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ART NEEDLEWORK.


Cutf of Dress

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Violets,


i


ART NEEDLEWORK li\

A COMPLETE MANUAL OF

EMBROIDERY IN SILKS AND CREWELS, WITH FULL INSTRUCTIONS AS TO

STITCHES,

MATERIALS, AND

IMPLEMENTS.

CONTAINING ALSO

A LARGE NUMBER OP ORIGINAL DESIGNS AND

.^

]glant(Some (gfolouretf

^estsn

for ©"reixiel

"5^orft>

LONDON:

WARD, LOCK, AND

CO.,

WARWICK HOUSE,

SALISBURY SQUARE,

NEW YORK:

lo,

E.G.

BOND STREET.


AT?

i

f^-%^^j^"/'â&#x201A;¬^ "-^^


THE WILD FLOWER DESIGN FOR EMBROIDERY IN CREWELS, SILKS, &c., SUITABLE FOR CUSHIONS, ANTIMACASSARS, AIjTERNOON TEA-CLOTHS, MUSIC-STOOL COVERS, FOOTSTOOLS,

&o.


^f^9i

bgy


PREFACE The

Needlework" for

a

of

popularity

very

supplying

practical

attending

a

elucidated

by diagrams.

material

are

clearly

implements, and the

Art

clearly

explained,

and

given

every that

can

will find fresh

colour

are

been

has

to

as

The

modes of

various

mode of working

are

transferring

assist

the

obviate

as

true

so complete as to

to

make

it

We

last

as

At

necessity

for

and

to

to

materials,

the same

time,

designs and fresh ideas in the following

calculated

nature.

to

from paper

designs

the learner.

likely

described

fully

given

is

"Art

as

with a view to

prepared

stitches

information

is

to

be

of

use

both

while the accuracy of the drawings of flowers and leaves

depended upon

work

so

Needlework.

The

The remarks on

proficient,

the

of

volume

present

instructions

more experienced worker

pages.

be

The

time.

school

known

popularly

with every year, and the rage for Crewels

increases

long

Embroidery

of

kind

that

have,

in

fact,

to

may

endeavoured

novice

and

thoroughly to

render

an indispensable adjunct of the work-table.


CONTENTS. CHAPTEB.

Introductory

I.

.... ....

1 I

Materials for Art Needlework

II.

III.

Implements

IV.

Tracing and Transferring Stitches and

V. VI. VII. VIII.

IX.

TAQE.

Mode

of

23

29

.

Working

32

Colour and Design

36

Articles suitable for Embroidery

44

Description of Engravings

53

Description of Folded Supplements, consisting of

No.

I.

Sheet of Crewel Designs Dress-Yoke

No.

II.

No.

III.

Description

Design

for

Embroidery of

—Bodice

for

a

—Plastron—CufF—Pocket—

and Parasol-Cover

Five-o'clock

Tea-Cloth

.

Tight Summer Jacket

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

99 100

.

.

.

.

lOI

Folded Coloured Supplement, to be

Silk, Satin, Plush,

or Velvet

Collar

Worked on 102


"'«


LIST

OF

ILLUSTRATIONS. PAGE.

Work-Basket Hop Leaf Waste-Paper Basket Work-Basket

14 14 14 15

Penwiper Sachet

15

Work-Box

24

Toilet-Cushion

25

Work-Basket

25 26

15

.

Music-Stand Chair Design for Sofa-Cushion FOR A Necktie „

27

.

Embroidery for Dresses

34 35 37 38

Sofa-Cushion

38

Lamp-Mat

39 40

Lamp-Mat

....

Pelargoniums Pansy Fuchsia

.

41

41

.

Convolvulus

41

Writing-Mat

46 46 46

Reading-Desk Design for Sofa-Cushion Saddle-Cloth Waste-Paper Basket

47 47 47

.

Work-Basket Medallions

5°:

.

Box for Writing Materials Garden Basket .

Occasional Table

51

54 54 54


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

io

PAG£.

Duster-Baskei

54

Card-Rack

55 66

Footstool Sofa-Cushion Cushion Medallions

Mat

67 68 68

69

.

Work-Baske'

69

Fan

70

Screen Antimacassar Table-Cover

72

Band for Window-Drapery

76

71

.

73

Mat

Tapestry

77 77 78

Mat Tapestry

Mat

Sofa-Cushion

79 80

Chairback Toilet-Cushion Embroidery Design

81

Prayer-Book Cover Case for Letter-Faper Table-Cover Photograph-Stand Table-Cover Basket Workstand Reading-Desk Chairback Chair

83

.

81

84 84 85 85 86

86 86

Almanack

87 87

Toilet-Cushion Foot-Rest

90 90

Chairback Garden Furniture

91

Work-Basket Dust-Brush Holder Pompadour Bag

93

.

.

Whatnot

92 93

93 95


ART NEEDLEWORK. CHAPTER

I.

INTRODUCTORY.

THE

recent fashion for "art needlework" has given an impetus to one of the most ancient of

From

feminine occupations.

for the tabernacle,

dawn of

history

women wove and

to the present time,

needlework has been a woman's

come down

of

the art have

needlework exhibited

at

South Kensington shows.

years

advocates

the Israelitish

of

ago

was

it

rather

the "higher

the

is

again taking

fashioi

education" for

its

decry this

to

women

as

The

era

place

was a reaction from the excessive

when

it

was held up

as

an ideal epitaph,

the whole Bible in tapestry."

century which concludes,

importance

There

"She

is

"She

said

to

among

present exhibition

work

the ornamental

arts.

accomplishment,

they trusted a day was

that in

very-

and favourite

of Berlin wool

formerly popular

openly stating

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;from the

special

the

to us,

coming when the needle would no longer be a familiar implement this

decorated hangings

and Grecian princesses did not disdain to embroider garments

has happily passed away, and needlework

Some

when

Beautiful specimens

occupation.

of ancient

down

the days

female fingers.

Probably

attached to needlework in the last century,

died at a good old

be an

excelled in needlework,

inscription

age,

having wrought out

on a tomb of the eighteenth

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;of

she painted in water-colour

such

is

the kingdom of heaven."

Addison, fingers alone

time to

is

read

in

the

by the

so devoted

or write.

Spectator^

story of to

playfully

some young

working "

Yet

even

sets

rebukes ladies

this

excessive

devotion to the

educated by a "notable" mother, whose whole

of hangings" and cushions

Addison waxes

work of the

eloquent

in

praise

that

they have never learnt

of "the delightful

art

of

needlework," and devotes a whole number of his periodical to its praise. If once too highly valued, needlework has certainly been unjustly depreciated. Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots were undeniably highly-ediKated and accomplished women, but


ABT NEEDLEViOUK.

12

the mastery of

Greek and Latin

not prevent both finding time to acquire the humbler art of

did

Beautiful specimens of their handiwork

needlework.

The

the best friend of her dreary hours of captivity.

been intolerable save for the solace found

needlework was considered a

days

amusement, and her correspondence

Norman Conquest

a history of the

left

accomplishment

fitting

vestments

century yet extant

tv/elfth

over

all

the

a

for

it

of

From

skill.

and the

work

a piece of

Queen Matilda has

Englishwomen were celebrated

"opus Anglicanus" being sought

at Hastings, the

When we

continent.

full

is

princess,

Many

art.

has been sung by Homer.

good preservation

in

this

in

the Bayeux tapestry.

in

William landed

as embroideresses long before for ecclesiastical

web

Penelope's famous

of specimxcns of her

gifts

higher the rank the more the lady was expected to excel has become historical.

queen found her needle

latter

long years spent in prison would have

of materials for work, and

allusions to various purchases

the earliest

in this

and the

still exist,

see specimens of

speaks well for the

work of the

of the worker and

skill

the goodness of the materials employed.

The

of these

excellence

needlework

collection of ancient

appear as bright as in

embroideress

of a

left

at

the

and

results

orphanage of

in

drawings

all,

There

much

although

and

possession

to

her

is

Scattered

at

there,

the

Many

of the

descendants. left

(and

pleasing

as

a satin dress exhibited at Kensington,

intervals

over

the

a

are

satin

by an

One

needle instead of a paint-brush. injuring,

so

beautiful

specimen of

a

artist

who

artistic

worked

with smoke issuing from the chimneys, ruined

reminding one of the lady of the

embroidered with product

actual

the

of

seven

the

that they

liking

to

wear, and risk

the same date were

Much

among other

Nearly there

Is

all

Hence we

wide diversity

month

doing;

now

Many

appear to

century, found

;

In

own find

such

needlework was

Ancient

generally

are.

the effect

to

diversity in

the

specimens

regular employment a

woman

despise

the

amusement

in

Some of

produced.

perpetuate

more the

Nearly every lady

have come

that

that

such

the dresses and

monstrosities.

Perhaps

may have cheered many

Mrs. Delany,

diversion in

her

is

down

to

us.

concerned, but

hangings would be

one marvels that any one could work patiently

in

one of the best

needle

during

the

a dull hour,

has found refuge from her troubles art.

far

petticoat

and the work thus took the Impress of the worker's

patterns,

some are so hideous

month,

after

the quiet,

heart-ache.

architecture.

cottages

things,

by way of a novelty, ordered a

are equally well executed, as far as the mechanical art of stitchery

beautiful as pictures on,

of

patient

and various other equally clumsy designs,

worker than modern embroideries

invented and designed her individuality.

century, who,

last

orders

castles,

an

work with a

to

not equally tasteful, as an elaborately-worked costume in the next case shows. labour has been expended on this dress, but the pattern includes,

at

exquisitely -worked

tiny,

All embroideresses of

toil.

old

prize In any exhibition

preferred

can only wonder at any one

patient

almost as

sprays of flowers, pansies, violets, jessamines, so delicately coloured, so deftly shaded,

must certainly have been copied from nature

the

and seventeenth centuries

displayed

the eighteenth century, which might fairly compete for

of flowers.

surveying

in

time was doubtless employed

curtains

does his pencil, and

artist

occur

that

ideas

first

Silks of the sixteenth

After

beautiful

of their labours.

the

counterpanes

elaborate

lasting

of

Kensington.

workers handled their needle as an lasting)

one

is

worked yesterday.

if

some

executing

latter

the

reward was

In

the

and eased many a

needlework, although some

workers of the

eighteenth

dreary years of the

loveless


ABT NEEDLEWORK. marriage

chronicle of needlework, of in

good stead even

imprisonment with the

Queen

blameless

are

which she was so indefatigable a professor, and the

art

old

into

her

of

Marie Antoinette

temple by similar means.

It

is

her.

As we have

age.

labours

—poor

Her

"Letters"

which her friends had forced

into

13

needle

—whiled

C)ueen of Scots

another

Madame

perfect

stood

her

lightened

her

more

but

incarceration in the

young

Elizabeth, and the

princess

needlework.

to

woman

seems strange to add the name of an emphatically strong-minded

It

a

unfortunate

equally

away the dreary hours of

recorded that she,

regularly devoted certain hours of the day

Mary

said,

and

;

interesting

to the

of

list

Yet Harriet Martineau was an adept with her needle, and had indeed

celebrated workers.

supported herself by her beautiful fancy work, long before her books could find a publisher.

To

the

her

skill.

end of her seems

It

consigned to oblivion of

training

a needle

their

;

but

in

tasteless

to

visit

" plain workers' " spinning-wheel exercise

;

occupation,

but

Kensington

seems a pity to

it

show

will

are

labour,

that

fingers

and

The

indeed

decorative

for

steam

have abolished the

spinning-machines

tasteful

Without

inventions.

hideous worthily

totally neglect

these days of elaborate domestic ornamentation there

in

nimble

of

the

as

girls' brains,

art."

is

the

purposes

The sewing-machine may have swept away

no despicable instrument.

is

specimens of misdirected

educating our

A

fingers.

pleasure in the exercise of

needlework should ever become a "lost

a pity that

wool-work, and kindred

Berlin

the

she was a skilful needlewoman, and took

life

the

deft

and

distaff

ample scope

encroaching

on

the

for

time

required for a high-class education, girls might learn the art practised by their ancestresses in ages,

all

book in

an art not to be despised

fails

the

they

left

days of sickness or

trouble,

when even

the wearied attention, and the sad heart cannot rouse

to fix

Then

accustomed study.

resource.

in

Even the

the

itr>elf

the

to take

pleasure

mechanical occupation of the fingers becomes a valuable

Norse kings recognised the good of some such amusement,

old

favourite

for

though

the labours of the loom and the needle to their wives, they did not despise " Twisting of collars their dogs for to hold,

And combing

the

mane

of their coursers bold."

As Addison

remarks,

"These hours thrown away

work

and beds

for

chairs

pleasing memorial in the

things entitled "fancy into disfavour.

Alum

the

work" some

nineteenth

century as

in

Loan

generations?

of the " survival of the fittest."

The

handiwork

wax

suffice

to

employed would leave a

so

We

remains

still

Some

flowers

believe that the terrible

One

—would

any of these serve

and

fresh

of the

or Elizabeth's court has long passed

grateful pupil

ornamental in

untarnished,

the

patient workers of samplers appear

have realised the enduring quality of their handiwork and foot.

would

exhibitions of needlework preach the doctrine

dame of Henry

fair

the sixteenth.

fame by adding them at the

it.

visits

years ago served to bring ornamental needlework altogether

baskets, cardboard constructions,

but her beautiful

time

least,

shape of ornamental objects behind

to delight future (or present)

away,

At

whole family."

and

play,

dress,

in

secured

commemorates

their

to

names a temporary

that of her teacher also,

"Instructed by Alice Underwood."

Few

people,

elaborate designs

the

daughter

in

these

of our ancestresses,

taking

and bustle, would have patience

days ot taste

up the needle

when as

several

the

generations

mother

laid

it

toiled

down,

at

a

undertake

to suite

and the

the

of tapestry

great-grandchild.


ABT needl:ework.

u

I.— "Woek-Baseet. 2.

3.— Embeoideey rou Woek-Basket No.

4.— WASTE-PArER Basket.

Hop-Leat.

i.

5.

