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JULIAN STANCZAK Elusive Transparencies

SEptember 1 -30, 2011


COVER TACTILE SEE-THROUGH, 1974, Acrylic on canvas, 36" x 36" BACK COVER BOUNDING, 1989 Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 50"


JULIAN STANCzak elusive Transparencies September 1 - 30, 2011

UNASHAMED OF CHANGE, 1968, Acrylic on canvas, 72" X 36"

GalleRy DirectoRs David Eichholtz & Richard Barger

130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite D, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284 www.DavidRichardContemporary.com | info@DavidRichardContemporary.com


ELUSIVE TRANSPARENCIES

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When I lived in Africa in the 1940s, I enjoyed

dots, dashes, lines, etc. offered the illusion

observing the haze of the lifting dew, the

that the surface was alive, breathing in and

clouds of smoke in the distance, the thick

out.

fog in the rainy season. I made watercolors

all over a surface causes it to shimmer, to

trying to capture the haze that separated me

become evanescent, to become elusive as to

from the objects, the haze that seemed to

its position in space.

Distributing these types of elements

stack filters in layers of space. Watercolor was a great medium for this because you

So while the flat canvas with its divisions of

could apply films of color with a simple

overlapping multiple folds is more or less

repeat of the brush stroke. My watercolors

in a stable position, the surface manipula-

were intense observations of the sunlight fil-

tion caused by the dots or lines forces the

tering through layers in space and unveiling

viewer to look through this—sometimes agi-

what is familiar but is not clearly defined or

tating—filter of surface activity. The logic of

stable.

the daily experience of seeing and knowing is continuously undermined by the surface

With time, I departed from illustrating the

action and the inability to visually stabilize

physical fact of the environment in the natu-

the image.

ral world. As an art student in the 1950s, I focused on the essentials of a shape, sim-

With certain paintings in the 1950s, I learned

plifying it to its basic geometry. This way

how to achieve minimal friction of the

I could explore more selectively the “see-

edges/boundaries of the shapes within the

through” aspect of my work. I would stack

painting as well as how to achieve abrupt

shapes with clean edges on top of each

value change. By mixing two opposing col-

other with illusory space between them. I

ors and then inserting their middle value, the

would energize the surfaces of the shapes

middle value would generate the illusion of

with vertical thrusts or lineal breakups such

the space between the shapes, locking them

as those in Unashamed of Change, 1968.

into a particular spatial position. Naturally, by continuing a contour line from one shape

These lines could be of opposing wavelength

to embrace another shape, I could also join

or opposing values.

them in a particular spatial location.

They might clash, or

they might fuse. Either way, they offered the visual mixing of colorants. I liked this inter-

I began to play with these different ways of

action because I did not want to present a

establishing overlapping and/or joining. This

“matter of fact” situation. Rather, I wanted

conflict between making the viewer think he

to offer a whisper, leaving the “what” and

knows where the shapes are, but then negat-

“where” of the shapes more mysterious.

ing that possibility by a different logic has occupied me through all my creative years.

To further make the shapes in my paintings

It gave me the power to animate space and

more mysterious, I invited other elements

to cause it to fluctuate. Depending on what I

into the surface readings, things like dots or

prioritized—the rhythm/beat, the color inter-

lines, as can be seen in Tactile See-Through,

mixing, or the lineal contour continuance—I

1974, and Accumulative, 1975.

could sculpt space or dissolve it into picto-

By altering

the visual appearance of the surface, these

rial flatness.


As hinted at above, over time, as far as my

than clear. Through color, I could produce the

surfaces are concerned, lines became dots,

appearance of colored filters that you have

dots became squares, squares became “win-

to see through to observe the underlying

dows” (lines framing squares), and windows

shapes. I could also direct the attention of

became line rhythms again.

