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SINGER Instructions FOR

Art Embroidery

PUBLISHED BY

SINGER SEWING A\ACH1NE COMPANY

Copyright,

191

i,

bv Singer

Sewing Machine Co.

\J


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;CI.A28«ilSEi


;

General Instructions In

using

tlie

Singer Sewing Machine

for

making and embroidery, there are some very important rules that must be followed lace

K,by

all

who

desire to learn

how

to

do

this

most fascinating work. The most important thing is to be able, easily and naturally, to exercise an independent movement of the feet and the hands. The feet must be trained to start, stop and operate the machine very slowly by means of the treadle without any help from the This leaves both hands free for hands. manipulating the embroidery hoops holding the work. The first impulse of a beginner is to move the feet in unison with the hands

No. 27-4, No. 15259 for Machine No. 15-30, and No. 208733 for Machine No. 9W. These cover plates can be obtained by mail or otherwise from any Singer shop.

Do the

not remove the throat plate, nor disturb

feed dog because

should

position

as

whenever the machine

is

essential

that

originally

used

for

its

fi.xed

family

sewing. Place a small iron washer or a spool weight on the spool, to retard the movement of the upper thread. A spool weight ( No. 9537 can )

be obtained at any Singer shop.

Preparation of hoops and placing material therein

as a consequence, short stitches are formed,

and often several stitches in the same place. The fundamental rule is: "Move the feet This is the slozcly and the hands rapidly." hardest thing to acquire, and you will need

is

it

remain

two hoops constituting the embroidery frame and wind them with narrow strips of white muslin, covering them diagonally with one or more layers of the cloth,

Take

the

With

according to the thickness of the material on

however, it will become easy and natural, and you will be able absolutely to control, by means of the treadle alone, every

which the embroidery is to be done, as this must be held stretched firmly between the

to

remember

it

constantly at

first.

practice,

movement

hoops.

of the needle.

In connection with this treadle

movement,

the secret of successful machine embroider}" to know how to control with accuracy the movement of the embroidery hoops between is

gauging the distance to the next where the needle should penetrate to produce the stitch desired. stitches,

point

To prepare

Figure

the machine

To

To

prepare the machine, remove the presserThen and raise the presser-foot bar. push the screw regulating the stitch as high foot

as

it

will

go so as to stop the feed.

i

put the material in the hoops, stretch

it

smoothly over the larger hoop, then press the smaller hoop firmly If

down

the material be not

into the larger one.

firmly

and smoothly

stretched over the frame, tighten

See that the tensions are adjusted so that a perfect stitch will be made upon such materials and with the same silk that you intend to

on the

use for the embroidery work.

the goods, doing the

While not essential, it is suggested that the feed and the throat plate be covered with a plate made for the purpose, using No. 3258g for Machine No. 66-1. No. 8335 for Machine

fully.

in Fig.

liable

I,

it

as

shown

being very careful not to stretch

bias,

but to pull

it

work slowly and

care-

If the material be so delicate that to

standing

it

with the thread of

it

is

be injured by the hoops, notwiththe

muslin

padding,

paper or cotton between them.

place

tissue


Sometimes the material upon which the embroiden- is to be done is smaller than the hoops, or the design is so large that it comes In such cases sew the close to the cloth.

therefore, that the

material firmly to a piece of strong cloth large

holding the hoop.

enough the it

In order to keep

to cover the frame.

work

fresh and avoid disfiguring pinholes,

is

movement

of the right hand

what determines the direction and length of

the stitch.

Do

not change the position of the hands in

forward,

right,

Guide the hoop backward, left,

or

in

without

circles,

removing the hands from the hoop

at

any time.

advisable to sew to the outer rim of the

is

enough to whatever material may project beyond the frame while it is on the machine, and to wrap the entire design in while it is put away. larger hoop a piece of cloth large

permit of rolling

in

it

work

Placing

in

machine

shows how, by raising the needle to the highest possible point, you can ])lace the embroidery frame in position without removFig. 2

Figure 3

Practice slowly and carefully, and when you have learned to govern the movement of the frame, you will find that there is no exercise

more valuable stitches

making drawn on

to a learner than that of

between two

parallel

lines

the cloth about a quarter of an

inch apart.

Persist in this until you can drive the needle

through the center of each this is

the jiarallel lines until Figure

;

although

Alachine the latter that

it

usually

is

Singer Sewing

in the

such a simple operation

is

remove

best to

it,

thus

avoiding the danger of breaking the point or injuring the

work by

of the material.

an extra

It is

tliat

the

changing the

tiny ribbon aj^pliqueed

on the

ready to practice the

first

tensions

to handle the

Take

a piece of

and

oiling

the

hoops

The embroidery hoops should be held in hand and moved in the direction

required, while the left

(See Fig. 3.) the

work

hand

hand in

is

used to press

front of the needle.

hand does and the right

Practically, the left

of a presser foot

acts as a feed.

you will be openwork

unstamped material

the right

down

cloth,

lesson in

Preliminary Practice

advisable to have ready

work.

the goods gently

to

you

embroidery.

machine, to avoid any chance of staining the

How

it

in making the stitches so uniwork has the appearance of a

piece of cloth to be used to try the machine after

When

scratching the surface

hoops containing an ordinary

set of

form

When

you have reduced

about one sixteenth of an inch.

2

have succeeded ing the needle

line at will.

accomplished, decrease the space between

You

will understand.

Figure 4

to prac-


Outline Stitch.

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


tice on.

Be sure

it

the hoops, so that

is it

drawn

perfectly tight in

will not

drag but move

and practice until you acquire perfect control of both hands and feet. Rest the arm, freely,

hot, as

entire

arm

to

move with

of the hoop

allowing the

the hand.

easily.

After

frame so

work unworked part of the design in the

this is done, replace the

as to bring the

within the rings. are general rules covering

The foregoing

near the elbow, on the table of the machine.

You can control the movement much easier in this way than by

some materials scorch very

we

all

shall

kinds of embroidery and hereafter take up, step by step, the details with which the beginners must become familiar before

endeavoring to do the more complicated work.

Beginning the Embroidery

When Fig.

4,

stitching

the

work

outline

is

the

in position as

design

twice

Before entering into a description of the

shown

in

with plain

Take hand, make one

and then begin the embroidery.

the upper thread in the left

various

lace

which

illustrations

of the

work

fection that

stitches,

at its

may

we show you

here

demonstrate the simplicity beginning and the high per-

ultimately be reached.

J

Figure

drawing up the under thread, and hold stitches both ends firmly until two or three on done be should This have been taken. stitch,

some spot

in the cloth that is

to be entirely

covered by the embroidery. When you have completed as much of the frame design as can be contained within the side one time, iron it carefully on the wrong covering first iron, with a moderately warm cloth, to remove the embroidery with a damp

at

the

marks made by the

rings.

The

greatest

iron too care should be taken not to have the

5

Fig.

5

shows the hoop embroidery frame

covered with a piece of to practice the

thing else

it

common muslin, on. More than

first stitches

used any-

resembles a child's slate covered

with the irregular marks made during the first lesson in writing: because in machine embroidery, as in writing, the lines tion

It

is

vacilla-

judging dis-

is uncertainty only by persistent practice that

and there

tance.

show

in

one acquires firmness combined with freedom of movement. The cloth in this frame shows the

first efforts

of the apprentice

:

unmeasured


stitches

made while learning to control with movement of the frame limiting

precision the

;

the length of stitch to the distance between

two

parallel lines imtil certainty of action

gained the

;

covering a cord, which

is

is

practically

same exercise on a narrower measure

:

all

repeated until considerable rapidity has been attained,

when

the learner begins to practice

covering a square opening cut

in

the cloth.

m.oving the frame rhythmically in the desired direction and in time with the the machine,

from one

movement

of

side of the square to

the other, so as to catch the edge of the cloth.

shown

In this illustration are ciples

upon which

the general prin-

machine embroidery

all

is

based.

These same without

stitches

made

in

either

certainty

or

when grouped

together

with

the beginning

fixed

the

direction,

precision

gained by practice (after one has learned to control the

and

movement

of the embroidery frame

to follow the design

as are

shown

illustrate

in

)

.

produce results such

the next

two pages, which

twelve unfinished pieces of embroid-

ery as they appear in the embroidery frame.


Figure 6


Figure

7


Shaded Embroidery

(Flowers). Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


Shaded Embroidery

FLOWERS Under

this lieading

we

offer the following

intelligence

directions to those who, having a taste in that direction and

some

practice in

and natural

We

part of the worker.

how

making machine

the

work

is

give such advice as

and good-will, desire to use this mechanical method of doing shaded embroidery without

in

exceeding the limits of their

own

ability

knowledge of drawing and painting, as obvious that

in

order to

<lo

and it

is

some of the work

may

would be necessary

know

to

have studied and to

the fundamentals of art.

selves, therefore, to

work

We

confine our-

that merely requires

on the you

and

shall also

be of service to you

ordinary work.

Prepare the machine by inserting a No. oo

i,

2

and

3

needle sary

(

although No. 000

when

No. 00

there

silk.

is

very

the success of the It is

well

is

sometimes necesand use

fine detail),

Place the material in the em-

broidery frame, having it

taste

shall describe to

to be prepared

embroidery, together with love of the work

Figures

artistic

it

tight

and smooth, as

work depends upon

first to select

the model, bearing in

this.

the silks required by

mind

that the silk on the


spool after

always darker has been worked.

is it

in

appearance than

Let us suppose that the model selected

the last part that should be embroidered.

composed of flowers and leaves. Stamp the design on the material. upper tension a

and work

little

is

Have

looser than under tension,

the stems of the flowers

When

first.

petals, etc., always work from the outside edge towards the center,

embroidering leaves,

slanting the stitches according to the design.

Keep side,

the stitches perfectly even on the out-

but not on the inside.

flowers are to be

worked

in

The

centers of

seed

modeling stitches finish the and see that of the flower, flower, which is the center of at the base or slightly the stitches to carry out the

all

(See

stitcii.

as in the petals

When

23.)

As

take a

damp

cloth,

each

hoopful

finished,

is

nib on wrong side of the

work and press dry before taking

out of the

it

hoop. Turn-overs of leaves and flowers should

be worked in raised embroidery or, as it.

we

call

embroidering the petals of

flat

such as daisies, wild roses, azaleas, broider toward

and

the center,

flowers

etc.,

beginning

at

emthe

outer edge and carrying the stitch toward the

base or calyx of the flower. Endeavor to curve

open

half

and others containing a great number of petals, group so as to overlap one another, thus showing only the Begin with the inside points of the petals. embroider in the same manner and petals and direction indicated (D, Fig. 4). then

tlie

outer

5

petals,

the turn-overs being the last covered

with the embroidery.

The

should be emwhich is described a part of the machine em-

center of the flowers

broidered in the seed hereafter, as

it

is

stitch,

broidery that deserves special study.

satin stitch.

When

Fig. 4.

embroidering buds

flowers, like roses, carnations

Figures 4 and

Page

B and C of

All

in Fig. 5 as well

of which you can readily see

should be embroidered diagonally

The stems

and upon the thickness of the stem, they are embroidered in a straight up and down stitch moving from the top to the bottom lengthwise of the stem (Fig. 5). sometiines, depending

(

Fig. 4

)


Art Embroidery.

Photographic reproduction of actual worit done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attaclimcnts.


Art Embroidery Any

material whatever

foundation for this work

;

may

be used as a

that

is

to say, this

how

it

the

all

is

done.

Nevertheless

steps that

may

we

embroidery permits the use of thick as well

enable you to execute this artistic

as transparent goods, to be selected according

best possible manner.

to the object to

which the embroidery

This style of embroidery

devoted.

is

is

to be

usually

most beautiful when applied

to sash curtains,

bed-spreads,

and

scarfs,

tray

cloths,

other

ornamental objects for which the goods gen-

used

is

tine antl

cloth, batiste, etc.

transparent like bolting-

What

will be

found best to

harmonize with these delicate weaves is embroidery done in white silk, as was used in the sample reproduced in Fig. i. This needlework itself

nor does

its

is

not at

all

difficult

in

execution require great pa-

By merely

examining the sample you will be able to determine how the work should be done and

tience.

shown

in the

illustration

work

in the

The machine should be prepared with a Xo. oo needle and art embroidery silk should be used for both the upper and lower stitch. The

tensions should be slightly loose. Use Xo. o needle unless the material is very fine.

Figure erally

shall explain

be useful to you to

i

Xo. oo silk, 70 and 100 D. Darning Cotton.

AI. C. or

Singer

Patterns containing sprays of flowers are the most appropriate for this embroidery what-

ever

its

use.

Stamp

the design on the material as usual,

span the embroidery with the hoops and follow the design with machine stitching. \\'e shall

begin by embroidering the stems,

using the stem or oblique stitch distinguishable


in the illustration.

This reduces

itself to

cov-

ering the stems with stitches running diagonal to

the

veins

lines

shown

of each leaf should

In this embroidery start from the edge of

where the needle should penetrate the

times, that the stitch

firmly

obviating

fastened,

looseness. freely

From

to the

may

any tendency

that point

it

present the even, correct outline

to

should

its

form.

the other hand, the stitches that

inside of the leaves as

length.