Embeoideey foe No.

4.


ART NEEDLEWORK.

15

6.— Woek-Basket (Open\

7— Embeoideey

8.

foe No.

Penwipee.

9-—Embroideeed Sachet. 10.— Woek-Basket

(Shut).

8.


16

ART NEEDLBWOEK.

'

But

perhaps, completing the task.

were content pile.

much

Still

revival of a

out

lay

to

a

in

it

ought to

Harriet Martineau found

(as

"

executed in

Builders of cathedrals

others

may

it

The meclianic

some

cases

serve,

like

in

and the present

brief space,

fairly

of domestic decoration.

woman, and

in

it),

may be

rejoice lovers

a desirable accomplishment for every

went gradually.

all

and wait for successive ages to complete the mighty

plan,

vast

beautiful needlework

taste for

those times

it

Skill

may prove

needlework

in

is

actually profitable

the poet's rhyme,

exercise

Like dull narcotics numbing pain."

Lady Jane Grey, who was

eight

men of her day, was Thomas Challoner, who wrote

prodigy by

mind.

of

mistress

learned

all

Sir

poem

Latin

a

as

quite

a

with her needle as she was learned in

skilful

as

was looked upon

and

languages,

her

in

praise,

in

specially

1579,

records that, " Inimitably fine

Her

With such an example,

there

is

needle wrouglit."

fear

little

the revival of

that

a

needlework

for

taste

need prove an obstruction to the higher education of women.

Once more

grandmothers has come into vogue, and our leisure

the tapestry-work of our

The

hours are busied with tracing, designing, and crewel-work. as

Nature

is

to

count the stitches

say,

the model, in the other

crewel-work or

and a

as

As

anything.

To

to

Berlin wool-work.

For some time past a very

to

the needle and

productions.

its

This

boon

a

taste,

In

in

freshly-plucked flower

a

that certainly never belonged

has been given

sort of attention

superficial

is

ingenuity,

of the

no doubt, owing mainly to the advent

is,

that

do Berlin wool-work.

that

carried

of colour

faithfully copied in its every gradation

embroidery may be purchased

this

this

is

can

be possessed of some

to

used in

such a charming extent

—one

is

In the one

conceive.

to

one can follow a pattern

as

match the wools required

The wool

possible

is

it

long

embroidery the worker requires

art

any shade.

may be

and

knowledge of drawing.

slight

almost

Berlin wool-work

old-fashioned

superior to the

crewel embroidery of to-day

sewing-machines.

Let little

it

On

articles.

women

the

encouraged is

not be supposed for one the

contrary,

we

moment

are obliged

boon they have been

great

— amongst

our young

girls

that

to us,

especially

we would to

and

— an

say one

word

hundreds

acknowledge with are

;

against

these useful

of

English-

hand, they have

but, on the other

indolence with regard to plain sewing

that

not likely to benefit our fancy works.

To sewing,

gain a thorough

and

then art and

make

straight

make

the picture

lines,

Embroidery

worn by the

ovals,

proficiency

fancy curves,

with

the

needle

is

it

needlework follow, just

as

necessary in

to

drawing one

practise first

plain

learns

to

and perspective which

&c., before venturing on the shading

itself. is

one of the oldest of the

ancients.

arts.

We

In the ornamentation of the ark

read of

we

it

"Upon

the

hems pomegranates

of

blue and

in

the Bible as used and

read that the

adorned with "cunning work," and the priestly robes of Aaron and embroidered.

first

his

veil

of the ark was

two sons were

richly

purple, scarlet and twined linen."


ABT NEEDLEWORK. 17

Irt rtiy' saik sa,Ia

'"'

°'

""

^°"' ^"' •'«

T ""' "'',"

T^t'7

of the slave-sh.ps were worked

^^^P' upon.

*^

'°''

"^^"^

"^^

'^"^'" ^"^ f"™'^"-

P-granates on It

The gods of Eg,pt had

II.—Embeoideet poe Sachet No.

embroidered, and

^^'--

had many "changes," according to the

Egyptians that the Israelites gained their knowledge of material help to them in building and decorating the

- -id

the

he.

that even

their vestments

rii

9.

different

seasons.

embroidery, which

was from the knowledge was of It

ark.

B

.h^


8

ART NEEBLEWOBK.

1

Dedau,

Syria was famous for the richness of her embroidery, as were also Tyre, Asshur,

.

.

The Greeks

Sheba, Chilmal, &c.

and used much embroidery

in

was a "studio"

for

work

We

perfect.

luxurious

their

in

industrious

apart

set

weaving and

indulged

largely

Embroidery flourished mostly Saxons the

portion did

tendencies of

artistic

was

embroidery

for

two

and

a

carried

Edward

the reign of vests

some

of

green

pelicans,

velvet

do perfected themselves

to

the Church.

long

since

it

in

The

made

show

which

of some

of the

principal

embroidered

with

gold,

a

white

Middle Ages.

Women The

too.

the

In the

race diminished so in

time was

this in

extent

the

are

given

artists

made

to

robe

worked

called

trade

Colonia

with

pearls,

royal

who had

in

In

us.

John de

and men both made

great ladies

pro-

the convents and

Also to William Courtenay for a gold.

ever

too,

though, unlike

what

to

Romans,

stuffs,

people.

robe

this

art

little

else

nearly every branch of fancy work, often making extensive offers

is

once more apparent among us,

Our

There

is

crewel-stitch

will

be found very

such a deliciously antique look about a

or curtains are handsomely worked, that our readers, taste

as the

make the

spared to

we___ shall,

no doubt,

find

our lumber-rooms and wardrobes specimens of samplers, &c., worked by fingers

cunningless.

copying them.

from the East.

fancy

recorded that payment was

is

the " rage" for embroidery in

it

proved a remunerative one

it

to

hidden away

embroidery and

images, and tabernacles in

a perfect business, and

Now

in

embroidered with gold.

robe of velvet

worked with

The names

Third

the

pains were

The embroidery of done by religious men and women the

are

allusions

on.

In nearly every house there

particular.

this

reached a very high perfection, and

it

history

In

in

kinds of ornamentation,'

all

England about the time of the

in

"opus Anglicanum," and was mostly abbeys.

No

embroidery.

should do well to copy them tastes,

of

lovers

and religious ceremonies.

their dress

Greeks, they imported most of

time of the

were great

especially

and industry may have

at

least

if

one asfbe/ic room

similar

room

and in

well

adapted

which the furniture

not possessed of ample means, in

their house.

for

by good


CHAPTER

II.

MATERIALS FOR ART NEEDLEWORK.

MATERIALS

that

may be worked upon

are so

exaggeration to say that almost any material

like

to begin upon. it

_

It

gets spoiled

not difEcult to work, and as

is

in

the

first

it

Children should

attempt.

also

be given

makes very good antimacassars, table and toilet mats, d'oyleys, &c, " Crash" is as much used as any material for crewel-work, and items, such

we should certainly not recommend it may be made from v>~hite linen. This can be

mats, &c., though

as

Pretty tea-cloths

width, and looks really well, especially fine

linen

is

is

to learn upon.

it

very useful

It

small

for

for curtains or portieres.

obtained of a very good

and looks well

frequently used for coloured silk embroidery,

linen,

not very great

is

the design be a close one and not too

if

hardly seems

a capital material

is

very cheap the matter

is

it

may be embroidered upon, from

Towelling of a loose texture

serge, &c., to the richest satin and velvet.

if

numerous and varied that

small.

Extra

nearly the whole

if

surface has to be covered.

Twilled linen, which this

material

is

so

is

very stout

narrow that

this

is

in

make,

about the

much used for borderings. only use it may be put to.

Cotton materials, such as workhouse sheeting, muslin, embroidery.

Children's

dresses

worked with crewel wool, and and washing Muslin

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;always

floss

silk,

a

are

strong

sheeting

twill

have

cotton, &c., are a

veiy

good

much used

appearance

for

when

and useful, with the additional merits of cheapness

well.

Scarves, aprons,

only need

of workhouse

The width of

is

a pretty material

fichus,

&c.,

minimum of

of this

skill

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

looks charming

material

make

and industry to

when embroidered with

elegant

eifect.

little

India

additions

muslin,

if

to

silk

our

worked

in

or crewels. toilet,

and

gold

and

This

may

looks quite Oriental, and could not be purchased for a light sum.

Twill cotton

be obtained

in

is

a very

several

strong material, and mostly used for covering furniture.

shades.

When

a suite of furniture

is

faded or in any

way

dilapidated


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK.

20

and unsightly this material

well

to renovate

possible

is

It

worked with

by covering the

it

lounges, ottomans, &c., with

chairs,

the curtains, hangings, and portiere should match

crewels, while

pattern.

in

Among These may

the woollen materials serges, cloths, merinos, and cashmere take a prominent part.

be obtained

all

either in silks or

crewels.

pink cashmere worked

Imagine a robe of pale

and there with yellow and This,

leaves.

worn by

if

The

suitable for a garden party or

drapery round

pink satin

pale

would produce about

be edged with narrow cream Serge

and shows in

to

it

fullest

its

finer

cloths.

than the thicker, softer

Every kind of grain

The

embroidery.

possible.

is

hat to match should be

edged with narrow cream similarly

autumn

leaves.

ribbed

surface

lace.

the dress, and

to

This drapery should

a rather better foundation than the more

harsher

the

that

work

takes the

Cloth can also be used for the same

frequently happens

It

effect as

lace.

advantage.

is

The

crown should be worked

the

foundation for

capital

the rougher pile

this

the

a

is

touched here

leaves,

charming an

satin,

fastened off at the side with a bunch of white violets and also

as

picnic.

shade the face, and lined with pale pink

so as to

ruddy autum,n

with

and interspersed with small sprays of white wood-violets and

silver,

a brunette,

Such a costume would be large,

may be worked

a charming diversity of shades and colours, and

in

well,

purpose, though

glossy smooth surface are

materials

of

work upon

better to

stuifs.

may be embroidered, from

silk

the

thinnest sarcenet

the

to

richest

gros-

silk.

Of

beauty and

used

materials

all

embroidery there

for

The shimmering

softness.

To

harmonises the most opposite colours.

We

materials.

Blue

surface

its

the complexion

It

should strongly recommend ladies to patronise a rule a satisfactory colour to use as

not as

is

upon

light

none to

is

too harsh and cold

;

but

in

satin

be compared with the

softens is it

for

satin

shades and

harshest

one of the most becoming of freely.

a foundation

and serge any colour may be used,

for

embroidery

;

It

is

the play of light and

as

shade on the surface of the one and the hairy, ribbed surface of the other carry off the usually crude effect caused by a large expanse of blue.

Velvet

Is

a

good deal used

crewel-work, both in cotton and

for

There

silk.

a ribbed

is

velveteen which makes a good foundation for crewel-work, and well adapted for mantel-hangings

and

Utrecht velvet may be used for the same purposes.

portieres.

viz.,

that

in

which the

pile

together with thick rep

The embroidery Is

a

kind

itself is

silks,

principally executed

the tints and shades that

in

Its

a

plies

to

is

This

best adapted for crewel-work.

in

painting.

in

texture and

colour.

a touch of harshness, and there

using this wool

Crewel wool

only, the loose twist

in

it

is

is

possible

much

to

make

thinner than

of which in working causes

it

to

It

material,

embroidery.

Crewel wool

crewels, silks, chenille, and plush.

Berlin wool

brilliancy without

In

"shadings" as a

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

expensive velvet

should always form the foundations for ecclesiastical

of worsted very different

obtain a colour of great

with two

the shortest

is

The most

possible

Is

so great a variety

is

one's design

as

artistic

Berlin wool, being

form

to

lines

like

made

those of

copperplate engraving.

The

silks

used

in

the embroidery

come under the head of Dacca, Mitorse,

filoselle, floss,

and


ART NEEDLEWORK. purse

Sewing

silks.

silks

when

thick

and

soft

may

also

21

be used;

kind

this

is

usually sold in

skeins. Filoselle

is

the raw material from which spun silk

is

made;

it

is

more easy

to

work with

,:'}giMi!l^

1

than

floss,

The French

and on that account more popular.

from those cocoons of are

2.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Embeoideex foe Wobk-Basket Nos.

known by Mitorse

is

the

silk

6

&

call

io.

it

bourre de

from which the moths have been permitted

name of "waste cocoons,"

much used by

the

Japanese

it

in

is

sole.

to emerge,

It

and

is

made

as these

cheap as well as durable.

those

exquisite double

embroideries

executed


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

22

by them, but keep

to

the

we

as

Berlin

English are

less

skilled

in

the use of our needle

which makes an excellent

silk,

substitute,

and

would be better

it

does

not require

to

much

so

care in handling.

Floss

is

the most

difficult

of the readiness with which

Gold and

silver

silks

it

to

silk

can be

are

work

with,

Dacca being more

mostly used

for

church purposes

It

material coming

up

is

used

present,

though there

is

much

in

vogue

for embroidering the

not so frequently used now, though there seems a hint of this pretty

again.

Embroidery over cardboard â&#x20AC;˘Dccasionally

at

toilets.

Chenille used in combination with silk was formerly stuffs.

on account

into fragments.

split

every probability of our ultimately using them in our

most costly

UDlversally used

in

the

home

very

is

for

little

working

used devices

except or

for

church

purposes, though

monograms upon mantel

it

valances

is

or

curtains.

The

design should

sharp

penknife or

There

is

first

scissors.

a thin kind

be drawn upon the cardboard

Then

place

it

in

pencil,

and then cut out with a

on the material, and secure

of m.ounting-board which

is

the best for

this

it

with strong

purpose.

thi-ead.


CHAPTER

III.

IMPLEMENTS.

THE

used

implements

on that account.

important

most-needed tools

The

Art Needlework are not many

in

Needles,

nor must

;

we

size to take

the wool easily, or in drawing

rendered thin and poor.

