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WINTER EDITION

WEST SIDE

STORIES

DECEMBER 2009

Are you ready to duel? LET’S GET IT OH! p. 3

• Wauwatosa West High School • 11400 W Center Street, Wauwatosa WI • Volume 14, Issue 4

THEFT

Car break ins at West

Various items taken from student cars in parking lot ZACK GARHART g Editor-in-Chief

HOLIDAY CRUNCH ZACK GARHART West Side Stories candy rush Senior Kelsey Chapman helps customer with large holiday order. Working at Buddy Squirrel,she is an employee of one of the many mall stores that receive favorable business during the holidays. “Even though the economy is bad, I still ring people up with orders of over $250 nuts or chocolates that are just gifts,” Chapman said. and hungry, unfortunately just in time lives, money shapes the holiday season LIZZIE BRADLEY g Staff Writer for the holidays. People are struggling with meals, traveling, giving, presents It’s pretty obvious that lives today are every day financially to simply get by. and more presents. Things are going to shaped, changed, and broken by one Here in Milwaukee, job loss be a little different this year, many Tosa thing, money. The decline in the econ- rates were the eighth highest in all of West families are making omy has done just that, changed many Wisconsin, with 10 out of 100 people fil- adjustments to their holiday routines.  lives. Millions of people have lost their ing for unemployment benefits in Octo- This is what West student Jessica Neljobs over the past year leaving families ber. The decline in the economy really son had to say “We’ve always spent with little or no income. Others have hits home. But does that mean that holi- Christmas with my extended family up lost a lot more, people are left homeless day spirit has to decline too? Like our in Madi- g Please see “ECONOMY” p.2 g

WOrld News

Detainees shipped to new home

Guantanamo Bay prisoners relocated to new prison within U.S.

Andy O’Leary g Staff Writer Illinois Governor Pat Quinn recently announced the new home for relocated prisoners from the United States’ prison camp for detainees from its two wars in the Middle East: A facility known as the Thomson Correctional Center, located in rural northwestern Illinois about one hundred and fifty miles from Chicago. The facility won out over several similar facilities, including ADX Florence “Supermax” in rural Colorado and the United States Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois. The winning bidder is similar to the aforementioned two facilities in that it will have a “Supermax” (or, as Pat Quinn described, it,

“Super Supermax”) level of security – a prison operating style that dictates inmates to spend up to twenty-three and a half hours a day in solitary confinement in a near-windowless cell. Only a monochrome television tuned to educational and religious programming and food served through a slit in a door serving as links to the outside world – but different in that it will mostly be built from the ground up. The prison’s location was chosen in part because of Illinois’s reaction to the recent economic downturn, and is projected to employ a couple thousand people. The selection process behind the new facility and its subsequent conclusion may mark one of the final hurdles in the long-running political

and legal battle over Guantanamo Bay’s prison camp – nicknamed “Camp X-Ray” by the military, but popularly known to the public as simply “Gitmo”. Its effects on the United States have created a debate that has spanned two presidencies and nearly one decade and began with the prison’s opening in 2002. Guantanamo Bay is an American military installation located in the Cuban bay under the terms of a perpetual lease given to the United States on the land after an armed conflict with the island nation (located roughly ninety miles from Miami) as part of the Spanish-American War. Following the attacks of September 11, Guantanamo became President George W. Bush’s g Please see “GIT MO” p.2 choice for

Thursday December 3, Wauwatosa West was hit with a wave of crimes that occurred within moments of each other.  Vehicles owned by three senior boys, located in the back of the West parking lot, were targeted by thieves as IBA games were held in the gym.  Taylor Irke, Chris Zachman, and Aaron Zebrick were victim to the crimes, as they had high valued items stolen from their cars.  Among the items were an Ipod, subs, a deck, an in-dash stereo, a flip down screen and even a book bag.  Zachman explains the feeling he felt when he found out, as his anger has yet to leave him since the robbery.  “I was mostly frustrated, I just wanted the police to find out who did it,” Zachman said.  As to how Zachman found out about the disturbing news, he said, “One of my friends came in the gym during IBA and told me [about it] and I didn’t believe him, but he looked serious so I ran outside.  Sure enough, my window was smashed and my side mirror [was] broken.”  Unfortunately for Zachman and his fellow seniors, there have been no arrests or charges filed.   The description left for Officer Braun entailed a dark blue vehicle that was an older model as it was narrowed down to either a Nissan or a Toyota. Also entailed was a description of the suspects; two black males approximately 17-20 years old, and a third black male that was wearing a white jacket and a white knit hat with a goatee. The reports claimed the suspects as not being familiar West students. Although Zachman considers himself somewhat “lucky” as only his Ipod was stolen, Irke and Zebrick suffer a larger financial loss as they had Ipod decks, subs, stereo equipment and even a friend’s book bag stolen from them.  Irke said that his initial feeling of anger has toned down, but he still feels frustration. His attitude is justified, as an attempt to steal his car was also part of the crime. Junior Zach Podzaline said that there was evidence in Irkes car that the thieves made an attempt to break the ignition in order to start the car; however, the attempt was unsuccessful. Officer Doug Braun understands the loss that the students g Please see “BREAK IN” p.2


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NEWS WEST SIDE STORIES

December, 2009

>> NEWS BRIEFS

Break In

>>Band members honored

g Cont. from page 1

endured through the robbery; however, he acknowledged both sides of it.  “Unfortunately, you’re taking that risk when you have that expensive stuff in your car”, Braun said. The window of time that the IBA games in question occupied was a ripe opportunity for the thieves to select vehicles to loot and, in turn, burglarize them.  A parking lot that lacked witnesses also lacked video cameras, which may have made it harder to locate the suspects; Braun, for his part, is currently lobbying the district to provide district-wide cameras to ensure safety. Concern has also arisen with the construction of the new storage area and concession stand outside; caution will be taken to prevent possible damage. Podzaline, a friend of the victims, offered a simple solution: “Students should park in the front row,” he said. Suggested solutions ranged from new parking arrangements, to a boxing match, to jail time, and even a call

Gitmo g Cont. from page 1

an offshore detention facility to house prisoners of war from the ensuing War in Afghanistan. Criticism from around the time of the war to the inception of Barack Obama’s Presidency largely came from the political left-wing, and revolved around the constitutionality of holding detainees (termed “enemy combatants”, a designation coined by the Bush administration) as well as the legality of the treatment of the detainees under the terms of the Geneva Convention. The Convention was structured as a treaty on treatment of prisoners of war that the United States is presently bound to.

Eight students from Wauwatosa West – an unprecedented number - were selected to the Honors Wind Ensemble and Honors Symphonic Band at the 43rd University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Honors Band Festival this year. Matthew Ferch, Amelia Forsmo, Salah Galaszewski, Karen Lange, Kelly Layde, Emmeline Pratke, and Valerie Vogel were selected to the Symphonic Band; freshman Gina Richter was selected as bass clarinet section leader in the Wind Ensemble.