Nor does

show any apparent

Figure

same spot several

may

you can

and do not preserve the

he embroidered in the same stitch.

the leaf,

it

On

The

of the stems themselves. in the centre

done

necessary to the perfection of

fill

the

see are uneven,

slightest regularity as this

part

of

the

leaf

intent to drive the needle

2

be

through any precise or determined point, as

to

must be rigorously done when embroidering

move

centre of the leaf, care being

taken not to destroy the symmetry of outline of the latter so that when the embroiderv is

the edges, as spoil the

we

stated before, in order not to

symmetry of design of

the aforesaid

leaves,

Xevertheless vou

mav

be assured that these


long and short stitches taken at irregular intervals in the centre of the leaves are

make than

difficult to

much more

those of the border, as

upon the dexterity in handling the embroidery frame acquired by practice, (we already know how cjuickly it is acquired with the Singer Sewing Machine), which gives such absolute certainty in driving the latter depend entirely

when

work

is

on bolting-cloth

it

the

done on is

but

satin,

preferable to

fill

if

done

in these

centres with a small web, as you will notice in the illustration in this lesson

Fig.

(

i )

,

taken

from a sample embroidered in white silk on bolting-cloth and showing part of a design for magnificent

a

same

made with these As you may suppose, the

bed-spread

materials.

cloth as to enable us to cover a small cord with

sample reproduced in the illustration is only a small part of this magnificent bed-spread. In

admirable exactitude and rapidity but to group

order to appreciate the beauty of

a needle through a determined point in the

;

different

stitches

so that

location

their

and

produce the artistic and agreeable effect that each figure demands in the accomplishment of this your own skill and artistic size will

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

taste will

The

guide you successfully.

entire effect of the

these irregular stitches,

border to the centre of each

leaf.

from the

in

We

cannot

determine their length for you nor their proportion to each other, nor

because the

how many

of them

There are no rules for

there should be.

this,

operator must

artistic taste of the

always figure as an essential part of the work. If you have no good patterns to copy you may first experiment and study effects by

making

how

a design

on

a piece of

paper showing

the stitches should be disposed.

the best effect until you find

it.

In this

may

seek

As you

will

way, with the aid of your pencil, you

notice by the illustration the placing of these stitches give a

shaded

the

work

is

would be necessary

work-

its

to see

it

fully

is

far

from

In Fig. 2

reality.

we reproduce

a magnificent Renaissance Lace cover containing many lovely lace

and four sunflowers embroidered in on linen. This piece of work, which consists of a combination of various styles of embroidery was made as follows. stitches,

art stitch with silk

The sunflowers were first embroidered with which was also used for the four

the art stitch

ornaments, simulating the leaves of the flowers which appear in the four corners of the cover.

The

lace stitches

were then worked, and the

edges of the cover were corded as were those of the flowers, leaves and other figures constituting the design.

We

effect that brings out all

the modeling and beauty of the pattern.

When

it

extended over an appropriate rose-colored lining. That alone would convince you that whatever you may imagine in connection with it

work depends on

shaded

manship

must warn you

that the

cord should

be covered with silk corresponding in color to

done on satin you should

that used in each figure

;

that

is

to say, the sun-

use silk of the same color as the ground, or

flowers and leaves should be corded with silk

somewhat

the

lighter

in

tone, to produce a mild

contrast.

same color as that employed for the art and the other figures in which these

stitch,

This work also admits of the use of raised

stitches

with

rings, particularly in the centre of the flowers

13

have not been used should be corded

silk the

same color

as the

groundwork.


Raised Embroidery This

is

common that

probably the best

of

all

known and most may say.

which serves as a basis of

learned in the schools.

you how

this

work

is

all

that

of em-

\\'hile this is usually the first style

broidery learned, and the one on which the

needlework, and. one

greatest practice

is

In order to explain to

hand, this

done on the Singer Sew-

is

Sewing ^Machine

medium tion

is

expended when done by

when

not the case

is

is

Singer

the

the rapid and efficacious

Your

of execution employed.

atten-

however, to the fact that

called,

it

is

new method of doing

best not to attempt this

raised embroidery until you have thoroughly mastered the machine and the movement of

To do

the embroidery frame. a

maximum

of precision

this

embroidery,

The

necessary.

is

cording already referred to as requiring the greatest dexterity and ability on the machine is

not nearly so important as the

now

This requires

taking up.

work we

are

the greatest

precision in the stitch and the utmost certainty

Raised embroidery is in properly placing it. extremely delicate, because of the high ])erfection that

The

must be

design

attained.

stamped upon the

should be

material to be used, and this in turn should be

placed in the embroidery frame, stretching

smoothly and

as .\.

Fig. I.)

tightly

Then

as

space between the

in the

fill

it

(See

possible.

outlines with stitching (see B. Fig.

I )

to give

the desired raised efTect. If the

embroidery

to be

is

done on

lingerie,

thread the machine with Xo. loo embroidery cotton,

thread.

winding the bobbin with the same Have upper tension just medium, un-

der tension a

little tight.

on broadcloth,

If

a No. o needle, and Xo. oo

ti^e

silk.

Begin the embroidery, taking the greatest care to see that the needle goes exactly from Figure

one

i

line to the other.

This work should be done so evenly and ing Machine,

it

is

only necessary

for us

accurately as to

to

make

it

impossible to discern

where the stitches join. On curved lines you must know how to narrow the stitch on the

you the size of the needle and the thread to be employed and how to prepare the machine, and then to do with the machine exactly as you would do with your hands. tell

inner curve, as well as the outer curve 14

how

to

(see C, Fig.

broaden i)

it

on

so that the


Raised Embroidery, Satin Stitch.

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


em-

stitches will be perfectly united without over-

believe

lapping and without losing their uniformity. In otlier words, the work must be done just

broidery so appropriately and artistically shown

as carefuMy as though done

ing Alachine Co.'s exhibition at Madrid,

difference being the

necessity

accuracy

doing

it

for

in stitch

of

outline

by machine as

you go,

this

method

will

we had

to

this

raised

cushions, divans, tabourets and a magnificent

is

how slowly much more

rapid than by hand. If

of

and

rapicily as the latter

always be

pieces

This

precludes the possibility of

capable of working, but no matter

large

Arabian department of the Singer Sewwould have great ever have been attempted. There we

by hand, the only

medium employed.

uniformity

the

depend on handwork, we do not

in the

table cover, all richlv covered with raised

A

em-

most extraordinary sample of this is a splendid curtain, composed of strips of lace alternating with bands of raised embroidery, which we reproduce in Fig. 2. Had it been necessary to do all the broidery. artistic

work


work on

this curtain b}-

hand,

it

would probably

silk.

There

is

shown

also

The

pattern

is

composed of large conopenwork centers

ventionalized flowers with

never have been completed.

two other very showv

filled

in

with various lace

stitches.

In

the

Figure 3

pieces of

work each

than the other.

made

of glace

richer

Fig. 3 silk,

is

a

and more exquisite

center of each leaf there

handsome

out, covered with raised

petticoat

with raised embroidery

is

solid space, not cut

embroidered dots. These

conventionalized flowers, which are

in 16

made

sep-


arately

and then appliqueed onto the

ruffle,

embroideries produce magnificent effects

are

used as transparencies over

placed alternately at the upper and lower edge,

and

this as well as the flowers

This shade

themselves are

richly

surrounded with a festoon of leaves and sprays

glace

as described in another lesson.

This raised satin letters

stitch is largely

and monograms on

formed of eight pieces of net done on

appliqueed with embroidery

The

silk.

the pattern

used for

is

when

light.

is

outline of the large leaves in

brought out

in raised

embroidery,

The

as are the leaves of the sprays of clover.

table linen or the

net

and

silk

of the points upon which the

Figure 4 finest lingerie.

D. M.

C. mercerized cotton

clover leaves appear have been cut

is

the best for this purpose. Fig. 4 represents a

of

its

exquisite design and graceful

worthy of a place room. this

The

kind

is

ing the latter to

in the

form

hang

is

most elegant drawing-

idea of embroidering objects of most satisfactory as some of the

uniting

the

eight

pieces of net are covered with a raised

em-

broidery

design

The

shade

finished

is

of off

three-leaf in

clover.

chiffon

edges embroidered in points. 17

leav-

free.

The seams formed by

lamp-shade that because

away

ruffles,

the


Scallops

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Beadstitch â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cording

This lesson, as you will see by the heading, can be termed a

trio,

but be assured

it

is

a

good one and with the aid of your faithful friend and ally, the Singer Sewing ^Machine, you can turn it into a quartet that will win universal applause.

F

A

centerpiece with a scalloped edge and lace

under the scallops

Gengood width for a scallop at the widest part of course on a doylie or anything small it need not be as wide as that. is

erally speaking }i of

a thing of beauty.

an inch

a

is

;


enable you to cut the material

away from

the

outside edge of the scallops, as you would

if

done by hand. If you want to elaborate a scalloped edge. a row of beadstitching on the outside edge or all around the scallops, before you put the

most effective. This beadstitch or if you will, is a straight stitch about ys of an inch in length, made close to the scallop. Make about six stitches, one over the other in the same place, then take a stitch forward and repeat the operation if you want the stitches to stand out more to cord on.

is

look like beads, take

over and back

you

more than

six

will be delighted

stitches

with the

you are working with colored

silk,

the beadstitch in a darker shade than

the one

you use for the scallops

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;black

may

be used with a bright shade of silk with good effect.

Cording can be done

backstitch,

;

If

result.

make

;

in

two ways, by cov-

ering the silk or cotton as told you, or

or

any

down

we have already

by using a couching cord of gold

color

you

choose

at regular intervals

contrasting shade.

and

with

catching

it

self color or a


Venetian Embroidery This embroidery ular. its

Its

design and

style

other

is

original in every partic-

unusual form, the capriciousness of its

so entirely

showy appearance form a different from that of any

embroidery that one should carefully

consider

how

it is

going to be used before

ing the work, in order to insure plication.

down

We

have seen

it

its

start-

proper ap-

used as an eider-

cover with a handsome, well arranged design in each corner. It is used with quilt

equal distinction and elegance on drawing-room

chair covers, and with spleiichd effect on sofa

In one case a magnificent reception

cushions.

room

suite of furniture

ornamented with

this

covered with satin was embroiderv.

an admirable piece of work,

and

in

effect

This was

artistic in

the combination of colors used.

was

design

The

exquisitely elegant, presenting an

and charming cohowever, was due to the wonderful accuracy with which the work had been executed and to the fact that ensemble

quetry.

full

of

delicate

Its greatest merit,


^'Zx

Venetian Embroidery.

<\

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


had been done entirely by the daughters of owner. If done by hand, the work would have been interminable. it

its

Having noted the style of this embroidery shown in the accompanying illustration in this lesson, you will readily understand that as

the detail

is

composed of

to be repeated to the end.

It is

and flowers with angular or

stars

undulating petals, joined with stems

slightly

or scrolls ending in the design so as not to

may

It

in parallel lines

the raised embroidery.

well as in

or padded,

filled in,

in relief as

In the

done

is

in

first section, as

those following, great care should

all

be taken to have each stitch begin exactly at the outer edge of the petal. You will not have

graduated shades of color.

in

pattern should be stamped directly on for

work except when it is intended furniture, when the foundation should be kind of

oo needle. Outline the design in ordinary machine stitching as is customary. Use No. oo silk for the upper and under a No.

will notice that the sections into

the petals are divided are always even

which

in

num-

you wish to take these in multiples of three, with the object of embroidering each two or three of these sections in the same tone of silk, according to the size of the petal, you ber.

If

may do

so.

You

should select as

many shades

of the same color as there are groups of two or three sections in each petal.

Endeavor

to

have the shading as gradual as possible, having

mind

that

the artistic

effect

broidery will depend quite as

harmony

existing between the

of

the

much upon

emthe

groundwork and

the shades of the embroidery silks used, as

upon

its

The

fill

up the

As soon

as one section

is

run three

filled,

covering

lines of stitching across the section,

the ends of the perpendicular stitches so as to

form a new

to take

line

of

place

the

the

which has been covered From this superimposed line of

by them.

stitching the stitches that are to

These

section should start.

the second

fill

stitches

must be At

perfectly uniform and run in parallel lines.

thread.

You

to

in

original dividing line

of satin.

Use

covered by the stitches put ne.xt section.

bolting-cloth, the material generally used

precise execution.

parallel lines

forming the sections are less,

according to the size of the petal.

Begin by re-enforcing the stitching at each forms the pointed end,

side of the petal that

bringing the stitches section A,

down

to the first parallel,

making two or three extra

formed by the

to.

Now

place

rows of

three

cover

triangle

and the point used in raised em-

first parallel line

of the petal with the stitches

the

you

will again

crossing the

stitching,

form a substiby the first Continue the work in the same you have filled in the last section

stitches already taken, again to

tute for the dividing line covered

embroidery.

manner

until

or the one nearest the center of the flower.*

Bear

in

mind

that the triple line of stitching

previously referred

to,

which crosses the end

of each section over the stitches

filling in

the

various sections, not only forms a support to those stitches but has a tendency to side

of the

other,

giving an

rested

inclined it

make

that

appear higher than the

section

appearance to the

look as though one section

upon another.

Continue this work until all the petals have been finished, using the same shades of color for each corresponding group of sections, beginning with the lightest shade at the point of the petal and graduating the tone until the darkest one

is

used

in the section

nearest the

stitches

one on top of the other, as is done in the raised embroidery. Stitch once across the parallel referred

the end of this second section,

work and making

one eighth of an inch wide, more or

line

make them stand out

dividing lines of the sections as these will be

The

in

to

of large conventionalized roses, the petals

worked

for

these stitches should not be

to be so careful about the stitches entering the

ends.

of which should be divided off

this

together

close

stitches

and perfectly even. The stitches should begin The at the sides and end at the parallel line. spaces that form the section to be covered with

also con-

show any unattached sist

broidery, keeping the

center of the flower.

Having

finished the embroidery of the petals,

thread the machine with the

appearing

in

darkest

shade

the embroidery, using this silk

for both the upper

and lower threads.

