teacher and school administrator Taylor on guitar in class to keep his Marion Kelly. McCurdy has taught students engaged. In addition to at Grady for 18 years, beginning as “jamming out,” McCurdy tells stoa student teacher in 1995. In 2001, ries from his life that many students McCurdy won Grady’s Teacher of enjoy and think are an effective way the Year as well as the APS Teacher of reaching out to students. of the Year. “When you know someone better, “It was amazing to me, just the you don’t want to disappoint them, depth of knowledge Mr. McCurdy which makes you want to try hardhas regarding his subject and lit- er,” senior Sam Holder said. “Everyerature alone,” said Brian Leahy, one tries harder to make him happy who co-taught with McCurdy last because he is giving so much to us.” year in his ninth-grade English McCurdy teaches literature by class. “The man seems to almost encouraging discussion amongst his sweat literature.” students and having a sarcastic, alMcCurdy coached the mock trial most jaded, sense of humor. Holder team from the fall of 1999 to the also said McCurdy “keeps it real” by fall of 2008. The team won every recognizing, but not tailoring to, his

EXPERIENCED AND ENTERTAINING: English teacher Larry McCurdy (left) first began working at Grady in 1995, and was featured in The Southerner (right) in the late ‘90s. McCurdy is known for the funny stories he weaves to his students AP Literature students. senior students’ lack of motivation. Reuter, who is now a syndicated photojournalist, said that without McCurdy’s help with writing his college application essay, he would not have gotten into Boston University. He added that McCurdy transformed his writing from a “loose high school style” into “something lean and focused.” “Beyond the writing tips, McCurdy made a point to treat me and countless other students like responsible young people—a far cry from the mere statistic many of us were made to feel like in the bureaucracy of the Atlanta Public School system,” Reuter said.

Literature teacher Deedee Abbott worked as a student-teacher under him for a semester in 2003 and said that she felt more like a student than a teacher. She said he has inspired how she teaches literature by reminding her to prioritize the content and the students above all. “He’s captivating, he’s a storyteller, he’s entertaining and he’s really, really smart,” Abbott said. “I felt like I was in a college class. He made the Iliad like a story rather than a dry text.” Senior Regan Lowring also notices his passion for teaching literature and said he makes learning it an “adventure.” “I will always remember how Mr.

McCurdy would pace up and down the classroom and how he would get really animated as he taught,” senior Regan Lowring said. “He gets so excited about what he is teaching that, as a student, you are pulled into his excitement. It gives the class a fun dynamic.” Reuter agrees with the class of 2013’s decision to grant McCurdy the Marion P. Kelly Award, which was presented to him at the Visions Ceremony on May 18. “The world needs more teachers like McCurdy and he, and the teachers like him, deserve all the recognition and honor they can handle,” Reuter said. p

By Gracie White For as long as he can remember, senior Cole Davies has been in and out of the kitchen helping to cook meals, if not preparing them entirely on his own. Davies’ mother, Rachel Geraci, believes his Mediterranean heritage is to blame for his young interest in cooking. “I come from an Italian family where cooking has always been a big deal,” Geraci said. “I believe you learn by watching, and he grew up watching a lot of great cooks in the kitchen. My dad and Cole still get together to do all sorts of things in the kitchen from creating homemade sauces to canning.” Davies remembers visiting his relatives in Manhattan where he’d go out with his family and eat at various restaurants that served “crazy good” food. “It got me wondering, ‘how do they make such great dishes?’” Davies said. “I wanted to be able to do the same, so I started reading cookbooks and magazines that had recipes I wanted to experiment with.” After years of research and practice, Davies wanted to put his skills to the test. In his sophomore year, he attended a summer culinary program at Trident Technical College in Charleston, S.C. “The folks there were so impressed with his skills that they enhanced their offerings to accommodate his abilities,” Geraci said. “He’s constantly coming up with new recipes of his own and researching new

