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CO. LTD.,

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DMC

LIBRARY

Embroidery on Net

TH. DE DILLMONT, EDITOR

MULHOUSE

(Alsace)


Cornell University Library

The tine

original of

tiiis

book

is in

Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright

restrictions in

the United States on the use of the

text.

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924086746884


Strip of

Embroidered Net.

Embroidery on Net.

Embroidery on net has become one of the most

attractive

kinds of needlework, being both easy to do and adaptable to a great variety of uses. The reason of its noj having until novi' taken its rightful place amongst the many different forms of

needlework, and of having failed to find favour with amateurs of fancy work, is perhaps due ,to the knotted net on which it had to be-done having to be made by hand which was a slow and rather tedious process. But now net materials with meshes of every sort of size are machine-made, which imitate the hand-made to perfection and bear washing equally well. The embroideries reproduced in the plates of the present album have all been woi"ked on such machine-made net and we have satisfied ourselves that it meets every requireinent and in every respect equals the

hand-made

article.

Nevertheless, added to the description of the different em-

broidery stitches employed, the necessary directions for making the net by hand are given in case any of pur readers should prefer making it themselves.

Implements loops,

^teel

meshes or

needles are

;

i

spools.

made

should be used

and 2). The made by means of

(figs,

or stitches as they are called, are

needles, and

The

for making: the net

of steel,

wood

or bone. For fine net,

the ends resemble pincers, with a hole


EMBROIDERY ON NET

4

bored through them below the fork, in which the thread is secured, fig. i the middle is like an ordinary knitting needle. The quantity of thread wound on lengthways between the forked ends must depend on the size of the mesh or spool employed, so that it may be slipped through the loops or stitches without difficulty. Besides these two implements, a weighted cushion is required ;

on which

to pin the loop of coarse thread that holds the netting

being made. Materials. The choice of the thread depends of course on the purpose the net is intended for. Cotton, silk and linen

whilst

it is

Fig.

Fig. i.

thread can

all

Steel netting needle.

Mesh or spool

be used

made

generally

I.

;

Reduced

size.

for netting. Natural size.

netted articles of one colour only are

of cotton or flax; those of several colours, in

silk or in imitation silk.

Of

the

D.M.C

articles,

those

we recommend

for netting,

Flax thread for knitting D.M.C (Lin k tricoter); Flax lace thread D.M.C (Lin pour dentelles), Alsatian thread D.M.C (Fil

are

:

D.M.C (Cotonperld) and Crochet D.M.C (Cordonnet 6 fils,. (*)

d'Alsace), Pearl cotton

6 cord

cotton

All these materials have a regular uniform twist and do *

not knot in the working;

The shape of the loops or stitches in Netting: stitches. is always square or oblong.

netting

First position of the hands (fig. 3). Every piece of net must be begun on a foundation loop of strong thread 4 to 8 in. long, which is pinned on to the weighted cushion. Then fasten the netting-needle thread to this foundation loop. Then take the mesh or spool in the left hand, holding it between the thumb and forefinger straightening out the other fingers beneath. Lay the thread over the spool and over the second, third and fourth fingers, bring it back upwards behind (*)

flax

See

and

at the

end of the book, the table of the sizes of the D.M.C cotton, '

silk articles.


;

EMBROIDERY ON NET these three fingers and lay

holds

it

it

to the left

D

under the thumb which

in position.

Second and third position of the hands (figs. 4 and 5). Carry the thread downwards again behind the four fingers, and slip the needle upwards from below through the loop that is on the fingers, and through the loop at the back of the spool or through the one to which the thread is fastened

Fig.

a second loop

is

3.

First position of the hands.

thus formed on the

left

hand which the

little

finger holds fast.

Then

gradually tightening the thread you draw out the fingers from the loop held by the little finger, and tighten the

loop passing over the second third and fourth fingers.

The

last

loop m.ust be kept on the

little

finger until the first

one is quite closed. Then only do you draw the little finger out of the loop, tighten the knot and finish the stitch.

The subsequent stitches are made in the same way, whether they serve for casting on the work or for making a netted ground.


EMBROIDERY ON NET

6

you have cast on a sufficient number of loops, draw out the mesh, then turn the work and, to begin a new row, lay

When

the spool against the

row

of finished stitches.

You then pass the needle through the last stitch of the preceding row and make as many knots as there are loops.

—

The stitches just described form diagonal Diagonal net. net for which the work must be turned at the end of each row,

Fig. 4.

because

it

is

Second position of the hands.

always made in horizontal rows running from

left to right.

Diagonal net broidery

;

bordered with

makes

it

is

very seldom used as a foundation for

a net with straight stitches a.

is

em-

generally preferred,

selvedge of double and triple stitches, as this

easier to join several pieces together or

sew them on

to a bit of stuif.

—

stitches. A net ground embroidered should be made just the necessary size to avoid useless work and economise materials. We subjoin directions for making squares, strips, frames and

Shapes of net -with straight

that

is

to be

rectangular pieces.


EMBROIDERY ON NET

7

—

Square of straight net (figs. 6 and 7). To make net squares with straight loops or stitches, begin by casting on two loops or three knots. In every succeeding row make two knots on the last loop so that each row is increased by one loop. Continue to increase until you have one loop more than the square should number. After this row, with the extra loop, make one row without

Fig. 5. Third position of the hands.

either increase or intake, begin the intakes in the next

joining the two last loops of every Slip the

knot,

two

last stitches,

that

row by is

to say, join

them by

but draw the spool or mesh out of the loop

tightening the knot,

row by

a knot.

a

before

—

Rectangular piece of straight net. Begin, as for the square, figs. 6 and 7, by casting on two stitches and continuing to increase to the length of the short side, and than make a row without increasing. After that make one row with an increase, and one with a decrease, until the side with the increases is the requisite length for the rectangular piece. You must see that the stitches do not become too short oh the side where you increase

;

this very easily

happens beca.use the double knot,


EMBROIDERY ON

8

resulting from the increase, takes

where you like a

two

join

-NET

more room than

by a knot. You

stitches

the decrease,

finish the

shape

square by decreasing at the end" of each row.