Now


cut out the center of the flower and

fill

it

in

with an elaborate spider-web. as shown in the illustration. The center can be seed stitch.

Now

cover the outline of the petals as well as the lines forming the stems that complete cord chenille couching the pattern with or

thread

gold

with

the

l)etals.

colors

As you

that

harmonizes

employed will note

to

in

fill

in in

It

is,

in

the

the illustration,

this chenille takes the place of the fine

used to outline the designs

tone

cord

other embroidery.

however, much easier to work with the

chenille as

it is

only necessary to guide

hand along the

the left

cover, holding

it

in place

lines

it

is

it

with

intended to

by two or three cord-

ing stitches taken at regular intervals.

The in a

silk

that holds the chenille should be

contrasting shade to

this, lighter

and you should be careful

first

or darker,

to cover the

stem-like lines in the design before working

over the outline of the petals. line

to

be covered

spider-web

way

all

in the

is

that

The

last out-

surrounding the

center of the flower.

In this

the ends of the chenille will be covered.

"*''^=^^>!^=^^


Seed Siitch.

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family vSewing Machine witiiout special attachments.


;

Seed Stitch There can be no better description of seed stitch than its name, but a few words about the

way

it

is

shafle,

leave space enough between the seeds

to put in those of another color

used will not be amiss.

made

daisy centers are

For the centers of flowers, such as wild roses, cosmos and dogwood, there is nothingelse to take its place. Seed stitch is made by

shades of yellow

;

put in the

ing space for the second

seeds are

made on

trasting color,

for instance

two

lot,

first seeds, leav-

but where these

or satin with a con-

silk it

;

close together in

adds very materially to

the beauty of the

work

to leave a little

space between the seeds, as

it

gives the

of shading.

efifect

Seed

stitch

fectively stitches,

in

can also be used most ef-

combination

with

fancy

or in leaves having the center

clearly defined by a vein, as a rose leaf

one side of the leaf can be made in seed stitch and the other in long and short stitch,

shape of the leaf and

the

veining being done

in

outline

or

the

stem

stitch.

Leaving the realm of silk and satin and taking a glance at the sheer and

much used for men and women," as well as

filmy fabrics that are so

our

"little

grown up women, seed

stitch

has a very important part to play.

It is

for real

quite unnecessary to

enumerate the thou-

sand and one dainty things that are

made

not only for underwear but also dresses

and

waists,

where

seed

stitch,

which

takes the place of French knots in hand-

work, will be a delight to the eye. little avail to tell you

would be of Figure

we knew

this unless

i

It all

of a surety that the

Singer Sewing Machine would enable you

and indeed much more than Do you know that on the finest fabrics you can use No. 120 D. M. C. cotton and a No. 000 needle with the best

taking three tiny stitches one over the other,

to accomplish

Do not cut the forming a seed or little dot. one fine stitches ahead thread, but take or two on until all are another seed, and so and make use more than one If you desire to made.

we can

results?

23

tell

it

you.


j^';[^^&BiBISI^«illlUI<i.K''<l>IffNMkv>---.^.

'^

/

7 \A

^^'•>

~'-'TVt|'

*^v>v

^?

V'"'

'

[-'

English Embroidery.


English or Eyelet Embroidery The design

selected

for

this

summer

should be rather large and not very heav)', like the one

shown

ing grapes

in illustration Fig. i, represent-

and grape

leaves,

or

plicity

a No.

dresses because of

its

and elegance.

Place the material in the embroidery frame, and after doing the necessary stitching, follow-

any other

subject with large open leaves and flowers.

The machine should have

and ladies' extreme sim-

frocks, christening robes, petticoats

embroider}'

oo needle,

ing the outlines of the pattern, cut out the

0«^ •»•?••

w

Figure

somewhat and the lower one considerably tighter. the upper tension should be

or cotton

may

loose

cloth in each grape (See Fig. i)

Silk,

a spider-web stitch (See A, Fig.

be used for this work, according

the engraving.

made around

on which the embroidery is to be done, and also according to the use to which This emthe finished product is to be put. to the material

broidery

is

Now

and i )

fill

as

in

with

shown

in

cover the stitched outline

the grape with a fine cord formed

of six strands of thread.

The

lines

forming

the stems of the leaves should also be corded,

but for this use only two strands of thread.

appropriate for adorning children's 25


Stamp the design (in linen, use No. 70 D. M. C. cotton and 00 needle, stitcii each eyewhether round or oval three times round, the first stitching on line of stamping, the let

second stitching just inside the

first,

the third

stitching just inside the second; cut out center

of each ring, close to third

row of

stitching

cover the three rows of stitching as

in

and

cording.

supply of embroidery finished and ready for -AH that is necessary is a little practice

use.

and the

The is

it

is

heavier.

so potent and so

ligible

much

is

is

Sewing .Machine is consumed,

time

reduced to a neg-

when considered the work done.

in relation to

2

A

desired to make the eyelets appear No. 12 thread may be used as a fine

less

quantity

the value of

fine

given

example of in

this

method of embroiflery 2. which de-

the illustration. Fig.

picts a child's beautiful frock of batiste covered

cord.

You

do the work.

that the labor involved

Fieure

If

will to

aid lent by the Singer

will notice that

many

with eyelet embroidery combined with raised

of the styles of

needlework herein described are so extremely simple, and can be made so rapidly, that only a few hours' work will give vou a considerable

embroidery.

The design

is

very dainty and

forms a festoon of leaves and flowers, embroidered in No. 100 cotton.

appropriate.

26

It


Shaded Embroidery on Velvet Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


Shaded Embroidery on Velvet or Plush In calling attention to shaded embroidery,

which

is

shall

we

shall give a description of the

shows a section of border for a The design should be stampeil on

work

done on velvet and plush. As this embroidery is generally used for decorating hangings, covers, sash curtains,

etc.,

kind of velvet or plush gen-

erally

chine embroidery reached, for the present at

least,

select the

used for hangings, which gives magnifiThe illustration cent results in this work.

considered the highest type of ma-

curtain. bolting-

cloth,

we

Baste the bolting firmly on 27

right

side

of


velvet ing,

and outline the design twice

in fine stitch-

using No. o needle and No. oo

cut the bolting-cloth

away from

design as you have as you

in

would anything

as

Xe.xt

silk.

much

of the

Embroider Great care must

We

have tried to describe to you, in the and simplest manner, the many embroideries made by machine up to the present clearest

This does not include the

the hoop.

time.

else.

nations that

may

be used in putting the velvet or plush into the

tions of the various kinds of

Duchess hoops No. lo (they have round edges), wind them with as much muslin as the hoops will allow, then take

l)utting

hoop.

Take

a pair of

a piece of white

felt

about i8 inches square,

cut a hole in the center about jYi inches in

them

embroidery, that

all

able this

is

many combi-

be formed by selecting por-

embroidery and

together. Referring to the shaded

we

believe that

we have

explained

essential in this combination to en-

you to know how it should be done with new machine method. Of course, you will

would have

diameter and place the velvet, with the bolting

understand that

basted on, over the outside hoop, lay the white

writing of innumerable articles had

on the velvet, then put the smaller hoop place. Do not try to have the hoops as

felt in

tight as

We

you would for other materials. should remind you and you will

doubtedly remember that

it is

with a the

warm

iron before

embroidery frame.

work should be pressed as velvet applique.

it

is

side

removed from

When in the

wrong

finished

entailed

the

we

en-

deavored fully to cover such an extensive subject and that at best we would have been able only to give you the most elementary knowl-

ini-

absolutely neces-

sary to press the material on the

it

this

same manner

edge of

it.

We

have concerned ourselves with indicating the materials needed and the manner of handling them and to describing the results obtainable as graphically as possible, leaving the rest to your

own

ability

and

talent.


Gold Thread Embroidery.

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


Gold Thread Embroidery This

is

an imitation of the Philippine em-

Place a Xo.

broidery done in gold and other threads and

which owes

its

perfection and facility of ex-

ecution to the special

i

needle in the machine, and

for the upper thread use gold colored silk as

near the shade of the metallic thread as

mechanism of the Singer

possible,

Sewing Machine. The embroidery should be done on satin, the design being stamped on the wrong side

having the tension

set

is

so that this

thread will adhere to the right side of the material without being either loose or tightly

enough drawn

to

show the

stitches.

The em-

Figure

of the material, this being the upper side

when

broidery will thus appear on the under side

placed in the embroidery frame.

Wind

of the embroidery frame, which

the bobbin of the machine with a very

side of the material.

is

the right

The gold thread extends

fine,

three-strand gold cord, leaving the ten-

along the surface merely held into place by

sion

somewhat

the upper thread.

may

pass through

loose so that metallic thread it

When

without becoming twisted. 29

the embroidery

frame

is

placed in the


machine, take one thread up through with the upper

silk

the ends of the

and draw the gold and holding it make one more stitch tying stitcli tlie

satin,

two threads

Now

in a knot.

begin the embroidery, making short stitches which should be as even as possible. While

doing

this

embroidery bear

instructions

regarding

in

the

The work should

stitches.

mind

the former

direction

he

moved

of

the

in

two

directions only.

When

the thread on

necessitating replacing is

the it,

bobbin

runs out

as well as

when

it

necessary to cut that thread for any reason

whatever, draw the cut end up through the satin together with the end of thread on the

newly wound bobbin, knotting them on the upper or wrong side of the material.

The with

figures in the design should be filled in

gold

the

thread,

keeping

the

stitches as close together as possible

having them overlap.

(See Fig.

the figures are angular in

line

When

i.)

form begin

of

without to

work

from the points, if curved, begin at the centre or whatever place seems easiest to enable you to fill them in evenly without juni])ing from one side to the other, which would affect the symmetry of the outline and interfere with the perfection of the embroidery.

This embroidery done with gold, silver or other metallic thread

is most appropriate for decorating sofa cushions, fire-screens, or the larger folding screens on which it is both

beautiful also

great

and

(See Fig. 2.) It with excellent results and appropriateness to ecclesiastical em-

lends

practicable.

itself

broidery.

Figure

30

2


First

Openwork

As soon as you have obtained some control over the movement of the embroidery frame and understand how to carry it skilfully to the

precise

point

Stitches

through the machine, or from right to If the

work be moved

you may undertake to practice your openwork stitches. Of course one cannot

A

even pretend that the stitches will exactly cor-

respond to the measure of your desire at first. That will come later, without your realizing it. For the present it will be enough to know how to carry the embroidery hoop very close to the spot which the needle should enter. Let us start on our first openwork. To begin with, it will be well to take a large enough space to work in, and thus have less fear of making a mistake.

any other

left.

direction,

the result will be a chain similar to B, Fig.

where the needle should

penetrate, first

in

1

1

B

i.


of the

first

of these divisions (See A. Fig. 2

on the other two sides of

Fig. 2 be repeated

i.

the square, in such a

frame from you, keeping the movement harmonv with that of the machine, and carrying the fine cord formed by the two threads to

set

manner

to fasten the thread, and from there push the in

the opposite

of

side

another of the parts into which

the

tlie

square

or

filet,

cords,

to C, where the stitches to secure the cord are

better

Now

but

them

carry

corner to corner, and you will have the mesh,

is

divided, according to the place from which you have started. Here again make two or three stitches to secure the thread and pass on

repeated.

that the second

ones, then repeat

formed,

already

lines

first

diagonally across the angles of the square from

(B), or to

square

tlie

of cords cross the

shown

in Fig. 3.

This represents a netting in which 4. the open squares have been filled with eight Fig.

which are magnified here that you may appreciate the work done. After making a few stitches in the center, so as to

carry the cord in a straight

If the Hne to D, and so on successively. direction than any other hoops are moved in

move

fasten the cords that cross there,

frame from first

the

the

so that the needle

side to side,

goes in on one side of the cord, and on other side the next time.

In

this

way

cover the original cord so as to increase

its

you have gone half its length, then come back until you reach the center. Now begin to thicken another of the fine cords, and continue this work until you have finished the size until

eight points of the "star"

shown

in the illustra-

tion.

Fig.

This

5.

also

is

small

a

openwork

Figure 4

those indicated

in

passing from

result will be a chain,

stead of a cord.

To

when

crosses the point indicated by C.

frame from

to

B

the

avoid this turn the em-

broidery hoop to the right

the

A

(as in B, Fig. i), in-

the needle

Then move

right to left, which, as

you

Figure 6

square

like

threads

in

frame

the

in a circle,

finally, as the

move

fastening the

repeating the

the

embroidery

movement

until

needle passes around the inmost

center, there will be

shown

After

last.

the center,

found a weblike circle as with stitches that join

in the illustration,

the radiating lines of cord, or star point, with

a long zig-zag and carry Figure

end,

5

where

stitches.

have been

told, is the

other direction that must

If

circle

what has been described

to

you

Now

should be

it

half

way

to the

fastened with two

carry the cord to the middle of

the next radiating cords, and so on until the

be followed. Fig. 5.

it

is

formed.

radiating line,

in

32

\\'here the circle joins each

make

the

little

points that are


shown

in the illustration

with stitches that join

Now

the circle intersecting the radiating lines.

carry the thread along the

make line,

circle, in

order to

the next point on the following radiating

always increasing the size of the cord by it with stitches, as in the lines of

covering

cord

Fig. 4, until the eight rays or points

in

radiating

from the

Fig.

This

obtain circles

6. if

is

circle are

the

you alternate the

webs, points, lines that are to stand out into

completed.

result little

that

you

relief, etc.

will

squares of the

with those of the rays or star points.