Photos courtesy of cole davies

Senior cooks up aptitude for culinary arts over time

COOL BEANS: Senior Cole Davies prepares larb, the national dish of Laos, which is a minced meat salad meant to be eaten in cabbage. Known for his tasty meat dishes, Davies has been cooking since he was a kid. trends in the cooking world. He’s taken the idea of cooking to a completely different level and introduced me to so many new things.” Davies said he often cooks meals for both himself and his mother if she’s not working on that particular night. Though he is

equipped with the techniques and knowledge to cook almost anything, Spicy Asian and Central American meals are among Davies’ favorites to prepare. “I have a few special utensils I always keep on hand, including my chef ’s knife, which is actually made by an old Samurai

sword crafter in Japan,” Davies said. “I remember my dad having one when I was a kid, and when I got old enough to cook, I really wanted one of my own.” His talent in the kitchen, however, is not limited to his family’s enjoyment. Davies’ friends have noticed his gift for cooking and take advantage of any opportunity they have to get a bite of his latest creations. “He made this jerk chicken and onion relish that was absolutely delicious,” senior Sophie Maschinot said. “He’s made many others dishes too, each of which had sauces and other toppings that really completed the entire meal. I really like that about the way he cooks; there’s never anything missing.” Fellow senior and vegetarian Kate Taber said his cooking smelled so good, she was often tempted to try the meat in his dishes. Davies says though he doesn’t see himself attending culinary school or having a job in the culinary business, cooking will always enrich his life. He sees himself cooking for his wife and kids when he settles down. “I just hope he is always in a place where he can share his talents with others because he takes such joy in creating meals for his family and friends,” Geraci said. “He hasn’t made a single dish I didn’t love. He puts so much attention to detail in every aspect of his meals. You want to slow down when you eat them so you can really savor the intricate flavors he’s put together. Even a quick burger or spaghetti sauce turns into an unforgettable experience.” p


sports

14

March 15, 2013

How to successfully serve an ace with Gabby Poux Step 2: The Toss

“Hold your racket out in front of you with the ball and racket together. Point your feet outward and your shoulders perpendicular to the line.”

Step 4: Contact

“Using your momentum, body weight and arm speed, turn your body as you hit the ball. The ball will go over the net with speed and accuracy.”

photos by ELi mansbach

Step 3: Preparing to Hit

Step 1: Ready Position

“Lift your racket up at the same time you throw the ball. The toss should be a little in front of you and high. Start turning your shoulder towards your target.”

“Put your racket behind your head and line your hand up with the ball. Place your left shoulder towards your target and put your feet together.”

“Bend your knees right before you hit the ball and then explode upwards. You should hit the ball as high up as you can reach and keep your head up.”

Step 5: Follow Through

Braves enjoy a positive start, but their future is uncertain

J.D. Capelouto

I’ve been forced to keep my expectations low. Late-season slumps have thwarted multiple playoff-worthy seasons, and the horrors of last year’s wild-card game will forever be burned into my memory. In my mind, this season’s start is blemished by an asterisk reminding me not to hope, not to dream. But how could I resist? This year the Braves have been blessed with the addition of the Upton brothers. The two, in addition to Jason Heyward, round out a powerful outfield. Justin Upton leads Major League Baseball with 13 homers and is second with a .629 slugging percentage. His older brother B.J., despite a slow start, is getting back into the swing of things. And who could overlook the heartwarming story of catcher Evan Gattis? After refusing a baseball scholarship to Texas A&M, he entered rehab, then worked as everything but a baseball player. Now he is batting .243, with 7 HR and 20 RBIs. T1hat’s pretty good for a former janitor. Our hopes are high for this Braves season. This city needs a sports success after the collapse of last year’s Braves and Falcons. I am tentatively dreaming of a National League East pennant and a late October run. It may be too early to predict, but this year’s squad seems to be something special. And at the very least, I’ll enjoy some summer days at Turner Field. p Axel Olson