Strip of straight net

(fig.

— The

8).

way

simplest

to

on the required number of stitches, decrease on one side by joining two stitches by a knot and increase on the other side by making two knots in one stitch. Care must be taken not to change the order of the decreases and the increases as any mistake of niake such strips

is

to cast

would interrupt

that kind

the lines

of the squares.

How as usual

a

Begun.

make

new

is

the corners of a done by decreasing

on the inner side, then making

loop on the

last

loop so as to

form the angle. You then go on making the strip, but with this difference, that you make the increases on the inside and the decreases on the

Fig; 6.

Square of straight

to

— This

strip.

net.

.

outside.

(See also the directions fof

the square frame of net,

fig.

Square frame of net

g.) (fig.

9).

After casting on the loops as for

an ordinary piece of net, increase

them

to the

letter

number

a,

of eight,

then make four loops, skip the last* four of the preceding row, turn, make five Fig.

Square of straight

loops, increase at the last one,

make

7,

net.

last,

Finished.

four loops and decrease at the

turn,

make

five loops,

increase at

make four loops, decrease at the last one, then increase at the same loop, turn, make four loops and decrease at the last one, turn, make five the last one, turn,

loops, increase at the last, turn, last,

turn,

make five

Fasten the thread on

empty loops

are,

make

four loops, decrease at the

loops, increase at the last one, cut the thread.

point

c,

at the

make

outside edge where the four

four loops, turn,

loops, increase at the last one, turn,

make four

make

five

loops, decrease


EMBROIDERY ON NET make

at the last one, turn,

make turn,, make

five loops, increase at the last

one,

four loops, decrease and increase at the last one,

turn,

four loops, decrease at the last one, turn,

loops, increase at the last one, turn,

make

at the last one, turn,

make

make

five

four loops, decrease

five loops, increase at the last

one

and cut the thread. Fasten on the thread on the outside edge to the first loop, the next loop, make six loops, and join the two separate

slip

between the and the fourth loop by a knot on the last strips

third

loop of the

and the

left strip

first

loop

of the right strip,

decrease at the last of the turn,

make five

to

three

make two

loops,

two

loops.

lo).

(fig.

broidery on net the

be mounted

make

make

turn, slip the last

Frames

decrease,

turn,

loops,

four loops, turn, loops, turn,

turn,

loops,

six

then continuing

make

Fig. 8. Strip of straight net.

loops,

six

Fof em-

latter

must

in the ordinary

way on an embroidery if it

frame, be machine-made net; for

the hand-made,

some

prefer a

Fig, 9. metal frame, particularly in the Square of straight liet. case of a small piece of work. Such a frame should be made of wire strong enough not

yield It

when the net is stretched. may be square or oblong

to

according to the shape of the

work to be done upon it. The wire should be covered first with wadding, fig. .10, and then with thin ribbon, wound tightly. round it, specially at the corners so that

it

may

be quite firm on the wire and not twist


EMBROIDERY ON NET

10

about

when

the net

is

fastened on

must then be secured by

it.

The ends

of the ribbon

a few stitches.

Mounting the net on the wire frame without a tig.

— When

ii).

the frame

more

set

it

the net

is

braid.

exactly the size of the inside of

need only be fastened in with overcasting

stitches,

closely together at the corners.

Mounting a piece of net on the frame with a tape

on the contrary, the piece of net is smaller than the frame it can be edged all round with a linen tape, eased on in the sewing so as to form gathers round little

(fig.

12).

If,

the net.

In this way the net can be tightly

without

stretched

tearing loops.

outside

the

Figure

shews how

to

12

sew on

the tape, to pleat at

the

corners

it

atid

to fix the net in the

frame. In piece Fig.

10.

mounting of

a

machine-

Metal frame tor embroidered net.

sable to turn in the edges a so firm as the knots

little,

^^^^^ ^^^^ j^ j^ ^^^j, as the woven loops are not

made by hand.

Special needles are required for this work, long Needles. and blunt, known as "filet-guipure" needles, made in numbers I

to 6.

For embroidery on net the same material Materials. should be used as the one the ground is made of; twisted threads for the various lace stitches and soft loose ones for the -.

darning stitches and the outlines.

The

best twisted threads for the purpose are either Flax

D.M.C

(Lin

D.M.C

Flax lace thread pour dentelles), or Pearl cotton D.M.C (Coton

thread for knitting

(Lin' k tricoter),


.

EMBROIDERY ON NET perl^)

;

I

I

for a loose thread

take

either

Special

D.M.C

stranded cotton

(Mouhn^ Stranded

D.M.C

special),

thread

flax

(Lin moulin^),

Stranded silk D.M.C (Sole moulinde) or Persian silk D.M.C (Soie de Perse).

—

Stitches. Little squares of net serve as a foundation for a number

of different stitches and these stitches lend themselves to so man\-

binations

that

com-

we

Fig. II.