>>Students go to jail

MARK HARRIS West Side Stories g

for security cameras; the crimes have sparked a mix of frustration and suspicion among the student body, and it

remains to be seen whether or not the criminals in question will be successfully apprehended.  

>>Bridge smashing

Closing Guantanamo Bay’s prison camp was a key component of Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign platform for President; upon taking office after his election victory that November, he made an executive order to this effect, issuing an order demanding the immediate closure of the facility by the beginning of 2010. Questions soon arose about whether or not President Obama would indeed be able to close the facility by his selfdeclared deadline; after it became apparent that multiple legal hurdles such as the question of fair trials for detainees (as opposed to military tribunals, an avenue favored by the Bush-era Department of Justice, or

no trials at all). Also the question rose as to where to house relocated Guantanamo detainees. The answers to many of these questions began to fall into place shortly thereafter, with the Department of Justice choosing a federal court located a few miles from the site of the former World Trade Center as the location to try detainees arrested in conjunction with the initial attacks of September 11. Regardless of these potential conclusions, criticism of the process continues to flow in from all ends of the political spectrum, and it remains to be seen if Guantanamo Bay will ever be completely closed.

presents. Well, there’s going to be a little less of those too. Mackenzie Hoffman is one that agreed that the economy was going to have an impact on her Christmas. “I think so. My parents have already told me to not expect as many gifts this year, and to pick out things I really thought about and want,” Hoffman said. That’s not exactly what kids want to hear this time of year, but with everyone adjusting to tighter budgets  all those big expensive gifts are out of the question. Sometimes less doesn’t have to be a bad thing. There are a lot of creative things you can do when it comes to giving instead of spending hundreds of dollars that don’t exist. Tieg Maryarski suggests making a mixed CD collection, or something in an art class like ceramics. Getting creative does take a little effort but chances are the person will appreciate a home made gift much more. Christmas is about giving, but that doesn’t have to mean material things. To make a cheaper christmas 2009 better than before the economy went south, don’t get wrapped up in

money and take what Tosa West parent Kelly Turkowtich said into consideration, “I don’t think this Christmas has to be any different because of the economy, just because the material aspect of Christmas is worse it doesn’t have to change what Christmas is really about.” It is more important than ever to remember the true meaning of Christmas. The current economical situation is one  we won’t forget considering it has impacted our own lives, and unemployment rates haven’t looked this bad since the Great Depression. A bad economy equals job layoffs, raised prices on almost everything, and little or no money to waste for everyone.This bad economy effects and changes lives all around the world, in Milwaukee, and here in our very own Tosa West everyday. Although this time of year it hurts the most, a different, less of everything Christmas doesn’t have to be a bad thing, it’s what’s made of it. So, this year try and look past the stress of money, try and appreciate family, your one homemade gift, and remember the true meaning of Christmas.

Economy g Cont. from page 1

son. This year we’re staying home celebrating with just my immediate family. It sucks we can’t all see eachother but it’s just not that easy this year.” With families not having as much money for gas and airfare, they’re choosing to celebrate at home. Other students mentioned staying in for a home cooked meals rather than going out to an expensive restaurant. But there’s more to sav-

i n g money in a situation like this other than staying close to home. When you think of Christmas, the first thing that comes to mind is, of course,

Students in Mr. Oliver’s second-hour Law in Society class were treated to a truly “hands-on” experience with one facet of the American judicial system on Tuesday, December 15, when they went on a class field trip to the downtown Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility. The tour, which featured a walkthrough of some of the prison’s administrative rooms and inmate cafeterias, sent a message best described by one inmate delegated to speak to the students: “You don’t want to see the inside of these walls.”

Mr. Vann’s advanced physics classes was recently treated to an in-class experience of truly “shattering” proportions, when they subjected bridges built by themselves to varying amounts of weight – ultimately breaking them all - as part of a large class project involving the science of bridges. The bridges, which held up to varying amounts of weight with greatly varying levels of success, were part of a project grade that also included a technical paper and large amounts of pre-planning.

>>Senior directed play Auditions were recently conducted for Wauwatosa West’s yearly senior-directed play, titled “Teen Antics”. The play - originally titled “Rumors” but later changed per a directive from the school administration to the current play - will feature Marissa Jones, Katie Applegate, Megan Falk, Paul Matthews, Alec Kartz, Andy O’Leary, Dylan Rogahn, Lizzie Seidenstricker, Taylor Peterson-Burke, and Leah Mott, and is directed by Eric Klein and Mark Wesson.

>>Teachers contracts On December 11, the Wauwatosa School Board approved a voluntary contract agreement for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years. The new contract includes a variety of elements, including a restoration of pay within the average range of comparable school districts. A negotiation for the new contract was defined by the efforts made by both parties.

>>CRASH pay it foward On December 17, CRASH held a “Pay it Forward” day.  The basic idea, based off the movie, was to try and get everyone at West to do at least three kind or considerate things for other people.  Each time someone did something for you, you would do something kind for someone else, creating a chain.  Ms. Keppler, the teacher in charge of CRASH, said, “We are just trying to improve the atmosphere at West.”    The members of CRASH wanted to see how many people they could affect by little acts of kindness and help to have a better day.  CRASH tried to make the teachers’ day better by bringing them food and giving the staff cards.


NEWS WEST SIDE STORIES

COLLEGE

LEISURE

Yu-Gi-Oh! Reborn

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December, 2009

COLLEGECORNER

the

Once popular card game makes comeback at West, especially among Upperclassmen Kelsey Kennedy g Staff Writer

As deadlines loom, seniors share the stories behind their workload in and outside of school Zack Garhart g Editor-in-chief

TOUGH SCHEDULE Lavon Poindexter

How tough is your schedule? “It’s not too tough, but I have a couple of hard classes. I’m only taking four classes at West, the rest are at MATC” What’s your toughest class? “By far advanced algebra.” What college is your top pick and does your schedule reflect your college choice? “Well I’m going to go into the Navy for a little bit. I may possibly be a mechanic in the future.” Zack Garhart West Side Stories g

SENIORS KONG YANG AND COREY JAY duel during a second hour study hall in the Trojan Room. Junior Scott Kamholtz spectates as he helps add and subract life points