With each of

the viewer, by making shapes stable, move, or

these variations I could energize the surface

fluctuate, bringing playfulness, reassurance

and could do so in subtle and shifting ways,

or confusion into the viewer’s mind/percep-

sometimes causing the viewer to focus atten-

tion, as can be seen in the difference between

tion, other times causing the viewer to relax

Spring Fold, 1973, and Mirrored, 1971.

attention. Because of our inborn drive to find psychological stability, we look for comple-

In my paintings, I have also been torn between

tion and understanding of pictorial rela-

the organic forms of nature and the ratio-

tionships, and the edge of forms becomes

nal shapes of geometry. I have always been

imperative for locating those forms in space.

reluctant to accept pure geometric systems

I can make the edge of forms either active or

because of their lack of connection to nature

passive, make them appear opaque or trans-

and emotion.

lucent—and, thereby, change where the form

geometric forms because of their clarity of

appears to be located in space—by switching

beauty and thought. I decided to incorporate

the viewer’s attention from one element to

both organic and geometric elements in my

the other or by switching the appearance of

work and to use color as the element provid-

the edge from stable to hazy.

ing emotive power.

In paintings like Red Diffusion, 1977, I wanted

The simple vertical line can become very

to create an illusion of actual, tangible space.

aggressive in its action. However, by using

In this painting, the lines do not alternate

line to alter the proportional mixing of color,

with opposing colorants to generate optical

I undercut this aggression and found another

mixing. Rather, the lines are used as accu-

way to create multiple overlapping planes. I

rate, controlled mixtures with black, a mono-

became fascinated with this visual phenom-

chromatic mixture that holds its position in

enon, that by dishing out condensations of

space without fluctuation. This creates a lin-

lines in three or four different measures of

eal rhythm of values in which shapes emerge

spacing, the eye would fuse these into dif-

with some edges that are sharp and others

ferent optical mixtures with particular spa-

that are undefined, vanishing.

tial locations, as can be seen in Proportional

However, I was attracted to

Black, 2011 and Proportional Orange, 2011. I The power of the artist to direct this “dance”

liked this economy of means: using only two

of shapes fascinated me. I challenged myself

colors, but giving the illusion of many colors

with acquiring accurate control over color

due to how those two colors are used in pro-

mixing, because through color, dished out

portion. The shapes in this situation become

in the right proportion, I could locate my

almost tangible, almost realistic, while at the

objects in space with constancy and control.

same time dissolving into the activated lineal

I experimented with the boundaries of forms

surface.

and with how to sometimes make their location in space clear and, at other times, less

The viewer has a different psychic response

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4

to a painting where the illusion of transpar-

experimented with a different visual solu-

ency is created by proportional optical mix-

tion to my fascination with elusive overlap-

ing/fusion (such as in Proportional Black,

ping. This phenomenon is mainly manifested

2011) and one where the illusion is created

through lines. In these paintings, the ground

by actual, physical mixing of paint/pigment

might consist of two opposing colors/wave-

(such as in Navaho’s Summer, 1971/73), and I

lengths or black and white, which together

use both of these methods in my work. This

offer the illusion of a “spongy” surface (i.e.,

difference in psychic response is caused, in

one not easily locatable in space). Onto this

part, by the differences in the colorants used

activated surface I superimpose lines sug-

to achieve each type of painting. In the paint-

gesting overlapping geometric shapes. These

ings that generate the illusion of transparency

lineal enclosures tend to offer a sense of solid

through optical mixing/fusion, the dominant

shapes or forms suspended in space. I play

color used is physically the same throughout

with the illusion of solidity by manipulating

the painting, but the perceived wavelength

the lightness or intensity of the color pro-

(the color seen) changes due to the differ-

gression within these lines, thereby present-

ent spacing of the line. Thus, in these paint-

ing not just one, but many ways of reading

ings, the mind tries to reconcile the physi-

these shapes in space. So, again, the logic of

cal fact (that there are no color shifts in the

what the line describes is questioned by what

painting) with the perceptual fact (that the

we almost subconsciously react to in regards

color appears to be changing throughout the

to our experience of lightness/brightness of

painting). In the paintings that generate the

spatial positioning. In these paintings, such

illusion of transparency through the use of

as Pulsating Line l and Pulsating Line ll, 1988,

physical mixing, I usually change not only the

and Measure ll, 1989, the boundary—the line—

predominant color, but also the color of the

takes full responsibility for ascribing shapes

dot or line that interacts with it. This shift-

in space.