Mounting net on the metal frame without webbing.

are

we are going to describe there will be some unknown to our readers. We can say for certain that many of them we have never met with either described or illustrated in any publication we have come across. Darning stitch, (figs r3 and 14). — The simsure that amongst those

'

plest stitch for covering a

ground

net

dar-

is

ning stitch. It is done over a prescribed number of squares, across which the thread is carried

backwards and

forwards until they are filled in. It is

the stitch

generally used

when

pattern

consisting

counted

stitches,

as is

a

cross

such one,

reproduced on ground.

to be

a net

stitch

a

of

pig. 12.

Mounting net on the metal

frame with webbing.


EMBROIDERY ON NET

12 It is specially

as curtains

work such throws up the pattern and is

useful in the case of large pieces of

and bed-spreads as

it

very quickly done. It

may happen

that

you have,

as

you go,

change the

to

how

direction of the darning stitch; figure 14 explains

embroidering outlines, to this

this is

very often used for

It is also

done.

we

will refer

again further on, poge 22.

Linen

^ This

stitch

(figs. i5, 16, 17, 18).

the stitch

is

with in the

(')

most ofton met

embroideries and the

old:

"grounds of leaves and flowers as well 'as

the edges are generally

After fastening

the

worked in

it.

thread to a

knot of the net it is, carried twice to ^^^ f^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ threads of the net so that every second thread passes at the end of the row under the thread of the net and over it when it is brought upwards again. This forms the body of the linen stitch which is completed by the second series of stitches, the same as in darning stitch (see fig. 16.) Fig.

1

3.

Darning

stitch.

When

stitch is to form a by carrying the threads

linen

corner, begin

over a prescribed

In this

first

should a fine

on the Darning

Change of

stitcli.

direction.

the

number

of squares.

the threads

must be

very slack, and in order that they

left

Fig. 14.

row

all

be of the same length lay or a coarse knitting needle

mesh last

square over which to stretch After finishing a few

threads.

squares in linen stitch, the auxiliary

mesh can be removed. The

threads of the

first

layer get shorter

by degrees through being constantly taken up and dropped by the passage of the second layer of threads until they are not

long enough to prevent the too

tightly

stretched.

last

embroidered squares becoming

Having reached the corner

cross the

(*) See also the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Th. de Dillmont, the chapter on Netting.


EMBROIDERY ON NET

l3

threads of the next row as shewn in figure 17. The first threads of the second side form the linen ground of the corner square from the second corner square pass to the third from the third ;

;

to the fourth, passing first

under and over

The

threads laid for the

old embroideries are done on very fine net, and the

linen stitch

Fig.

1

worked

is

5.

Linen

in

two

layers of threads only, that

Fig. 16. Linen

stitch

of four threads. Laying the fir^t stitches.

one journey little "figure

to

and

fro.

Laying

with linen

the.

second stitches.

Fig. 18. Linen stitth

of two threads.

illustrates, in the

two

layers of threads.

19, 20,

21).

—

Loop

working,

stitch is generally

transparent ground than- can be obtained

stitch.

There sre two kinds of loop slanting.

in

stiti.h

Figure 18

in linen stitch in

Loop stitch (figs. used to make a more

is

of four threads.

Fig. 17. Linen stitch of tour threads. Formation of the corners.

a

the-

corner..

stitch,

the straight and the


EMBROIDERY ON NET

14

to the middle of a then make a loop reaching to the middle of the next horizontal bar (fig. 19). These loops are always made from left to right the thread must be laid to the right and the needle passes downwards from above under the bar

For the straight kind fasten the thread

vertical bar of the net,

;

and

in front of the thread.

The

length -of the loop must be

half the height of the bars of the net.

For the second row turn the work, make a stitch over the vertical bar of the net, pass the thread under the bar of the net, as in the first row, then over the loop and under the bar which is under the loop. Figure 20 shews the way to join the rows of loop stitch together and how to pass the needle through the existing stitches.

Fig. 19. Straight loop stitch. First

Fig. 2b. Straight loop stitch.

and second journey.

Row

of stitches finished.

For slanting or diagonal loop stitch, fig, 21, you make the loop stitches round the knots, instead of round the bars of the net, so that the stitches quite naturally take a slanting direction.

The

thread must be carried round and not over the knots, and

regularly

plaited

on which account

it

is

sometimes

called

"plaited stitch".

As net

figure 21 shews,

and that makes

you can only fill every other stitch of the ground more transparent than the

this

preceding one.

Star composed of long straight stitches (figs. 22, 23, This star covers sixteen squares of net. Fasten your 24). 'thread to the middle knot of the sixteen squares, then carry it in a diagonal line from left to right, under a knot of the net.

—


5

EMBROIDERY ON NET bring

1

back towards the other extremity of the square formed the knot 22). This the underneath rays of

it

by the sixteen squares of net, slip the needle under and lay three threads in this same direction (see fig. forms

the star.

To make the stitches that complete the figure take the .starting

point as the centre and, following the direction of the arrow, cover the net with three threads in a vertical line

an dthree others

horizontal line

(fig.

in a

23).

That being done, slip the needle four or five times under the threads just laid never

under the threads of the net the back of the

work

Fig- 21- Oblique loop stitch.

— then fasten

off

your thread

at

(see the finished st^r, fig. 24).

Leaves in darningr stitch (figs. mostly used in making the often.-adorn embroidered net. The stitch

needle, starting from the middle,

ib and 26). fine

.

delicate

This

leaves

a

is

that

is

carried alternately to the right and

under the threads of the founand you push the stitches, as you make them, close together with the point of your needle. To make these stitches to perfection you must left

dation,

not forget to turn the work so as tb

have the finished stitches directed ,^'g- '^towards you. First you stretch the Star cemposed of long stitches. threads, as the engravmg J underneath1 threads. o o shews, to Laying the the number of two or three, and then make the leaf with one, often even with several veins. When the leaf has only one vein, as shewn in the left part of figure 26, the needle divides the prepared threads eqjaally into two, where, as in the case of wider leaves which would be improved by having two or more veins, you divide the threads accordingly ,

.