Yu-Gi-Oh!, popular manga/anime (Japanese cartoon) that was created in Japan several years ago and as it developed a fan base here in the U.S.A, has made its come back at West. Study halls, lunch periods, and even ongoing classes are filled with students dueling. The series of Yu-Gi-Oh! follows the adventures of Yugi Muto, a smaller-than-average high school freshman who is famed for his skill at a special kind of battling-card game, known as Duel Monsters. As the popularity of the Yu-Gi-Oh! Series grew; a real-life version of Duel Monsters was developed as a card game, and more commonly referred to asYu-Gi-Oh! after the manga and anime themselves. This game can get rather complex, as there are many special rules and different types of cards. A freshman who wishes to remain anonymous breaks down a few of the rules: “There are three different types of cards. There are monster cards, which you can only play once a turn. Monsters have attack and defense points…there are also trap cards, which you play face down, and spell cards, which you can play whenever, but can only activate on your turn.” It’s a lot to remember! Another freshman explains his strategy- “You just throw down a card and hope it’s better than the other card.” Many, like freshman Lucy Kissinger, recall Yu-Gi-Oh! from when they were younger. “I grew up watching Yu-Gi-Oh! and was entertained by it after school,” Kissinger said. A fellow freshman remembers making his friend cry in second grade because he stole his Yu-GiOh! cards; however, as many grew up, Yu-Gi-Oh! sort of drifted off of their radars for a few years. It was something most considered childish and silly, something that should be

shoved in the closet and forgotten about for the next few years. Numerous people have completely forgotten who Yugi even is. Sophomore Sammi Sandrin said, “He’s [just] a dude with really weird hair.” Bizarre as Yugi’s hair may be, that’s not all there is to him and the game of Duel Monsters. Both were - and, indeed, still are - cultural icons in many parts of the world. Lately, Yu-Gi-Oh! has been regaining popularity here at Tosa West, especially among our seniors; one underclassman remarked that he’d seen a bunch of the seniors playing it in the learning center after school. The reason behind this rebirth of interest among the upperclassmen is simply because of Will Utech’s efforts. Utech is a senior and a captain of the Tosa West/East Swim and Dive Team. Utech said that he and his friends were the first people to bring Yu-Gi-Oh! cards to school again. “Well, obviously it was really popular a long time ago, and I still had the cards, so I was like, well, I might as well. People are always looking for something goofy to do in school rather than work,” Utech said. And what better to do when slacking off than play Yu-Gi-Oh!? Of course, this isn’t just something Will and his friends do to distract themselves form their schoolwork: Every other weekend or so, they haveYu-Gi-O h! tournaments. Lexi Utech - a sophomore and Will’s sister said, “Some of [Will’s] friends just hang out to play Yu-Gi-Oh!.” While some may claim that whoever still plays Yu-Gi-Oh! is a loser, Will and his fellow players don’t seem to care. “It’s all right to have contrasting ideas about it. It’s pretty nerdy, but I don’t care. It’s fun,” Utech said.

Rachel Gerlach

How tough is your schedule? “It’s tougher than some people’s. It’s a lot of work.” What’s your toughest class? “AP psychology, Challenge, and Advanced Composition are all tough.” What college is your top pick and does your schedule reflect your college choice? “My parents wanted me to take a tough schedule, or they expected me to. My first choice is La Crosse, I’ve liked it ever since I took a visit.

EASY SCHEDULE Kayla Quesada

How easy is your schedule? “Pretty easy, I only have five classes and then I leave for business co-op.” What are your easiest classes? “One is a study hall, one is child development, and co-op is just fun.” What is your top pick for college and does your schedule reflect your college choice? “I already got into Bryant and Straton for nursing and child development, which is why I took CNA. They’re also giving me an $8,000 scholarship, so that’s another reason I’m going.”

Carlos Pinto How easy is your schedule? “I’m just lazy; I think I have a severe case of Senioritis. My schedule is so easy.” What are your easiest classes? “Well I’m a T.A. for gym, I have gym, a study hall, lunch and chef foods. They’re all easy.” What college is your top pick and does your schedule reflect your college choice? “I feel that with proper preparation that I will get into Harvard.”


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OPINIONS WEST SIDE STORIES

December, 2009

Christmas and the Constitution

HOLIDAYS IN SCHOOL

ANGELA O’BRIEN g Editor-in-Chief When the average Tosa West student turns the corner out of the stairwell behind the first door near the parking lot, they’re greeted with a shower of color and festivities. This little strip of hallway between the guidance office and the career center has turned into a Tosa West “tinsel town” of sorts, with hanging lights, dangling snowflakes, and even a twinkling Christmas tree. It’s bright and merry, but is it constitutional? Religion and public schools are infamous companions, both in a historical and legal sense. In the early days of our country, Thomas Jefferson wrote in a letter to the Danbury Baptists that a “wall of separation” existed between the institutions of church and state; over time, that wall has extended to the school district, as well. Multiple cases have dealt with everything from voluntary prayer during class, to good luck prayer before basketball games, to parents pulling their children from school due to religious beliefs and practices. In the case of Clever v. Cherry Hill Township, the New Jersey District Court ruled that religious symbols could be used in school so long as they were for a constitutional, secular purpose. In turn, the question that inevitably arises is: Is a Christmas tree a symbol

of Christmas, and is it doing any harm standing where it is in a highly public place in the school? According to a home page article issued by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, “Christmas trees are now considered secular and therefore constitutional in public institutions.” So, the decorations are legal and valid; and why shouldn’t they be? Christmas trees, snowflakes, nor tinsel are direct symbols of neither Christianity nor any other religion, and should e perfectly acceptable in public schools, according to many within the district. “No one has come to me with a complaint,” Tosa West principal Patricia Luebke remarked. “Obviously,” she continued, “if there was some concern, I would have to look into it, but like it said in the NASSP article, Christmas trees are now considered secular symbols.” McKinley Elementary School principal Mark Carter concurred. “We try and focus our [Christmas] trees around giving,” he remarked. “At the school, we don’t decorate them with ornaments or lights or anything like that. We decorate them with gloves and then, when we break for the holidays, we donate the gloves to social workers who pass them out to people who need them.”

Even though the Christmas tree, Santa Claus, and Christmas lights have all been deemed “secular” despite their semi-religious connotations, where is the line that exists that deems whether something is appropriate for public schools, or if it is not? Does this line exist definitively, tentatively, or not at all? “The line exists when something is so openly religious, so blatant, that there is no hope of arguing that it is even remotely secular,” Luebke stated. Would that be something along the lines of a nativity scene, perhaps? “We would not allow something like a nativity scene,” Luebke said. “That would be so religiously based, so nonsecular… it would be a clear constitutional violation. If anything like that were to go up, I feel that it would be my job as principal to step in and say something or have whoever put it up take it down and display it at home or somewhere else private. We do have a lot of Muslim students in attendance, as well as students who are nonreligious, and that would not be fair to them.” If – and I speak hypothetically when I say this – a nativity scene were to be erected in a public school, it would be perfectly constitutional so long as other major religions were represented alongside of it.