ing of both the predominant color and of the interacting dot or line occurs in almost all of

In the last decade, I confronted myself with

these paintings, but it is more readily seen in

“constellations” of small panels grouped

some paintings—such as Tactile See-Through,

together to exist as one unit. A number of

1974, and Fervent ll, 1972—than in others.

these constellations, including the first one I made, concentrated on the illusionary see-

By using colors that are opposing in wave-

through of shapes overlapping in space,

length but equal in value, and by applying

like transparent folding planes. Each panel

them in symbiotic step-by-step measures, I

is really an individual painting with an indi-

can sculpt convincing illusions of overlapping

vidual atmosphere that prompts the visual

planes in space. Through the interaction of

experience of seeing into and through veiled

the two opposing colorants (the predomi-

forms in space. However, by grouping them

nant color vs. the line/dot), the eye produces

together, I produced a “visual sound” not

the visual appearance of a third color that

unlike that of a symphony orchestra, where

lays over the surface like a haze, as can be

different sounds unite into one new experi-

seen in Out of The Blue, 1978.

ence of “sound color”. I liked that. I named the first constellation I made Windows to

In

the

late

1980s

and

early

1990s,

I

the Past (not exhibited) because the panels


were reflections on my efforts of the past

three-fold overlappings by diminishing the

50 years, variations on the theme of “see-

perceived wavelength purity as it mixes with

throughs”. For example, individual panels in

black.

that first constellation painting referenced

polyphonic sound of an orchestra so much

back to paintings such as Navaho’s Summer,

as the mysterious snares of a drum.

These panels do not produce the

1971/73. I also was recognizing the fact that, although I had been an artist in the United

From the beginning of my creative life, I

States for 50 years, I was still somewhat out-

searched for a particular vessel that would

side, looking in as if through a window.

be compatible with my psyche and that would allow me to communicate my vision

Now in my later years, I have challenged

of the environment to others. Since I am

myself with a new experience of “see-

awed by nature’s performance, daily unveil-

throughs”,

different

ing the miracles of creation, I did not want

sounds, moods and processes. The newest

to compete with her by directly copying or

one is in this exhibition and is called One

realistically depicting the external world. I

Color = 4, 2011. This is a strange name, but it

chose to humbly accept her gifts. I also did

describes exactly what is happening in this

not want to represent the pain of life as the

series of fifteen panels. I used one color as

motivation for my work. Rather, I chose to

the background of each panel, but through

deal with the awe of each new day. What

three different proportional spacings of the

has been left for me to explore is geometry

black lines, I achieve four optical color mix-

as a graphic container that I then fill with

ings in each panel. Each of the fifteen sets

luxurious color experiences.

constellations

with

of mixtures—from bright green over blues to purples and magenta—reveals simple

WINDOWS TO THE PAST, 2000, 50 panels, 16" x16" each

-- Julian Stanczak, June 17, 2011

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UNASHAMED OF CHANGE, 1968, Acrylic on canvas, 72" X 36" EACH

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ACCUMULATIVE, 1975, Acrylic on canvas, 30" x 30"

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TACTILE SEE-THROUGH, 1974, Acrylic on canvas, 36" x 36"

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ASSEMBLE, 1973-74, Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 40"

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NAVAHO'S SUMMER, 1971/73, Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 50"

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RED DIFFUSION, 1977, Acrylic on canvas, 60" x 50"

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MIRRORED, 1971, Acrylic on canvas, 40" x 50"

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SPRING FOLD, 1973, Acrylic on canvas, 32" x 74"

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PROPORTIONAL BLACK, 2011 Acrylic on wood, 16" x 16" PROPORTIONAL ORANGE, 2010 Acrylic on wood, 16" x 16"

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PROPORTIONAL WHITE, 2010 Acrylic on wood, 16" x 16" PROPORTIONAL YELLOW, 2010 - 11 Acrylic on wood, 16" x 16"