If a needle

which process can hardly be said of the worker

improve

to

way

The

pieces

article

too

is

fitted

relieves

insufficient

your wool

will find

appearance, besides trying the patience

long

too thin, too

the

to

requires to be dragged through the stuff,

it

general

its

left

be too thick, nor the eye of

Therefore take care that

and giving her a great deal of unnecessary trouble.

next

;

and must be

for,

too short, and

nor

the eye be in

let

sans reproche.

embroidery

otherwise

to

gum.

needles or the long-eyed embroidery

backwards and forwards you

it

too short

is

your needle be neither too thick nor

large

forget to mention the useful paste or

Never allow your needle

less

and a piercer comprise the

stiletto,

This depends m.ostly upon the material they are used

discretion of the worker.

hoops

a

needles should be either the ordinary round-eyed

needles.

every

frame,

a

number, but are none the

in

well

closely the

is

in

the worker,

is

frame

a

the

people

other,

imagine

is

liberty,

The

more scope

keeps

the

for

work

the

as

more

her

free

the

four-piece

tambour-frame, suitable

that working

most cases a mistake, for her

ordinary

the

;

need description.

to

one within

gives

leaves both hands at

category

known Some

of work. this

our

in

for

a frame

at

frame

from puckers, and,

an if

used

consisting

of

in

two

any other

dresses or

more tedious than

is

effectually

proves

postures,

frame

holds

enemy

the work,

back-ache,

to

anything,

it

is

easier to

work with than without.

The

use of the

stiletto

is

taken in embroidering a pattern.

of

the

this

to

make

The

the

holes

holes

through which the cord-edging has to be

should never

be made too

large,

and the whole

process effected with the utmost neatness and precision.

The

piercer

is

work

either

in

invaluable for laying the threads in gold or silver embroidery, and in raising

crewels

or

silk,

In church embroidery

it

is

used

for

working

silk

over


ART NEEDLEWOBK.

24

This

cardboard.

resembling a

little

stiletto,

instrument

and

flat

is

made of

steel,

which

is

about, as

a to

one end,

Detail of Woee-Box.

—WOEK-BOX.

15.— Embeoideet for Woek-Basket No.

Now

at

at the other.

14.

13.

round and pointed

word its

for

the

paste

or

17.

gum, which, perhaps, my readers have been wondering

connection with Art Needlework,

When

the material used for the foundation


ABT NEEDLEWORK. of the embroidery

with paste or

is

thin,

gum and

it

customary to

is

pressing

it

down upon

and easy to work upon, besides preventing

16.

frame

is

its

it

with linen or paper by smearing

This makes

the material.

17.

Embeoideey foe Aem-chaie No.

positively necessary

when

it

more

it

lightly

substantial

getting dragged or torn.

Toilet-Cushion.

18.

A

line

25

the embroidery

is

Wokk-Basket.

Foe Detiu see No.

15.

20.

executed over cardboard with

floss


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWOEK.

26

The

silk.

process

woof ends

is

follows

as

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;A

strip

of strong linen or tape should be stitched along the

the material, which must then be sewn firmly with strong thread to the webbing

ot

When

on the frame.

It

done the

of the frame are to be slipped through the mortice-holes of the other pieces,

laths

and the

pegs

better

is

fastened

tension

appears

twine.

A

threaded with

packing-needle

till

be done

in the

When

corner

them

of

with

the

the portion

tissue-paper

work

precious velvet this

:

is

in

it

of

the

work

is

In this

may be sewn on

it

Foe Detail see No.

Mtjsic-Stand.

finished

is

rolled

may be managed

in

this

is

in

and tack

finished,

way

it

take

down it

but also perfectly smooth.

The

it

put

may be

observe

that

wc

prevent

to

the bars the

and

rolled

of

creasing

it.

2r.

till

the stuff to be wrought upon be

is

fresh

in

and

fine

thread.

When

holland,

and

spread

another

stitches

covered very easily and well. really

her

large

very seldom necessary.

hands

will

A

are

not

only

scrupulously

be found to tease and roughen

should be smoothed with pumice-stone before commencing operations.

are

so

catch in the work, and in

if

small

roughened forefinger

dress must next engage the attention, and

with which

be washed

A

to

to

round the opposite bar, and so on

way,

v\^ith

out,

large surfiices

Every worker must be careful

and

the other side must

the frame, and then carefully place a portion of the

frame adds greatly to the fatigue of the worker, and

the wool,

twine must be sewn over

and cut off;

securely,

it

the holland,

portion of material.

clean,

The

securely.

and wadding between,

a piece of fine holland

satin

piece

Or

finished.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Brace

or

the frame

in

than the frame

larger

is

19.

When

fine

same manner.

the material

round one

reached, knotted

is

the

must be drawn through the upper right-hand

twine

or linen, and the end tied most

lower

the

the lath

has been

this

The strain should be increased gradually and cautiously till The v/oof ends must now be braced to the side-pieces with

in.

sufficient.

comer of the tape

use the thread double for this purpose.

to

fond of

pendants of

all

kinds, bangles, rings, Sec,

adorning ourselves, be rigorously excluded.

frequently occasion serious mishaps.

In

the winter

These are apt the

oatmeal and carefully dried, so that no erasure of the skin ensues.

to

hands should In the

summer


ABT NEEDLEWORK. it

would be well

damp,

especially

wash them often

to

engaged

if

in

delicate

in

warm

water,

I'j

so as

to prevent

their getting moist

or

work.

of the worker be not perfectly clean and fresh, a bibbed apron and sleevelets should be kept as part of the worker's to keep all pure from dust, and hold If the apron is made with large pockets, they will be found useful to

If the dress

be fomid

will

paraphernalia.

even

an ample supply of materials, or

engaged upon be it

affords an

hold

end of the

one

support to

20.— Embeoideeed Chaie.

of

be perfectly willing to

to

show the

towelling will

Paste— every one

my

a few of in

a

readers

saucepan,"'

mixed

it

sacriiice

Every kind of work

her work.

small

needs

between

difference

Foe Detail see No.

personalities

and

care

careless

of work

piece

the

may

not

know

add a pinch of it

the recipe,

resin

on the

Thus

we

fire

or

and

we

alum

to

stir

till

attired

should imagine an anxious

i8.

the sake of the spotlessness

for

handling;

delicate

the

even

coarsest

and dainty manipulation.

can miake paste, you will say.

smoothly, put

if

and leaves the hands and arms unburdened.

it

the worker will not be particularly vain of her reflection, though

worker

stuff

This prevents the weight of the material from proving a fatigue, as

large.

effectual

to

This, however,

give

it

here

handful

every quite

thick.

:

is

—Mix of

A

the case, and as

not

flour

and water

When

you have

some

flour.

wooden spoon

is

the best

for this purpose.

Paste material

it

overlooked.

should is

not

be kept more than a week.

better to use the fingers

When

the

material

is

In

spreading

it

upon the back of

rather than a brush, in order that no

especially

thin,

like

sarcenet for

instance,

little it

a

lumps get

may be

first


ART NEEBLEWOBK.

28 lined and then

afterwards.

The

When "When

When scissors, little

A a

is

it

paste

is

this

edging the embroidery

first

material

the

surrounding

it,

at

a material of

upon first

some

the outset saves a deal of time sets

to

the use of a frame becomes essential. linen,

and afterwards applied to more costly

be worked and then be backed by paper.

applied to the velvet and tacked on

is

A

effect.

trouble

work through

the linen round the embroidered part.

gold or silver cord run on wdth sewing to

easier to

be removed from the frame and cut round with a pair of sharp

should

leaving a narrow edging of

richness

little

done, the design should

is it

much

substantially lined

occasionally executed

this

done

thus

is

so

is

be allowed to dry thoroughly before the embroideress

should

a material

Embroidery stuffs.

It

than through a flimsy one, that

stability

work;'

backed with paper.

and

in

handsome this

silk

piece

case

it

will

of

may,

By means

of this

strongly with tiny stitches.

hide the bare edge of the design and add

embroidered w^ork of

course,

will

often

be transferred

if

outlive

necessary

the to

half-a-dozen materials in succession.

When

a piece of

work

is

finished

our paste

the back, after the linings have been removed. silk

is

brought

into

requisition

to

smear over

This prevents the ends and fastenings of the

or W'Ool from coming undone, and effectually keeps the w^hole "tidy."


Collar, Cuff,

and Pocket of Dress, with Crewel Embroidery of Violets, Leaves, and

Marsh Mallow.


i2i


CHAPTER

IV.

TRACING AND TRANSFERRING. programme

part of the

THIS To

a somewhat wearisome one, and requires careful consideration.

those ladies whose knowledge of drawing enables

upon the material we a tedious process

—while

draw

we

accurately,

To

is

may

freedom of

is

skilful

we must

just give a

by drawing

certainly gained

design, however,

worked upon be a

really cannot

word of advice and encouragement.

And

it

For such

costly one.

or

greater

we

for herself.

such as an ornamental to

a

as

design straight off upon the material,

one's

attempt

at least

little

scroll,

effect

the case

this

is

without

alternatives, therefore,

different,

help,

we

and even a

especially

will give

the

if

instructions

and transferring.

for tracing

The

who

exactitude of form and size, and a lady with

little

draughtswoman might lack the courage

material

up

lack the courage so to do, or

them with the barest knowledge of drawing.

effect

should advise every worker to In a set

once to draw their designs

tender this chapter of instructions.

easily

effect

who

to those workers

these last-named, however,

talent

at

our sincere congratulations that they are thus enabled to escape

offer

Flowers, ferns, leaves. Sec, require

no

them

design should

to the

of a

glass

first

be traced upon cartridge or drawing-paper by holding the design

window and

tracing

it

upon the drawing-paper by means of a

pencil

or

pen.

Another way it

to

this

the case

is

to place tissue-paper

drawing-paper by means of transfer-paper should

move

is

to

lay

the

now be pricked

removed the material

The

style.

it

through, then to transfer

the two.

The

design in

design upon the drawing

pricked carefully and evenly with a pin or steel point. design

pounce or pouncing-powder through has been

placed between

be carefully gone over with an ivory

or cartridge paper should

next

above the design and trace

will

the

The

on the cartridge-paper upon the material and rub holes.

When

this

be found covered with

is

done and the cartridge-paper

little

dots

in

the

shape of the


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWOBK.

30 design.

The pounce

to soil her hands,

should be rubbed on with a

the finger

is

not at

21.

of a to

design

fold the

all

brush,

a bad substitute.

Embroidery

correspond with each other,

little

the

Music-Stand tor No.

quickest

or,

if

When

the worker doesn't object the halves or four quarters

19.

and most accurate mode of drawing

paper into two or four divisions and draw upon the upper side only.

The

is

holes


ABT NEEDLEWOKK. may

be

then

pattern

correct

"Bank to fold in

A

through

pricked

obtained than

is

post" paper

is

and thinner than cartridge-paper, which

cheaper

made from

dark pounce

a capital

the material so that no second

last

too thick

is

pulverised pipeclay, or powder-blue, pipeclay, and

the material to be traced upon be a light

if

trial

For

needed.

is

A

by means of weights.

place

its

means a much more

this

pouncing the design great care must be taken to place

In thus

in

and by

once,

at

manner, so we should recommend the former to our readers.

this

make

divisions

the whole were gone over separately.

if

very good pounce can be

charcoal

four

all

31

second

reason

this

usually

trial

it

one.

exactly in the centre of

it

better to keep the whole

is

dotted

the

m.akes

impression

blurred and indistinct.

When

â&#x20AC;˘

pricked

the

outline

been removed the design

has

This

material with paint or Indian ink.

Make

and

stiff

should occur

remove the paint

to

to

is

rub the material briskly; advise

Do

workers

all

the

it

this

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

put

a

quite

will

however,

this,

;

There

the

ruins

A

transfer.

the

design

been done, traced.

is,

The

that

saucer,

If in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

happens

way

of

We do

to

the

way

easiest

should, however,

more than

it

obtain

to

all

upon

painting

and with a piece of rag

of the paint.

by no means

quickest

design,

white

;

pattern

a

once. oil

to

is

and then to carefully tear away

stitches,

which would otherwise perhaps come

believe,

I

over with

traced

a

a very excellent is

in

again

blue

is

suitable

for

month, well

natural

by the or even

as

inventor.

two,

draw one's

flowers,

to

A

lady

learning

patterns,

light

pencils,

who

supplied

The

materials,

a

the

gives

much It

is

the

we

if

is

When

purpose. will

prepared

in

full

directions

this

has

be found perfectly

two

A

white for dark.

an excellent thing

very fascinating

which may afterwards be "painted

never have a real "taste" for drawing

tracing and

for

colours,

white

piece of cloth

use,

are supplied

time to embroidery will do well to devote

in

amusement

There

is

Of

worsted."

knowledge of drawing and some ingenuity of imagination.

especially

for

cloth

together with

drawing.

while

mode of

the usual

placed between the -material and the paper pattern and

of pouncing.

the trouble

all

Tottenham-

Hanway-street,

16,

and the pattern and cloth have been removed, the design

The

6d,

Francis,

substitute for

hard lead pencil

of each colour, and blue and white for 2S.

by Mr.

invented

piece of prepared cloth

This saves

and blue.

apparatus

tracing

a

is

which

court-road,

as

a

into

and

doing,

easily

traces

all

performance.

design will be

the

or

possible,

the best kind of

is

a similar matter.

for

a

turpentine

so

in

know how

remove

as

inferior

and follow the outline with

to the material

pattern

and bold

free

all

little

be cautious

to

we

be found suitable for these.

paint will

tack

as

sable

stiff

pouncing powder with hairy materials such as serge or woollen goods

use

not

should be always used in the case of white linen,

and the embroidery consequently an

feeble,

a mistake

outline

sweep of the brush

each

_

For painting the outline a

and can best be put on with a pen. brush.

last

must be gone over upon the

are

to

be able

to

copy a bunch of

course

this

to design

requires

a

some people who would

they were to learn for a dozen years, and to these

give the above instructions for tracing and transferring.