There were two court cases in 2005, decided on the same day, both involving similar statues of the Ten Commandments, but one was ruled constitutional and the other was not. The deciding factor? One statue stood alone on government grounds; the other was part of a larger display. But what about more direct hits on the so-called “wall of separation” in public schools? The choice of terminology has already been established here in the Wauwatosa School District, with the December and March/April breaks now termed “holiday” and “spring” respectively, despite their close proximity to major Christian holidays. Nevertheless, the exception exists every year. Somehow, some way, a little bit of Christmas works its way into the school district, whether people want it there or not. This year, it came as the cover for the program of the winter choir concert, titled “Choral Collections for Christmas.” “I can only speak for McKinley here when I say this,” Carter remarked, “but I have my music teacher send me their list of songs that they wish the students to sing. I try and find that equal balance of all major religions, [as well as] the lack of religion, and usually, we don’t have any problems. If there are too much or too little of

Christmas songs, I might instruct my music teacher to change it up a bit to reclaim that variety.” So, the cover of the choir concert has “Christmas” on it. What’s the problem? Wauwatosa School District superintendent Phil Ertl had a similar question for Unit Five during the district competition for American Public Policy Special Emphasis (or “APPSE”) class; this time, in regards to an orchestra concert being deemed a “Christmas concert”. “Orchestral music has no words,” Emily Roznowski, a junior, said in response to Ertl’s question. “Therefore, I believe there is no coercion.” All in all, this specification and controversy all boils down to the separation of church and state that the Founding Fathers feared so much. The wording of the First Amendment in relation to its clauses pertaining to religion is not particularly specific, leaving room for broad interpretation. As our society evolves and outlives the Constitution’s original framers, it becomes harder and harder to judge it by the Constitution’s standards. “If we look at our own practices through another’s eyes,” Luebke stated, “our own lenses can better focus on the bigger picture.”

West Side

STORIES

West Side Stories (WSS) believes that it is essential to preserve the freedom of the press in order to preserve a free society. Therefore, WSS will resist all attempts at censorship and will serve the best interests of the students. WSS will be guided in publication by a concern for the truth, will strive to provide a comprehensive account of events in the school/community, will strive to be a leader of student opinion through its editorials, and will be an open forum of the exchange of comment and criticism. WSS’s editorial page will take stands on important issues, will help protect the rights of students, will support groups seeking the betterment of the community, will support candidates for school office, and will serve as a constructive critic. Columns and reviews will be signed unless there is

a consensus of opinion among the WSS editors. Copies of the complete WSS editorial policy are available in Room 267 at West High School.

Letters to the Editor: Letters are accepted from all readers. Editors have the right to edit for length and obscenity, but will not alter the original meaning of the materials. All submitted letters must be signed. Subscription information: For a subscription, please send $20.00 payable to Wauwatosa West High School. Send to West Side Stories, c/o Wauwatosa West High School, 11400 W. Center St. Wauwaotsa, WI 53226 Awards: Wisconsin Newspaper Associations awarded West Side Stories a second place in 2007-2008, a first place 20082009 in the General Excellence category. West Side Stories

has also received a Bronze Medalist ranking from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. A number of students have also placed individually in state and national writing competitions.

Tricia Gates Designers: Rachel Long Kou Vang

Staff Writers: Allison Turkowitch Andy O’Leary Editors: Breanna Subotich Angela O’Brien- Editor-InCalesta Ahola Chief Calli Miller Zack Garhart- Editor-In-Chief Elle MacGillis Ellyn Kirtley Emily Rozonowski Kong Vang- Design and LayHarry Ostrenga out Jenn Asbach Editor Kelsey Kennedy Herschel Kissinger: Managing Kiayra Spights Lexi Utech Editor Lizzie Bradley Emily Hoffman: Photography Lizzie Fried Mariah Rogers Editor Mark Harris Meagen Chaneske Photographers: Parker Banghart Laura Shively Stephanie Eberle Ella Nelson Tyler Voit Ellen Jagen Waj Ali


OPINIONS WEST SIDE STORIES

Christmas, the good the bad and the ugly Elle MacGillisg Staff Writer

The holidays are almost here and people are getting in the mood by shopping, decorating, and listening to Christmas music on the radio.  We all have our favorite traditions at Christmas . . . and some memories of the ones that didn’t go so well.

Holiday Favorites: My favorite thing to do during the holidays is to open presents and listen to Christmas music late on Christmas Eve. -Mr. Guse My favorite Christmas tradition is making cookies with my mom! -Emmeline Prattke Grade 10 I love making cookies! -Maggie Overholt Grade 9

Best Experiences: When I bought my first real Christmas tree, my cat charged it and ran all the way up.  It started swaying back

and forth, until it fell breaking some lights and decorations.  -Mr. Schneider One year I switched some Christmas presents from beneath my tree and replaced them with boxes filled with rocks.  I hid the real presents for two days.  My mom bought new presents and I got double the amount of stuff! -Montel Primer Grade 10 My Grandpa gave me a pancake mix tin for Christmas, and inside was an iPod touch -Brandon O’Neil Grade 12

Worst Experiences: I remember when my Grandma’s dog fell through the ice on her lake on Christmas. -Shelly Wachniak Grade 12 I remember getting coal for St. Nicks and a grill for Christmas -Jake Mauermann Grade 10 My cat died on Christmas Eve! -Jordan Llanas Grade 9

Go ahead, Pay it Forward Jenn Asbachg Staff Writer

“Paying it forward”. You’re not actually going to give someone money, but doing acts of kindness, instead. The idea is based on a classic film about a boy who thought he could change the world. C.R.A.S.H. - Creating Real American Social Harmony has decided to present this “Pay It Forward Day”. On this day, Tosa West students were to do random acts of kindness for others. At the end of the day, students responded in a variety of ways. “Some people called others pretty and a lot of compliments on hair and clothing.”- Johna Buggs said. While some took notice to the designated days, others were under the impression that this kind of attitude should be portrayed on a day to day basis. “No, I thought it was all the time. But some random person overheard me ask for a quarter and randomly gave me one.”Shelly Wachniak said. If you participated on this day, you prob-

ably didn’t know that you changed your own life. Doing kind acts of kindness, no matter how big or small, makes you feel better. In society today, people generally don’t want to help each other. Someone drops their colored pencils; maybe one person, out of everyone in the entire hallway would help them pick it up. Are people really willing to help each other? Are their still good people out there? The answer is yes. Fact: You all are good people. No lie, but society has changed your individual opinions. The nonconformist has combined to a large majority. Resulting in a new conformity, this is society. Paying it forward brings the good out of conformity. This as a whole makes society better for everyone. You didn’t have to participate on this day to be able to pay it forward. Everyday you’ll see many opportunities to help someone; make their day better. So pass it along, “Pay it Forward”.