,

,

,

'

into three or four clusters.

,

'

,

.

.

,.

,


EMBROIDERY ON NET

i6

In embroidering leaves in darning stitch you should also be push the stitches more closely together at the two ends,

careful to

and leave them rather more play in the middle. Figure 26 shews two leaves completed one with one vein, the other with two. ;

.{


EMBROIDERY ON NET

'7

back to the starting point and up again to 'the middle. A foundation is thus prepared for the darning stitch, which should always be begun at the top of the scallop. Scallops in buttonhole stitch (fig. 2^). Another way quite as pretty and easy as the preceding is, making two button-

hole stitches before passing to the opposite side.

Veined scallops scallops

is

(fig.

29).

Fig. 27, Scallops in darning stitch.

A

and

to stretch a thread to

third

way

fro in the

left to

right

under the middle

thread and from above downwards under the

the needle

is

making

Fig. 28. Scallops in buttonhole stitch.

square, then slip the needle from

Fig. 29, Veined scallops.

of

middle of a

left

bar.

Then

Fig. 3o. Scallops in Venetian stitch.

passed from right to

left

over the stretched thread

and under the right bar, and so on.

The

thread must be drawn rather tightly round the one it encircles so that the stitches form a round and very even vein at the back of the scallop. Enough stitches must be made completely to cover the thread and fill the bottom of the square.

Scallops in Venetian stitch

(fig.

3o).

The

prettiest

which best suit the character of embroidered net are those done in Venetian stitch. You begin by making seven or scallops


EMBROIDERY ON NET on the bar of the net, then you conmaking the same stitch, to and fro, decreasing in each row by one stitch, until only one remains to be made, by which 3rou fasten the scallop to the top bar.

eight buttonhole stitches

tinue

The thread must be

carried

on the wrong

side to

the

next figure.

Wheels "worked in single darning stitch, and in interTo make these verted darning stitch (figs. 3i and 82). wheels, or spiders, as they are sometimes called, the thread is fastened on at the junction of four squares carried diagonally to the right and left (fig. 3i, left detail) across the empty space and brought back to the middle after winding it round the

—

;

>J_.5._^_-i_i._i^-'

I

f

Fig. 3i. Laying the for

;

,

making

a

first threads wheel,

and the beginning of

first.

I

I

u

t

Fig. 32.

Wheels

in single

and interverted

darning

a .wheel.

stitch.

These diagonal threads should be closely covered with

overcasting stitches to give

them the appearance

Bringing the thread back

to the centre, pass

over the diagonal threads as for the wheel to cover half a bar.

detail),

many

of a firm cord. it

times as

(see the leff is

necessary

Figure 32 shews on the right a finished wheel in single darstitch,, such as has just been described, whilst on the left you have a wheel done in interverted darning stitch, that is to

ning

say by dropping and picking up threads, as in darning.

The latter also shews how when the thread that forms the foundation of the wheel starts from a corner it f emains single in the first square until the wheel is finished; When it has attained the requisite circumference,

before the one which slip the

is

you stop the thread

as

it

passes

the continuation of the single thread, and

needle through the wheel, to double the thread

first laid.


EMBROIDERY ON NET Hibbed wheels

(fig,

33).

19

— Prepare a foundation the same as make

a back-stitch over

one bar

of the net, shp the needle under the next bar and go on

making

for the preceding wheels, then

back-stitches until the bars of the net are covered with them.

Bribbed lozenges tion

is

required

(fig. 34).

— For these

the back-stitches are

;

lozenges no founda-

made

directly

on

to the

bars of the net. Both sides of the wheels

and lozenges can be used in

work

;

shews

piece

a

of

the engraving

both

wrong and

the

right side.

Wheels

set with

loop stitch (fig. 35). Often a wheel

~

occurs in a big square of net which

cannot ciently

Fig. 33.

Ribbed wheels.

Fie. 35.

^ Wheels framed with loop

Fig. 34.

Ribbed lozenges

it

sufiifill;

it

may

then be framed with

whole or half loop

stitches

to

up the

fill

surrounding space.

The

left

part '^

.

,

. stitches. •

of our engra-

ving shews very distinctly how the thread, passing under the wheel and twisting once round the thread laid for the wheel, is carried round the square by. forming eight loops.

The arrow shews how you

pick

up the loops and

finish the

figure explains the laying of a second thread in

same the loops, and

make

a second circle.

first

how

circle

round the wheel. The second

the thread

The white

is

passed through them to

detail in the

line serves as guide for the stitches.

represents a finished wheel.

The

third detail


;

EMBROIDERY ON NET

20

Star with corners in buttonhole stitch (fig. 36). Few kinds of embroidered net are so quickly executed as the one shewn in fig. 36. Two buttonhole stitches on the outside and a single crossing of the thread below are all that is needed to make this pretty star. The middle square is ornamented with a little wheel.

Star with corners in darning stitch (fig. Sy). This figure shews us a pretty subject worked in darning stitch made over one laid thread and over four bars of the net.

The

left

part of the figure

shews the subject begun.

Floweret in dot on a linen ground

stitch (fig.

of

38).

dot

— With the help stitch

a

great

variety of supplementary

and ornaments can be produced on a foundation of linen stitches. details

Fig. 36. Star with corners in buttonlioie stitch.

It

would be

Framing the figUrOS. reproduce certain patterns on net unless and soften the outlines with darning stitches

difficult to

one could round

off

Or overcasting, as

shewn in the

subsequent figures.