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FERVENT II, 1972 Acrylic on canvas, 28" x 28"

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OUT OF THE BLUE, 1977 Acrylic on canvas, 30" x 30"

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CHROMATIC FOLD GREEN COOL, 1970 Acrylic on canvas, 22" x 22"

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MEASURE II, 1989 Acrylic on canvas, 34" x 34"

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PULSATING LINE I, 1989 - 98 Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 42"

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PULSATING LINE II, 1989 - 98 Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 42

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BOUNDING, 1989 Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 50"

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FORMING IN WHITE 1, 1991 - 92 Acrylic on canvas, 30" x 30"

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FORMATION, 1973 Acrylic on canvas, 50" x 60"

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SILKY LIGHT, 1972 Acrylic on canvas, 34" x 34"

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SUSPENDED, 1990 Acrylic on canvas, 36" x 70"

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ONE COLOR = 4, 2011 Acrylic on wood, 15 panels, each 16" x 16"

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Julian Stanczak 1928 Born in Borownica, Poland. Present Lives and works in Seven Hills, Ohio

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Teaching 1957- 64 1964-95

Art Academy of Cincinnati and University of Cincinnati. Professor of Painting, Cleveland Institute of Art. Numerous instances as artist-in-residence, visiting artist, or visiting lecturer.

Solo Exhibitions 2011 David Richard Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM: Elusive Transparencies. 2010 Danese, New York, NY: Julian Stanczak: Color – Grid. 2009 Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH: Julian Stanczak: Recent Work. CB Collection Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan: Julian Stanczak: The World of Op Art 2008 Danese, New York, NY: Julian Stanczak. Cleveland Artists Foundation, Cleveland, OH: Julian and Barbara Stanczak: parallel paths –singular quests. 2007 Museum of Contemporary Art, Cincinnati, Ohio, "Julian Stanczak" 2006 Eckert Fine Art, Naples, FL: Julian Stanczak: Master of Op Art. Miami University Art Museum, Oxford, OH: Julian Stanczak: Constellation Series Paintings. Wisconsin Union Galleries, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI: Intersecting Pathways: Julian and Barbara Stanczak. McClain Fine Art, Houston, TX: Julian Stanczak: Forty Years of Painting. 2005 Springfield Museum of Art, Springfield, OH: Optical Reaction: The Art of Julian Stanczak (50 Year Retrospective). Stefan Stux Gallery, New York, NY: Julian Stanczak, Constellation and Color: Four Decades of Painting. Elevation Art, Cleveland, OH: Chroma: Prints by Julian Stanczak. 2004 Stefan Stux Gallery, New York, NY: Julian Stanczak, Master of Op Art:Highlights of the Past 40 Years. South Texas Institute for the Arts, Corpus Christi, TX: Julian Stanczak: Op Art Painting. 2003 McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, TX: Julian Stanczak: Op Art Painting. 2002 Washington State University Museum of Art, Pullman, WA: Optical Reaction: The Art of Julian Stanczak (50 Year Retrospective). Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL: Optical Reaction: The Art of Julian Stanczak (50 Year Retropspective) Eckert Fine Art Naples, Inc., Naples, FL: Julian Stanczak: The Art of Perception. 2001 Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL: Julian Stanczak, OP=Visual Poetics: 50 Year Retrospective. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, MI: Julian Stanczak: Decades of Color. Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA: Julian Stanczak: Pioneer of Op Art, 50 Year Retrospective. Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH: Julian Stanczak: 50 Year Retrospective. 2000 Asheville Museum of Art. Asheville, NC: Optical Perception: The Art of Julian Stanczak 1999 Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH 1998 Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH: Julian Stanczak: A Retrospective 1948-1998. 1993 The Dennos Museum, Traverse City, MI: Julian Stanczak: Color=Form, Retrospective. 1992 David Anderson Gallery, Buffalo, NY: 44-Year Retrospective 1991 Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, Ohio Charles Foley Gallery, Columbus, Ohio 1990 The Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH 1989 Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL: Retrospective.