Setting the record straight on Health Care Reform Andy O’Leary g Staff Writer

When I heard the news that Democrats in Congress were looking to drop the public health care plan known as the “public option” in order to forge a compromise with the more conservative Democratic members of the Senate, I was dismayed. In fact, “dismayed” doesn’t begin to describe my feelings about this latest turn of events in the eternal see-saw known as “health care reform”. Perhaps “disgusted” would work better. As a progressive American and one who has had the displeasure of experiencing the highs and lows of private health care over the past few years, I think it’s high time for Democrats to stop this country’s head-in-the-sand-attitude towards true reform. If they are to go about doing this, a good first step would be to dispel the numerous indisputably false rumors about reform. How, exactly, is a “public option” co-existing with a private marketplace socialism? Even if it is, why would this be anything new to the United States? If you claim to be “against all socialism”, then I’m assuming that you’re against public education, a socialistic institution. You’re most certainly against unemployment pay (socialism), farm

subsidies (socialism and communism), and public highways (practically communism), as well. If you think this is socialism, thank yourself that you weren’t alive for FDR’s New Deal or LBJ’s Great Society. Who’s to say this “reform” isfiscally irresponsible, either? For all that the rightwing claims to support running government as if it were a business, they seem to throw the maxim of “spend money to make” proselytized by many a corporate executive out the window when it comes to our government. Have any of the “TEA partiers” bothered to look at the Congressional Budget Office’s estimate of how much money a public option would slash off our deficit?I would guess not, since they evidently didn’t have any problems with the wasteful spending that characterized Bush’s two follies in the Middle East. I have no issues with respectful political discourse in our society; in fact, I consider myself a rather pragmatic guy. What I do have an issue with, however, is dishonest debate.If you can’t bother to check your facts before launching damaging attacks on proposed public policy, then you might as well have no leg to stand on in my book.

Unaffair to Tiger The other day somebody flipped on Sports Center in study hall, and no sooner had they changed the channel in disgust as Tiger Woods appeared. Not in disgust because of the fact the golfer with an 85% approval rating (the only negative 15% came from other golfers) was having an affair, but the disgust came simply from seeing his face plastered across the television for the hundredth time. The fact that the media continues to drag out Tiger’s act of deceit is what is disgusting to me. What people don’t realize is; the majority of people that hold as much wealth and fame as Tiger, is having or has had an affair. That’s right; that includes the bankers, the politicians, the athletes, even the owners of ESPN. When you carry such an iconic figure as Tiger did, whether it be through fame or power, women (or men in some cases) throw themselves at you. More people than known are guilty of it in some way or another. I used to live in German-

town and there was a pilot that lived behind me, and he had many friends scattered across the country. When Clinton’s affair with Monica Luinskey was exposed, he quoted his buddies in Washington as saying, “Thank God they didn’t find out about me.” Whether you like to believe it or not, practically every single one of them is having an affair. But now all of the sudden an athlete who was as close to having his face on a dollar bill as Barack Obama, slips up, has a few encounters with women who aren’t his wife, and the world is supposed to stop? I can speak for most people; at least the ones in my study hall, I’m going crazy just hearing about it. Oh yeah, and that pilot? He got divorced three years later. Turns out his wife found out he had a girlfriend. When his wife confronted him, he asked her if he could keep his girlfriend and stay married with the kids. I suppose I’m not the only one going crazy.

5

December, 2009

Mini Editorials Your staff’s opinion on some of West’s most prevailing issues

T h u m b s down to the lack of snow day. We’re living in Wisconsin which invariably means lots of snow during the winters. In the large storm in early December, weathermen across southeastern Wisconsin were predicting massive amounts of snow to arrive overnight and many students were crossing their fingers in hopes of a snow day. Nevertheless, when they awoke the next morning students were dismayed to learn that Wauwatosa Schools were to remain open. According to Mrs. Marks in the attendance office, about fifteen percent of students were missing from classes that day anyway strictly due to weather issues. We all know that we live in a state that receives a lot of annual snowfall; nevertheless, the district has only one day set aside for inclement weather makeup. Why not schedule in a few more days? Thumbs up to the nearcompletion of the concession stand in front of the football field, a project that has been ongoing since early August. The new lights have been installed and the entire facility should be ready for track meets this spring as well as the football season next fall. The building will serve multiple purposes, as a concession stand and storage area for sports during off seasons. Officer Braun is petitioning to get the school board to add cameras to the outside of the building to protect against vandalism and help track down the perpetrators if ever there is an incident. Officer Braun’s main reason for the installation of these cameras is to obtain concrete proof to catch those that act unjustly so that they may be held accountable for their actions.


only the dumb drive intexticated Texting and driving, as popular as it is, how bad can it really be? ZACK GARHART g Editor-in-Chief

S

having, reading the newspaper, putting make up on, or even juggling a phone call while holding a beverage and managing to drive with their knees; drivers at West have witnessed all of these reckless activities occur in other cars, and each careless activity is as fatal as the next.  As the list of activities continues to become more appalling, there is an aspect of the list that is even more appalling, and that was the fact that one particular activity is missing: texting.  A habitual occurrence for some, repulsive to many, and flat out dangerous to the rest of the drivers on the road. “If you’re texting and driving, you become unaware of things around you.  It’s that much easier to get in an accident,” Senior Aaron Klauk said.  While Klauk drives on a somewhat regular basis, the concept of texting and driving seems completely absurd to him, simply because of the distraction that it provides. However, t h e

s a m e ideology is not shared by as many teen drivers as it should be.  According to Keepthedrive.com, 2,500 teens were involved in fatal crashes in 2004 due to veering out of their lane or failing to yield.  While the details as to what caused the crashes are unstated, texting is a favorable suspect.  The number 2,500 may seem fractional in comparison to how many drivers are on the road at one point in time and the chances of something bad happening.  On the other hand, that fractional number does not look as obsolete once it is compared to the number of deaths that resulted from drunk driving in 2004, which was 16,694, according to alcoholalert.com.  However, when you compare

the two scenarios to teen drivers, little correlation is found. “Your whole body is impaired when you are drunk.  Only your line of vision is impaired while you’re texting,” Junior Zach Soderberg said.  Despite finding little correlation between the two, Soderberg said that he can see where people can make the comparison considering the danger that can come from each, which is one reason that he does not do it. Like Soderberg, there are still students that chose not to take part in texting and driving, as some text but do not drive, or vice versa.  Among the students that text but do not drive, a general feeling of repulsion is conveyed towards sending messages while being behind the wheel.  “I think it’s pretty dumb [to text and drive] because when you’re looking down, you’re missing something on the road.  When I do drive, I’m not going to do it,” Junior Jenna Domiano said.  Although Domiano has not received her license, she is fully aware of the consequences that come from texting behind the wheel.  Domiano’s perspective that on the subject is not farfetched, as Senior Katie Applegate shares almost identical feelings towards it.   “I hate when people text and drive. It freaks me out,” Applegate said.  “When my friends do it, I tell them, ‘I’ll take the wheel if you’re texting.’”  Applegate is among a group of students that don’t drive but still text, which may be a crucial factor that dictates her attitude towards it.  Her attitude

