Page 104

An

Book

Embroidery

them, about three-quarters of an inch apart small upright stitches, about half an inch apart, could couch, or fasten these down, one row alternating with the other. This is a most decorative method of rilling in large ;

Single petals can be laid diagonally,

flowers or leaves.

may have

crossed and tied down, or a complete flower laid lines radiating

from the centre, with the second

layer of threads in concentric circles couched

down with

small stitches of a contrasting colour.

Chequered Pattern a

gives

pattern Fig.

15.

—the

way

weaving

plaited after

;

as to

hand

or

the

lie

easily

—just

in of the cross threads

matter.

To work

Basket or 15).— Fig. 15 basket vertical

threads are laid or placed in

position in such a

form

(Fig.

a Chequered Pattern.

filling

is

the

a simple

—Begin at the

right-

corner and pass the needle over and under three

strands for three rows, then reverse the chequer by lifting

the stitches previously passed over.

much

This work looks

if the darning is all done from right to left. economical in thread, but much more practical

better

It is not so

on account the same

of its greater durability, as the threads all lie

way they ;

arexarried back behind the material

instead of being worked to and fro as in ordinary darning.

Spanish and Japanese embroiderers make great use of these laid stitches which, like most other stitches, probably originated in the East, as they are to

The

Italian,

be met with in most oriental embroideries. 70

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