This openwork embroidery, although

in the easiest and simmanner, embraces nearly everything that one need know in order to execute the most complicated and difficult needlework. These lines of fine cord are employed in the making of nearly all netting, openwork, embroidery and laces, as well as in the making of spider-

been presented to you

plest

it

has

Having mastered the

full details

of

making

openwork, any one can make innumerable combinations by merely changing the form of this

the design.


Netting

Filet,

or

Open Mesh Embroidery

In the preceding lesson the open

work

it

was

Fasten the end of the cord to the cloth take the cord between the index finger and thumb of the left hand, twisting it evenly and guiding it as

stated that

with two or three stitches

therein described, although

presented in a very simple form, ])ractically

comprised everything necessary for the execution of the most intricate work. The only additional

thing

he

to

considered

is

;

you cord. Place the left hand over the work, resting the thumb on the embroidery

the

design and the inde.x

finger

on the thumb.

Everything else now depends on the precision with which you move the embroidery hoops to make the stitches on each side of the cord. The size of the needle, and (Fig.

Figure

cording.

To make

1.)

i

the cording properly, a

great deal of practice

is

required as well as a

thorough understanding of this new emIjroidery method. It is not enough to know how to move the embroidery frame to a ]ioint near where the stitch should be placed; it is necessary that the needle should pene-

The needle should not pierce the cord nor should it penetrate the cloth at any perceptible distrate accurately the exact spot.

tance stitch

from the cord neither should the be any broader nor any narrower ;

than the thicknesses of the thread or silk used to cover the cord. Care in noting these instructions and a reasonable amount of diligent this

practice

will

enable

Figure

ihe

any one to do

number

2

of the thread should be in exact

relation to the coarseness of the material

cording well.

which the cording 34

is

to be done.

To do

on the


to be described, use No. o needle and No. lOO cotton and have the tensions

lines of cord

both alike.

make

work about

It

should be understood that

tlie

edges of

in

which go from corner to corner marked A, then proceed to

the square the

Fpider-web

away should

the

be outlined

web-like

Bring

any one of

form the netted mesh are placed

squares, using the

in position,

Figure

accordance with description on the preced-

B.

come to mesh of tiny darning stitch shown in

threads

sciuare

until

you

5

the

illustration,

filling

in

three sides of the

square with several rows of stitching. Carry

ing page.

Figure

centre.

In this work a

with stitching before the lines of cord that

in

the

Figure 4

Figure 3

the cloth to be cut

in

the thread of the machine along

2.

Having

made

the

two

the

cross35

thread along one of the nearest lines


to the sciuare

marked

Within

C.

form

this

1)6

forming the in

Figure

fastened to the middle of the side lines the

stitch,

first

square.

remaining

which

Figure

j.

is

squares

known

cover

Continue to fill with this same

This

4.

Make

stitch.

until

it

I

A

cord beginning at

a

B

C and those following. known as the spike

is

is

A

and

whence

reached, from

turn to the starting point

re-

close to the first

cord, each cord to be covered separately so

as the "Spirit Stitch."

This manner

(See Square

s(|uare.

another square the points of which should

of using the darn-

they

will

stand

joined together.

l-"rom

that

out

when they

arc

Figure

ing stitch

is

as follows:

Run

a line of stitch-

ing across the centre of the square is

(

.V),

sides.

Carry other

lines of stitching

coming

which

to be secured at the centre of the

two

A

pass on to C, again

liack to the starting point

A

;

thence

D

and from there start other spikes tlie same as the former ones. After reaching D go up to E again, coming back to finish at A. to

from

half of one side of the square to the divid-

ing line and from this to the other half (B). These stitches will form a triangle with the apex ending in the opposite side of the

Figure

6.

This

is

a

reproduction

beautiful frock for a child. batiste 36

and shows the same

It

is

filet

of

a

made

of

ground-


Figure

work

as

that Fig. 7

lesson.

no opportunity to ajipreciate the dethe work, we insert herein thirtynine filet or open mesh designs selected from a large number of samples, which we believe

preceding

give

represents a tray cloth, also

tails

in

showing

this filet

cloth

made

is

7

Fig.

5

of

the

ground-work. The trayembroidered with

of satin,

of

Figure S silk,

and

is

illustrations

within

the

magnificently effective.

show only limits

of

the the

amount

prove of great assistance to all who desire to study more carefully this beautiful work. (Figs. 8, 9, 10 and 11.)

.\s the

of

filet

engravings,

and

will

may

37


o


^ ^

p


<>


Hedebo Embroidery Hedebo

When

one of the most popular embroideries of the day and ever increasing in favor;

it

It is

is

it is

to the other in a perfectly straight direction,

;

book on embroidery can be considered complete without a word or two about Hedebo. Linen is the material above all others that should be used, D. M. C. cotton No. 70, No. o needle. The tensions medium, not loose. It is the arrangement and shape of the open-

Hedebo work,

and then

it

that

make

it

over to

it

in the

make

so at-

%

consists of lace

When

Where

there are only single lines to define the

and crescents,

stitches are put in.

arrangement, with

well chosen stitches for each.

a good distance

either side.

There are

spaces, the cording

artistic

is

the bars are finished cord on

squares, triangles, ovals, circles, hearts, leaves

an

bars will be required at

inch apart, which

generally.

in

the

;

how many

estimate

broidery. itself

the

;

can be most effectively

bar stitch and cording.

make

same way be particular to have the bars a uniform distance apart for small spaces put them a little nearer than in large spaces. It is wise to measure the length of the lines before you work the first bar and in

say

Hedebo embroidery

heavier like a bar, then

it

next one

combined with both eyelet and raised em-

stitches,

two fine stitches and work back same way that you cover cord

fasten with

a cottage industry.

tractive,

the material

its

No

ings in the

away

Denmark where

grows on one wonderfnlly. the Httle town in

to cut

between the parallel lines, cut only a little at one time, while you are a novice, only about half an inch then run across from one line

a Danish embroidery, indeed takes

name from

you begin

Those various

done as soon as your

is

With

a

little

systematic

and intelligent study of the openwork and lace stitches you will have no diffipractice

shapes are often defined by parallel lines, anywhere from % to ^i of an inch apart, and that is where the bar stitch comes in. Outline the design with two rows of stitching as usual, cut out one figure at a time and put in a suitable stitch do not have too great a variety of stitches in the same article have the same stitch in all the squares, the same one in all the crescents, and so on.

culty in mastering this work.

much this

surprised after a

kind of

work

will

little

You

will be

very

how

easy

while

become. The ease with

which one is able to adjust the tensions on the Singer Machine, is one of the most valuable

;

adjuncts to the perfection of the various kinds

:

of laces and embroideries of which

(See illustration Page 42.)

41

we

speak.


.

-^

^

%vii^^n^. wit*

^-*

Hedebo Embroidery


Richelieu Lace

This kind of in

style,

is

lace, strong,

simple and elegant

cloth

is

When

being used in great profusion to

now ready

for the embroidery frame.

using batiste or similar material, thread

trim underwear as well as household linen.

the machine with No.

When made

D.

with

silk

it

is

splendidly eflfective

for covers, curtains, collars, jabots, etc.

The

engraving

illustrating

the

instructions (Fig. i)

may

is,

as

you

see, a

The

following

thread or No. 70

thing to be done

first

is

medium

to follow the

1

outline of the design with ordinary

yoke for a

be useful to you should you

stitching.

desire to take advantage of the design.

(See Fig.

i,

avoid excessive ravelling

B.)

when

This

is

machine done to

the cloth

is

cut

out later and also to form a foundation for the

Place the batiste or other material to be used for the

no

a No. 00 needle and

tensions.

Figure

chemise and

M. C, use

groundwork

work upon the pattern and stamp its shown on the side marked A. The

stitches.

Cut the cloth from one of the spaces that

outline as

43


are to be

filled

only difference being that no braids are used and the under tension should be considYou have probably noticed erably tightened.

with lace stitches and embroider

therein the various stitches to be used, as

was

done with the Renaissance lace. As soon as is done, cut the goods from the next figure and embroider this in the same way, repeating the operation until there are no open spaces left in the

The

which

centres of the flowers

may

be

filled

it

with

desired, or with

lieu lace is

a spider-web, according to the requirements of the design. Now proceed to cord the edges of

and picot

various

the

Use same

if

stitches,

object of this final step in the

accentuate

the

outline,

throwing

work it

in

a sho]) of the Singer

at

Madrid,

as well as to cover the needle

holes.

This also serves to give the lace the

pretty

uniform appearance it ought to have. The machine is Tighten the under tension. now ready for the cording, and for this .select (See Fig. i. D.) These a four-strand cord. instructions carefully followed will enable you without difficulty to execute the embroidery of the chemise yoke. Always stamp the design on goods, do not Follow the same instructions given trace it. regarding

the

other

laces,

in

Sewing Machine Co.

You

Spain.

will notice in the

reproduction that this bit of panel contains a zig-zag

border,

this

handsome

effect

being obtained by making alternating diagonal

neat,

heretofore

openwork spaces of

2

is

relief,

web

form part of the decorations

into

strong

entirely of the

with a few of the other

Figure 2 illustrates a fragment of one of the rich panels that

Figure

The

composed almost

the flowers.

work.

to

the

is

lace stitches filling in the

composing the pattern. needle and thread for all the

figures

size

made

is

sance, except that no braid is used. The difference between the two laces chiefly consists in the groundwork, or mesh, which in the Riche-

frame.

the simplest of lace stitches

manner in same as the Renais-

that this kind of lace as well as the

this

bands of lace and

worked

in

lace

That is, one band and the other of the

cloth.

stitch

material used for the

groundwork of

the lace,

outlined with a cord.

As an example of the many combinations may be made with the dift'erent kinds of

that

needlework, embracing the various kinds, note Fig.

the

scarf,

44

3,

showing part of of

undeniable

a

beauty,

handsome even

if

table

only


judged by the linen crepe,

This

illustration.

is

trimmed with Richelieu

made with The lace.

pattern consists of a well arranged festoon of leaves, the veining in these is

embroidery.

This pattern

is

done

in eyelet

finished in long.

There is no lace the making of which offers any serious obstacle to the Singer Sewing This mechanical medium, heretoMachine. fore only used for making clothing, will produce within the hoops of an embroidery frame

Figure 3

curved leaves

filled

with lace stitches, which

spring from the main branch.

forming the groundwork white

is

eflfect.

material

embroidered with

silk daisies in satin stitch,

ask-like

The

giving a dam-

the

most exquisite

incredible rapidity.

you of

this

lace

work, and does

We

it

with

propose to convince

by describing the

volving the most subtle artifice

finest laces, inin their

making.


Point Venise We

must agree

that

all

with a very

laces,

chine

is

used for making

how

it.

To

illustrate the

made we use

few exceptions, are exquisitely tasteful and

description of

select the design

supremely elegant, if one only knows how to and to apply the lace in its

one of the Point Venise collars exhibited at a Singer shop. It shows the most beautiful de-

proper place.

sign

Figure

Point Venise designs are very beautiful, the

workmanship very dainty and the wonders in the w^ay of execution is

readily realized

when

a Singer

;

and perfect execution of any

illustrations

reproductions of

all of which Sewing Ma-

In Fig.

I

is

fifths natural

46

there,

and

i

the

lace admits of

this lace is

herewith

are

photographic

it.

shown size,

part of the collar, three-

which

will enable

you

to


appreciate the greater part of the lace stitches

and

otiier

refer

work contained

to this

making of the

Stamp

illustration

in

it,

we

as

and we

sign

A very

describe the

ground

lace.

work

the design on very fine firm material,

necessary

in

lace stitches use

no

begin

with

the

lace

stitches

flowers (or scrolls, as the case

It is

form the

may

be), care-

stitch for the

back-

After this groundhas been put in, a cord must be

on the

right

at the begin-

In basting the cord on, put a stitch over

been basted on, cover with a

fine close stitch,

as you have been previously instructed.

You

Figure

away

and easy

and back on either side of the cord, just close enough to keep it in place. After the cord has

best to

that

its

the picot stitch.

stitch

ning.

For making the

thread.

No. 150 thread.

effective

is

all around the design, two rows of outlining you made

in

together; use No.

will not lose

basted

embroidery frame with the care handling this class of goods. Put needle in the machine. a No. oo Outline the design with two rows of fine stitching, close then put

you have already worked

shape.

shall

will notice that

some of the edges of

2

and flowers are made heavier than

one leaf

the scrolls

only at a time, then the next one and so on.

the others

In cutting the material away, keep as close to

cord for the heavy edges, a 2-strand cord or

fully

cutting

material

the

in

the outlining as possible, without cutting the stitches.

After

put

much

in as

all

is left

or, in other

put in what

is

No. 12 thread for the

of the design as you have in

away

suitable for the spaces

the material that

After the work

words, the background, and

called the

In doing this a very at

use a 4-strand

fine edges.

Use Batten-

is

where they are

to go.

entirely finished stretch

it

and evenly on a wooden frame, tacking close enough together to keep it perfectly smooth and firm. When this is done, rest the four corners of the frame on four flat-irons or blocks to raise it from the table take a

groundwork or founlittle

efifect,

tightly

dation stitch.

must be cut awav

to obtain this

berg rings when required, choosing the sizes

the lace stitches have been

the frame, begin to cut

;

of the material

one time, so that the dc-

;

47


basin of clean cold water with fills

of

gum

arabic thoroughly

two tablespoonmixed with it,'

wet the whole thing, using a clean not remove from the frame until dry, then cut

away

cloth. it

is

Do quite

the material from the out-

side edge of the design, close to the covered

cord. Fig. 2 sho\Vs

an exact reproduction of one we have just described, that

half of the collar

you may copy

it

if

desired.