CHAPTER AND MODE

STITCHES

ONE

of the

among our grandmothers

fashionable

we used

reason

how

has

it

adapt

to

effect

hope, in

fancy

in

than

if

DiAGEAM

I.

and most fascinating of

oldest

its

work, a

fullest perfection.

charm

peculiar

the

to

it

for

particular

knot the

being

an

half-way

from

the

Diagram

i.)

quarter

The will

practice

its

is

left

she

engaged

is

upon,

among

revived again

the

to is

the stitches

For

this

know

just

worker.

skilful

and

all

thus

us,

will

obtain

a

better

it.

StITCH.

made

surface,

of

a

in

now

and

decidedly the least mechanical of

a settled rule only were applicable to

CeEWEI

the crewel or long stitch once so

is

3.

— W0EK.ING

AN OtTTLINE.

DiAGEAM 4.— Shading.

following are the instructions for the popular " long stitch :"

The to

is

design

DlAGEAir

linen

stitches

most workers, while one who

DiAGEAlI 2.— WOEEIXG AN OUTLINE.

A

OF WORKING.

for tapestry-work,

It

and much discretion

V.

length

make them

abruptness

of

destination

of the

then inch

first

of the longer

the

in

the worsted

needle

the

distance,

point

curves,

must be

shorter

the

work when

more

or

left

according

coarseness finished,

&c.

brought from the under side of the cloth or

passed

and carried on

stitches

or

is

is

it

back

less.

at

to

It

about

entirely

the

from the upper side

again

again

is

as

to

the judgment

extent

of

surface

or fineness of the material

at

about

second.

(See

brought

beyond

far

up

the

about

at

of the worker, to

wrought

be

who

covered,

the

and

the

upon,

Naturally a closer stitch and more solid work are

required for antimacassars or sofa-cushions, which are always coming in contact with fidgety and restless

human

beings, decked out with every kind of ornamental

excrescence likely to pull and


ART NEEDLEWORK. catch

worsted- work,

at

than

needlework,

of

frieze

a

for

33

under

immediately

nailed

the

ceiling.'^

The

In working, the

terminates

then

the veins are put in

of stitches

are

The

towards

the

be avoided. taking

care

them of

direction

thin

places in

executed is

studied

in

of great

plant

a

in

II'

'I.

I I

I

floss

'1,1.1

DiAGEAii

should, in

different

and

outline

will,

carefully silks

;

is

going

edge of

inner

angles

in

stilj

this

line

stitch,

of the object

be worked

across,

as

we

recommend our readers

not

if

she

instruction.

it

laid with

keeps

It is

the

the

her

loves

always

art,

piercer

;

this

in

floss

little

to the

have her

very necessary to

Embroidery

fibres

as

fill

silk

up is

implement

open and broad, whereas

1

1

'

!'

1 '

I

-'5;iii^ \i i^'ij.

'..^I'W'i

'

'1

'

I

1

1

V

H

f"

'^

•-==.

i'"l'I.IJu'jil'-i3a.|i!^

5.

DiAGEAM

Satin Stitch.

constantly

lost

treatment,

call

6.

French Knot,

Before the

twisting.

which the French

good embroidery, be

which require a

the

stitch

engravings, too, will often afford useful hints

should be passed over and spread on the stitch,

same way, and

the

|ih[-.*w,.'

r

I

,|i-,

|l

.

I

'I

This kind of

filled

is

fS

'ji.ll'ii

I

\i Jjl

they would be

do

being

1 I

we

stitches

I

i

it

stalk

or grain

fibre

should never

any appearance of patchiness.

Hi

^

stuff",

in

curves and

without

,„ie??'iJ,j|-|r'.i

it

make

though

respect,

embroideress

working with

I

the

till

Old-fashioned pieces of pictorial embroidery

:'^|TO'|I:-

without

outline

beginning on

first,

easy to

and ready to find

alert

way, the

this

use

of

stalk

line

Indeed, an

stitch

this

a leaf,

and work back again to

side

the

inside

by

crossed

is

it

of a

stalk

one another, and a sharp, hard, defined

into

quite

is

this

in

Good

and her mind

open,

dovetail

It

4.)

others.

in

stitches.

eyes

till

take all the stitches right up to the

done, but invariably lengthwise.

it

advantageously

to imitate

outline

are treated diflerently, though the

worked

is

not to

Thus the

needlework.

frequently see

in

the lines of stitches follow the direction of the

that

imitated in

may be

careful

Diagram

(See

colour

two shades may

the

that

so

colour,

edge of

Be

centre.

working the

instance,

satin.

(See Diagram 3.)

last.

outer

for

one colour are worked

all

Variegated leaves and shaded flower-petals the same.

;

the needle to the other

pass

Leaves that

2.)

first

and work on the

first

then work another line

;

(See Diagram

up.

end

lower

and should resemble the woof of

laid

be covered

to

is

flower;

a

in

lower end

the

outline

begin from the

flower or

be smoothly and evenly

stitches should

flat

silk

end of the

is

is,

pulled

right

through the

piercer.

point perdu, because

and undefined,

i.

its

beginnings and endings

of course, not available for twisted

and point passe, or

satin

stitch,

must be adopted.

silks,

This

* In spealiing of Paolo of Verona, Vasari mentions with. api>robation the fact that he worked with the old-fashioned close stitch, which besides greater solidity " This manner of working," he goes on to painting.

has been adopted which

is less

had the advantage of producing an effect more like say, " is now nearly forgotten, and a longer stitch

durable and less agreeable to the eye."

C


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEUDLEWOBE.

34 consists

m

passing

the

and Chinese embroidery, with the right and wrong right

sides'),

keeping the the work;

wrought

are

stitches

Diagram

to

be raised a piece of

This

5.

stitch

should,

if

The

it.

known

strengthen in

the

take the

it

coral

Design

roii

with

common

between the

stitch,

taken over the

and

as

pattern, it

materials.

usefully

pattern

is

cardboard, and the silk

fern

to

enrich

some

skill,

to say, they

all

of which are

then

principally to

Sec,

stitch.

is

material.

applique-work, and

in

and thumb of your

has

for

certain portions of

The French knot

it.

we recommend our

needle

left

hand,

round

been drawn through.

at

the

The

a

is

used

readers

needle being on the right side of the

work, with your right hand you then twist the silk

stitch,

and

requires

The

two

padding, as illustrated

warp or the woof of the

chain stitch, knot

makes the

finger

the stuff near to where the

raise

Indian

SorA-Crsuiox, &c. ^

need description, are only used that

to

of

indeed,

in

should always be taken in a slanting directionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; that

of embroidery,

first

silk

to

material

most kinds

practise

stitch,

silk

comes

again

desirable

pieces

(making,

alike

the centre of the

in

possible, never run parallel to either the

Buttonhole too well

sewn

should be

string

stitches

is

it

beautiful

used for embroidery over cardboard, and when the

is

22.

taken over

here

piercer

and the

cotton,

exactly

sides

Sometimes

even and smooth.

in

The

manner.

this

in

may be done with

this

Those

from one outline to another.

silk

stuiF,

to

you

short distance from

silk,

and then

insert

the it

in

needle must then be pulled


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWORK. through,

and

needleful

must pass

the

wound

silk

and be

round

it

drawn quite

will

form a

a frame, you do this stitch somewhat diiferently. is

then thrust quite

it

carries

first

put

also

is

drawn through,

23.

it

must be re-inserted filling

is

finished,

which the whole

will

form the half of a

6.)

In working without

Diagram

small portion of the stuif being taken, a needle

up the

in

the

stuff

silk,

at

and when the thread

the point where

it

was

centres of flowers.

Embeoideey ros the End of a Necetie.

Edging cords and gold are fastened down by the outline

tube

through the tube formed by the twisting of the

French knots are used for

in.

A

little

(See

sphere, and should be as smooth and round as a bead.

through

tube

little

The

tight.

35

a hole must be

made

fine

in the

sewing

stuff

silk

with a

taken

SLiletto,

over

them.

When

the cord cut off and

the end threaded on a large round-eyed needle, taken through the stiletto hole and fastened off securely at the back.

This Stitch,

is

merely the

stitch

point russe, satin, &c.

proper;

many

others

are

used

in

this

work,

such

as

feather


«^^K^^^S*S»^^^^S^^^^!Se«9«»aieS^S!5S^^S«S^SS««^»s«)

CHAPTER VL COLOUR AND DESIGN.

WE

English are a colour-loving race, and our

but for that details

fault to

we

is

make

in a

subdued and decorous way

taste in the

appointments of

in the

to abuse them, but the greatest

In Art

in this particular.

a difficult matter to lay

and leave the

down

rest to the natural taste

we have

;

Needlework colour attention.

we

rules as to colour;

if

the most prominent feature,

is

she has any

can only warn, advise, and suggest,

of the worker.

Ladies

any symptoms of colour-blindness should by no means attempt embroidery. will not

know when

hopes, however,

cesthetic aspirations of the present generation will result

and should be studied with the utmost care and

do not or

outward seeming

the use of a crude, harsh tint instead of a good, cheerful tone of any colour

numerous "dress reforms" and

is

is

a great mistake in the use of colour in their dress

some improvement

It

in

In our dress, too, no exhibition of crude colour should ever be allowed to appear.

employ.

English ladies

in

may be used

use these or any other colours injudiciously

be avoided

that the

would be monotonous

Flaming reds and gorgeous yellows, forbidden us by good

fact.

of our dresses,

To

our houses.

lives

they lack the

artistic quality,

who

experience

Unfortunately people

and cannot understand why a scheme

of colour which appears rich and harmonious enough to them should offend the eye of other In a choice of colour

people.

A exist

in

great authority on colour

orange, 13

of orange and

green),

integrally

It

II

64.

neutralised

19;

follows,

purple, russet

11

their prismatic

and

that each in

integrally 16.

integrally 32.

purple)

21;

the same proportions

intensities

;

Of

The

(green

secondaries in the citrine

and

8 of

(compound

purple)

compound of two

— thus The

The

tertiaries,

olive

secondary, being a

of purple by three of yellow.

the secondaries in the same proportion. in

green

(orange

therefore,

13

consideration.

says that, to be harmonious, primaries of equal intensity must

by the remaining primary

of green by 5 of red,

be used

first

the proportions of 3 yellow, 5 red, and 8 blue

proportions of 8

is

harmony must be the

24

primaries,

orange by 8 of blue,

tertiaries arc

neutralised

by

course the above proportions suppose the colours to

but as hundreds,

we may

rather say thousands, of shades


n

ART NEEDLEWORK. and tones are

in

our individual

taste,

This

latter quality teaches

breaking

up harsh

also

possess

much tempered by more subdued

this

In the arrangement

quality

;

if

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; E.MBEOIDEEED

used

subdued,

surroundings.

back upon ourselves,

light falls

at

Greys and browns are invaluable

Black and white

used

in

judicious

Lamp.Mat.

injudiciously,

however, they frequently act entirely

glaring.

of a room one will occasionally see a brilliant antimacassar placed just

upon

it,

rendering

their intensity, while if the said antimacassar

have been

tints.

and softening crude colours.

lines

by contrary, and make a decided colour even more where the strongest

all, fall

us that blue and orange are harsh colours and must be used in

24.

quantities

after

and our experience.

small proportions and in

and decoration, we must,

daily use in dress

the

its

otherwise good qualities almost hideous in

had been placed

in

some

cool,

dark corner

same time appearing a pretty spot of colour amongst

it

its

would dark


ART NEEDLEWOBK.

38

In dress, "tells,"

An will

and renders the embroideress

be compelled

have on

arrangement of a home, and especially

the

its

to

good or

effect

who

twig or branch, for instance,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ElIBEOIDEEY

roil

will

not do in embroidery

the under part somewhat added

not seem natural. a

grey,

cream,

if the surface

A

or

in

nature will sometimes

to, or,

;

is

bare and

CniLDEE^'s DeESSES.

26.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EilBKOIDEEED SOFA-CUSHION.

This

making her sketch, that she

of leaves and flowers, while the under side

cluster

trifle

indifferent.

A

add or diminish.

upper side a thick

leafless.

embroidery, every seeming

copies fi-om nature will often find, in

25.

almost

in

FOE DETAIL SEE No.

59.

the upper side must be considerably thinned, and

strange to say, though copied from nature, the effect will

Another hint may be

beneficial to the anxious worker.

In embroidering

upon

any neutral-tinted ground the colours used may be much more vivid than

be pure white.

White

worker who would be an

materials are usually embroidered in

artist

at

silk.

her work must remember that she does not possess


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWOBR. all

an

artist's

In obtaining his colours

privileges.

he may

39 alter

or produce them

mixing, &c., but the embroideress cannot do this with her wool or

silk,

by unlimited

and must take care to

use just the right tint of colour she requires, or the effect, from an artistic point of view, will

27.

Embkoideey poe Lajip-Mat. Ko.

Lamp-Mat.

28.

be a

failure.

In subduing and somewhat altering the shade ot a colour, too, the artist has the

advantage over the embroideress, gain this end for herself. so that

if

28,

the worker

has

who

must, by the juxtaposition and proportion of her colours,

Crewels and

" an

artist's

silks

are

eye"

now made

for

colour

in

every shade and

she will

know

tint

exactly

of a colour,

what shade

to


ART NEEBLEWOBK.

40

choose

so

as to render her

wool, in which

it

work

was not possible

the harmony of the

work was

attractive

useful.

To

fill

This

is

another advantage over Berlin

and for

this

reason

frequently destroyed.

drawing a design no empty

allowed to appear.

artistic.

to obtain sufficient gradation in a colour,

29.

In

and

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUNCU

little

OF Pelaegoniums.

spaces

up a bare space a

should be little

bird,

left

and

yet no unnatural crowding

bud, or butterfly

will

often be found


ABT NEEBLEWOBK. The

Japanese have the art of "

ordinary Japanese a useful hint.

screen

We

this

English are

31.

clusters,

is

too

up" with very

fond

of

size.