i s opposite from those that do choose to text while driving.“It really depends on the driver. If they don’t have ex-

perience driving, then they shouldn’t be [texting and driving].  If they are experienced, then they can [text] at stop signs or lights,” Junior Bryan Ross said.  As an experienced driver and text message sender; driving 50 miles a day and sending 250-300 texts a day, Ross understands that the concept of texting while driving requires multiple elements, as the circumstances range from driver to driver.  Ross said that he does in fact text while driving, but he limits himself to doing it only at stop signs or red lights.  “Multi-tasking is a key aspect.  It shouldn’t be a problem if you can,” Ross said.  “It’s also a responsibility kind of thing.” Whether it is a question of multitasking, responsibility, or plain confidence, the number of injuries and accidents resulting from cell phone distractions negate any arguments supporting texting while driving.  According to the New York Times, each year drivers engaged in their cell phone cause 570,000 accidents that result in minor and serious injuries.  As the numbers are a clear representation of the problem, questions surface as to what should be done about the use of cell phones while driving.  While a law banning cell phone use would be ideal, the details regarding the law and its enforcement are debatable.   “You couldn’t really enforce a law against texting and driving.  If someone is by a cop car, they’re obviously not going to text,” Soderberg said.  Soderberg brings up a valid point, as catching a driver in the act of texting may be rather difficult for an officer.  Students, despite the fact if they text or not while driving, share a common concern for the enforcement aspect of the law. “I would agree with the spirit of the law.  Although, it is like the teacher trying to find the cell phone in the classroom, it just doesn’t happen,” Senior Mariah Rogers said.  Locating a driver on their cell phone for a police officer is quite similar to a teacher locating a student texting, as the action would have to be witnessed firsthand.  This is where a problem surfaces. “Officers would have to physically see you do it.  The car that the officer is riding in would need to be higher than the other vehicle,” Officer Doug

Braun said.  “It would also create a distraction for us [officers] to be looking out for it.”  The point that Braun brings up is valid, considering the fact that locating a driver under the influence of texting would be quite difficult for officers. Despite enforcement controversies, there are nineteen states that have instituted a law that strictly bans the use of hand held cell phones while operating a vehicle for people of all ages.  Among the states that have included a cell phone ban are California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Utah, and Washington.  While Wisconsin is not among the group of states, there is in fact a bill that has passed through the state Senate, 27-5, that is working to ban the use of cell phones by drivers of all ages.  Opposing voters on the bill argue the fact that the enforcement of cell phone distractions is already included in the state’s inattentive driving law.  “The inattentive statute already covers distractions while driving.  It couldn’t hurt to add one for texting,” Braun said.  The creation of such a law would require hard facts pointing towards accidents resulting from texting.  Since Braun said that drunk driving and speeding are the cause of roughly 75% of accidents, laws banning cell phone use are being overlooked.   On the other hand, those that are in favor of the bill stand behind the fact that awareness must be raised on the subject and the law would do exactly that.  Not only will the law encourage awareness to the rising subject, but it will make this action illegal, which will in hope alter the perception of drivers from using their hand held device behind the wheel.   “Once people realize that police are serious about it, they could definitely stop,” Soderberg said in regards to a potential law.  Whether or not the law will carry significant weight in the number of recorded accidents each year, there is a general consensus that something must be done.  Jenna Rieves, a Germantown paramedic, understands the reality circling distractive driving as she deals with the consequences of poor driving on a daily basis.  “Texting [while driving] is just as dangerous as talking, drinking, alcohol, or drugs,” Rieves said. “Even though it only takes a few seconds, in the course of a 15 minute drive, how many times can one person talk back and forth and have a conversation? Think about it... one text may take 15 seconds, but when you are having a conversation, you may be texting for 13 minutes out of the 15 minutes it takes to be somewhere.”  

Texting by the numbers

(statistics and surveys courtesy of Pewinternet.org)

At the time of the 2006 survey, just 35% of adult cell phone owners said they used the text messaging feature on their phones. By April 2009, the use of text messaging by cell phone owners had nearly doubled to 65.3% 40% of all teens 12-17 say they have been a passenger in a car when the driver used the cell phone in a manner that placed them or others in danger. One in three (34%) texting teens ages 16-17 say they have texted while driving. That translates into 26% of all American teens ages 16-17. 52% of cell-phone owning teens ages 16-17 have talked on a cell phone while driving, which translates into 43% of all teens of driving age. 58% of teens who text have been passengers in cars with other texting drivers, compared to 28% of teens who do not use text messaging. 44% of teens who text have been passengers in cars when the driver is using the phone dangerously, compared to 31% of non-texting teens who have had this experience. Older teens are more likely than younger teens to have cell phones and use text messaging; 82% of teens ages 16-17 have a cell phone and 76% of that cohort are cell texters. In the survey conducted by Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, 28% of the surveyed admitted they sometimes did not drive as safely as they should while using their mobile devices

Which one of these numbers applies to you? E-mail us your thoughts and stories about texting while driving at Westsidestories@gmail.com or find us on Facebook and write on our wall.

Designed by Kong Vang g Design & Layout Editor


FEATURES

8

WEST SIDE STORIES

December, 2009

WINTER

Snowboarding Essentials

Lizzie Bradley g Staff Writer Designed by Kong Vang g Design & Layout Editor Photo Courtesy of Silas Poston Model: Bryan Ross

HEAD The quality, or need, of a hat is dependent strictly on the person. They don’t require a lot of spending since they do not affect the quality of the ride HAT: Lime Green Beanie Price: $1.00 Where to buy: Dollar Store

HANDS

BODY

Pay attention to gloves with good grib and good instulation. Mitts can also work. Gloves: Grenade Price: $29.99 Where to buy: Lackie and Joys

While some ski jackets can cost up to $500, they are not always necessary. You can find a nice water proof sweater to cover up the layers, and it will work just the same JACKET: Knitt Poncho PRICE: $5 WHERE TO BUY: Greenfield s downtown, Mexico, thrift stores, an yw

you can find them

SUPPORT

here

LEGS

rd in your boa g strapped of ir pa d Since stayin li so buying a ris essential, e most impo rguably th a is like gs es m a n bindin d n Trust bra tant thing. e ch and Rid Te b Li , Burton ve Fi w o Fl BINDINGS: 9.99 PRICE: $14 3 BUY: Moda WHERE TO

Buying heavy duty snow pants are crucial as boarders endure a lot of falling throughout a ride. Insulation is also important SNOW PANTS: Burton rangers Price: $149.99 Where to buy: Lackie and Joys

BOARD

FEET

y ard you bu y of the bo r u yo The qualit f o y the qualit fore will depict mework be o h r u yo o a in ride. D ey n o a lot of m t place you invest ea gr a is st gsli board. Crai board r a beginner to shop fo H All heart D de Ri cm 5 Board: 15 Prostreet .99 PRICE: $449 s ie and Joy BUY: Lack WHERE TO

Shoe sizes vary from boot sizes, so make sure you purchase on es that fit your feet comfortably. Boots with good insulation are also essential for warmth BOOTS: Burton Sabbaths PRICE: $199.99 WHERE TO BUY: Moda 3

t their When asked wha round here, favorite hill is a Zack said...