I am shivering in my seat. It is 40-something degrees in March. I am underdressed and quite mad at the weather. But none of that matters, since my misery is being foiled by the joy of my first Braves Declan Farrisee game of the season. Turner Field is playing host to the dreaded Phillies, a team I’ve come to hate over the course of my life as a Braves fan. The game serves as a glimpse of what is to come: summer days spent cheering for my Braves while savoring overpriced hot dogs and Coke. Even the outcome of the game, a 2-0 defeat, couldn’t dampen my spirits. I, like all Braves fans, have had lots to be happy for this season so far. Who could ask for anything better than an 11-1 start? Even after a brief slide, the Braves still stand on top of the National League East Division, with a 22-18 record. The newly assembled team seems to be meshing perfectly, even with injuries to major players like Brian McCann and Freddie Freeman. This season is ripe with promise, and seems destined to last longer than the regular 162 games. Yet as a Braves fan, especially in recent years,

CALL ME MAYBE: A sign outside the stadium urges companies to call APS Athletics to advertise at Grady. A marketing department within APS also helps to solicit possible corporate advertisers.

METROPCS posts ads on Grady stadium in exchange for funds continued from back page can provide more equipment, better equipment, newer equipment,” Beggs said. Some students, however, such as junior lacrosse player Deya Bowers, believe APS is taking it too far with all the signs facing Grady’s parking lot. “It may be their stadium, but it’s on our campus,” Bowers said. “Nobody wants to look at an advertisement at our public school.” Bowers does, however, appreciate that APS students are benefiting from the MetroPCS partnership by receiving better equipment. “It’s a fair trade for the advertisement,” she said. Senior varsity football and lacrosse

player Bilal Vaughn has similar opinions about the signs. “I think that it’s distracting a bit, but that’s because they’re new,” Vaughn said. Vaughn said other non-APS schools he has attended also have sponsors and advertisements. He said the signs there were noticeable, but nothing “as big and flashy like MetroPCS’s.” Vaughn also agrees it is good for APS to get more funding but hopes Beggs and the department of athletics do not take their partnership with MetroPCS too far. “I think it’s a good idea for APS to partner with a company, but as soon as I start to see MetroPCS Field and the Grady Androids instead of Knights, I’d pull the signs down,” Vaughn said. p


sports

May 15, 2013

15

By Allison Rapoport At the Georgia Latin Convention, there is an activity called “Rent-a-Roman.” A student volunteers to be rented by fighting his way onto a podium (it’s actually a drink cooler) that is set up amongst a crowd. After the student ascends to the podium, members of the crowd bid on the student. The student then becomes a “slave” to the highest bidder for the rest of the day. While this tradition may seem creepy and illegal, it is actually a very fun and efficient way to raise money. Just ask the Emory University crew team, which has employed a similar fundraising process successfully for years. Anyone who has played club sports at Grady knows that funding is always an issue. That is true in college as well. Without such creative approaches to fundraising, Emory’s crew team would not have an oar in the water. “As far as clubs go, [the crew team] may be one of the more expensive ones at Emory, but we do have this great program that helps lower dues for students,” said Tommy Connor, the team’s assistant fundraiser this year. Emory’s program is called “Rent-a-Rower,” and its name describes the activity perfectly. One can rent a member of Emory’s crew team to do any sort of job. “Anyone in the surrounding neighborhoods and communities, if they have any jobs that they need help with, they can hire one of our teammates,” said Connor, who is also in charge of the Rent-a-Rower program. “The jobs range from moving, to doing yard work, babysitting, serving at parties or helping do dishes or laundry. [They include] just about anything we’re willing to do.” People who are interested in renting a rower can either fill out a form on the team’s website or contact Connor directly via email or phone. Connor explained that the people who hire the crew members are genuinely trying to help the team. “They know that more reliable work is out there, but the people that are going to hire us for these jobs definitely care about the school,” Connor said. “Some of them are former rowers, so they know how hard it is to pay for things.” The money the rowers make subsidizes team dues, which can range from about $500