Shaded En^broiderv (Fruit).

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Familv Sewing Machine without special attachments.


Renaissance Lace There

is little

Prepare the machine with No. no thread, a No. o needle, and have both tensions alike

that need be said of this well

known and much used

lace, as

we

are

all

fa-

Figure

and adjusted

trimming for napery, bedsets, curtains and numberless other objects of household use.

miliar with

it

I

as a

the lace

is

to suit the material

to be made,

ga'^lie or tine linen.

49

which

is

upon which

generally or-


The accompanying (Fig.

I

curves being taken in

illustration in this lesson

the braid

shows a conventional wild rose pat-

)

and in order that you may the more easily understand the description we show the be-

Having

finished.

selected the design that

is

the in?ide edge of

to cut

away

the cloth from the

inside of a petal. \\'hen putting in the different

ginning of the work in some of these roses,

shown

when

down.

stitched

Next, begin

tern,

wdiile others are

is

make your foundation warp of the material and

stitches

lines

the

this

your design straight.

to serve

When

run with will

you begin

to

keep

make

the stitches, fasten your thread firmly to the

stamp on the goods the outlines to be covered with the Battenberg braid only. Use No. o needle and Xo. no thread for sewfor the lace,

inside edge of the braid

by taking two or three

small stitches, but do not put any unnecessary

Fiffure 2

ing braid

a

B

on the design, and for making

stitches

and No. 300

Moulin on top of tension. Put material firmly in the hoop, drawing it fectly straight, then proceed to sew on bin

Have

chine.

braid over

To do on

all

a

I'etit

medium

the design that

is

in the

work

ma-

a

cut only a part of the cloth to prevent the

the

work

away

at a time,

getting out of shape.

Use

a Battenberg ring for the center of the roses.

per-

the

It is

making.

hoop.

sew the outside edge of the braid making a fairly long stitch through

this,

first,

edge of the braid as it gives the clumsy appearance. In large spaces,

^titches in the

needle and Xo. 400 Petit Moulin in bob-

not necessary to iron the

As each hoopful

of the

work while work is fin-

ished, the edges of the braid, etc.. should be

gone over with a firm close

the open edge of the braid, the fulness at the

clean finish. 50

stitch,

making

a


Xow cut awa}- the cloth between the roses and fill the space with picot, webs or any other ground stitch, according to the design. Continue until you have finished all of the pattern found within the frame that you can.

The rest of the work, such as thickening tiie making spider-webs, diagonals and knots, etc., should now be done in accordance with

C(jr(l,

the design selected. will

find the

lace stitches

there

is

or can

;

least

It is

not believed that you

difficulty

making these

in

although there are

many

When

of them,

nothing that you do not already know

You will probably succeed in disnew combinations suggested by your

this

cop_\-.

covering

own good The

away

finished

is

it

While on the

purpose.

should

be

made

for

stretcher, brush

wrong side of the lace lightly with a very weak solution of gum arable. Do not iron it. As a finishefl sample of this lace see Fig. 2. the

taste.

cloth should he cut

lace

this

placed upon a stretcher especially

as fast as an

Figure 3

open space space

is

When stitches

is

needed, but not before the

This

last

completely finished.

make

a

ring of

around the center, having

it

as large

a rose

is

finished

is

a magnificent tray cloth, emijroidereil

upon

in silk

nainsook.

flower will permit.

cloth

not

corded.

select

or darning

stitches

worked.

SI

away

The

is

a sijecimen of a

embroidered in Art

lace stitches

used

same ones shown

Openwork

"I'irst

is

cut

lace are the

threads disposed like rays, placed at an equal already described,

is

All the edges of the pattern have been

Stitch.

distance from each other, on which the weaving stitch,

Xo. 3

This panel was embroidered with thread on You should notice that all of the

Cut tlie cloth away for the center of this ring and fill in with a web or star, which, as you will see by the illustration, you already know how These are formed, as you know, of to do. as the size of the

satin.

panel.

in

making

this

in the lesson in

Stitches," therefore you may from those illustrations whatever seem best fitted to your work.


English Point Who

know

does not

this beautiful lace?

have represented

Jn

women,

what center of learning dedicated to from the simplest school to the most fashionable college, is the making of this lace not taught? And what one of you, since earliest childhood,

has

adornment

of

failed skirts,

to

see

it

bodices,

used

in

aprons,

and a thousand other

sonal adornment

Happily

patience nor great fortune

we

struck with

many

it

Xor per-

square yards of this

i

At the present time what most commands artistic good and the beautiful arrangement of the openwork stitches. If

wonderstruck our grandmothers would have been if they could but have seen us wearcapital

needed.

lace,

How

What

is

wonder when we are

our admiration of lace

!

order to possess

however admirably executed. The Singer Sewing Machine has worked the miracle.

the ties.

articles of per-

ing a dress entirely composed of lace.

in

ible

mitted to look upon

?

a prodigy of patience

!

of this lace to-day neither inexhaust-

are

Fissure

collars

gown

a

the

is

taste displayed in the design

What

there

would

lace,

52

remain anything incredible about it is

that there should

still

this

be people will-


!

ing to undertake the execution by hand of a

comparatively

large

it

is

of lace, knowing worn out long before

jiiece

that their patience will be finished.

The tedium

of hand embroidery has been

into a stimulus to begin a

almost before the

last,

and concise and, while helping you to grasp the details, will enable you to appreciate the simplicity and richness of the work. lucid

new method of lace making new piece of work

converted by this

when done by hand, and that it will stand much rougher treatment in the laundry. The seven accompanying illustrations will help to make my description of this lace more

begun but a few days There are some who

Fig.

I

illustrates

a design that

may

serve

even make the \okes of their chemises of

you in making a handsome tie. which you could have ready to wear within a very few

English Point

hours.

before, has been finished.

One lady, before she took up the study of machine embroidery, was positively certain that it would not be possible to e.xecute embroidery by this mechanical process that would compare with hand work either in beauty or strength. She has since learned the Singer Sewing Machine method and become an enthusiast. She now declares that not only is embroidery lace and the machine-made stronger and more exact, but that the wrong side of the

work

is

much

Select a fine, round mesh, double-thread net.

Single-thread,

This work

square mesh net will not do.

may

according to

its

be done with object, but

it

silk, is

if

desired,

better,

and

even more appropriate to work it with thread. Xo. no thread is best for basting braid on

and No. 150 thread for making stitches. Use No. 00 needle and medium tensions. Stamp the design on the net and stitch the braid on

same manner as for Renaissance Lace. Never baste braid on before putting the

in the

better finished than 53


work

in the

hoop, the only correct

the net in the hoop tightly,

is

way

These openwork

to put

for one person to hold

can be shown

smoothly, and firmly over the larger

hoop

in place.

described

Braid should be put on exactly After Renaissance Lace.

as

in

this

lace

edge of the braid should be gone over cording to fasten it firmly on the net.

pattern

designs call for two or

braid, producing a richer effect

like fine

have

more kinds of in some of the

be varied to suit

and much good taste selection. \\'e would,

a

better

make stand out more

filled

in

to

appearance the

figures

clearly.

to

the

in

the

After you

the leaves, flowers,

with

etc..

the lace stitches desired, cut out the net along the outer edge of the braid

might

figures.

Figure

Extreme care should be taken

gives

and tends

stitches in petals (on net) are done, the inside

Some

their

in

may

however, suggest that the closer stitches be made to alternate with the more open ones,

hoop, while another person puts the smaller

as

stitches

the fancy of the worker,

it

to (Iraw the

call

:

this is

what we

the foundation of the various

fisr-

3

ures.

(See Fig.

i.

A.)

This cutting should

net smoothly and evenly over the larger hoop

be done as closely as possible to the stitched

before pressing

edge of the braid.

in

the

smaller one,

because

any attempt to stretch the net into position after the hoops are closed will result in tearing

The open space thus

left

should be crossed with lines of thread forming spider-webs (B) or just a plain star (C),

according to the size of the space to be

it.

filled

The and the requirements of the pattern. lines forming the picot stitch (D D) should

Place the embroidery frame on the machine

and after the braid is put on proceed to embroider the openwork stitches on the net.

be 54

made

coarser bv stitching over them, back-


Do not remove the stiletto you have taken a stitcli or two this is necessary to avoid any danger of the loop becoming entangled with the bobbin. If you desire to finish the edge with a narrow lace, put this on the outside edge of the braid as you proceed with the work, covering it

wards and forwards, in order to make them stronger, and it is while doing this that the

ing the latter work. until

tiny loops characteristic of this stitch should

be formed (B D).

Begin by making a

line

heavier by covering the thread, and at about the middle stitches,

make

three or

as though

four

independent

you were about

to

make

;

Figure 4

another line at right angles from the first. Take a fine embroidery stiletto in the left hand and with it hold back the stitches just made, so as to

form a

loop, while bringing the needle

to the thread

as

you would cord.

This will greatly add to

the beauty and eft'ectiveness of the work. (See Fig.

i,

E.)

back

Besides

you have been covering, continu-

describing 55

the

illustration

how

this lace is

used to assist

made, you

in

will find


herein several other illustrations, reproducing

the

finished pieces of this popular lace.

and the picot

Fig. 2 represents a table-cover of exquisite

shows a very handsome On both of these pieces the emdone with cotton thread on linen.

tray cloth.

broidery Fig. 4

is

;

Xo.

3

forming the groundwork,

stitch,

giving

it

the elegant and

5

ciate in the illustration.

Fig.

5

represents a

section of a panel. Fig. 6

of a

shows a lovely centerpiece.

stitches,

dainty appearance that vou will readilv appre-

Figure

workmanship

filet

is

young

a picture showing the dainty head girl,

embroidered

in colors,

which

Figure 6

You

will note that in this jjiece the English

Point has been happily combined with one of

appears from between a pair of English Point lace curtains;

an odd fancy.


Duchess Lace Duchess Lace

the most modish of all seems it unnecessary to say that the Singer Sewing Machine, once having invatled the territory of embroidery and fine needlework, immediately proceeded to prove that its use was the simplest and most rapid method of making Duchess Lace, as well as

stitches

is

the most rational

way

an

simply sold

Point,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;of

stitches,

around.

consists of large medallions,

now

imitation

Duchess Point beautifully made,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

showing the net

cribed in the article on Brussels lace.

The

outside edge of the leaves that surround

the medallion, (see B, Fig. i), should be cov-

by

ered with a very fine cord, in imitation of the

a system of small bobbins.

net, the various stitches

flower design should be outlined

with plain stitching and then corded, as des-

a very old pattern of Brussels infinite patience

The

tern.

sold as

heavy thread shown in the real lace. If you wish to obtain a really perfect imitation of this lace, having the finished work

will notice that in the applique of lace braids

it

all

will see in the illustration, the design

ground, on which small sprays of flowers are

You are undoubtedly familiar with this famous lace, or at least with its imitation, and on

then cord

As you

to attain perfection in

made by hand with

means of

like

cut out the net between the braid and put in

thanks to the exquisitely dainty lace braids

now

it

finished,

is

fastened, in imitation of the Brussels lace pat-

]\Iuch of the lace is

going around each leaf or

net,

After center of figure

a cording.

manufacture.

its

on the

flower with No. 12 thread and covering

laces; therefore,

and general design The Duch-

soft

and

pliable,

buying the

closely resembles English Point.

When

finest

use only the best materials,

Duchess braid procurable.

Lace having some modifications tending to increase its beaut)- and richness, may be considered as an English Point brouglit to a high

enough to permit of

state of perfection.

use the straight wide braid, joining the edges

ess

It

requires a

prettily

special

design,

fine

composed of

if

formed flowers and small leaves joined

The

lace

is

made by applying

waved

braid.

possible, but

if

it,

they should be

When

made

of

the leaves are larger,

the design

show a space

in

the center of the leaves, this should be filled

with a cross-stitch, as shown

by delicately curved stems, as shown in Fig. i. upon which we shall base our instructions. net, as described in the lesson

the flowers in the pattern are large

in this lace

simply to use the

lace braids to

in

filet,

The

D.

are very simple, and

it

cross-stitch

is

stitches

advisable

and picot;

the last having tiny, independent loops, as de-

on English Point.

For outlining design and sewing on braid no thread and No. oo needle; for stitches on the net, No. 150 thread is used. I'ut plain braid on first (the design is not outlined where the braid goes go over outside edge like fine cording with No. no thread, then put on the medallion or waved braid and go all around the inside of both braids like a fine cording, this will hold it firmly on the net, then begin on the flowers making stems first, using a very fine cord. .A.fter that, work your

scribed in English Point.

This rich

use No.

^lachine has

lace,

which the Singer Sewing

made

so easy to produce,

is

much

used to trim blouses, bed-spreads, ladies' un-

derwear, collars, christening robes and even

)

gowns. Fig. 2 size,

shows an

article that,

because of

its

represents considerable time and labor.

The work on this spread is the imitation Duchess Lace that has been the subject of this lesson. 57

It

is

made with Battenberg

braid


applied

being

in

in

the

two

sliape

of

different sizes.

medallions,

these

No. 500 cotton

thread was used, the

organdie foundation.

work being done on an


Figure

The

pattern forms a border scalloped on the

inside edge. is

one

the

monogram.

Distributed

along

the

center of the spread, between the border and the

medallion,

are

eight

lace

in

each corner, and one on each

side.

Because of the large size of this piece of lace, and in order to do justice to its exquisite workmanship, we have reproduced here only

In the center of the spread there

a very large medallion, with a plain space

for

2

one corner.

same

bow-knots, 59

The

three other corners are the

as the one shown.