We

necessarily

and

leaves,

rather

than

as

and should be adopted

to

be made up of

the

In studying an

think

things

as

mean when

z.— Cojs voLvuitrs,

merely composed of a vast concourse of atoms.

large flowers

perfection.

to

are apt

3

much must

little

to impress the observant,

fail

Fuchsia.

they are small, forgetting that

mountain

cannot

filling

41

For

Japanese

little,

this

and that the highest

reason

—merely

we

covering

choose thick the surface


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEBLEWOEK,

4^

with as

little

that

avoiding

in

as

Judgment

possible. this

required in

is

thus arranging

heavy crowding our work does not

fall

designs

into

the

for

embroidery, so

opposite

extreme of

meagreness.

To

to light, and stands

warmth and

light,

:

it

is

composed of the other two

well known, has a complementary colour,

thus, green

is

the complementary of red, purple of yellow, and orange of blue.

their

its

complementary form a

complementaries

in

harmonics

its

intensity,

repeated

Where you want

respect.

is

sounded,

and

this

the colour the most akin

well to m.ake your prevailing colour yellow.

33.

is

in

is

as

primary and

reflect

Yellow

about midway between yellow and blue

there

Each primary, primaries

and secondaries.

return, however, to our primaries

in

and harmonious

full

Ejibeoideey toe Weixing-Mat Xo.

also.

The

small

quantities,

the

eflfcct,

yet

proportions

relative

primaries, indeed.

when

a fundamental note

however well proportioned

primaries,

do not produce an harmonious

The

35.

acoustics,

a certain proportion; as, in

sound

contrast.

if

A

in

quantity

the contrasts are multiplied

by being

being

observed,

black

and

white

being

added, and distance and light helping to blend the component colours, a very agreeable result

may be produced.

the decoration of. their temples

The

Egyptians

not

by any means depend on

in

made use of

this

system

of colour. Brilliancy does

proportioned will appear dull

heavy

tertiaries

and heavy,

may, on the other hand,

Alwavs remember

that

when

a

as well if

as

the

primitive

colours,

which

if

gaudy and discordant, while the

not dull

well

and

well arranged, produce an effect almost brilliant.

primary

is

tinged with another primaiy, and contrasted with


;

ABT NEEDLEWOEK. a secondary,

43

For instance

the secondary must have a tinge of the third primary.

may be used with pure green; but

scarlet,

which

is

:

Simple red

red tinged with yellow, must have a blue

green; and crimson, or red tinged with blue, must have a yellow green. Colours other.

grey,

placed

in

Neutral colours for

example,

reflect

react

upon one another, and acquire each a tinge of the

the complementaries of colours on which they are placed.

Neutral

on an orange ground, acquires a tinge of blue, of which orange

On

complementary colour.

on a blue ground, effect

juxtaposition

orange

a green ground the grey becomes reddish ;

while

on the colours placed on

a

neutral

ground has a

very

;

on yellow ground,

subduing

is

the

violet

and harmonising

it.

34.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Embeoideey foe Weiting-Mat, No.

35.

Perspective should not be a characteristic of embroidery, the so-called "pictorial embroidery"

seldom appearing short

of ridiculous and unnatural.

dress

and decoration

light

and shade were used, the

textile

fabrics

necessarily

real

light

Light

and shade belong to

change position and

might

fall

shadow, and the whole effect be necessarily spoiled.

upon

In

sometimes,

it

you desired to remain

In

light,

that part

so that

pictures.


CHAPTER

VII.

ARTICLES SUITABLE FOR EMBROIDERY.

number of THEample

which embroidery may be applied are very numerous, and afford

objects to

scope for ingenuity.

the most useful

of

mats

toilet

appropriately

on the ugly

of the

made

in

hnen, towelling and

crash,

among

to

are

we have been doomed

&c.,

may

be made

all

those

also

little

curtains

until lately to

embroidery, and are screens,

Large standing-screens,

embroidery.

in

and are admirable for decorating

open shelves of

placed at the

occasionally

are

that

Cushions

use.

hand and banner

Curtains, both in

consisting

These are most

&c.

the most prominent place in

antimacassars,

executed, look almost as well as pictures,

if skilfully

as

may be made,

suites

among

and are an immense improvement

cretonne,

the luxuries of our rooms.

mantelpiece valances, friezes,

room,

For bedrooms whole

crochet or dimity mats

Httle

always to the fore

a

number.

and covers, night-dress-cases, bed-covers, watch-pockets,

and footstools occupy, next

frames,

Antimacassars, screens, sofa-cushions, and portieres are

cabinets, &c.

Articles

suitable

among them bags

;

are

penwipers,

:

may be

which

bazaars

for

satchels,

made

needle-cases,

embroidery

in

not forgetting tobacco-pouches, cigar-cases, smoking-caps, which

of designs and

stuffs.

It

is

such

a

difficult

thing

to

get

Aprons

to the finest

put

on

muslin,

dresses,

If

tablecloths

silk,

not or

as

mention

suitable

when

in

hundreds

present to a

to

birthdays or Christmas

scent -bags,

ticket -cases,

and money.

tea-cloths,

&c.,

upon, from coarse white linen aprons with

&c. bibs

or satin.

the

done

to

may be embroidered

when of crewel-work, should always be worked

the trimmings,

afterwards,

foundation. their

must not forget

every material

in

For

We

may be made

anything

gentleman, that ladies will hail these last-named as a welcome boon

draws near.

purses,

d'oyleys,

tea-cosies,

numerous

very

are

material in

this

way,

window-curtains.

and, indeed, whole dresses, are

is

apt

to

get

dragged

if

the

pattern

they have a habit of looking Trains,

ladies'

waistcoats,

now much trimmed with

as

if

cuirasses,

needlework.

is

separately and

worked on the

ladies

had donned

petticoats,

Children's

bodices,

dresses

look


ART NEEDLEWORK. when embroidered

especially well

are not

Aprons

carriages

for

twill,

another

is

round the

should run

design

workhouse

crash, merino,

in

way.

this

It

is

item

and these

edges,

should

colours

may

dresses

or holland.

army of embroidered

the

join

to

These

like trimming.

serge,

satin,

silk,

many

best for even these that too

and that the embroidery be put on separately

used,

be made

in

45

be bound with

afterwards

The

articles.

braid

or

ribbon to match the colours used in the embroidery.

A

brilliant

and

leaves

vine

also

will

design

somewhat out of place

is

are the

tendrils

of designs most suited to

sort

be found of greater use

the white

dark colour, as

of a

if

These carriage-rugs have the advantage of

when

Hanging pockets,

silk.

the

needle.

These may be made

indispensable in a lady's

Embroidered

and cravat-ends

sashes, fichus,

scarves,

in

gauze

silk,

crepe,

and looks

driving in the heat and

are

likely

all

subjects

for

and are almost

cashmere,

or

tulle,

soils

may be embroidered with

Mittens have of late taken very much the place of gloves, and fine

crash used

looking cool.

well as

lightness as

quickly

or hops,

ivy,

The

purpose.

this

taking off that cool appearance so delightful

glaring in the sun, dust.

Variegated autumn leaves,

here.

toilet.

girdles

and

suspenders

are

a

improvement when used with

great

hanging

pockets.

Utrecht velvet

a very suitable

is

and should be finished

course need lining,

When

thick silk lace.

material

room

a

for

by a deep

off

chenille or

Rooms

colour both with each other and the rest of the furniture.

we hope

indiscriminate use of inartistic decoration, that

There

is

another material that

also

with crewels

looks

and decided

the

;

especially rich

material

bags are frequently worked or

name of the owner.

her bag with a in

any

fanciful

fish,

thick,

is

in

and

gold,

of the china.

Gold and

more

and

soft,

pliant

The

effect

owner chooses.

to

an overdose of female admirers.

worked and have

hint will not be

fear,

little

AVe have seen

Ladies'

a

a

be bold

little

straw hand-

monogram

We

velvet,

several

and embroidered

somewhat representing the pattern

a design

in

may be worked

room which contained

which were of white Utrecht

should

our

advise

readers

this

to

adopt

makes them

all

it.

the

into account.

Why

curates should

or no time to wear them.

advise our readers to present

is

and when worked

Little dogs' great-coats

young curates who are burdened with always be

remain, a mystery, unless, indeed,

inclined to gout or corns ever

by the

It

material should

work upon.

in

thrown away.

purpose.

this

brown,

so rarely used, except for church decorations, that

I

harmonise

of an eccentric turn of mind, will ornament

if

was singularly good.

and pretty when taken

will,

little

design for this

Slippers are acceptable to every one, except popular

has been, and

should

crewels, either with a spray of flowers, a bird, or the

Sometimes the possessor,

the

it

or even with

are so often spoiled

shades of grey or

The

and pale blue or crimson threads

silver are

effective

in

suitable.

cabinets of precious china the hangings of in silver,

this

dragon, or some quaint head, &c.

design

fringe,

very handsome and suitable for

is

may be had

kind of ribbed velveteen which

silk

much ornamented with embroidery,

is

These of

or mantelpiece valances.

portieres

Gentlemen

welcome these additions

them where they

curate of a few of his fair tormentors.

will

These

it

be

presented with slippers ever

be that curates are usually over-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or

ladies either

to their comfort,

really acceptable,

slippers

are at

all

and we should strongly

and so

may be worked

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who

rid the unfortunate

in either silk or crewels


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

46 in

a hundred different devices.

ladies'

dress wear.

Gloves

35-â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MiT FOE Weiting- Mateeials. JSTos. 33 and 34.

If

may

worked

also

be

in

silk, satin,

embroidered

or kid they are extremely handsome tor in

the same way.

Ladies

occasionally

Foe Details see

m

^

fettfifij 37.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Design foe'a Sofa-Cushiox.

-Detail of EEADiNa-DESK No.

36.

embroider their parasols, and they look extremely well when so done, though this would be likely to form the occupation ot one " whose time hung heavy on her hands," for very handsome parasols

may now be

obtained at most reasonable prices.

A

very pretty as well as essential addition to


ART NEEDLEWORK. the tea-table

is

the cosy, which should

be embroidered so

47 as to

match the table-cover both

colour and design.

39.

Saddle-Cloth.

For Detail see No.

44. 40.

41

41.

.

Waste-Paper Basket.

Woek-Basket.

Emeeoideet poe Waste-Paeee Basket No.

40.

in


ART NEEDLEWORK

48

We

should advise

workers to embroider upon tolerably good materials, for

all

The work

work, time, and trouble seem as though thrown away.

Of

used.

upon crash or towelling

course in working

coarser than

upon

taking than

we

silk or

even

should a

Common

say nothing further on the subject.

not the

varies according to the material

stitches

would

necessarily

and we should embroider a serge with somewhat

linen,

satin.

the

if

be much

less

sense will put this forth to every worker, and

pains-

we need

In former times the bed-curtains and hangings were beautifully

embroidered, and at a Kentish mansion near Penshurst a bed that was destined for King James

The

the First cost eight thousand pounds.

hangings were of gold and

This costly room was

richly- embroidered satin.

and design, the cost of the whole amounting

in

to

up with

chairs, stools, &c.,

twenty thousand pounds.

Embeoideiit roE Table No.

43.

very proficient

fitted

There

the art of embroidery.

is

a

room

and lined with

silver tissue,

of similar materials

C)ueen Elizabeth was

49.

at

Penshurst where the crimson chairs

and couches are magnificently embroidered, and said to be the work of the Queen and her maidsof-honour.

This room was worked especially to do honour to Sir Henry Sidney.

Ages more

especially there

in

power the

decline,

and

we

work

gradually

art

reached

was

its

a rage

perfection

can only hope that, as it

up

to

its

since

its

men

then,

we

Much

as well as

the

so-called

England.

"While

the

the Middle

Saxons were

are sorry to add, there has been a general to see

the folly of our ways,

we

women.

their

richest vestments

Baycux tapestry was simply crewel-work done

in

This work was meant for the Church,

beauty and worth, would occasionally demand or seize upon

monks of Abingdon

shall

of the embroidery of oldrn times was done

decorate the walls and ceilings of their stately palaces.

from

in

we have now begun

original glory.

convents and abbeys by religious

though Royalty, struck by

;

for embroidery

In

Queen Matilda as in

a present

to

is

said to herself.

long stitch on linen.

it

to

have extorted

The famous Qiieen

Matilda


^an I'lT^-iiiiiriiiiii

mmmmm


%nM/.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWORK. bemg the author of this work, but Both men and, women pursued this art as a

there

has the reputation, of sut^ect.^

49

much room

is

and a

business,

for

great

doubt upon the

trade was

carried

on with other countries.

At

St.

Mary's Church, Oxford, there

Many

blue velvet upon a gold ground.

It

is

of

beautiful examples of ancient ecclesiastical needlework are

thus scattered up and

down

the country.

vestments wrought

divers

kinds

in

a beautiful pulpit-cloth of applique-work.

is

In Lincoln alone there are upwards of six hundred

Not

needlework,

of

We

embroidery used, but also for domestic decoration.

only

are getting

church, however, was

the

for

more

like

them ourselves

in

this particular.

Embhoideet poe Saddle-Cioth No.

44.

But

There have been

to return to the practical.

crewel-work washes well.

This

several disputes as to

bran should be placed

now and

tlien,

wring

but after shaking

to

partly dry

little all

it,

ox-gall

;

is

but

it

.

in

will not

then either

it

warm

water, and the

When

bear rubbing. so as

finish

it

to

rid

it

of as

by hanging

it

work

No

left to

much

these precautions strictly adhered to there

is

much

soap or soda must be used

;

to

render

it

clean do not

superfluous water as possible, hang

on a frame to

finish,

If the

no reason whatever

a

Press the material every

soak.

soaked long enough

used as a preventive against the colours running.

work should not be

whether the present

hardly a safe thing either to vouch for or deny, as so

is

depends upon the carefulness or otherwise of the washer. little

39.

or iron

it.

it

Sometimes a

wool used be good and

why

the washing of crewel-

entirely satisfactory.

Perambulator-aprons are

articles that

may be embroidered

;

also

counterpanes, and even the


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWORK.

s<^

There

backs of pianos. wide, and costs

centre,

worked

sheeting very suitable for counterpanes;

This material

2S. 6d. per yard.

trouble expended upon If

a twilled

is

in a design

imitate peacocks'

to

a

indeed, any design,

handsome bunch

and handsome, and quite pays for any

is

quite as suitable

feathers, with

front, a

in

if preferred.

few sprays of

45.

a

bunch of large ones

would be very pretty and

it

an evening dress worked in tobacco-flowers and maidenhair

by

72 inches

is

it.

and smaller worked round for a border,

scrolls, or,

thick

is

it

fern,

Embeoideeed

to

The

fern.