COURTESY OF Becky han

Emory crew team rents out members to raise money

ALL HANDS ON DECK: The Emory crew team groups for a photo before a race. The team uses the Rent-A-Rower program to pay to attend competitions such as this one. a year for novices to about $800 a year for varsity members. The price rowers charge for their service is explained on the website and on fliers that the teammates are required to distribute throughout the neighborhoods surrounding the Emory campus. The cost for this type of labor is generally reasonable, Connor said, but the team members are still able to raise a good deal of money. “As far as hourly wages go, it’s pretty fair, and usually the people that hire us are aware of [the price] and are generous with helping out,” Connor said. “Per rower, per hour, it’s $20, but if you hire for four hours, it’s $60. And that’s per rower. A lot of jobs will be two or three rowers so these people could be shelling out $180 for 12 hours of work.” Rower participation is voluntary. “The more jobs you do, the more your dues get paid,” Connor said. “But there is a limit so that you can only do as many rent-a-rowers as is enough to pay for the current semester’s dues plus $100 towards the next semester. After

that, you have to let other teammates sign up for the jobs.” Most of the teammates participate in at least one rent-a-rower job. “Everybody needs money because we’re all poor college kids,” said Becky Han, the newly elected assistant fundraiser for the 2013 year. “People don’t want to miss an opportunity at all.” Much like club sports at Grady, the crew team does not get as much funding as Emory’s varsity sports, but Han does not think that is necessarily a bad thing. “Since we’re a club sport, we kind of get to choose which regattas, or races, we go to,” Han said. “Since we’re not varsity, we’re not really mandated as much by Emory or by NCAA.” Han believes the Rent-a-Rower program is rewarding. She said the team members enjoy the process and are often more than compensated for their hard work. “[From] the experiences I’ve had, they’re fantastic people,” Han said. “There was one

time that I went and the lady was like, ‘I’ll have cookies and milk for you when you get done,’ so the people are very inviting and very welcoming. We work hard for them, and they pay us and sometimes they give us more than they should just because they like to donate to us because they know that it costs a lot of money to go to these places, and do crew, and to buy equipment and all that. But generally people are very nice and very friendly.” Connor said he has had similar experiences when he was rented. Neither Connor nor Han know how long the program has been around, but it has been very successful in raising funds for the Emory crew team. Not only has it helped them raise money for the team, but it has provided a service to the community. Grady student athletes needing to raise money could possibly take a lesson from the Emory University crew team’s Rent-aRower program. p

EXCLUSIVELY @ theSoutherneronline.com: Junior Nyla Woods recently won the state track and field championship in shot put. See the full story online.

After starting out the season with a tough 4-0 loss against Paideia, the boys soccer team went undefeated in its region. In the postseason, the boys lost their first-round playoff game against Marist on penalty kicks. They went on to beat Stone Mountain and finished third in the region tournament but were defeated in the first round of the state playoffs by Northwest Whitfield on penalty kicks. After securing the No. 2 seed for Region Six 4A, the girls finished second in their region after posting a 6-1 record. After beating Northwest Whitfield 4-0 in the first round of the state playoffs, in the second round the team experienced a devastating 1-0 loss to Columbus High School.

The girls lacrosse team had the most successful year in its history. Captained by junior Salome Kakalashvili and sophomore Lindsay Van Beck, the team went a perfect 11-0 and ended up first in its division. The girls team beat rivals Northgate and Woodward. With few seniors on the team this year, next year’s girls lacrosse season looks hopeful. The boys lacrosse team started off its spring season with a 2-0 record. After the loss of senior Henry White and junior Tucker Lancaster to injury, however, the team hit a slump and lost every game for the rest of the season. This year’s captains were junior Declan Farrisee and seniors Bilal Vaughn (also the team’s goalie) and Alex Stearns-Bernhart.

