Page 218

—

An

Embroidery Book

manipulate, a softer metal would be more satisfactory.

A

length of copper wire about one-eighth of an inch in

diameter and 15 inches long, could be beaten into the

form

of a hairpin (Fig. 73)

by means

of a

too hard to take the curve

hammer

the

if

;

can be softened by annealing it. The width between the prongs may vary in different forks according to the width of the insertion to be made, from half an inch to 3 inches apart metal

is

is

the

stitch

usual

which

size

material in

The

spacing.

made with

is

needle, in

it

a crochet

vary

will also

according

to

used

working

fingering

for

;

wool,

four ply, a No.

1

the

three

or

steel crochet

needle does very well. Cotton, flax,

wool,

metal

raffia, string

threads,

worked up

to

all

and

may

be

form various

useful articles for decorative

purposes. Fig. 73.

could be

An effective

fringe

made by threading

beads into the wool the beads could be kept at the edge of the wide prong. An Insertion or Fringe. Method of working This insertion may be worked in two ways. By looking ;

—

:

at Fig. 73 it will be seen that the stitch is a very simple one. Make a slip-knot as Fig. 63, and one chain ; with-

draw the hook.

Place the fork with the prongs upwards

between the thumb and the middle the chain stitch on to the left prong with the

in the left hand,

finger

;

slip

166

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