Flowers,

effective.

Imagine a scarf of white

form a

satin for

pattern should be represented

and then a smaller bunch, and so on

all

Medallio:n-.

round, the smaller bunches and sprays of fern forming festoons, not running straight round, for if

so the drapery of the scarf

would be even more embroidery.

An

effective if

impossible to

it

worked on black

satin,

show the

Violets

apron, bodice, train, pocket, &c., look charming

of white and blue

violets.

and they are much used

also

come

are

full

This design

design.

always a pretty design for

when worked

in

little

bunches

Roses always form a large portion of every representation of flowers, crewel-work.

in

moss-rose buds and leaves,

Forget-me-nots

would render

is

in

A

lawn tennis dress of ecru

flannel,

with trimming of

acknowledged by most people to be as near perfection for

their

share

of

approbation,

together

with

as

possible.

myrtle,

apple-


ABT NEEDLEWORK. blossoms, &c.,

and many kinds of

topped chiffonier might modernise silk

or crewels,

be

good design

a very

Any

article is

one

thus obtained

for the embroiderer's needle,

mixed with almost any flower, and the

a

Applique-work

one

is

46.

We

dresses, dolmans, &c.

with grey applj |ue-work. cashmere. in

The

effect

hop-plant

for nearly everything.

and

always a graceful

artistic

and much more

most charmJng and

It

may

effect.

effective than

effective of trimmings for

MEDALLION'.

The embroidery was

was very

and pretty.

rich

when done

of thick velvet, and seemed to be raised from the

it

in

On

dolmans, mantles, &c.,

always looks handsome and distingue. applique-work, as well

as heavier

if

the

work

is

applied

Mantelpiece valances such as curtains,

things,

&c.

poitieres, Little skilfully

The

have seen a dress of dark blue cashmere which was richly embroidered

black velvet upon silk or satin,

look especially well

suitable

far less trouble

of the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EilBKOIDEEED

is

marble-

have a deep fringe.

should

trouble and ingenuity.

have

tendrils

Ottomans can be covered with crewel-work, and are Berlin wool-work.

The edge

little

and

old-fashioned

the sides of serge or satin, worked in

at

same.

by

possession of an

in

by having panels

it

and covering the top with the

Quite a modern elegant is

fruits.

51

things

are

also

embroidered

in

this

way,

slippers, cosies,

cut and carefully embroidered, generally prove satisfactory.

If

cushions,

we

sit

&c., and,

down

to our

when work


ART NEEBLEWOBK.

52

merely with the idea of gaining amusement, and no higher motive or ambition,

Needlework

Art

we

contrary,

think

ourselves with crochet

and Berlin wool-work.

worthy of a better attention and greater study, we

it

we

a void that

fills

and content

alone,

never could before

eye as the painter looks

at

his

and we

satisfy,

and handle

picture,

it

we had

better

.let

on the

If,

shall find that

it

just

shall

look upon our work with .the same

with

as

delicate

touch as the musician

a

fingers his keys.

An

old

applies

this

proverb says, "Nothing to

Art Needlework

drag the material to gain

be

cleanliness,

cleanliness is

to

and delicate handling that be rich

good

in a is

it

workers to

and never stop

that

is

picture-like effect

start till

work and

which

skill

and ingenuity are

its

;

at

that

hint will not

first

us,

called

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

little

indeed, if

we

in

could

artistic

taste.

;

it

its

we fancy woman who is

out

us

we

fail

to

have

of that

mere

should give as our advice

only can effect this

value.

;

No woman

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

if

difficulty,

no one can it

being

she has time,

such a one to be lacking in feminine proficient in

means of beautifying her home

beautiful in any form cannot

To

the beginning of their

at

would hardly seem worth the reaching,

indeed,

A

Time

yours.

want of

to inhabit.

steady application, and

fairly

will

Patience, harmony,

be thrown away.

gradually lifting

upon

:

it

are spoiled from the

one has not, especially

attainment which constitutes

fortune, and has always the cultivation of the

we seem

be above fancy work

and certainly

that this

grows upon

that

things

tear or

our highest ambition

is

with patience, keep pace with perseverance, outrun labour, conquer

the very striving after

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;should

we hope

least invariably follows

at

many

so

And

not worth doing well."

one's temper over one's

lose

thing, but this every

more a thing

reach perfection at a stroke

of course

There are

and careful handling.

Improvement

qualities,

smooth

at all

might sum up the rules for needlework under these heads

mechanical sphere of action that

all

To

especially.

to utterly spoil the

is

We

undertaking;

to

worth doing

patience and perseverance are needed here as in most things, and without

;

effected.

skill

is

literally

fancy at

work

saves a small

her fingers'- ends.

The

be praiseworthy and ennobling.

1


CHAPTER

VIII.

DESCRIPTION OF ENGRAVINGS.

NOS.with and turkey I

Work-Basket.

3.

red plush,

Illustration

in

and point

interlacing buttonhole stitch,

stitch,

3,

The

russe.

worked

The

silk.

worked with

are

threaded

with the gold braid.

a narrow fringe

No,

is

The

olive silk.

The

sewm round the

centre

handle

is

of the

veining

where the cane

lid,

wound round with

Rosettes and tassels of

lid.

Hop-leaf and tendrils suitable for Embroidery

2.

in

pale-green crewel wool, with thick veinings of the same shade. a

trifle

paler,

and the

stalk

is

in

twisted

silk,

is

hung

The

The

grey cloth.

the latter in a bluish

the embroidery

is

6, 10,

tint.

sewing on of the lining and straps

satin

sides, as

for the

The edge and

and 12, Ornamental Work-Basket,

sides,

and

tassels,

and

in Illustration

The are,

leaf

if

is

is

i.

in

anything,

canes

thin

covered

with

by which the basket

ring

in silks

and crewels, the former

leaves are green.

The sewing on

of

is

red

satin,

The and

basket

fitted

is

made of wood and cardboard

up with pockets

hidden by ruchings and rosettes of red

to

match.

satin ribbon.

The The

and cross-piece of the basket are of wood, and the ends of cardboard, with

shown

embroidery

open-worked,

hidden by a bronze ring.

covered with a light straw, lined with

foundation,

and

basket has a circular piece of embroidery on a ground of pale

Trace the pattern and embroider the swan. and water

in silver-grey,

Nos.

front of the

tendrils

tendrils

the same shade.

Cardboard basket with 4 and 5, Waste-Paper Basket. and wound round with black leather. At the back is a bronze up.

silk

chain

worked with

is

Crewel Wool.

Nos. canvas,

is

in

alternately with

The

shown

as

covered

For the embroidery

gold thread, and the raised spots and stamens with pieces cut out of the braid. sprays

cane,

split

and work the embroidery

flowers are

and of reseda, and the buds with pink

several shades of blue

of thin

embroidered and trimmed with gold braid.

on the plush the pattern given

trace

Work-basket

(Embroidery.)

is

in Illustration

6,

which represents the basket open.

given in the original

size.

When

In

No. 12

the design

the pattern has been drawn, the roses


ART NEEDLEWORK.

si

are embroidered with crewels or

47.

split

filoselle

in

four

shades

of

pink, and

the

blossoms with

Weiting-Case.

48.— Gabdeh Basket.

43.

SO.

white, fi

The

— EilBEOIDEEED

TABLE.

FOE DETAIL SEE NO.

43.

Ul'Stee Basket.

whcatcars are worked

51.— Detail of No.

in

chain

stitch

with maize-coloured

filoselle

50.

or crewel wool

J


ART NEEDLEWORK. and gold thread.

The

^

55

stems consist of gold cord sewn on with

silk

53.

54.— EMBEOliEliED CaED-EacK.

Toii,

DETAIL SEE NoS. ^Z &

55.— Detail of Dustek-Baseet, No.

leaves

and sprays are worked with many shades of green

The

of the same shade.

Detail of

ISTo.

54.

53.

50.

and brown

filoselle,

or crewels in


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK.

56

The

overcast and feather stitch, and plain and interlacing satin stitch.

and

The

quilted.

Nos. 7 and cardboai-d

handle of straw and cardboard 8.

Penwiper.

the

centre,

is

that

sewn a square it

silk,

in

of

only measures

blue satin, on which or

of

foundation

this

is

the pattern

sewn

a

given

in

Embeoideey roB stiffened

2] there.

CuA1E-Ii]dGÂŁS,

muslin

No.

7.

wadded

4

inches

flannel,

is

satin.

made of

silk braid.

On

c'v.C.

in

diameter,

(See Illustration 8.)

piece of fine white

slightly

penwiper

4 inches long by 2| wide, and bound round the edge with black

cord so

is

covered with a leaf-like pleating of red

The

(Embroidery.)

56.

to

is

lining

It

is

rounded towards the covered outside with

embroidered with coloured crewels

Trace the design upon the

flannel,

and "work

the;


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK.

57

flowers for chain stitch with red, blue, and pink silks, the tendrils and foliage with olive silk in satin

and overcast

Then

stitch.

down

turn

the blue satin, and

line

of gold thread with overcast stitches of blue

the

embroidery.

A

form the handles.

cord

thick

The

of blue

ends are then

57.

silk

is

A

silk.

sew round the edge a double

white

silk

fringe

is

sewn on under

sewn round the foundation and continued

up with loose-pleated ruchings of black

filled

to

cloth cut

Design toe Table-Coyee Boedees.

round the edge with small Vandykes.

Similar

cloth

is

then sewn on underneath the cardboard

foundation.

Embroidered Sachet.

Nos. 9 and 11. taffetas,

and coloured

12 inches.

On

with silver-grey

the

silks

or crewels.

wrong

side they

taffetas.

The

The are

outer side

Materials required:

cardboard

wadded and is

is

Cardboard, cotton wool, grey

cut into

two

squares, each measuring

scented, and then covered on both

embroidered,

the illustration of which

we

sides

give

m


ART NEEDLEWORK.

5-8

/No.

/I I.

.

After the pattern has

been traced upon the

5!!.

three

shades

of

silks

or

crewels,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;EilBROIDEBY

(

taffetas

the

rosebuds are worked with

rOR CaRD-TeAY.

and the ivy-leaves

in

green.

The

stems

and sprays are


ART NEEBLEWOBK. embroidered with green and brown

59.

in

grey of

diflferent

silks in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ElIBEOrDEEY

59

crewel stitch and point russe.

FOE SOFA-CUSHION No,

stitches.

A

strip

border

is

worked

26.

shades in knotted stitch and point russe, and

sewn on with black

The

is

of grey taffetas i% inches

relieved with fine gold cord

broad

is

then gathered at


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEUDLEWOBK.

6o

each side arid used to join the two halves of the sachet, one side being of handkerchiefs, laces, &c., being placed within them.

grey

silk

and 14.

Ornamental Basket with Embroidery.

60.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Box roE Weitikg Mateeials.

61.

10 inches high, including the handle. white cloth placed round the frame. pattern cerise stitch

It

is

Foe Detail

open so

then

as to admit

off with

finished

fasten.

Circular frame of bronze standing

SEii

Xo.

64.

Cakd-Basket.

has a strip of cardboard covered with

No. 14

gives

the design

in

its

original

satin

and

When

the

lilac

size.

has been traced upon the satin the blossoms are embroidered with white, yellow, in

;

sachet

Button and loop to

cord and a ruching of grey sarcenet ribbon.

Nos. 13

The

left

chain

stitch

and point

the stems and sprays

russe.

are brown,

The buds

are

and worked

in

pink

and green, and worked

feather

stitch

and point

russe.

in

and satin

Along


ABT NKEDLEWOBK. the scallops

is^ewn a

light blue silk braid

and gold cord; the cloth

A

basket finished off with ruchings of blue satin ribbon.

Nos. 15 and 17.

The

Work-Basket.

material

62.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Embhoideeed Footstool.

6y rests

on four

feet

and

is

fitted

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hakd

the open-work of the canes.

Screen.

On

blue

silk

selected

is

Toe Detail see No silk,

inside

these pieces

then cut uway and the

black polished cane;

the basket

69.

63

and

is

finished

on the outside with ecru-coloured

the

is

cord and tassels trim- the handle.

Fob Detail see No.

with handles of red

lined with pieces of cardboard covered

61

are

silk,

ofi

by

tassels.

It is

which shows through

covered with scarlet

silk

which


ART NEEDLEWORK.

62

has

been previously wadded and quilted

design for the grey cloth with silk or crewels red,

cornflowers

the

knotted

stitch,

blue,

and the

and the wheatears

asters

in

finely

in

No. the

16.

centre

is

straw

split

Square cushion,

five

silk,

silk,

in

chain

in

crewel

and knotted

and overcast

stitch.

are

pattern

work

a

silk.

:

crewel

The

stitch.

give the

worked

In

yellow in

buds,

leaves,

The sewing

wide, covered -.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

with

flowers

blue

satin; in

with white and

Co.

;

the

leaves with

two shades of

olive

For the open-worked pattern draw out every 10 threads

row of buttonhole

worked with the same

in

inches

and point russe

one way, and cross every 4 of the threads this

poppies; are

stamina are worked with

gauze embroidered as follows

stitch

we

gimp.

64.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ElTBEOlDEET FOE BoX, Ko.

blue

The

crewel stitch and point russe.

in silk

a square of linen

In Illustration 17

stitch.

The

white.

hidden by red

is

Toilet-Cushion.

crewel

for

and branches are worked with green and brown

on of the embroidered portion

diamonds.

small

into

Then

with blue

stitch line

standing with

left

the

silk

;

grey

silk.

Round

the edges of

the cross stitches on the outside

embroidery with blue

satin,

so

that

the

satin

forms a narrow band round the linen gauze, and add the bows of blue satin ribbon, folded as

shown

in

our

ilkistration.

