Page 40

An

Embroidery Book

hues gain in brightness when used with black and lose accordingly when combined with white.

Juxtaposition

of

Colour.

—Colours,

then,

when

associated, influence each other simultaneously in various

ways, darkening and lightening, adding to or detracting from, as the case may be thus, by placing a light and

dark one in contact, for example, black and white, the former looks blacker, intenser, while the latter looks more startlingly white on account of its dark neighbour. It is advisable, also, in arranging the colour scheme

and positions into consideration what the leading features have one colour in the scheme more

after taking materials

to determine at the very outset

and to predominant than the others, either in intensity or in area. There should be some central point or points of interest which will attract the eye to certain parts of the are to be,

construction.

A Dominant

Colour. colour, by conveying a

—A

liberal use of a

dominant

definite impression,

will give

decision of character as well as beauty of tone to the work,

while a vague, uncertain, or too equally

distributed

arrangement will leave an unsatisfied and indefinite impression on the mind. There are abundant suggestions to be had from fields, hedgerows, flowers, plumage of birds, etc., for the embroideress who can adapt them to her purpose, but a simpler plan for the beginner

scheme from a good

is

to choose her

colour

picture, a coloured illustration, a

piece of chintz, cretonne or good brocade, or,

when

study the various pieces of old embroidery preserved in our museums, as a record of the time possible, to

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Embroideryboo00arth  
Embroideryboo00arth  
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