Linen stitch framed with darning stitches (fig. 39).

In framing linen stitches at the corners with darning

ches they must be set less closely

you

may

stit-

much

than in figure 37 also,

instead

of

stopping the stitches at each corner, continue

them round


EMBROIDERY ON NET

21

round the figure and then overcast it or make a thick padding round the edges and embroider the outlines over the bars of the net as you do in white embroidery.

Outlines in darning and overcasting stitches. Freehand designs require outUnes and veins in darning or over-

made without

casting stitches, net,

as

illustrated

of our plates.

darning several

thread

The

in

outlines in

stitch

are

rounds

in

of

medium

overcasting a

regard to the squares of the

several

done a

size

coarser

in

pliable ;

for

thread

should be used for instance, Special stranded cotton D.M.C (Moulin^ special) N° 14 which ;

gives

more

Fig. 38. Floweret in dot stitch

on linen ground.

relief to the over-

casting.

Cut stitch (fig. 41) Here "cut work" means half covering the bars with buttonhole stitches

and cutting away the

other half with scissors. inside bars are often

The

ornamen-

with two-edged buttonholing and knotted picots. You separate very slightly the stit-

Fig. 39. Linen stitch framed with

darning

ted

ches of the

first

row of button-

holing so as to insert those of the second row between.

In

doing

cut

stitch

on

stitches.

l^HI

machine-made net you should strengthen only the outer side buttonhole

of the bars with

and leave out such picots as would come too close together, for the meshes of machine-made net are generally very small and the picots would touch each other. stitches

Fillings for

machine-made

stitches suitable for this purpose.

net.

They

Here we give

five

are easy to do and


EMBROIDERY ON NET

22

need little time or patience for which reasons they are generally used for big pieces of decorative work. These stitches are finished off outside by an embroidered outline of darning or ;

overcasting stitches, or else by a

Ground

waved

in

through every row

stitch

woven

(fig.

braid or twisted cord.

42).

Carry the thread

two squares and behind a knot and you have the stitch

of the net over

in question.

Ground worked in zontal rows

(fig. 43).

hori-

— Make

half crosses over four squares

of net, then carry the thread

under

tl^ree

Fig. 41.

across the

Cut

fifst

knots

and two

In the second row carry the thread one and you have the ground represented in

squares

of

the

net.

stitch.

the engraving.

Ground formed of intersected loop Cover three

stitches

(fig.

44).

a whole row of squares with cross-stitches and skip rows of stitches. When you have covered a sufficient number of rows with cross-stitches,

take a very long needleful of thread

and slip the needle upwards from below and from right to left under the two bars of the third top square ;

then come

down

to the first

square of the three lower rows and pass from right to left

under the bars, so

as to

leave an interval of three squares bej

Fig. 42.

Ground

in

waved

tween the new stitches. The next row of stitches is done in the same way

stitch.

so that the stitches are not only set contrariwise but cover each other reciprocally.

Latticed ground (fig. 45). Begin by- running the thread and fro under two vertical bars and over three horizontal ones. When the ground is quite covered, carry the thread from right to left under the bars where the threads of the first bars to

cross

each

other

;

then take the thread over the elongated


EMBROIDERY ON NET crosses, corresponding to five squares of tile

same

On

line

the

under the bars of the

way lines,-

tlie

net,

and pass

it

in

net.

hack, the long stitches intersect each other on

the stitches of the horizontal

23

first

rows.

The lower rows

are

worked

in

the upper in vertical.

—

Groiiiid in Russian stitch (fig. 46). Begin at the top, pass the thread, from right to left, under one bar of the net. ^


EMBROIDERY ON NET

24

page

1

and copied from one of the and most curious pieces of

2

oldest

antique

net

grounds worked thread,

all

In

existing.

all

the

two kinds of

in

the stitches that are to

be worked in the coarsest thread are to be worked first.

Ground in darning stitcli and The darning loop stitch (fig. 47). stitches with which you begin the ground are worked in the coarse thread as well as the almond-shaped

Fig. 47.

Ground

and loop

darning

in

stitcli.

ones that connect them stitches

are

made

in

;

the loop

the finer

thread.

Ground consisting of little and loop stitches (fig. — With a coarse thread 48).

-wheels

finish the wheels, only over the

whole surThen, with the fine thread surround them with loop stitches, worked in rows, as shewn in figure 20. bars, throughout the

face of the net.

Fig. 48.

Ground of

little

and buttonhole

wheels

stitch.

Ground consisting of squares in darning and loop stitch (fig. 49). Darning stit-

ches worked horizontally in the coarse-thread, over four squares

of the net, alternate with loop stitches in fine thread covering,

same number of squares. Diagonal ground with the squares framed (fig. 5o). the

~-

Fig. 49.

Ground

of squares in darning

and loop

stitch.

Pass

the needle with a coarse thread under the first knot, from right to left, then

diagonally under the next knot


EMBROIDERY ON NET

25

from

left to right. Repeat the same stitches twice, to and fro^ so that the squares of the net are framed with a double setting of stitches.

When take

the whole ground

the fine thread and

is

covered with these

.make loop

=i_i_Ji_ÂŤ,_J_ÂŤ^_4_J_{,_;_

stitches in

first stitches

the squares


EMBROIDERY ON NET

26

in the preceding pattern,

you frame

the squares of net with three rows

of stitches

worked

once more to and

to fro,

and fro, then, you make in

fine

thread, cross-stitches over the

first

ones.

Ground of squares in darning: and overcasting stitches (fig. 52.)