After a slow start to the season, the boys ultimate Frisbee team, led by juniors Sebbi DiFrancesco and Michael Dillard and senior Joe Lavine, finished the season strong. With poor starts in its first two tournaments, the team, trained by its new coach Mark Poole, fared well in the state tournament, despite missing almost half of all practices due to rain. The team beat rival Woodward in two of its four meetings. In addition, the boys beat Paideia (for the first time in the team’s history) in a round-robin tournament, but lost the other two times they played Paideia. After losing Lavine to injury, the team was still able to place fourth in the state tournament.

Thanks to a huge influx of freshmen on the squad, the boys tennis team was able to secure a winning record this season. Led by seniors Jeffrey Cox and Troy Kleber, and freshman Alex Lepik (one of three varsity freshmen), the team finished third in its region before being knocked out in the first round of the state tournament by Dalton High School. In the regular season, the boys beat their rival Paideia, but lost to their other traditional rival, North Atlanta. The girls team made it to the state playoffs for the first time in a decade, but was knocked out in the second round by Lanier High. In the regular season, the girls lost to region rival Chamblee twice in close matches.

BASEBALL

Kate de Give

TENNIS Allison Rapoport

ULTIMATE FRISBEE

Kate de Give

LACROSSE courtesy of bilal vaughn

Kate de Give

SOCCER

The baseball team reached the state playoffs for the first time in three years. Juniors Luke Leonard, one of the team leaders in home runs, and pitcher Liam Henry helped to catapult the team to victory over Chamblee and into the state playoffs. A player to watch for the future is freshman David Schwartz, an up-and-coming pitcher who proved reliable as a closer this season. After one of the coldest seasons in recent memory, the basrball team faced Northwest Whitfield in the first round of the state playoffs. After multiple rain delays, the team lost in the last game of the series, 11-1.


the Sports section

thesoutherneronline.com

HENRY W. GRADY HIGH SCHOOL, ATLANTA

May 15, 2012

VOLUME LXVI, NUMBER 8

APS SCORES WITH CORPORATE SPONSOR METRO PCS By J.D. Capelouto tudents were surprised when they arrived at school on March 13 and realized that Grady’s stadium had received an unexpected wardrobe change. The previously plain gray walls of Eddie S. Henderson Stadium,

S

which is owned by APS, were now clad in large purple signs facing the student parking lot, advertising MetroPCS and its newest cell phone and plan in large bold letters. “MetroPCS: Proud Sponsor of Atlanta Public Schools Athletics,” the posters proclaimed. The APS athletics department recently partnered with MetroPCS, and is receiving funding in exchange for allowing MetroPCS to advertise on the stadium. APS director of athletics Jeff Beggs said a num-

METRO A of a p PS: Newly p ar tner o ship a sted signs o chieve d bet w n Grady stad iu een AP S Athl m advertise etics a nd the MetroPCS as a cell ph one co result mpany .

ber of companies have approached him about advertising throughout APS Athletics, and Beggs has considered partnering with them as well. Since the contracts have not been signed yet, Beggs cannot release which companies those are. “We had contact with other cell phone providers, but MetroPCS was willing to step up to the plate and advertise,” Beggs said. According to Beggs, APS has a marketing department that

helps solicit potential advertisers. Beggs added that the company has been quite active, as evidenced by the other contracts currently in the works. “I almost talk with the marketing company every day about issues and potential advertisers,” he said. Beggs believes the advertising is necessary because APS Athletics does not receive enough funding from ticket purchases alone, so the money from MetroPCS goes to buying equipment and uniforms. “The additional revenue that we’re going to gain from advertising will go to supplement that money so that we