Brussels Lace Here is one of those laces whose fineness and delicacy make it seem incredible that it should have been produced I)y a Singer Sewing Machine. Nevertheless, the instruc-

ship may he executed by this new system of embroidery without worry or difficulty. A

specimen of this beautiful work is shown in Fig. 2. which illustrates part of a Spanish lace

Figure tions that follow will soon convince

you that

i

mantilla.

The

illustration hardly does justice

with the aid of this machine nothing can be

to the exquisite detail in this

more quickly done. Your experience in making this lace will show how this and other fine laces of the most delicate workman-

illustrates

a table-cover

broidered

in cotton, to

easier or

made

work.

Fig.

which we

shall refer in

the brief explanations required by this work. 60

i

of this lace, em-


A fine double-thread, in

making

this lace.

Have

net.

round mesh net

Stamp

is

used

the pattern on the

the tensions on the machine slightly

recommended in the former lessons for lace making where this same material was employed.

Figure

2

Place on the machine Xo.

loose so that neither will draw, and then pro-

ceed to cover every line

in the

design with the

the

openwork

stitches

150 thread for

and a Xo. 00 needle

Figure 3

machine

When you

stitching,

using

No.

no

and have the tensions

thread,

work simply etc. shown

placing the net in the embroidery frame

will

have to observe

all

the precautions 61

slightly

loose.

This

requires that each tiny leaf, stem in

the

design

be

covered

with


machine

small

spaces

be

stitches,

filled

in

or

with

that

short

stitches in the holes of the net.

the

many uses to which this lace may be put, as you have probably seen it innumerable times,

larger

interlaced

These

particularly

stitches

need not be very heavy nor overlap, but they should always

lie

close

together and

tains, etc.

handkerchiefs, sash cur-

fine

in

When

the pattern

is

a very fine lace braid, such as

follow

the direction of each figure, especially in the

making English point

case of scrolls or leaves.

outline

the

flowers,

relatively' large,

employed

is

may

lace,

medallions,

in

be used to etc.

If

this

Figure 4

The

outlines should be finisheil with a

be used, omit the corded edge referred to be-

tin_\-.

one-strand cord, giving firmness to the straight or scalloped edges.

fore.

work

If greater variety be de-

you wish you may embroider openthe

in

flowers using the

shown

finer

which illustrates an unfinished piece of work held by the embroidery hoops.

any band or ribbon motif appearing in the pattern may also be outlined with this

lace stitches, as

sired,

cord. It

If

centres

hardly seems necessary to describe the

is

\\'hen this lace 62

is

in Fig. 4,

finished

it

should be placed


Figure 5


upon a stretcher especially made for this purpose. While on the stretcher brush the wrong side of the lace lightly with a very

tion of

gum

arable and water

;

weak

solu-

allow this to

dry.

The machine-made tions,

being used

When

laces

have acquired con-

design

plicated

is

altar-cloths,

for

used in this

way

a

generally

very

albs, fine,

selected.

etc.

comMan\-

of the hand-made pieces give evidence of inexhaustible patience, only explained by the tenacious

persistence

has kept a

vow

Many of the convents and asylums abroad have grasped this fact and the more skilled nuns have been instructed in this system of embroidery.

importance in ecclesiastical decora-

siderable

Fortunately the tedious phase of this work has been eliminatetl by the rapidity with which it may be done on the Singer Sewing Alachine.

of

at the

some devotee who

cost of her eyesight.

piece of

In

Fig.

illustrated

is

3

work done by one

the

t^r^t

of these nuns after

a few lessons.

In

those

finished

of

pieces

trated in these lessons,

it

sent reproductions of the

is

work

illus-

proposed to pre-

most

select

examples

of machine embroidery. They are marvels of execution, elegant in design and correct in style.


Novelty Lace If This is what they have called it. any of you wish to give it another name you may, in all freedom and without fear of correction. No one knows who named it, but it Novelty Lace without having is still called aroused a protest or claim. It is a combina-

tion

formed of some of the features of English

point and Richelieu with a

modicum

of ap-

and has been very happily

plique on net,

re-

ceived.

This lace

is

but

it

ming

was embroidered on white in yelproducing an elegant and delicate

cream colored

The

effect.

materials used for making this lace are

and a very fine round mesh net. upon the batiste. Then place the net under the batiste, baste them together, and span the two materials with the embroidery hoops. Whenever two materials are used, they silk batiste

Stamp

the design

should be basted smoothly and evenly together, not only around the outside of the goods, but

it is

both exquisite and rich,

considered most attractive as a trim-

for ladies' dresses.

Nothing more mag-

nor handsomer can be imagined if the embroiderer understands how to combine the nificent

shades of

silk,

Used

connection is

lowish

largely used in toilet furnishings,

spreads, eider-down quilt covers, etc. in this

illustration

silk

used

in

the lace so they shall

harmonize with the color of the gown itself. The sample which serves for the accompanying

also here

and there through the center, before

they are put into the hoops.

The machine should be made ready with

a

No. oo needle and with medium tensions. Use No. no thread for tracing design, and No. 150 thread for stitches and cording.

The work should be begun by cord on the stems, making

it

basting the

firm,

and then


proceed to cut away the material, being careful to cover the outlines of the design twice

with an ordinary machine

stitch.

{

See

B

in

the illustration.)

Cut the

batiste

Now

or three of

the petals of the flowers leaving the net on

which some lace stitches should be worked, making them as fine as you possibly can, as shown in C and the other petals of the same

picot

to

in

fill

stitch

groundwork,

the

described

in

English

point.

This

away from two

proceed

using the

should be very open,

stitch

and

in

order to preserve this appearance use an embroidery stiletto to hold the different stitches apart where they cross each other, reinforcing

them

at those points

stitches as in

by taking three or four

making an

eyelet.

shape.

In the centre of the flowers you cut

either

away

stitches fill

may

the batiste and embroider the lace on the remaining net, or if you prefer,

this space

cutting

away

with a spider-web, in that case the net as well as the batiste, as

shown in the different flowers in the sample accompanying these directions. Some of the is

flower petals

work

may

the batiste

simply have

itself.

for

ground-

The stems

of the flowers are

covered with

fine

made of cord The leaves

close stitches.

attached to these stems should be treated the

same

as the petals of the flowers, namely, al-

ternating the

openwork centres with those of

batiste to suit

Having

your

finished

own the

fancy.

work thus

described,

proceed to outline the flowers, leaves

and bor-

ders of the lace with a four or five-strand cord.


Lace

Point This handsome lace

ming

ladies'

seaux and

is

gowns and

much used especially

pattern, in accordance with the oft repeated

for trimfor trous-

rule.

In other words, the outline

is

to be

Stamp the pattern on the batiste; lay this on a piece of ecru net somewhat larger than

the lace does not have any foundation

the pattern

forced.

itself,

gone

over twice with the machine stitching because

layettes.

finished, necessitating

baste materials together care-

Now

cut

all

when

having the edges reinthe cloth

awav from

the

,m >m

Figure fully and span with the embroidery hoops. The machine should be prepared with a No. oo needle, No. 120 thread, and both upper and lower tensions should be medium. When making this lace (See Fig. i two rows of stitching should be used to outline the

design, leaving the net alone.

thread and begin

to cover

Use No. 150

the

net

with a

very fine lace stitch wherever indicated by the pattern.

(See A. Fig.

to the small leaves

)

.After this 67

i.)

This also applies

and petals of the flowers.

work has been done

in

the entire


space

embraced

by

the

embroidery

frame

away the net from what we shall groundwork of the design (B, Fig. I ), soon as it is cut away fill the ground-

begin to cut call

the

and as

work with

a picot stitch as ilescribed in the

English point.

These

now

details

having been carried out

it

is

only necessary to outline the design with

cord, using a six-strand cord for this work.

golden dream,

may

increase their happiness by

adding to their trousseau a

whose

set

of

lingerie

and merit would consist in the fact that it is their own handiwork. All your embroideries may be due to your own labor and intelligence W'ithout any great effort nor the necessity of devoting unlimited time to their making. The bridal set alluded to comprised an underskirt, chemise, nightgown. principle value

Fisrure 2

Iron the work with the greatest care.

The

drawers and corset cover.

design for this lace shown here was copied

some idea of

from a

reproduced

and elegant bridal set of underwear. Apart from its great merit, it is a demonstration of the convenience and utility of this system of machine embroidery, because, with this rapid and efficacious method, rich

the voting ladies

who

I-^ig.

3.

You

in

this

Fig.

In order to give you

work,

the

drawers are

2 and the nightgown in

will notice in the illustrations that

the design consists of medallions of

two

dif-

ferent sizes, joined together with smaller ones. All the pieces of the set are

are about to realize their

made

of nainsook

on which the embroiderv has been done. 68


Figure 3


Cluny Lace As ill

in the

case of Brussels Lace, described

the former lesson, round mesli net should

be selected.

The pattern should be stamped

openwork design should be embroidered on the net itself, using a few stitches to indicate

Around

the central vein in the leaf.

this, at

and the design stitched twice over (See A. Fig. i.l all that is in the hoops. Prepare the machine with a No. oo needle and No. 150 thread, having both tensions slightly

an equal distance from the border, run a row of stitches covering the centre of the leaf with

loose.

tween the

on the

net.

the stitching.

Figure

When

placing

the

net

in

the

embroidery

hoops the same precautions should be observed as in

making other

laces, in

order to obtain the

In other leaves after outlining

the central vein you latter

may

in the

space be-

and the edge of the

leaf with

fill

i

embroidered knots placed in alternating No other embroidery will be necessary in these leaves. Surround the opentiny

holes in the net.

tautness necessary without pulling the design

work centres of

out of shape.

the

Begin by cutting the net away from the and fill the opencentre of a flower (B, Fig. i ing left with a web stitch with four symmetric-

without using cord as a foundation, the ring to be brought out into relief

ally distributed knots.

contains other leaves which instead of being

)

The

small leaves, or petals, surrounding

thi-'

the flowers with a ring like

crocheted ones used in Battenburg, but

from the centre to filled in

with the

its

web

by

stitches carried

outer edge.

stitches are

The

pattern

composed of


from one edge to the are made, a

Imagine the admiration won by an entire costume of this lace which was seen at a ball,

thread should be carried across the centre, which is to be knotted on each bar, thus

worn by a young lady noted for her beauty. That which heightened the interest with which this young lady was regarded, who with at-

small

bars

other

(C).

crossing

After these bars

preserving an equal distance between them.

The rings shown in this design serve as a groundwork or support for its other figures. They are made of cord with a knot in the center, the same as those shown in the netting or

filet

designs, but are smaller in size, as

be seen in the illustration.

may

Finally, outline

the figures in the pattern with a

tractive grace, increased the brilliancy of her

charms by wearing so rich and original a gown, was the fact that the work thereon was all her own, the product of her own hands, and due She was heard to state this to herself alone. several times with great pride

all

who

four-strand

Fieure

cord,

sign

and having finished as much of the dethe embroidery frame will hold at

it

is

scissors.

to her friends,

her with admiration not un-

some cases by

taken a few lessons

in

incredulity.

making

this

She had lace on

Sewing Machine, and credit for the was no doubt partly due to her aptitude for the work and her intelligence and persistent application.

the Singer

successful result

advisable to use a very fine pair of

curved manicure

at

2

tinged in

as

one time, cut the net groundwork out as closely For this purto the corded edge as possible. pose

looked

In order to give

We

you a better idea of the beauty of the collar, part of which is used as an example in Fig. i, You it is reproduced in its entirety in Fig. 2. may thus judge of the handsome effect it would produce in conjunction with a child's

have cited

this case

stimulating to constancy

in

with the object of practice of

embroidery, feeling certain that a reasonable

amount of

satisfactory results.

daintv dress.

71

in

machine

every case

application will ensure


Hemstitching Probably there is nothing more used in ornamental needlework for home use than hem-

on the near side of the needle, the finger on

stitching: in this, as in every other kind of

the

sewing, the Singer machine takes

What

a difference

first

from the old time

the far side

work so Take the

place.

tedious,

back

stitch

with the right hand take hold of

;

that

you can move

first

the

in

stitch

it

as

you wish.

forward, the second

drawn

threads,

(this

is

to

eye-straining process of handwork, in which

hold the threads in place), then one stitch in

our grandmothers took such pride, to the delightful pastime of accomplishing so much in

the hem.

an amazing!}' short space of time on the Singer machine.

member, one

The machine

is

to be

in

stitch

the

hem draw

is

either case the

but the threads arc

hem;

it

should not be too wide, as

the

first

would not stay

turn of the

over exactly on a

hem

line

top of the in that

in place.

case

with the lowest or

it

can

l)e

In

insertion.

Crease

evenly, then fold

:

manner of working is the same, drawn differently for an

threads, six or more, according to the witlth

the threads

elaborate, the stitch

very effective

used as an insertion as well as for a hem.

several

you want the space

to be at the

Re-

forward, one stitch back

hem more

called the zigzag

a plain hemstitched

reach the end of the hem.

the threads, one stitch in hem.

To make

adjusted as previously

described for embroidery.

For

When you

take one or two fine stitches to fasten.

It is

not necessary to count the threads for is more acwarp are apt to

an insertion, measuring the goods

it

curate, as the threads of the

first

thread drawn, baste with rather short stitches

be a

far

enough away from the top of the hem not to be caught by the needle while hemming.

the distance you desire the insertion to be

Have

the hem and draw the first thread, then draw as many threads as you want the insertion to

the tension

medium

tight

;

the

needle

and thread must be chosen to suit the texture of the material. For instance, when hemstitching a sheer material like Persian lawn use No. 200 thread and a Xo. 00 needle. For this work do not use an embroidery hoop, as that requires sewing muslin on the edge of the hem, which would leave a mark. Have the right side of the work uppermost, and place the top of the hem directly under the needle. Picginning at one extreme end, take one or two tiny stitches in the same place to fasten the thread, holding the hem down on the machine perfectly smooth and rather tight with the thumb and forefinger of the left hand, the thumb

little

heavier than the woof.