Grounds

Fig. 34.

them

in darning stitch with big wheels,

over

stit-

others

or

number

always present a heavier appearance than equal

GrounJ of squares

which darning

in

preponderate

ches

in

already described and should only be used therefore where a very well-covered, those

shaded surface Fill a

is

required.

diagonal line of squares

with darning

stitches,

i3,

fig.

an equal number in each square, then carry a thread between the squares and double it coming back b}' overcasting it. as close as possible, but

Fig. d5.

Ground with squares of darning stitch and little

Groundof big wheels.

wheels

(fig.

53).

- In

figure 53

you

fijl

the squares with darning stitches, as in figure 52,

and instead of making long

bars you introduce a wheel with four

spokes into each empty space.

Ground with squares of darning In and big wheels (fig. 54).

stitch

figure 54 the darning stitches

Ground in darning and cross-stitch.

Fig. 56.

ornamented with

big.

and the

wheels cover four squares of the Ground w^ith big wheels (fig.

Grounds of a wheels worked in

described in figures 24 to 26.

certain size either

net.

may

55i.

be

of the waj's


EMBROIDERY ON NET

27

—

Ground in darning stitch and cross-stitch (fig. 56). Begin, as before, witla the darning stitches and then do the To give the proper shape, finish cross-stitches.

rows

them all

next rows that cross

the

the

in one direction first; in

the

you insert the thread between the stitches first crossed. first

Ground figures

(fig.

of 57).

geometrical

— This stitch

which has no resemblance with the former ones is composed of simple geometrical lines.

Fasten the thread to a knot of the net, then pass it, always diago-

^'S-

^"- (Jround of iieometncal figures

under

nally

three

bars

other of

the

net and repeat this three

times

;

after

that twist the

thread

once

Fig. 58.

round the

Bordering in buttonhole stitch "on big-meshed

net.

bar of the net to fasten it, and come back to the knot already encircled and repeat the four rounds, as in the first instance. By always bringing fourth

the

thread

back

to

the

knot

where the next square is to begin you will have four threads stretched along two sides and five along the other two.

Detached lozenges are also often Fig. 59. Bordering in buttonhole stitch used for ornamenting wheels in on s'm all-meshed net. in this case the darning stitch thread is carried under the vertical and horizontal bars which formed the spokes of the wheel. ;


EMBROIDERY ON NET

28

Bordering in buttonhole stitch

(figsi

58 and Bg).

— Scallo-

ped edges in net should be buttonholed, always from right to left. A padding of several threads should be laid down first to give irelief -to the buttonhole stitches, you then cover the bars of the net entirely, making besides, three to five stitches over the knots of the net turned outwards the knots turned inwards ;

and the bars of the net must not be cut until the whole border is- finished. Fig. 58 shews a bordering buttonholed on large-meshed net, which gives very square scallops. On small-meshed net the scallops round themselves in the working, as seen in fig. 59. are skipped

To

embellish the buttonholed bordering a picot braid

may

be sewn on to the outside.

—

Note. For the washing, ironing and pinning out of embroideries on net see the chapter "Miscellaneous Directions' in the

Encyclopedia of Needlework, by Th^rese de Dillmont.

Persons wishing for further directions regarding the execution of the patterns contained

in

EMBROIDERY ON NET

or the materials mentioned therein should address themselves to the firm of

TH. DE DILLMONT, who

will

at

MULHOUSE (Alsace)

immediately furnish them with the required information.


Patterns

of Embroideries on Net (20 Plates)

XIV

Plates I to

contain various unpublished patterns

for laces, strips and grounds.

Plate net,

is

XV,

copied from an old piece of embroidered

composed of

strips

joined

together by

a

con-

necting stitch. Plate

work

XVI

represents a fragment of an old piece of

exhibited in Paris,

Plates

XVII

to

XX

suitable for a piece

Plate

XVI.

at

the Cluny

Museum.

contain 12 subjects on a big scale

of work

like the

one represented

in


Plate

EMBROIDERY ON

i

NiET

I


Plate

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroideries on net to be worked with the

D.M.C Cotton, Flax and

Silk articles

11


Plate III

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroideries on net to be worked with the

D.M.C Cotton, Flax and

Silk articles


Plate

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroideries on net to be worked with the D.M.C Cotton, Flax and Silk articles

IV


Plate

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V


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Plate VII

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroideries on net to be worked with the

D.M.C Cotton, Flax and

Silk articles


Plate VIII

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroidery on net

to be

worked with the

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Silk articles


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Plate XIII

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroidery on net to be worked with the D.M.C Cotton, Flax and Silk articles


Plate

EMBROIDERY ON NET

Embroidery on net to be worked with the D.M.C Cotton, Flax and Silk articles

XIV


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EMBROIDERY ON NET

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XV


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Embroideries on net to be worked with the D.M.C Cotton, Flax and Silk articles


Plate XVIII

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XIX

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Embroideries on net to be worked with the

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Silk articles

^

XX


D-M-C LIBRARY Tn order to encourage

and develope the

taste for

needlework

and to make the use of the numerous articles specially manufactured by them for sewing and embroidery more widely known the Societe anonyme Dollfus-Mieg & C'ÂŤ, have issued a series of publications forming a complete library in itself, which treats with every form and description of of

all

kinds

needlework.

Each album consists of a series of unpublished and very varied accompanied by an explanatory text with the assistance of which it will be found easy to execute even the most compatterns,

plicated designs.

Although in artistic value, in the selectitjn of the patterns and the care expended on the execution, these publications surpass every thing till now produced of the kind, they are offered at a price greatly below their value that they: could be produced under such favorable conditions is due solely to the size of the editions and the object in view. ;

AH

needlework publications are edited in French and German, in English. As the text however is but of secondary

and some

importance while the designs are the principal feature, all these works can be used to great advantage even in the countries where other languages are spoken than those in which they are edited.