1988 Alice Simsar Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI 1987 Standard Oil Company World Headquarters, Cleveland, OH: 10-year Retrospective. 1985 Jane Haslem Gallery, Washington, D.C. Walker Gallery, Chicago, IL. 1984 Charles Foley Gallery, Columbus, OH. 1983 The New Gallery, Cleveland, OH. Brubaker Gallery, Sarasota, FL. 1982 Alice Simsar Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI. 1981 National Museum, Warsaw, Poland. Sandusky Area Cultural Center, Sandusky, OH. Alice Simsar Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI. 1980 Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH. Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, OH. 1979 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. 1978 International Monetary Fund and Care Medico, Washington, D.C. The New Gallery, Cleveland, OH. Kauffman Fine Arts, Houston, TX. A.S.A. Gallery, Oak Ridge, TN. Miller Gallery, Cincinnati, OH. 1976 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Kingpitcher Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA. Marjorie Kauffman Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. 1975 Alice Simsar Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. Lakeland Community College, Mentor, OH. Packard Gallery, Toronto, Ontario Canada. 1974 Canton Art Institute, Canton, OH. Alamo Gallery, Alamo, CA. Phoenix Gallery, San Francisco, CA. Jane Haslem Gallery, Washington, D.C. 1973 Van Straaten Gallery, Chicago, IL. The New Gallery, Cleveland, OH. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. 1972 Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH. London Arts Gallery, Detroit, MI. Images Gallery, Toledo, OH. Lantern Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, Ohio 1971 London Arts Gallery, London, England. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. Images Gallery, Toledo, OH. Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH. 1969 Akron Art Institute, Akron, OH. London Arts Gallery, Detroit, MI. Ray Packard Gallery, Akron, OH. Mackler Gallery, Philadelphia, PA. 1968 Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. Kent State University, Kent State, OH. 1966 Feingarten Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. 1965 Miami University, Oxford, OH. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY.

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1964 1963 1948 32

Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY. Edgecliff Academy of Fine Arts, Cincinnati, OH. Stanley Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya.

Selected Group Exhibitions 2011 D. Wigmore Fine Art, Inc., New York, NY: Structured Color: Anuszkiewicz, Benjamin, Davis, Downing, Hinman, Stanczak, Tadasky. Nancy Margolis Gallery, New York, NY: Obstruction. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH: CLE OP: Cleveland Op Art Pioneers with Julian Stanczak, Edwin Mieczkowski and Richard Anuszkiewicz. Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH: Julian Stanczak, Edwin Mieczkowski and Robert Mangold. 2010 Madron Gallery, Chicago, IL: The Perceptive Mind. Deedee Wigmore, New York, NY: Op Art of Ohio; Anonima Group, Richard Anuszkiewicz and Julian Stanczak in the 1960's. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH: In Honor of the Cleveland Arts Prize. 2009 Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH: Modern and Contemporary Art at Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum. 2008 Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI: Sensory Overload: Light, Motion, Sound and the Optical Art Since 1945. Albright-Know Gallery, Buffalo, NY: Op Art Revisited. Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY: Pop and Op. 2007 Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA: Bars and Stripes. Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH: Optic Nerve: Perceptual Art of the 1960s. Pratt Institute of Art, New York, NY: The Optical Edge. San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA: Op Art Revisited-Selections from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Canton Museum of Art, Canton, OH: Director's Choice. Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Malibu, CA: A View Within Reinberger Galleries, Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Institute of Art: 125 Year Anniversary Exhibition. Jacobson Howard Gallery, NY: After Image: Op Art of the 1960s. State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, NY: Selections from the Permanent Collection of the UB Anderson Gallery. Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH: Op Art: Then and Now. D. Wigmore Fine Art, New York, NY: To Be Named. Neuberger Museum of Art, State University New York (SUNY), Purchase, NY: Visual Variations: Perceptual Art. 2006 New York State, Museum, Albany, NY: Op Art Revisited: Selections from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. D. Wigmore Fine Art, New York, NY: Geometric Abstraction and Color Function: Two Generations. Washtenaw Community College, Ann Arbor, MI: Josef Albers: To Open Eyes. D. Wigmore Fine Art, New York, NY: A Century of American Art. 2005 Eckert Fine Art, Naples, FL: Timeless: An Eclectic Collection Spanning two Centuries. McClain Gallery, Houston, TX: Universal Medium. McKenzie Fine Art, New York, NY: Good Vibrations. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY: Extreme Abstraction. Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, MI: Op Art: The Responsive Eye' Revisited. Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH: Op Art and Color Field Painting. 2004 Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Oklahoma City, OK: Light and Movement. Beck Center for the Arts, Cleveland, OH: The Lead Chicken Award: Major Cleveland Painting at Mid-Century.


Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ: The Abstract Eye: Selections from the Permanent Collection. Ashmore Gallery, Miami Beach, FL: High Art: Perspectives. 2003 State University of New York at Binghampton (SUNY-Binghampton): Abstract Expressionism: Works by John Hoyland, Julian Stanczak and Larry Zox. Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery and Times Square Gallery, Hunter College, New York, NY: Seeing Red: International Exhibition of Nonobjective Painting. P.S. 1 Gallery, Queens, NY: Site and Insight: An Assemblage of Artists (Curated by Agnes Gund), 2002 Miami University Art Museum, Oxford, OH: Wired: Art That Moves. Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA: Inner Light: Selections from the Permanent Collection. 2001 Cleveland Artists Foundation, The Beck center for the Arts, Cleveland OH: Harmonic Forms on the Edge: Geometric Abstraction in Cleveland. Gallery One, Washtenaw Community College, Ann Arbor, MI: Color in the Eye. 2000 Baum Gallery of Art, University of Central, Arkansas, Conway AR: Color Function Serigraphs. 1999 Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN: Pop(ular)/Op(tical): Art of the 60's and 70's from the Permanent Collection. 1998 Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY: Eyes Pop. 1997 DePaul University, Chicago, IL: Expanding Tradition: the influence of Polish Artists in the US. Cleveland Botanical Gardens, Cleveland, OH: Responses to Nature-Responses to Art," Julian & Barbara Stanczak. 1996 Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC: Color Function Painting: The Art of Josef Albers, Julian Stanczak and Richard Anuszkiewicz. 1995 Lakeland Community College, OH: Action-Reaction: Julian and Barbara Stanczak. The Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH: The Spirit of Cleveland: Visual Arts Recipients of the Cleveland Fine Arts Prize 1961- 1995. Traveled to: Canton Art Museum, Canton, OH, ArtSpace, Lima, OH, The Riffe Gallery, Columbus, OH, and the Beck Center for the Arts, Lakewood, OH 1994 Akron Museum, Akron, OH: Abstraction & Geometry in Painting. 1993 The Upstairs Gallery, Ithica, NY: Julian Stanczak, Clayton Pond: Prints. 1991 Galeria Zacheta, Warsaw, Poland: Jestemy, Ministerstwo Kulturi I Sztuki. 1988 Worchester Art Museum, Worchester, MA: Op & Pop. 1987 Madrid, Spain: Art in the Embassies. 1985 National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC: The Martha Jackson Memorial Collection. 1984 The Drackett Fine Art Collection, Cincinnati, OH. 1983 Cleveland Institute of Art. Cleveland, OH: The Cleveland Institute of Art: the First 100 Years, 1882-1982. 1982 Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ: Josef Albers: His Art and His Influence. 1981 Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.: The Development of Optical Art. 1979 Jane Haslem Gallery, Washington, D.C.: Artists from Yale. The Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH: Visual Logic: Davis, Mieczkowski, Pearson, Stanczak. Traveled to Parsons School of Design and New Gallery of Contemporary Art. 1977 University of Maryland. College Park, MD: Modern Prints. 1974 Akron Art Institute, Akron, OH: Forms of Color. 1973 Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH: American Contemporary Art. Mansfield Art Center, Mansfield, OH: Stanczak-Anuszkiewicz. 1972 Amherst College, Amherst, MA: Color Painting.