When Asked where they get most of their boarding gear, Eva said...

“Granite Peak, it’s the biggest and has nice size and quality hills. It also offers a lot of different Courses.”

EV A

ck a Z

“I go to Laacke and Joys, It has a good selection of all the major brands.”

When Asked what their favorite brand is, John said...

“Personally, I like Lib-Technologie. They have good designs and their boards are good to last you a long time. They also have different boards made out of different chemicals to make them more flexable.”

hn o J

Adam suggests...

“I would say rent your board at first, because you’re probably going to want to quit.”

Ad

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FEATURES WEST SIDE STORIES

9

December, 2009

HOLIDAY

Stocking Stuffers Jennifer Flynng Staff Writer

FOOD

Holiday Cravings

Stephanie Eberle g Staff Writer

Ginger Snaps

•2 cups sugar •1 cup shortening •½ cup molasses •2 eggs Mix the previous ingredients together with a beater. •2 teaspoons baking soda •2 teaspoons ginger •1 teaspoon ground cloves •1 ¼ teaspoons cinnamon •3 ½ cups flour Mix the previous ingredients with a spoon. Roll into small, walnut sized balls and place tops only, in sugar (if entirely rolled, bottoms will burn). Place sugar side up on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees. Mrs. Razner, a geometry teacher, wants to share this recipe she acquired from a babysitter.

Apple Pie

Crust •2 cups flour •2/3 cup Crisco •1 tablespoon salt Mix together with your hands until dough forms pea sized balls then add 5 tablespoons water. Mix with hands until you can get the crust formed into two equal sized balls. Generously flour surface of counter and rolling pin. With heel of hand begin to flatten the ball working from the center out. Once ball has flat top, flip, apply more flour and begin using rolling pin working from center out. Flip and re-apply flour to pin, dough, and surface often. Once the dough is flattened to a circle type of shape and a ¼ thick (or less) roll up around the rolling pin and carefully unroll it into the pie plate. Form that crust to the bottom and trim the crust up to match the size of the pie plate. Take a fork and poke a few holes in the crust to prevent air bubbles. Filling •5 to 7 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and sliced thin •1 cup sugar •1 tablespoon flour •1 teaspoon cinnamon •Dash of nutmeg Mix this together. Then pour into pie plate. Put 4 or 5 pads of butter on top of the apple mixture. Take 2nd dough ball and begin to work with it just as you did with the first one. Carefully unroll that crust on top of the apple mixture and trim. The top crust should be big enough so that you can tuck it into the crust of the bottom and pinch together. Make a couple of slits in the top so the heat can escape. Sprinkle the top with sugar and cinnamon. Bake at 400 degrees for one hour. Cool and eat with ice cream. From Ms. Keppler.


SPORTS 11 WEST SIDE STORIES

December, 2009

IBA

It’s a Shootout

Intramurals Basketball season kicks off with exciting upsets and undeated teams LUCY KISSINGER g Staff Writer

With the IBA season already well on its way, the teams are fighting it out on the courts for have a top record come the playoffs, which are set to be played at the end of the winter.  With over one hundred Wauwatosa West students and faculty playing, Adam Orlando, a senior, is leading the score board with the most points so far this season, claiming a stunning 86  points all to himself.  Orlando stands with one other male Tim O’Brien, as they plays with other Seniors such as Laura Bavlinka, Katie Applegate, and Rachel Chaltry.  Although the Diva’s stand at 1-3, they boast the league’s leading scorer.  As the Diva’s struggle with one win, there are teams around the league that hold impressive records.  The league’s returning champions, Trojan Men, have climbed to the top of the standings with an undefeated record.  The Trojan Men are surrounded with talent coming from Seniors Ricky Porter, Kevin Gorman, Brandon Euper, Ryan Bruss, Taylor Ihrke, Dylan

Crafton and Spencer Smith.  Tagging along on the squad is also the talented Junior Zach Podzaline as he imposes a threat from all around the court.  Porter, Euper, Smith and Podzaline are all among former Wauwatosa West basketball players, as they have hung up their career playing organized basketball.  Also matching the Trojan Men’s undefeated record is the Faculty and Young Money.   Each undefeated team is holding the top spot in their respective divisions.  The other division leader is the IBA Legends as they have a strong grasp on the Blue division.  The Average Joe’s are in a close fight with Globo Gym for the second place spot in the Yellow conference.  However, the match between Globo Gym and the Animaniacs on Dec. 17 put a separation between the two teams.  As Globo Gym was up by 15 points at one point in the game, the Animaniacs stormed to a commanding lead and pulled an upset with a margin of three points.  Continuous three point attempts that were made by Globo Gym set the team farther back as the balls fell short of the

basket.  While players on any team would agree that the competitive nature of IBA is a strong reason behind the turnout, others join for the enjoyable aspect of basketball that is not obtained unless being on a school team.                 “It’s something fun to do outside of school with my friends,” Hannah Fuhrman, a senior, said about IBA.  In her first year on IBA, Hannah plays on The Diva’s and hopes to get better at basketball as the season progresses.  All of the players on the IBA teams are not on the West 2009-2010 basketball season roster. If you’d like to watch the teams play, games are held on Thursday nights.  You must be a Wauwatosa West student, faculty member, or immediate family to a participant if you’d like to attend.   All photos taken by Kong Vang Design and Layout done by Kong Vang

JANUARY

Teams and Records Trojan Men FALCULTY Young Money IBA Legends Average Joes Globo Gym Cobras Scranton Party Retrojans ANIMANIACS Greenstreet Elite PlayHers The Divas The Business Lobsters Shooters Flint Tropics

5-0 4-0 4-0 4-1 3-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-4 0-4 0-4

Jan. 7th Jan. 14th Jan. 21st Jan. 28th

Feb. 4th

7:30

T. MEN

VS.

FALCULTY

RETROJANS

8:30

DIVAS

VS.

G. STREET

JOES

7:30

COBRAS VS. Y. MONEY

VS.