Further on will be found a list of these publications, which had of all booksellers, mercers and embroidery shops, or if necessary direct from the publisher Th. de Dillmont, are to be

MuLHOusE

(Alsace).


— —

:

List of the publications of the D-M-C Library

* Encyclopedia of Needlework A handsome volume

by 1107 engravings. English

of about 800 pages illustrated

Bound

binding. Gilt top.

in-i6

Price

.,

:

1/3

* Albums for Cross-Stitch Embroidery * In-4'',

ALBUM

I

:*

Price

32 plates with 278 designs. Artistic cover

ALBUM

:

1/3

II

40 plates with i36 colored designs, comprising several alphabets. Artistic

In-4°,

cover

* ln-4°,

40 plates with

La An album

1

ALBUM

2/—

:

III":

Price

82 designs

:

1/8

Broderie au Pass6 (Flat stitch Embroidery) accompanied by tracings Polychrome cover

in-4° of 20 plates

with explanatory

text.

Le An album

Price

f

in-4°,

for

reproducing the designs, Price

S/

:

Filet-Richelieu (French net work)

of 3o plates with explanatory text. Artistic cover

.

.

.

.Price

2/

;

Alphabets et Monogrammes (Alphabets and Monograms) An album

in-4''

(oblong shape) with

gilt

composed of 60

edges,

explanatory text

plates witfi

Price

:

Motifs de Broderie copte (Motifs for Copte Embroidery) This work

is

divided into

3

parts each of

which

tory text. Artistic cover. In-4"

Le Two albums

is

2/

,

accompanied by an explanaPrice

'

:

2/

— each

Tricot (Knitting, P' and II"* Series)

in-4'',

containing

the

first

72,

and

the

knitting. Artistic cover

second 63 patterns, for Price

2/—

:

each.

Le Macramd (Macram^) An album (*)

The

in-4''

°f

'^~

publications

p'ates with explanatory text. Artistic cover

marked with an

asterisk (*J and

are edited in English.

Prices no longer in force

of which the

title

Price: 2/

is

underlined


LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE

La (Net

Two

albums

in-4'>,

D.M.C

LIBRARY

Broderie sur Lacis

work embroidery, composed of 20

!»*

and

II"<i

Series)

plates each with explanatory text.

cover

Price

Artistic

1/3 each.

:

* The Embroiderer's Alphabet An album

in-i6, containing 82 colored plates composed of alphabets, monograms and patterns for counted stitch embroideries, followed by jo plates of monograms and festoons with tracings for white' embroidery. Attractive

cover

Price

*

New

5^-

:

Patterns in Old Style

Work

divided into two parts each of which is composed of 12 plates, accomeach Price 3/ panied by an explanatory text and figures. In-4°

:

* The Net Work Containing 28 pages of text with explanatory figures and 20 plates with patterns Price 5 '' for embroidery on net. Artistic cover, Iij-8° :

Le Crochet (Crochet Work,

I^t

and

II""i

Series)

Two albums in-4'', containing the first C4, and the second 67 patterns for crochet work and a detailed description of the patterns. Artistic cover Price: 3/ each.

* Crochet Work, An album

III'''^

Series

in large octavo, containing 12 plates with a great variety of patterns

for crochet

work and an explanatory

text

with figures

Price

lO''-

:

* Drawn thread W^ork An album

in-8»,

planatory

of 20 plates containing a great variety of patterns and an exPrice 5 •' cover

text. Artistic

:

Recueild'Ouvrages divers (Collection of various kinds of works) An album

in-4'

Price

of 35 plates containing 242 engravings with explanatory text

;

1/8

Motifs pour Broderies (Motifs for Embroideries,

I^*

and

11"^ Series)

Two albums in-8", each containing 32 colored plates, composed of grounds, borders, floral designs etc., also a series of tracings to facilitate the reproPrice: 1/— each. ducing and enlarging of the patterns (*)

The

publications marked with an asterisk

are edited in English.

(*)

and of which the

title

is

underlined


THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE

LIST OF

* Motifs

for

Embroideries

and

(IIF'^

D.M.C

LIBRARY

IV*'^ Series)

Two albums in large octavo, each

containing 20 colored plates, composed of various designs in modern style, for embroidery on counted threads. .Price Q^- each. :

La

Dentelle Renaissance (Point lace)

Containing 76 pages of text with explanatory figures, 10 plates withoiit text and 10 patterns on cambric for executing tlie designs reproduced on these plates. In-8°

Price

1/8

:

* Teneriffe Lace W^ork An album

in-8",

of 20 plates containing patterns for wheels, borders and lace text. Artistic cover Price: Si"!

and an explanatory

Point de croix Nouveaux dessins (Cross Stitch New Designs, P* Series) •

An album

in-8»,

containing 24 colored plates, composed of grounds, borders for cross-stitch embroideries Price 3 } •

and various subjects

* Cross Stitch

:

New

Designs

(II"*^

and Ilpd Series)

Two albums in large octavo, each

containing 20 colored plates composed of grounds, borders and various subjects for cross-stitch embroideries Price: 4^- each.