Pleasure

from

be wide.

Now

suppose you are going to make a very

elaborate doylie with a hemstitched hem, a zig-

zag insertion and embroidery

Draw one thread hem on all four

in

the

center.

mark the width of your sides, draw two threads to to

mark

the width of the insertion, then have }our embroidery design stamped and make If the threads are not drawn first no certainty that the embroidery will be straight. \Mien the embroidery is comjjleted. draw the rest of the threads for the insertion. After the threads are drawn. }dii will find that you have an open square at each

that

there

72

first. is


one of the four corners in,

any

stitch

may

these

;

after the zigzag insertion

is

be

caught and proceed

filled

made, with

border

Before you change your work

which your fancy suggests.

The threads being drawn, span the work in the frame, draw tight and have the drawn threads perfectly straight. To make the zigzag: After the work is placed on the machine take two or three fine stitches to fasten the threads

;

%

begin about

manner

this

in

until the

finished.

is

in the

hoop,

while you are making the border put what-

ever stitch you decide upon in the corner after the zigzag

is

done on either

have made the corner

side.

When

you

cord the two out-

stitch,

side edges of the corner with a very fine cord

of an inch from the

to

make

it

When

material and catch a cluster of threads, about

firm.

the border

is

finished press the

1

work

.1..,,

fC^liii'miijmmn^vyi'r

f(

I

/l.fcUki*»^*-»'^^*'******'*»^**»i*»*H4i».H»*4»»«»»»»i******J**

A<ltl'l'W||.,>«

Linen DoylJe Hemstitching,

fourteen stitches,

of

the

gether

work down

cluster ;

together

fasten

^14),

then

with

first

it at the extreme edges, right side down, on a padded table or board be sure that it is perfectly smooth and tight, then wet ;

fastened to-

bring you ys of an inch from

it

with

three

stitches

threads you are stitches

threads and fasten

(7)

the

to

now

on the seven

7

cluster

work down

on, (

half

)

threads you

with a cloth dipped

Leave

material on the opposite side from which you started; catch seven

Byzantine Lace.

by pinning

three

three stitches on half

of threads

this will

Drawn Work and

dry.

of

it

Do

not iron

it.

threads and scribed

last

73

clean cold water.

When

up, straighten the edges,

three

in

pinned down imtil

—then

it

is

thoroughly

it

is

dry take

draw the

make your hem iron the dovlie.

it

rest of the

as already de-


The making of hemstitched tucks is a Uttle more difficult than that of the hemstitched hem. Xot that the process of hemstitching is more difficult, for it is exacth- the same, but there is much more measuring where there are a number of tucks, and unless the meas-

ing the

made

the effect

is

spoiled.

There in

skirt

shown

in this

page

is

a

good

lace

stitched

is

no end of

tucks,

pleases one's

of Hemstitching:,

said in

effective

combinations

embroidery with hemwell as beading of any

as

Ribbon may be used if it In our illustration we

fancy.

Tucking,

etc.

have shown a simple design of hemstitched

illustration

of this pretty work.

tucks and lace, realizing that those using the

Tucks and spaces must be carefully determined and measured after the threads are

Singer Sewing Machine can easily make more

:

elaborate ones

drawn, follow the instructions in the foregoing article about basting a hem. Use a fine needle and thread for basting

and take short

we

making the

or

insertion,

width desired.

The dainty

Example

as in

hem.

urements are accurate and the basting carefully

work and hemstitching, same as

the beginning, are the

stitches.

The manner of

who owns

if

they so desire.

a Singer

equipped to undertake

work.

hold74

Any one

Sewing Machine all

is

well

varieties of needle-


Mexican Drawn-work KIRST FÂťARX This work

is

materials

that

permit

the

threads.

The embroidery

maining

threads,

running

1

is

in

1^'ig.

the

threads

re-

kept

perfectly

way

the

work

is

of

of

the

goods, after the threads running in the op-

have been drawn out.

shall first describe the

strips like

which

usually appears.

it

a

instance,

threads

work done

an insertion, which suitable

wherever we think

work

is

done

it

will

in

it

when

straight

in

The goods must be (])articularly

if

the

being done on a fine linen) and the

the hemstitching use No. no No. o needle and have the tensions the same as described in the article on Filet Embroidery.

In

doing

thread.

for

drawing the advisable

drawn band must be kept

perfectly even with the thread of the goods.

crosswise

select,

i

parallel edges of the

We

the form in

Let us

towelling,

place the insertion, so that

the

is

drawn, great care

mmmamutfrnm mm

Figure

direction

are

embroidery hoops.

kVA*JtAMA.VA*'>A.VA*/A*A<LVÂŤViVVVt'%<V4^^^^^

posite

Use Xo. o needle and Xo.

should be taken to place the work properly

drawing out done on the one

2.

10 thread.

Once

when made of

apparel

personal

of

in general.

blouses and other

It is also effective in scarfs,

articles

shown

frequently employed to ailorn

napery and other household linen

By

to

this part of

carefully

examining Fig.

readily see the various

have the appearance

from beginning 75

to end.

2,

you

will

stages of this work,


:

Begin the work by forming tlie lienistitclied shown in the engraving marked B, using from eight to ten threads to form each bar. The greatest care should be taken to have

bars

exactly the same

This

bar.

is

number of threads in each when you begin

particularly so

work along the second margin of the openwork band, when the same group of threads must be fastened together each time, as shown in the illustration.

Start at the middle of the insertion and gather the bars just formed into groups of six bars each, as shown in the section of the illustration

means of form a the

marked

fine twisted

bars,

them firmly by Allow the thread to

C, holding

several stitches.

cord along the center of

connecting the groups of

shown from C

as

six,

Going back to the first group of hemstitch bars, do the work shown in D, drawing together three bars and holding them together with a heavy knot placed about a third of the way between the center of the to D.

bar and the outer edge; then carry the cord along to the next immediate three bars to lie held together in the same manner.

From

this last point pass to the center of

the next group of bars, designated as E, and

there fastening the cord, proceed to the

first

third of the next following group, designated as F, which, as you will note, is connected

with the opposite side of group D. In group F do the same work already done in group D then pass on to group

G

;

thus forming a wav-

ing line of cord to the end of the drawn-work band. Now turn back and repeat this work on the opposite side of the centra! knot.

return to the

first

ation, placing the

margin

the

of

group and repeat

If

we

this oper-

second series of knots nearer the insertion and, always

preserving the undulating lines of the cord, make a raised knot on every two bars instead of separating first,

them

into groups of three as at

we form a raised knot on we shall have alternating shown in F and E. We shall now

and. finally,

if

each separate bar,

groups as

take up the part of the design

G, \vhich

is

a closely

woven

shown

in

group

stitch not unlike

darning, because up to the present the undulating lines have merely been drawn together in

the center of group E.

As we have described

Figure

this design as begin-6

:


with

iiing

line

tliL'

keep them

of two knots in the center

and ending with the Hne of four knots near margin

the

of

work,

the

would

it

well to state here that this method

made immediately in front of the first cord, between the first and second one, between the second and third one and directly after the

be

may

be

reversed so as to begin the design with the four outer knots and

end

with the two

it

and covering them with short

flat,

In order to do this, a stitch must be

stitches.

third one. This

same treatment should be given

the groups of three bars.

center ones.

This finished stitch

most important to keep the groups of bars at an equal distance from each other, to preserve the evenness of the work, so that group F shall not be pulled out of shape, you may readily determine for yourself which side you would better begin the work, in order

which suggests a woven surface, should cover the cords and bars so as to show the original undulating outline. Begin at the center of the figure and work half way up until the eight rays or starlike points have been com-

to judge best the distances.

shows the border of a silk scarf, embroidered in silk thread, from which the foregoing detail was taken, and contains other combinations and narrower bands of openwork, forming a very beautiful ensemble, which commands our admiration because of the elegance and precision of the work.

As

is

it

Group tral

G

:

pleted, as

Fig.

relating to the closely

woven

cen-

part of the design formed on the three

undulating lines of cord that meet there, and the bars,

of three.

which should be combined This woven

stitch

is

in

made by

groups laying

the three cords side bv side, being careful to

shown

in the illustration.

I

SECOND F»ARX as insertions, anti which are

In the First Part of this article attention

was asked only

to those designs

adapted to use

ing out threads

r unning

way

trimming

for

But of drawn-work scarfs, etc.

5 ******'*»>»H»l,,fr«f,T*f,|,Ti«MI»W*»T.fM»T»»|s»|lf,»ll»ti

of the

making an appropri-

cloth,

ate

formed by draw-

only one

towels,

if

this style

is

to be ap-

plied to table-cloths,

hand-

kerchiefs and similar arti-

which the openbands cross each

in

cles,

work

other at

threads

right will

angles,

have

the

be

to

drawn out lengthwise of the

material

as

well

as

crosswise. This also applies in which openwork band is formed of various squares, as shown in the illustra-

to those designs

the

tions in this lesson. In both

when two threads drawn out of the ma-

instances

are

terial,

one running length-

wise and the other crosswise, a small square open-

ing

is

perceptible,

equivalent the Figure

cloth

the open

3

77

to

which

cutting

is

out

and working in But the

space.


method now under consideration and its application is so different from that described the article "First

in it

worthy of a

is

Openwork

Stitches." that

special description.

Examine the work reproduced in Figure 3, which shows a corner of one of a much admired traycloth. and you will at once understand that we are now considering an entirely different kind of work, although there is a strong resemblance between the two and the method of working is almost the same. Your own good sense will prove to you that it would be

useless

having

undertake

to

mastered

first

Openwork

"First

this

the

work without

details

given

in

Stitches."

The work illustrated in Fig. 4 has been so arranged that each stage of the embroidery is This

illustrated in a series of three squares.

you to appreciate the consecutive that have been superimposed thereon

will enable

details

order to bring the work to completion;

in

therefore,

you

if

will

compare one

of

line

these squares with the following one, you will easily

distinguish the proper order in which

the various stitches follow each other.

Let US begin with the squares marked A,

which show the material after the threads have been withdrawn in only one direction, leaving

two

parallel lines of perfect cloth be-

tween the two drawn-work bands, which are of

The cross-threads that have not drawn should be cut along the edge

equal width. yet been

marked B and

at the

corresponding edge on the

other side, leaving at the outer edges two more

bands of perfect material equally distant from each other, so as to form a perfect square. Remove the threads just cut. leaving open squares as shown

in section C.

being ready for work, begin at

The

D

cloth

now

and draw

a

corded thread diagonally across the square to the opposite corner, wdiere the crossbands of cloth have the

formed a tiny

solid square.

thread here with several stitches,

Fasten taken

diagonally from corner to corner. Repeat this

operation in

all

the open squares found within

working diagonand in the same direction. Return over the same ground already covered and repeat this

the embroidery frame, always ally

operation in the

Figure 4 78

two opposite corners of

tiie


them the appearance shown in E. The small linen squares formed b}- the cross-bands should also

squares, giving

be covered with a cross-stitch.

Square F.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Begin

from

going

stitches,

retaining

the

and

i

point

this

stitches

in

where

center,

to the

straight line

a

at the edge

threads with one or two

the

fasten

should be

re-

peated; then pass on to 2, there form a small knot, taking up half the threads contained in the intersecting bands. Do the same with the balance of the threads, and carry the embroidery thread to the center of the fastening the after square next ;

threads there pass on to

always

3,

re-

the

of

together

tying

the

peating

threads that compose the intersecting bands separating the open squares, as

was done

in 2

:

go on to the center of

the next square until you have reached 4,

and do not forget properly

to place

the retaining stitches at each point in-

At 4

dicated.

of the

start at the

beginning

inside line so as to

first

come

back over the ground just covered, passing over the centers and making the little knots in each half of the

composing

threads

intersecting

the

bands, until the four threads shown in F between the original diagonally placed threads are completed. In order to finish this part of the work, as

shown

in G,

simply repeat the process,

the other sides of the square

filling in

as already explained.

work

In order to complete this

shown

in the

two remaining

as

series of

squares consisting of three squares each, beginning with F, simply

open

follow the instructions for Fig. 5 in the

lesson

Stitches,"

on

as

The embroidery

Openwork

"First is

it

in

the

same

square

H

weaving

stitch described in a

lesson.

Here

five

of

the

design. is

the

former

radiating

gathered in at one time and, center, include the diagonal

lines are in

the

threads

first

placed within the square,

which are covered with the weaving Figure

5

79


,e.|.SiSto.3>D'g.S'Cia<6.o,c,j-6<5.5iO'0*"'0'0'0<g'0'B<otS'0'gi

<aio.ct5.o.u.g'e.5.t»i£'0'3,oi5.'"

-.-.n'rioia-S'S'g-o'OtO'otg'nr

Figure 6 ici>§iaio>oigia<

lOISiatQlSlOtD-

ig>DtO'Cig'6<6< idiDiOiD'O'O'Oi.

itotO'S'?'? •Jio»o<n'L _ _ _

,_,^ , ^

^r -.