J.D. Capelouto

see METROPCS, page 14

Every BODY is meant to do something exceptional Ever since I was young, I have been a large girl. I don’t say this to put myself down, and when I say it, I don’t mean that I am fat or exceptionally tall. I simply mean that I am bigger than average; I am “athletically built,” and although I am comfortable with my body now, it has not always been this way. Kate de Give For a long period of time between seventh and 10th grade, I suffered from the eating disorder bulimia. I remember being so disappointed with myself every day. I would eat until I felt like my emotions were numbed, even if it was only for a few minutes. Then I would purge, without stopping for even one moment to think about how dangerous it was for my body or how detrimental it was to my mental health. During this dark time, it was really hard for me to participate in the sports I loved. I would purge before soccer practice, sometimes making myself feel too sick to play. I would sometimes feel too fat to run in my cross-country meets. I thought that because I was bigger than a lot of the girls, I would never be as good of

thin; she rose to the top because of her commitment to the sport and her tall, athletic frame. I’m sure many of my idols have gone through periods in their lives similar to mine. It is not easy being the “big” girl. We are not usually put on magazine covers or coveted by men, and we are not always viewed as strong, but rather as bulky and intimidating. But we “big” girls have to stay strong, because women’s sports need us. Sports need powerful, confident women who are willing to build themselves up and achieve greatness. I know that sometimes it is hard for girls to look at themselves in the mirror, no matter what size they are. But confronting that image in the mirror is an important step. The next time you look in the mirror and see something you don’t like, ask yourself, would you be able to kick the soccer ball all the way down the field without strong legs? Would you be able to dominate on the basketball court without above-average height? And on the other side of the spectrum, would you be able to complete a beautiful pirouette without those long legs? Would you be able to pole vault over the bar without that lanky, nimble frame? Most importantly, would you be you without your body? p

a runner. It took a few years and a lot of self discovery to realize that I had it all wrong. As my sophomore year came to an end, so did my eating disorder. I think it was because I was genuinely feeling happier and more in control of my life. I had a great group of friends, I told my mom about my problem and most importantly, I started to throw myself into sports in a way I never had before. During my junior year, I began playing water polo, and I joined the swim team. For the first time in my life, it was helpful to be big. I could hold my own with the male defenders in a water-polo game, and I found out that those “thick thighs” I had hated throughout my adolescence were really just muscles that gave me extreme power and speed in the 50-yard freestyle. It has become obvious that I would not be able to succeed in the sports I love without my body shape. I like to look at my sports idols for assurance. Serena Williams did not become a world champion tennis player by being a skinny twig. She became a world champion because of her skill and her strong, muscular body. And Missy Franklin, swimming gold medalist at the 2012 Olympic games, did not succeed because she was rail

Grady Sports Score Central: April/May

April 5 Grady 1, Washington 0 April 17 Grady 7, Lithonia 0 Grady 10, Columbia 0 April 19 Grady 1, Marist 1 Grady 2, Chamblee 1 April 23 Grady 3, Stone Mountain 2

Lacrosse

Baseball

Soccer Marist 6, Grady 1 April 30 Grady 4, Northwest Whitfield 0 May 1 Northwest Whitfield 2, Grady 1 May 7 Columbus 1, Grady 0 p Girls p Boys

March 29 Grady 20, South Atlanta 5 April 3 Grady 11, Carver 8 April 15 Banneker 4, Grady 3 April 17 Columbia 9, Grady 0

April 18 Grady 16, Lithonia 8 April 22 Chamblee 5, Grady 0 April 23 Chamblee 4, Grady 3 Grady 11, Chamblee 4 April 24 Grady 7, Chamblee 1 (clinched state playoff berth)

State Playoffs: May 3 Grady 3, Northwest Whitfield 1 Northwest Whitfield 11, Grady 8 May 6

April 20-21:TIL Tournament Won tournament April 24 Woodward 11, Grady 2 Grady 11, Dunwoody 1 April 25 Grady 8, North Gate 1 April 26 Parkview 10, Grady 8 May 1 Starr’s Mill 21, Grady 2

See complete coverage of games on thesoutherneronline.com and on The Southerner Facebook page.


Southerner Volume 66, Issue 8  

The final issue of the 2012-2013 school year honors seniors with the annual list of where our soon-to-be graduates are headed after high sch...

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