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1971 Mansfield Art Center, Mansfield, OH: The Saalfield and Sundell Collections. 1970 Carnegie Institute of Art, Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh International. Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN: Contemporary American Art. 1969 Flint International, Flint Art Institute, Flint, MI: The Square in Painting. Lafayette College, Easton PA (organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service): Black White: Exhibition of Paintings and Constructions. 1968 Albright Knox Art Gallery, NY: Second Buffalo Festival of the Arts Today. 1967 Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh International. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY: Contemporary Painting. Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, OH: Three Generations: Albers, Vasarely, Stanczak. 1966 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.: Painting in the White House. Riverside Museum, NY: Yesterday and Today 1936-1966, American Abstract Artists. 1965 The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY: The Responsive Eye. San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA: The Colorists: 1950-1965. Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY: Kinetic and Optical Art Today. Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY: Vibrations Eleven. 1964 Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati, OH: Motion and Movement. Awards 2004 Viktor Schreckengost Award, Cleveland Institute of Art 2001 Medel of Excellence, Cleveland Institute of Art 1976 Best of Show nomination, International Platform Association, Washington DC 1975 Best of Show nomination, International Platform Association, Washington DC 1974 Best of Show nomination, International Platform Association, Washington DC 1973 Best of Show nomination, International Platform Association, Washington DC 1972 Award for Excellence in Painting, Ohio Arts Council, Governor Gilligan presiding 1970 Outstanding American Educator, Educators of America 1969 Ohio Fine Arts Award, Women's City Club, Cleveland, OH 1968 Cleveland Fine Arts Prize for Visual Arts, Cleveland Foundation for the Arts 1966 New Talent, U.S.A, Art in America, along with Donald Judd, Robert Morris, R.B. Kitaj and others 1965 First Prize and Purchased Award, 30th Midyear Show, Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio 1961 First Prize and Purchased Award, Artists of Southern Ohio, Dayton, OH First Prize, Third Interior Valley Competition, Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati, OH Selected Publications 2011 Julian Stanczak. Elusive Transparencies. Santa Fe: David Richard Contemporary. 2010 Danese. Julian Stanczak: Color – Grid. New York: Danese. 2008 Hickey, Dave. Julian Stanczak. New York: Danese Houston, Joe, Ursula Korneitchouk and Frances Taft. Parallel Paths – Singular Quest: Barbara and Julian Stanczak. Cleveland, OH: Cleveland Arts Foundation. 2007 Houston, Joe and Dave Hickey. Optic Nerve: Perceptual Art of the 60's. London: Merrell Publishers, Ltd. (cover ill. Julian Stanczak, detail of Concurrent Colours). 2005 Morgan, Robert C., Julian Stanczak, Construction and Color: Four Decades of


Painting. New York: Stefan Stux Gallery. 2004 Fyfe, Joe, Agnes Gund and Dave Hickey. Julian Stanczak: Op Art Painting. New York: Stefan Stux Gallery. 2003 Wilson-Powell, MaLin. Julian Stanczak: Op Art Painting. San Antonio, TX: McNay Museum of Art. 1999 Nill, Annegrath T. Julian Stanczak. Columbus, OH: Columbus Museum of Art. 1998 McClelland, Elizabeth. Julian Stanczak: Retrospective 1948-1998. Youngstown, OH: Butler Institute of American Art. 1993 Shinner, Jacqueline and Rudolf Arnheim. Julian Stanzcak: Color = Form. Traverse City, MI: Dennos Museum Center, Northwestern Michigan College. Museum Collections Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Akron Art Museum, Akron, OH Allentown Museum of Art, Allentown, PA Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada Art Academy of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH The Art Museum, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ Asheville Museum of Art, Asheville, NC Ball State University Museum of Art, Muncie, IN Baum Gallery of Art, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL The Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas, Austin, TX Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH Canton Museum of Art, Canton, OH Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA Centrum Sztuki Studio im Stanislawa I. Witkiewicza, Warsaw, Poland Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Cranbook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, MI Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, MI Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Herron Gallery, Herron School of Art/IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH Housatonic Museum of Art, Bridgeport, CT Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, MI Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO Kennedy Museum of Art, Ohio University, Athens, OH Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles , CA Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL Masur Museum of Art, Monroe, LA McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, TX The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA Kendall Campus Art Gallery, Miami-Dade Community College, Miami, FL Miami University Art Museum, Oxford, OH Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee WI