^

=

V'?'^***^"«>*f

_ ^ _ _ - 5. _ _-; C.S,o.6.O'fl»«'6'0'6'9'0'Dr0.OI tdia<a'6id'Die<5<§>6>o>a<a>ata<iitd>o>a*6>6>6i^>D'Q'6'fi'g'0<a<g>

._^

Figure

7


stitch for

the

one third of their

lateral

with

tlie

alone

lines

again taken up,

all

weaving

lengtii,

being

live

then freed,

covered,

then

lines

being covered

last

third of their

on the

and one combinations and designs, and may be used to trim any material from which threads can be extracted.

As an example of the results obtainable this work and of its many applications. in Fig. 5 is shown a linen towel embroidered

from

length, as in the beginning.

This drawn-work lends

itself to a

thousand

iiniiiiijiiiiiiiiiiinmuiiiiiiiiiBiim^^^

\mmmmwmm

Figure 8

81


with cotton.

made

Fig. 6 reproduces part of a panel

entirely of

drawn-work done on

drawn

ican

several

linen

many ways

brocade embroidered with

will

silk.

In view of the popularity enjoyed by Me.x-

work to-day, we

pages

and embroidered with cotton thread. Fig. ; shows a beautiful scarf of the same work, in

be

-

of

illustrations,

which the various designs may and have no doubt that they

prove of interest

who

attempt this

fi

I

»^*

»f

« >

to all

work.

I

A -•*.»*'

Figure 9 82

here

in

applied,

IVim'U/Mri'i

i

insert

showing the

Ifili/I


mwm

Figure lo

Figure

ii


Teneriffe Wheels This lace

household

most appropriate for trimming

is

(such as a centerpiece, a bureau scarf, napery, etc.) but its use has become linen,

so general that

or batiste

many

blouses

ladies use

and even

to trim silk

it

entire

summer

and the Teneriffe wheels are fastened to this, making a border. The wheels are made separately, one at a time, and are afterwards fastened to the scarf with a very fine cord, as

Figure dresses. it

can be

It is

both elegant and economical, as

made with very

little

effort

expense, the time consumed work by machine being much when done bv hand. trifling

the

Figure

You ican

is

in less

at a

doing than

i

The stitches and form of these wheels give name to the lace. Made separately they

the

are afterwards joined in groups, forming rosettes, or in strips, to

an edging.

be used as insertion or

.Sometimes large circles are

made

Figure 3

2

will note in the table

Fig. 4, the greater part

and

in

the case of any other lace.

scarf

shown

taken up with

in

Mex-

drawn-work, which has already been deThe drawn-work forms the foundation

scribed.

84

of the

individual

wheels,

producing a very

effective dress trimming.

Take any ordinary cloth that is (it will not show as it will

dressing

free all

from be cut


ii*iw*^«

S'^'^c-aRs*

^0^ !;«•--

s

§

g

§

^

^1

i*

::

'-"wX

JviV

"S# ;:

I

I

^N''^

'"'

y.''.^

^^^i^

fi

i-

^2^

^~***^*?W«!^

i.

I

;C";-rifj!^V«A.^V*VW^Vw*^^^

^^^


away) and trace a circle on it, using, if possible, a compass in order to insure greater accuracy. Cover the outline of this circle with two or three rows of stitching, then cut

Now

out the cloth.

one of the circle,

drive the needle through

edge of the

lines of stitching at the

and after fastening the thread with sev-

eral stitches,

draw the thread

the circle, fastening

it

straight across

with several stitches at

a point diametrically opposite to point.

Make one

its

starting

towards the

stitch back, or

bunches of four; then pass on to the second third of the division (see Fig. 2)

taking two from each two preceding groups instead of the

as

Now make

the cir-

two threads, one from each of every two preceding groups.

(See Fig.

3.)

The wheels should now be from the latter,

this,

four.

of thread at the point indicating the last third of the original division, taking up only

made

thread and crossing

same

cle

outer circumference of the circle, then bring

first

continu-

ing to take up just four threads each time, but

the thread back across the circular opening,

beside the

still

Do

entirely separated

by ravelling out the so as not to break any of the stitches in the beginning between the cross cloth.

threads, as these

this

form an edge of

tiny loops,

though you were about to make a spider-web. (See Fig. i.) Continue to fill the open circle with threads placed about a thirty-second of an inch apart until the entire circumference

by which the wheels may be fastened together. When this is done place the wheels on the

has been covered, making each thread across the others in the center, and fastening it with

around twice, as you do

two at the edge. The work now to be done makes it necessary that there should be an even number of these threads. In the middle, where the threads cross, make a small closed circle, iising the weaving stitch used for making the solid center in a spider-

put a fine cord around each wheel, covering

a stitch or

web.

Divide the

space

between

this

solid

center and the edge of the circle into three parts,

center,

and beginning

make a

taking up

at the third nearest the

circle

of thread

the cross threads of

formed by the

web

in

material ful

sign

to

:

in

any position you please, being care-

have each wheel smooth cut the cloth

;

then stitch

in outlining the de-

away from

the back and

it, as you have been already instructed. A most elaborate and beautiful border can be

made

of

Tenerilife

wheels,

placed

close

to-

gether and corded, the outside edge can be

away the same as a scallop. By varying the number of threads taken up when making the stitched circles around the cut

wheel and the arrangement of the groups of thread, a variety of patterns out.

may

be worked


Velvet Applique.

Photographic reproduction of actual work done on a Singer Family Sewing Machine without special attachments.


Velvet Applique Having finished the description of the larger number of laces that were thought to be of interest, we will now take up a new series of There are very many of these, known, the

embroidery. but

we

face down, then cloth or satin on top of it, face down, then the crinoline with the stamped design uppermost, on top of all. See that the materials are perfectly smooth and even, and then tack them to the table by driving a pin

shall explain only the best

Figure

through them

most practicable and best adapted to general use. Tkis one is the work known as applique, and we shall describe the easiest way to execute

it

first

materials tight.

marks

crinoline.

will

be

left

on the velvet.

For basting

use a curved needle, Xo. 6 Milliners and No.

stamp the design on Then lav the velvet on a table. is

the various

Baste the materials together,

keeping on the lines of the design so that no

with the invaluable aid of the

operation

each corner and along the

at

sides at equal distances to keep

Singer Sewing Machine.

The

i

to

40 thread. 87

(To curve

needle, heat and bend


Figure

2


with two pairs of pliers while hot.)

now ready

is

the

for

The work

enough

machine, as no em-

to

keep

of muslin

broidery hoops are needed for this work.

it so. It is well to sew a strip around the edge of the work,

all

and put the tacks in the work up until it

Trace the design with two rows of stitching, using No. o needle and No. oo silk, of a color to match the velvet. After the design has

This applicjue

on

satin, satin

is

may

on

tiste,

If these materials are used,

was stamped and traced The tracing must be done stitching, the second row close to

very

the

first

fine

one, but not on

it

;

this

velvet that forms the design cut away.

move

When

is

when

the tracing

is

existing case.

begin to cut the velvet

away from

the

when

When

This work

hangings,

dresses,

is

is

in this

used, the

must be done is

placed

as in

frequently used for

cloaks,

As you

w'ill

sash

spreads,

this

new

selected the

most

notice in taking

series of embroidery,

we have

up

simple and best adapted for the first lesson. This offers the fewest difficulties, although we exist with the

say that practically no

new method

at

difficulties

all

of embroidery once

you have thoroughly mastered the use of the machine itself. As already explained in the other lessons, as soon as you have succeeded

finished, cut the crino-

learning

may

the back, as close to the stitch-

how

in

to cover the cord perfectly you

well say that you have conquered

all

the

Those who have attentively followed the instructions and have, therefore, suc-

ing as possible, but be careful not to cut a

difficulties.

stitch.

Do

absent

is

silk.

may

away from

used

and other household decorations. Fig. 2 shows a handsome cover made of applique of velvet on satin and embroidered in

where you have cut it, covering the cord smoothly and closely with silk of the same shade as the material under the velvet. Use No. o needle and No. oo silk. line

is

the rings.

cotton and cord on the edge of the velvet,

is

velvet

the embroidery frame

curtains

Use manicure scissors with long, sharp points. Be very careful not to cut the material under the velvet and only to cut the velvet away from the spaces. The velvet forms the design. If you cut away any of the design, the work will be spoiled. Do not cut away too much at once. Put the work on the machine, use No. 6 Tetz

After the cording

net.

not necessary

each additional portion of the work

design just a hair's breadth outside the tracing.

â&#x20AC;˘

it is

stitching outlining the design

is

finished re-

the bastings.

Now

nainsook or bolting-cloth applied to

employ the stiff linen, as the embroidery frame may be used, because the difficulty

to hold the

the rest

cloth, or of ba-

to

it

on the crinoline. in

on

also consist of satin

cloth, cloth

bring velvet on top, showing design traced in as plainly as

not take

perfectly dry.

been traced, turn the work over, which will silk,

Do

this muslin.

not use an iron for pressing, but take

ceeded in learning to control the movement of

three thicknesses of muslin, wet them in clean,

the embroidery frame, will appreciate the truth

cold water, and wring out partly, so that they

of these assertions.

Spread then smoothly on a pine table, lay the work on it, velvet side up, draw it tight and perfectly straight and tack it

instructions as to the preparation of the

will not drip.

and the order

in

should be taken up.

89

Everything else

is

simply

work

which the various kinds


Applique on Net.


Net Applique As

and

a sequel to the preceding lesson

order that you

may

Choose the material

in

ference of treatment between appliques of vel-

already

vet

own

ing to your

better learn the slight dif-

which

shown and of other appliques

it

to be put.

is

to be

employed accord-

and

to the object to

taste

When

it

is

to be used

for cording jabots, ladies' gowns, or even neck-

made of that material, we now describe to make net applique on a Singer Sewing Machine. The knowledge of this work will constitute a basis upon which to make combinations of various materials that may serve

wear, very handsome results

not

how

Stamp used

be

on the

'

the

for

net,

The two

may

be obtained.

the design on the material that applique,

then

place

is

to

this

which must have a round mesh.

materials must then be basted care-

^'â&#x20AC;˘SssiJs:-?t-:'

â&#x20AC;˘.Âť

N-

Figure

groundwork

as a

for applique.

The

i

fully together,

chief dif-

and placed

in

the embroidery

ference between net applique and that of velvet

frame, care being taken to see that both are

manner in which the materials must be prepared for work. When using net, use the hoop embroidery frame, and eliminate the stiff linen which is no longer necessary.

evenly and firmly spanned by the hoops.

consists in the

net

may

stitches,

this

The

itself

to

be embroidered

line

as usual, covering all that part

the frame, then proceed to cut close to the stitching

in beautiful lace

many combinations

that

embraced by

away

the cloth

and outlining the pattern,

leaving the net representing the applique un-

form of the applique lending are

Out-

the design twice with machine stitching

covered as

both

Now

eleeant and beautiful in effect. 91

is

shown

in

A, Fig.

i.

proceed to embroider the lace stitches


These

on the net selecting

same

nia}-

stitches

be varied at w best

adapted

ill

to

by the

employed and best harmonizing with

design

each

those

figure

Of

of that design.

figures

course,

the

must always contain the same

This

the leaves.

will be

you

will consult Fig.

the

work

is

i.

made

plain to

When

this

you

if

part of

finished cord the outline of the

design, using a five-strand cord for the purpose.

If

be not used, the cording and

silk

may

be done with a No. 00 and No. 150 thread. Fig. 2 shows a section of a panel. This elegant and artistic work is made of stitches

needle,

appliques of bolting-cloth on net.

handsome sprays of flowers design

the

are

of

light

that

The form

cream-colored

bolting-cloth adorned with a combination I

lace

artistic

if

which we

stitches

shall

describe later, and appliqueed on white

This produces an effect of charming

net.

elegance and admirable simplicity.

The process

is

the same.

The design

stamped upon bolting-cloth. This is laid smoothly on the net, held in place by a basting stitch and then spanned by the rings, the outline being again followed by the machine stitching. Cut the boltingis

cloth out of those parts of the design to

be

filled in

fill

in the

with the lace

stitches.

Now

open spaces and cut the bolting-

cloth close to the

machine stitching out-

lining the design, leaving the figures of

the

latter

from the

The I

uncovered and standing out

net.

outlines

'>egin this

by

should

first

now

be corded.

cording the stems and

branches, as these usually terminate in the leaves Figure

stitches,

that

is,

all

the

and

flowers.

This enables you

more easily. Here you have a work that

to cover the joining

2

petals

of

unites

beauty and elegance with simplicity, and the

given

must be embroidered in the same Whatever stitch is selected for the stems must be used in all the stems, and that chosen for the leaves must again appear in all

done with the extraor-

flowers

ease with wdiich this

stitches.

dinary Singer Sewing Machine method will

is

enable you to finish scarfs, bed-spreads, and

many

92

other objects quickly and satisfactorily.


Index Page

General Instructions

Shaded Embroidery

3 (

Flowers

9

)

Art Embroidery

11

Raised Embroidery

14

Scallops, Beadstitch.

Cording

18

Venetian Embroidery

20

Seed Stitch

23

English or Eyelet Embroidery

25

Shaded Embroidery on

\'elvet or

Plush

Gold Thread Embroidery First Filet,

Openwork

29

Stitciies

Netting or

27

31

Open Mesh Embroidery

34

Hedebo Embroidery

41

Richelieu Lace

43

Point X'enise

46

Renaissance Lace

49

English

c^2

Point

Duchess Lace

57

Brussels Lace

60

Novelty Lace

65

Point Lace

67

Cluny Lace

70

Hemstitching

72

Mexican Drawn-Work Mexican Drawn-Work

75 (

Second Part

)

yy

Teneriffe Wheels

84

Velvet Applique

87

Net Applique

91


AM

ta iÂŤtt


i^ copy

del, to Cat.

13

19U

Div.


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