Nos. 18 and 20. crewel

stitch.

The

Low

Chair of Fancy Straw, upholstered with

chair itself

measure 4 inches high.

It

is

is

gilt

of a dull

tint

silk

plush embroidered in

of gold, and the cushion for the seat should

loose from the chair, but the cushions for the back and sides are


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK. way with

upholstered, in the regular plush,

buttons.

A

63

coloured braid, with

and a cord of the corresponding colour round the cushion.

the embroidery, which

is

worked on the plush

in

tassels,

No. 18

is

sewn round the

gives the design for

crewel stitch with coloured

silks.

The

small

covers for the arms are embroidered to coiTespond.

Nos. 19 and 21,

Ornamental Stand for Books, Music, Pictures, &c.

65.

polished cane has an oval is

Detail or Bag No,

satin

with purse

silks

and

fine

is

shades of red chenille, the asters white chenille and white

chenille of various

worked with

tendrils

violet

and ^blue

are embroidered in

chenille,

silk.

with stamens of yellow

brown and green,

partly with

The

given in No. 21.

of the embroidery being executed in crewel, feather, and knotted

are

of

80.

embroidery, the original size of which

worked on a design of white

The framework

stitch.

The silk.

chenille,

violets

The

The

design

colours, part

rose has four

and forget-me-nots leaves, sprays,

partly with

silk.

and


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NFEDLEWOBK^

64

No.

2 2.

Design for Embroidery

in

66.

67.

sofa or carriage cushion,

waste-paper basket.

or

it

Either

Crewel

Stitch.

Detail of No.

This

is

intended for the centre of a

47.

Embeoidery roE Smoking-Cap.

may be employed for silks or crewels may be

a wall-pocket or blotting-book, used.

The

poppies

a

or even

a.

deep bright red,


ABT NEEBLEWOBK. 65

forget-me-nots

pale

blue

with

yellow

centres,

the

leaves

69.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EiiBBoicEiix FOE Foot-Rest No,

62

of one

or

two well-chosen

shades


ART NUEBLEWOBK.

66

The two

of green. entirely

in

white

circles

cotton

in

this

the

centre of

design

the design should be in old gold.

very elective

is

as

an

ornament

for

a

If

worked

nightdress

or

pillow-case.

No.

23.

Design for the End of a Cravat.

70. /

71.

is

embroidered with coloured purse

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Loiris

It

may

ears of

also

silks

com.

The

embroidered

give the original

in

size.

jz.

on crossway pieces of white grosgrain

for a cushion or sachet.

latter are

we

Seize Footstool.

silk,

the

stitches

stitch.

Embroidered Screen or Lamp-Mat. be used

design, of which

Detail op Cushion No.

used crewel, overcast, knotted, and feather

No. 24.

The

The

This screen

is

embroidered on black cashmere.

pattern consists of a bunch of cornflowers and

satin stitch in

two shades of yellow

silk,

or in crewel


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

The

long stitches are worked with gold thread, as also are the stems.

flowers consist of one white stitch and

gold thread.

The

The

with crewel wool.

stitch

The cup

two blue

in

satin

stitch,

with red

72.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Embeoideeed Cushion.

7 3.

with yellow

silk

stitches.

The

veinings

are

worked with

has an outline of gold thread, with a green and wood-coloured framework.

poppies are worked

stitch,

67

silk

In

the

petals,

Foe Detail see No.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Detail of Cushion

and point d'armes

for

No.

the centre in buttonhole

71.

74,

wood-colour.

The

The small flowers The pattern consists

foliage

Is

worked

in

different

The

shades of green, the stems with gold thread.

are yellow, red, and white.

octagon border imitates a brocaded braid.

of yellow stars and red diamonds,

with gold centres. screen

is

The

long stitches between the diamonds are worked with white

mounted on bamboo, and ornamented with

tassels

of different colours.

silk.

The


ART NEEDLEWOBZ.

68

No. 25.

with turquoise blue in

buttonhole

ice

wool

in

chain, overcast,

and feather

—EilBEOIDEEED SEE

CrSHIOK.

76.

Nos. 26 and 59. Sofa-Cushion. satin

centre the cushion is

is

worked

Foe Detail

Medaliion.

with bronze

worked

N'O. 73.

77.— Detail of Fan No.

satin

stitch.

is

stitch.

74.

75-

The pattern The outer edge

Ground, White Pique.

Border for Children's Dresses.

is

quilted

82.

(Crewel Stitch and Point Russe.)

merveilleux, with embroidery

down with

arranged in reversed pleatings.

The

Square cushion covered

worked on a ground of bronze

small buttons

Medallion.

of brown

satin,

velvet.

In

the

and round the edge the

design for the embroidery

is

transferred on to the


;

ART NEEDLEWOBK.

69

from No. 59, which represents a section in the original size. The asters are worked with two shades of rose silk in crewel stitch the stamina in knotted stitch with gold silk. The velvet

;

outer leaves of the cup-shaped flower are

worked with three shades of

olive silk in

chain stitch

w/w\w|lfs

iSiiiiij:JJiillilUJiilte^^^^^ 78,— Mat.

79.

Foe Detaii see No.

81,

—WOEKSTAND.

Woek-Bag. Foe Detaii see No. 65.

80.

81.

Detail of Mat No.

78.

the other petals in different shades of heliotrope, outlined with the same colour in overcast stitch.

In the centre of this flower lines

meet with brown

silk.

The

of yellow

sprays

silk

of leaves

are are

worked

diagonally, and crossed

where they

worked with two shades of blue

silk

in


ART NEEDLEWORK.

70

overcast

stitch

knotted

stitch

with to

old-gold

;

the tendrils are

with yellow

the design

Round

is

finished

No. 26, and

leave the square represented in

the cushion.

overcast

in

the outer edge

with olive

stitch

and the blossoms

silk,

in

buttonhole stitches round the scalloped edges are worked

The

silk.

When

silk.

worked

is

a

frill

the velvet

after

it

away from the work,

cut

is

wadded

has been slightly

sewn

is

it

so as

of satin 2 inches wide, and at each corner a

to

bow

and ends of the same material. Nos. 27 and 28. fine

and blue cashmere for

small

diamonds with blue

lining, silk.

The

border, of which

is

FaIT,

worked with

centre

blue, white, and green silks

in

is

No. 27

satin,

with a border of

cut out of satin,

diameter.

FoE DeXAIL SEE No.

white flannel, and vandyked round the outer edge.

are

The

and measures 10 inches

8Z.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EilBEOIDEEED

in

mat of blue

Circular

white flannel and ruching of blue satin ribbon.

net, in

Embroidered Lamp-Mat.

The

centre

gives a section,

is

stiffened is

quilted

embroidered

77.

cornflowers, forget-me-nots, and sprays

The

and crewel

respectively in chain

Round

then sewn on, and the mat strengthened with a ribbon wire.

The

stitch.

the centre

is

border

a pleated

ruching of blue satin ribbon.

No. 29 shows a bunch of pelargoniums, which, when worked a

handsome centre

should be worked petals white, with

buds

at

the

for a

sofa -cushion,

in faint

are

No. 30. Pansy

worked

for

antimacassar,

&c.

pink shades, while the darker ones are

deep purple shadings.

left side

music-stool,

in

in

leaves are

worked

in

The

silks,

petals

deep red, or

would form

of paler

tints

the

light

else

shades of green, and the

little

pink and white, just tipped with dark red or purple shadings.

Embroidering a

the darker shadings deep purple,

The

in

crewels or

little

The paler petals worked in marone, The leaves and stalk are green, with

Hand-Bag, &c.

and the centre yellow.

deeper-coloured vcinings.

Nos. 31 and 32.

Fuchsia

and Convolvulus for working the corners of an Antimacassar,


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK. The

Sofa-cushion, &c. (pink

of the fuchsia are worked

petals

covered with white, would

almost

silk,

paler

The

red anthers.

be

The

the darker parts are in purple.

obtained),

71

suitable

if

desired

with dark veinings.

The

stamens are yellow.

colour could

be worked

should

stamens

leaves are pale green,

with white shadings inside the cup.

the

a shade of pinkish white

in

with mauve for the light shadings, and the leaves and tendrils are in green

Nos.

round

loped

Mat

34, and ^S-

o^T^,

edge, and

the

may be taken

with

lined

from No.

either

from No. 35, a narrow black

o^'

2)2)

The double

pattern.

and the

stitch,

are

braid in the centre

silk

purple,

silk.

olive-green cloth, scal-

If the pattern

arranged

down

is

taken

the centre of

Embeoideeed Screen.

worked with fawn-coloured

The

silks.

in

silk

interwoven

The

silks.

pattern in

No. 34

is

buttonhole

chain stitches

worked on a

the chain stitches are worked with several shades of olive.

;

and blue

across with three shades of pink

worked

is

is

up with vandykes of fawn-coloured

intervals are filled

ground perforated with small holes

The

silks,

almost

blue,

border, the design of which

worked round the edge.

^^

worked with two shades of fawn-coloured

are

A

material.

woven with coloured

braid,

lines

same

the

34)

83.

the

Oblong mat of

for "Writing Materials.

pale

is

be

pink with

in pale

The convolvulus The little bud is

not

silk,

so as to

form a diamond pattern.

Nos. In the design

and

2>^

centre

given

in

is

The

inner

worked in

in

an

the

ground the design

Reading-Desk.

38.

oval

original is

size

worked

part

of the

satin

stitch In

several shades of

filled

flowers

in

No. 38.

crewels

in is

or

worked

When silks.

in

olive

dark polished wood and

of

dark green

up with

pale olive,

maize and

Reading-desk

velvet

the

The silk

on which

pattern has been

and crewel

embroidered traced

in

knotted

stitch

stitch.

The

and point

The

foliage russe.

the

upon the

the buds pink.

flowers in white and

crossed with a darker shade.

olive in satin

is

cane.

gilt

is

calices

are

embroidered


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

7^

When

embroidery

the

completed the oval

is

is

lined

with cardboard and a bright green

lutestring.

No. ^y. Designs worked paitly in satin

and partly

stitch

The

one within another.

Arm -Chairs,

Crewels for Sofa-Cushions, Settees,

in

materials used

in

the

are

is

long or crewel stitch placed in rows

so-called

crewels and

This pattern

&c.

filoselle

of different shades.

silk

Nos. 39 and 44. Saddle-Cloth. (Embroidery.) Saddle-cloth of navy blue cloth lined with black felt, and embroidered with three shades of grey-blue silk in chain and interlacing buttonhole

The

stitch.

small

pattern

long chain stitches are crossed with gold thread.

worked with the same

at

original

size.

The

letters

worked with

are

84.

gold cord.

The

W

leaves

in

acorns are

is

worked with

The monogram

of gold thread.

stitch.

Nos. 40 and 42. plates.

on the outside

and

olive

tendrils

The in

crewels

in

is

design

is

a thin sheet

the

in

the

and are edged with

stitch,

IN Outline Stitch.

silk,

tendrils silk,

with brown

G

and the

silks

knotted stitch

in

crewel

the

;

stitch.

The

and the cups with two shades of brown,

embroidered with blue-grey

in

silk

in

crewel stitch edged

given

Basket of osier and polished cane, studded with

and covered with very dark red

No. 42.

in

stitch

;

the

with buttonhole, overcast, and feather

lined with

satin

a

In

No. 44 shows the former

blue- grey silk in

is

overcast stitch with silk of the same colour.

lined

buttonhole

the same design as the border.

are worked.

and

Waste-Paper Basket.

basket

the

in

corners

fi-ont

intermingled with a spray of oak-leaves and acorns

is

The crown

with gold cord, and sewn on

ni

feather-stitching of coloured

crewel stitch with olive

in

crewel and knotted

bronze

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; TowEi

three shades of olive, the stems

worked

and

monogram and crown

the back a

corners

colours

In the

The

smaller

larger with stitch of

cloth,

flowers

are

lid.

The

olive.

sides

are

embroidered

is

worked with blue

two shades of pink

two shades of

of wadding, and sewn on to the

which

;

the

The

leaves

cloth

is

and then

embroidered with


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEJDLEWOBE. Round each

a similar pattern in the same colours. of dark red

No.

blue

Work -Basket.

41.

The

silk.

small

packets

folds

of blue

embroidery

section of the embroidery

is

a twisted cord

and ivory wool.

open-work part of the basket of

73

of

oval

is

fancy

of

straw

and

of

the

Above

lid

these

is

covered of

packets

with blue needles

and trimmed round with pleatings of the

worked on

a

ground of white

feather stitch with pink and olive

and

silks,

Blue

has a similar kind of border.

black

polished

The

cane.

threaded with blue satin ribbon, on which are sewn droppers

surface

needles.

satin,

Basket

in

same

fitted

with

covered

with

is

cushion

a

is

The embroidery

cloth.

and

satin,

material.

worked

is

has

also

chain

and

It

in

The

knotted stitch with gold thread.

lower

lid

cord and tassels and bows and ends of blue satin ribbon

silk

are then added.

85.

Embroidebed Table. Coteb.

Nos. 43 and 49. Occasional Table. (Embroidered cover.) with dull crimson satin embroidered from the design given

The

stitch.

blossoms

of

centre

being worked with

calices

are

brown

filoselle.

in

satin

edelweiss

yellow

silk,

worked with grey-green

The

leaves,

and overcast

stitch.

are

silk

Low in

trefoil-shaped table covered

No. 43

embroidered with white chenille crossed in in

satin

overcast stitch,

stems, and tendrils are

The embroidery

is

stitches

then

brown

of

various

in

and overcast

satin

in

and the grasses

worked with

satin

in

stitch,

The

filoselle.

russe

point

shades of

the

with

olive-green

edged with a heavy cord and fringe of

the same colour as the satin.

Nos. 45 and 46.

Medallions for Note-Books, Card-Cases, Purses,

be worked on various materials,

may

also

such as

silk,

be worked upon cambric or muslin

Nos. 47 and 66.

Box

for

in

&c.

The

leather, velvet, &c., in outline stitch.

black

Writing Materials.

designs

The

may stitch

silk.