LEGENDS SCRANTON

VS. COBRAS

LEGENDS

VS.

FLINT

LOBSTERS

VS.

LOBSTERS

JOES

7:30

SHOOTERS

VS.

PLAYHERS LEGENDS VS. G. STREET

8:30

LOBSTERS

VS.

FALCULTY RETROJANS

VS. Y.

7:30

PLAYHERS

VS.

FALCULTY RETROJANS

VS.

ANIMAN.

SHOOTERS

8:30

DIVAS

VS.

FLINT

T. MEN

FALCULTY

VS.

COBRAS

SCRANTON VS. G. STREET

LOBSTERS

DIVAS

VS.

JOES

MONEY

T. MEN

ANIMANIACS

VS.

MONEY SCRANTON

FLINT

VS.

ANIMAN.

VS. Y.

VS.

FLINT

ANIMANIACS

VS.

SHOOTERS SCRANTON

VS.

8:30

VS.

VS. Y.

MONEY

SCRANTON

VS.

PLAYHERS

VS.

SHOOTERS

RETROJANS COBRAS

VS.

T. MEN

VS.

COBRAS JOES

PLAYHERS

VS.

DIVAS

VS.

FLINT

LEGENDS

RETROJANS

VS.

G. STREET

SCRANTON

VS.

COBRAS

FEBRUARY

7:30

DIVAS

FALCULTY

JOES

VS.

G. STREET

8:30

T. MEN VS. LEGENDS

FLINT

VS.

SHOOTERS

VS.

LOBSTERS

VS. Y.

MONEY

RETROJANS VS. PLAYHERS

JOES

VS.

ANIMANIACS


12

SPORTS WEST SIDE STORIES

December, 2009

BOYS BASKETBALL

fresh shot with the fresh cut ZACK GARHART g Editor-in-Cheif

Basketball fans at West have become accustomed to seeing young players fill big shoes on the varsity level, as they have witnessed stars like Rico Combs, Sam Krenzien, and Ray Sterling rise up in recent years.  However, this year may be a little different from the rest, as #32 on the roster sports a fresh haircut that reflects his graduating class.  His name is Anthony Carroll; although that name is a rarity among the student body, the name AC is becoming rather common to students.  The freshman stands out on the court for his playing style that draws attentions from fans as well as scouts.  Team mates have taken notice and liking to AC’s presence on the court. “There’s really nothing he can’t do. Some players are only good in a few different aspects of the game, but AC is good at everything on the court,” Senior captain Sam Krenzien said. “He really understands the game.” His do-it-all ability reflects the points he scores in each game. The average 12.3 points that AC puts up a game is the third most on his

team, as it also ranks in at the 7th best in the Woodland Conference. In regards to this, AC said that he is just doing what he does best.  As for the level of competition that he is facing on the varsity level, he said, “It’s mostly the same level of play, except the players are a little bit bigger.” His size, at 5’11, matches up well with the other players on the roster (not including Senior Alex Gordon). Many fans are even unaware that AC is even a freshman.  Considering he is only a freshmen, his remaining years on varsity provides him with quite some time to grow. Outside of playing at West, he also plays on the Jerry Porter Elite AAU team.  This not only increases his chances to play, but offers him a vast level of competition to prepare him for his years to come on varsity at West.  “This year I try to spread the ball around, because it’s their (the seniors)

last year. I know I’m going to be here for a few years,” AC said. Since the Trojans will graduate five seniors this summer, AC will return to a young and talented varsity team that will boast a strong 2011 class. As a member of the 2013 graduating class, his chances to establish himself as a leader and contributing factor in the game plan will only increase as time goes by. Ranking within the top 100 on the list of players on the national radar, AC has not only established himself as a rising star in the Wauwatosa area, but also as a player to watch within the state of Wisconsin. While it is his playing style that is receiving a lot of attention, there is another aspect of his game that is rather eye catching; his hair. “Man, it’s just the Memphis style,” AC said with a grin in regards to his flat top hair style.

BOYS SWIM & DIVE

Diving into the record books

Coach Weigel prepares his swimmers for tough swim season KELSEY KENNEDY & LUCY KISSINGER g Staff Writers

As the boys’ swim and dive team prepares for practice with a bit of dry-land work, they are the center of everyone’s attention in the humid pool area.  An intense beat reverberated against the wet pool deck as Head Coach Russ Weigel cranks  up the volume on his iPod, which contains hard-core songs such as ‘Do or Die’ by Agnostic Front, and ‘Master of Puppets’ by Metallica.  As head coach of the East and West combined boys’  swim team, for the six years they have been together, Russ runs his practices with skill and authority.  Drill work is the focus in the early weeks of the season, and Russ is planning on increasing the intensity as the season and his swimmers progress.  “I have a race-pace philosophy; high school swimming is mainly sprint dominated,”

he said.   He wants everyone to be on the same page, from first-timers to state qualifiers.  Everyone starts at a different level, and prepares for the season in their own way.  “I swam seven times a week for seven or eight months,” Jake Shackelford, a junior at East, said.   In contrast, West senior Will Utech shares his strategy. “I prepared for like two months, [swimming] four times a week,” Utech said.         Meanwhile, new Assistant Coach Nick Koepke works with the JV swimmers, while also helping out with Varsity.  Like Russ, he has a lot of experience in swimming, having swum four years at Menomonee Falls, and an additional two at UW-Whitewater.  “[There are] a lot of young kids, a lot of room to grow for each and every one of them.”  August Vaughan, a freshman

HURRICAN SWIMMER Ethan Heinrick warms up during boys swim practice

at West, said why he chose to join swim team.   “I’ve been swimming all my life.”        Over in the diving well, new coach Josh Lindquist watches as his divers leap off the board and somersault into the water.  Not only is this his first year coaching the Tosa West/East team, but it is his first ever year coaching.  As a junior in college, he dove at both King and UWM.  Retired from actual diving himself, his former coach recommended him for the job.  “The mental challenge.  These divers

have to be able to spin so fast and spot their flips and turn out right,” is what Lindquist said his favorite part of this intense sport is. While some may chose to dive because of the physical challenge it presents or level of competition it requires, West Junior Shawn Schlumph says he enjoys diving because it is not something one normally gets to do.  Although the amount of divers is few, the team is gearing up for a promising season.        Back at the pool, Coach Russ is eyeing several swim-

mers and hoping for another excellent season.  Last year his swimmers broke 10 of 12 team records, and three school records.  He said that it is a good thing that so many swimmers have returned, and that only two swimmers were lost in graduating last June.  He also said that Tosa is rich in history when it comes to the sport of swimming.  And there is no doubt that he is looking forward to making even more of a lasting impression on the record books with his group of fantastic athletes.

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2009/2010 Issue 4 Dec