* Hardanger Embroideries Album

in large octavo, containing 36 plates composed ot a number of patterns openwork embroidery on counted threads 20 pages of text with explanatory figures accompany the plates Price 8^for

;

:

* Marking Album

in-S"

Stitch,

P* Series

containing 12 colored plates composed of alphabets, for counted stitch embroideries

and patterns

» Album

monograms Price

i

Irish

:

I''-

Crochet Lace

pages of text with numerous explanatory figures and 7 plates of patterns for Irish crochet lace, to which are added tracings on linen for reproducing the patterns illustrated "on the plates Price 1/5 in large octavo, 53

:

(*)

The puplications marked with an

are edited in English.

asterisk {*)

and of which the

title

is

underlined


:

anonyme

Thie Soci^t^

DOLLFUS-MIEG & 0%

Mulhouse-Belfort-Paris

manufacture and put on sale under the trade mark

DMC work

articles specially intended for embroidery, sewing, knitting, crochet, lace

and in general

COTTON, These

needlework

for all kinds of

articles are

made

l_(NEN

in the following materials

AND

SILK

in all sizes in ecru, white, black

and

all

colours.

They are to be had in embroidery and haberdashery shops etc. ; but the variety of articles manufactured by the Soci^te anonyme Dollfus-Mieg & C'°, bearing the D.M.C trade mark, is so great that it is impossible for even the best furnished shops to keep them all in stock. But as houses that are in connection with this firm or its agents are able to procure any of the D.M.C articles in small consignments, customers can always be supplied through them with all they require.

Cotton : Alsatian thread (Fil d'Alsace) Cotton lace thread (Fil k dente'le). Demi-Alsatian (Demi-Alsace). Bell thread Tiers-Alsatian (TiersrAlsace). (Fil 4 la cloche). Embroidery cotton Embroidery cottons (Cotons a broiler). special quality (Coton a broder qualite speciale). Pearl cotton (Coton perle). Shaded pearl cotton (Perle ombre). Chine for crochet knitting, etc. Special stranded cotton (Moulin^ special). Crochet cotton 6 cord (Cordonnet 6 fils). Special crochet cotton (Cordonnet qualite spiciale). Crochet cotton, bell mark (Cordonnet a la cloche). Crochet cotton* (Coton pour crochet). Knitting cottons (Cotons a tricoter). Hosiery Fluted cotton (Coton cannele). cottons yCotons pour bonneterie). Stranded Felting cotton (Coton 4 feutrer) cotton 8 threads (Mouline 8 fils). Darning cottons (Cotons a repriscr). Darning cottons special quality (Cotons 4 repriser qualite speciale). Sewing cottons superior quality and good quality (Cotons a coudre qualite superieure et bonne qualite). Sewing cottons and bell tacking- cottons (Cotons a coudre et a batir el la cloche). Special thread for sewing machines (Fils speciaux pour Marking « Alsa ». machines k coudre). Marking cottons (Cotons a marquer). Knotting cotton cottons special quality (Cotons k marquer qualitd spiciale). Knitting cotton (Fil a pointer). Alsatian crochet cotton (Cibl^ d'Alsace).

— —

— — —

— —

— —

(Relors pour mercerie). Knitting cotton bell mark special quality Superfine braid and braid (Retors special pour mercerie). « Alsatia ». Alsatian twist special I" quality (Lacet superfin d'Alsace et Lacet 1" qualiti). quality (Retors d'Alsace qualite speciale), etc., etc. boll

mark

Flax threads

— —

Floss flax or Flax embroidery thread (Lin a broder). Flax Stranded flax thread (Lin mouline). floche). Flax lace thread thread for knitting and crochet (Lin k tricoter et 4 crocheter). (Lin pour dentelles). Washing silk: Stranded silk (Soie moulin^e). —Persian silk (Soie de Perse). :

flourishii.g thread (Lin

Gold and Silver

:

Gold and

silver

embroidery threads (Or

et argent fins

pour

la broderie).

The following strokes placed

numbers of the numbers indicate

tables give the

beside

thickness of the thread.

the

of the above articles ; the each case the corresponding

si:(es

in


List indicating the

tU. /150\ s!!? oI

^

"

DMC

\80

Ki^r.y

ALSATIAN THREAD, DEMI-ALSATIAN (Fil

d'Alsace, Deml-Alsace)

TIERS-ALSATIAN and COTTON LACE THREAD, 9 cord (Tiers-Alsace et Fil

30

.

36

.

4Q.

50

60

i denteiie, 9 brins)

numbers and

sizes


of the

D.M.C n

threads in Cotton


List indicating the

numbers and

sizes of the

as well as the

MARKING COTTON (Coton k marquer)

KNITTING COTTON

CROCHET COTTON 4 CORD

(Coton k trlooter)

(Crochet 4

fils)

6 8

a

I

10

i

10

I

12

1

12

I

U

'

10

12 IS

14'

20 18 24

18-

30

35

16

<

-

18'

20.

20'

'

25

40

<

30

45

'

SO

-

60

'

35-

24

'

30

'

40

40. 50

.

LIN

POUR

70

DENTELLES

80

DMC

90 100 120

FLAX LACE THREAD

150

(Lin pour dentelles)

200

KNITTING COTTON

bell

mark

(Retors pour meroerle) 12 •

16 •

20-

10

15

3525

.

k pointer)

40. 30

10

I

15.1

20

30

J

'

-

30

20

KNOTTING COTTON (Fll

25

35

4550

40-

60

50

70

D.M.C registered trade mark D.M.C


D-M-C

threads in Cotton, Flax and Silk,

widths of braids. s.

4

I

6

I

810 15

.

20

.

3040 SO

'

6070

80 80

3

I

5

I

6

I

8

I

10

I

12 16

.

20

25 30

.

35

40

-

SO

-

60

-

70

-

100

-

150 -


Printed by the Socil^Ti anonyme

DOLLFUS-MIEG & O"


*^^!~-l^>^-

4-^v^

ms

S^P^


Embroid on net transl fr cu31924086746884