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Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, MA Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY National Gallery of Art & Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Naples Museum of Art, Naples, FL Neuberger Museum of Art, SUNY, Purchase, NY Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, NV New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL Oklahoma City Art Museum, Oklahoma City, OK Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando, FL Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ The RISD Museum, Providence, RI San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. The Snite Museum of Art, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN Springfield Museum of Art, Springfield, OH Tamayo Museum, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City, MX Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH University at Buffalo Art Gallery, SUNY-Buffalo, Buffalo, NY The University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, MI Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England Wake Forest University Fine Arts Gallery, Winston-Salem, NC Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA Winnepeg Art Gallery, Winnepeg, Manitoba Canada Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA Public Collections Air Products & Chemicals, Allentown, PA Alcoa, Pittsburgh, PA American Greetings, Cleveland, OH American Republic Insurance Company, Des Moines, IA Ameritrust Bank, Cleveland, OH David Anderson Collection, Buffalo, NY Atlantic Ridgefield Company, NY Art Collection of the First National Bank of Chicago, Chicago, IL AT&T Art Collection, San Antonio, TX Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Baltimore, MD The Bank of New York, NY Cardinal Federal Savings Associations, Cleveland, OH Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Champion International, Hamilton, OH Chase Manhattan Bank Collection, New York, NY Central Cadillac Company, Cleveland, OH Cincinnati Bell Company, Cincinnati, OH Cincinnati Microwave Company, Cincinnati, OH Cleveland Art Association, Cleveland, OH Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, OH Detroit Edison Company, Detroit, MI Digital Equipment Corporation, Stow, MA Drackett Fine Art Collection, Cincinnati, OH Duke Power Company, Durham, NC


Dusquense Company, Pittsburgh, PA Etzhold Sammlung, Cologne, Germany Gail W. Feingarten-Oppenheimer Collection, Beverly Hills, CA First National Bank of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH First National Bank of Dayton, Dayton, OH Gund Foundation, New York, NY Hewlett Packard, Palo Alto, CA Senator Javitz Collection, New York, NY Johnson & Johnson Fine Art Collection, CT Jones, Day, Reaves & Pogue Law Firm, Cleveland, OH Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland, OH Senator Metzenbaum Collection, Washington, DC National Bank of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Nelson B. Rockefeller Collection, New York, NY Nissan Company, Nashville, TN Northern States Power, Minneapolis, MN Owens Corning Fiberglass Collection, Toledo, OH Plain Dealer Headquarters, Cleveland, OH Prescott, Ball & Turben Company, Cleveland, OH The Provident National Bank, Cincinnati, OH Neil K. Rector Collection, Columbus, OH Siemens AG, Munich, Germany Smith, Barney & Company, New York, NY Society Bank, Cleveland, OH Sprint Incorporated, St. Louis, MO St. John Unitarian Church, Cincinnati, OH Taft Collection, Cleveland, OH Trade Bank & Trust Company, New York, NY United Parcel Service, New York, NY USX Corporation Collection, Pittsburgh, PA Wasserman Development Corporation, Cambridge, MA

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Published on the occasion of the exhibition, Julian Stanczak, Elusive Transparencies, David Richard Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM September 1 - 30 , 2011. Photography by: Ellen Page Wilson catalog pages 9, 13, 28 Richard Barger all others Price $20.00 ISBN: 978-0-9839312-0-1 Catalogue Š 2011 David Richard Contemporary, LLC, Santa Fe Works of art Š 1968 - 2011 Julian Stanczak Courtesy of Danese, NY


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DAVID RICHARD CONTEMPORARY 130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite D, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284 www.DavidRichardContemporary.com | info@DavidRichardContemporary.com

Julian Stanczak "Elusive Transparencies"  

Elusive Transparencies, a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Julian Stanczak focused exclusively on his illusory “see-through” abstrac...

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