This box, which

is

intended for

holding


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK.

74 writing

together with paper, envelopes, and

utensils,

on the outside, and inside with the

The

mountings.

and monogram

has a satin ribbon

No. 48.

which covers the

satin

v/ith

same coloured

in

silks

on

se^\^l

top

a

blotter,

satin.

It

of the writing mat

crewel and stem stitch with gold in

which the writing

loops, into

Garden Basket.

Roman

Basket of

Detail of Mat Xo.

85.

flovv'ers

colours

of

is

used

worked are

crewel ^^ool

in

pink,

blue, and

in

yellow

with a lock and bronze

fitted

embroidered with a wreath

is

The

cantille.

tassels.

the lid

lining for

are thrust.

utensils

a

bag netted with ecru-

On

the basket a bouquet

straw, fitted with

coloured thi-ead and drawn up vrith ecru-coloured cord and

of

is

bronze plush

covered with

is

8^.

chain

satin,

overcast,

for

the flowers,

and

and point

stitch,

the

for

leaves

The

nissc.

shades

several

olive.

Nos. ^o, 51, and ^^.

Duster Basket.

Basket of willow straw and black polished cane,

ornamented with three plush Vandykes, joined together and finished and

tassels.

The

middle vandyke

work

it

with

is

split

the calices, leaves,

plush

is

embroidered

embroidered from silk

in

crewel

and branches

No.

from q^j.

the

design

Trace

in

the design

The buds and with olive-green. The stitch.

given

v/ith

Nos,

on

flowers

are

stamina

arc

woollen

51

balls,

and

peacock-blue pale pink and

worked with

tufts,

The

c^^.

plush pale

olive

and blue,

silk

in


ABT NEEDLEWORK. knotted side

The

stitch.

Vandykes

are

and olive-green, and bronze

sewn

design

is

outlined with gold cord sewn on

of bronze-brown plush

same

the

in

edges

the

to the basket,

style

is

with

embroidered from No. 51

A

No. S5-

as

Vandykes with

which

^-

woollen

of the

tassels

border

and

balls

of tufts

The

silk.

pink, blue,

in

heliotrope,

of peacock-blue

The embroidered

same.

ornamented with woollen

yellow

fine

plush

is

next

tassels.

^03. 52, 5;^, and 54. Embroidered Card-Rack. Gut out three oval pieces of cardboard? cover them on both sides with red satin (the centre cover must be embroidered). Sew a red

87.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Detail of

cord round the edge and stitch them together;

back corresponding at

the

to

back and

pieces.

edge.

in

Make

The

this

is

sidepieces

^t,

show the

figures are

ground of longcloth.

when

the

;

then

cover

No. 90.

cut a

this

of double satin;

large

pleat

dry the pattern

is

side

cut

piece

red

of cardboard satin,

and

tliem at the bottom to

for

the

sew a cord

and sew them

hide the joinings of the front

designs on the lower ovals.

worked

The wrong

with

also

Ornament the bottom with a red bow

front.

Nos. 52 and

No. ^6,

shape with the front

Mat

in interlacing is

out

satin stitch, either separately or together,

on a

then brushed over with a solution of clear gum, and close

to

the edge,

and sewn

like

an

applique design


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

76

on

to a

ground of

olive serge.

The

outlines

then gone

are

over with

gold

cord,

which

is

continued to form the tendrils.

No. sy. Design pattern on the

satin

for

Border of Table-Covers, &c.

and go over the

up the space between the double

Fill

outlines with lines

Ground of

brown

sewn on with brown

filoselle

with feather stitching of fine olive

and work round the outer edge with slanting buttonhole

stitches

Trace the

old-gold satin.

of old-gold

two shades,

in

silk

silk.

worked

silk

far

.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ElIBEOIDEEED WiNDOW-DBArEBr.

apart.

pink

up

The silk

in

in

leaf patterns

silk

in

herring-bone

olive

and pale yellow

silk,

olive,

brown, and red

silk.

plain

worked

slanting buttonhole stitch.

maize

Nos.

are

60

and

64.

stitch,

alternately

with

The brown

with dark red plush, with

for

lines

in

Writing-Paper.

embroidery

lilac,

blue,

is

filled

(Embroidery.) lid

filled

with alternate leaves of

overcast, knotted, and

worked Upon the

and

yellow,

of chain stitch at each side are

and the space between

and with designs worked

Case

two shades of

from

The the

crewel stitch with

case

is

pattern

covered given

in


I

ART NEEDLEWORK. 77

No.

of bronze

handles

The

front. sizes,

Narrow

64.

case

envelopes,

of

straps

and

is

a

of the

leather

divided inside into

post-cards,

illustration

in

satin

stitch

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

with

is

crossed

centre

several

bud

Mat.

Foe Detail see

sewn down with

silk

silk

respectively

to receive

on

case.

the

note-paper

sides

Two and

of different

at the top

brown

threads

of the

same

No.' 86.

Foe Detail see No.

shades of pink

calyx being put in with

with blue

of the

side

The embroidery pattern is traced upon ecru-coloured linen gummed on to paper. The pattern is then cut with careful comand gummed upon the red plush ground. For the embroidery

silk.

87.

and the flower on each

silk,

the raised spots and lower tendrils with olive blue, the

found

are

several compartments,

90.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mat.

:

each

&c.

89.

proceed as follows

gummed down

are

of the same metal

lock

which has been previously parison

red

the

small

The

silk.

The

linen

5-petalled

ground

The

veins

and

the

at

It

flower with

bell-shaped flowers

and the centre with gold, colour.

side of

are

are

worked

heliotrope,

worked with

the sides of these flowers

threads

stamina,

in

stems

each

and

case being tendrils

are


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWORK.

78

worked with gold

all

silk

thread.

every

Lastly,

outline

edged with gold cord, sewn on with

is

of the same colour.

The tray is fitted into a light frame of gilt The three triangles are cut out of cardboard, reeds by means of blue silk cord and tassels. The cornflowers and forget-me-nots are covered with white cloth and lined with white taffetas. The heath is embroidered with blue, and the wheatears with yellow silk in crewel stitch. The sprays and tendrils are embroidered with worked in knotted stitch with red purse silk. Embroidered Card-Tray.

Nos. 58 and 61.

green and brown

in

silks

A

crewel, overcast, and feather stitch.

ruching of pale blue sarcenet

ribbon runs round each triangle, and hides the sewing on of the lining. silk

then tied at the corners and

are

91.

No3. 62 and 69. upholstered

in

Footstool.

peacock-blue plush.

among

Tapestbx Mat.

the tassels,

Oblong

the centre

is

A

section of the pattern

the ground

colour of

is

filled

silk

up

in

side of the border are

yellow

silk.

finished

of

Nos. linen.

are

and

The bunch

68. in

brown polished wood

down

it

is

at

each end of the footstool like

worked

as follows

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

pattern on

stitches

of wool or

olive wool, outlined

The Vandykes

silk.

with red-brown and

rounded and edged with a knotted fringe of peacock-blue wool, and peacock-blue

(pompons) of the same colours.

6^

No. 69, and

worked with peacock and

off with tassels of red

silk balls

in

m.

a pattern embroidered on a fawn-coloured

and partly with long single

on each

tabs

given

61.

crewel stitch with coloured wools, and outlined partly with a contrasting

in chain stitch,

The

is

of blue grosgrain

Illustration

in

footstool of dark

material resembling figured damask; and this embroidery hangs a tab.

shov/n

Fob Detail see No.

(Embroidery.)

Down

as

Bows

Embroidery

the middle

is

for in

silk.

Larger a

silk.

balls

Screen.

The

The

footstool

and

tassels are

This

r.creen

rosebuds are

in

is

then edged with a row

sewn on

is

at

each corner.

embroidered

three

shades

upon of pink,

grass

the


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK.

rounding pattern

silk,

and

cord,

and measures

satin,

satin

silk

of the same colour.

The The

applique.

point russe.

of

out

the

it

spray

satin

shades

is

then

together.

It

olive-green

Similar cord

of

flowers

and feather

or sateen

drawn up

stitch,

for

The

lutestring. It

may

rest

lined

is

The bag

point russe

in

is

with

sur-

taffetas

and

straight

cut out of a piece of

and the front part

is

Trace the pattern upon

and Vandykes below the

lines

stitch,

overcast,

and the

silk,

is

edged by gold cord sewn on with

is

crewel

half

No. 6^.

in

are

knotted

stitch,

and

and stems with

calices, leaves,

fine

worked with

colour,

cord

and

fine

and the

velvet

is

chenille.

velvet,

embroidered from the pattern

The

of the bag sewn

of olive-green

tassels

silk.

slightly

we

give in

wadded No. 6y

crewel, knotted, overcast,

in

silk

red

sides

Smoking-cap of dark blue

worked with four shades of bronze

is

the arabesques being worked in the darker and blossoms in the lighter shade.

the

70.

a

Smoking-Cap.

the same colour where

No.

canvas

folded in

is

in

same

of the

top with

at the

overcast

stitch.

in

The blossoms

silk

size.

The

The

brown.

Embeoideeed Sofa-Cushion.

with

The iowers edged with and chain

sewn on

worked

is

olive.

and lined with black the original

It

which

velvet,

is

and

No, 6y. Embroidery

in

by 23.

rosebuds are embroidered with pink

lined

the stalks

cerise.

The

palm-leaves.

the original size

in

of brown

is

cord, piquee with

silk

inches

11

92.

several

olive-green,

in

(Applique and Crewel Work.)

embroidered from the pattern given

and cut

leaves

tassels.

Work-Bag.

Nos. 6^ and 80. olive-green

yellow

in

yellow and olive

with

blue, stars crossed

mounted

worked

is

of blue, the

shades

forget-me-not in three

79

lines

The crown Footstool

stitch are

meet

;

of the cap

filled

the is

up with crossway

remaining part of the

as

of white

flower

is

silk

sewn with

worked

in

satin

embroidered to correspond with the border.

Embroidered and Made

either figure as a footstool or

lines

a music-stool.

in

Louis

The

the

Sixteenth

foundation

is

style.

This

stool

of red plush, and the


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

8o

wreath of roses foliage

is

crewels or or,

if

in

shades

all

different shades

in

the flowers,

is

is

in three shades

silk

should be a

the owner choose,

it

pink, red,

damask white,

tea,

and gloire de

of green, and the ribbon, which edges and winds in and out

To

of blue. faded.

little

may be

truthfully represent this style

The wood of

entirely

the footstool

is

all

The

Dijon,

the colours

among of the

black, with gilt tracings,

gilt.

ail^>>Iji:r>^-s>>iOj>>>^>^lT>>>;!;l!irfr>l£y»^^

93.— ElIBEOIDEEED TOWEI,

94.

Nos. 71 and 72. velvet, at

the

velvet,

edged corners.

and

with

(Embroidery.)

Sofii-Cushion.

silk

The

Embeoideey roB Towel No.

cord,

and

cover on

embroidered

in

plain

the

finished

outer

and

side

Oblong cushion covered with peacock-blue

with

off is

interlacing

9:.

pompons

turned satin

of

back en

stitch

with

coloured revere.,

faint

wool

faced colours

and

silk

with bronze of

filoselle.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

AET NEEDLEWORK. The

cushion

velvet,

left free

by

this revers

embroidered with

patterns

in

filoselle

the corner are

of the cover

in

virorked

same

the

also

of reseda

silk

stitches

in point

de

Ceewel

riz,

as

silk

The

revers.

outlines of the leaf

filoselle

and

filled

in

with

Cushio:!^.

Dbsigit.

as

shown

shows the method of embroidering a flower and bud.

with a

the

and dark reseda

Embeoideeed

96.

shades

hidden under a triangular piece of peacock-blue

with brown

55.

several

is

8i

cord of the colours used in the embroidery.

in

No. 71.

The

cushion

The same is

then

illustration

finished

off


ART NEEDLEWORK.

82

Nos.

yi,

In the centre

and 74. is

Circular Cushion covered round the

a circular

of

piece

edge with puffings of yellow

olive-green velvet, slightly scalloped

the design given in No, y^-

The

leaves with various shades of

olive-green

flowers are

made with

worked with braid,

and

between

pale

the

the

braid

of

bronze

plaited

flowers

silk

in satin,

stitch

the

and gold thread,

The

silk.

and

velvet

double

point is

cut

and

embroidered from

worked with pink, white, and blue overcast,

and

knotted

97.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EiiLEOinjiJiY roE Basket Woek-Staitd No.

are

-

russe

in

the

centre

worked with

away and

the

space

stitch.

^ilks,

and the

The 4

lines

106.

and the knotted

lin^s

silk.

stitches

are

blue filled

silk.

between them are

also

formed

For

up with

the

with

the

patterns

old-gold

satin


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEDLEWORK. edged with two rows of pearl and

stitches

filled

up

plaited

in

heliotrope, the lower with

or

stitch

crossed

The

silk.

braid

mountings.

white

floss

silk

Embroidered Fan.

Fig.

stem

stitch

and gold

cantille.

twisted

almond

Frame of carved with

It

is

satin,

Fig.

all

worked

gilt

4.

silk,

of black fretwood covered with

is

chain

in

stitch.

ivory covered with white in

and stem

crawel

and gold

cantille

black

silk,

The

fan

has

and worked

from No. yj.

stitch

cord with

tassels, finishes

embroidered

satin,

Border of gold

silks.

lace,

and

Frame of polished black wood with gold

round, and having a border in

threads of the

side

first

like

punto

Pattern).

tirato.

tassels

designs,

Square mat of

For the

an open hem, taking in

latter,

in

in

A

the

crewel and

of black

silk

covered with

six threads

worked with pink crewels

in

it

in

fine holland,

draw out a at

sufficient

a time.

6 must be taken with 3 threads of the second

the embroidery in the centre see No. 81, which represents are

cross, stitch with yellow silk.

in

silk

floss

wood covered with

Mat (South Kensington

of threads and work one side 3

worked

is

and a border of hen-feathers and gold beads.

Nos. 78 and 81. out

overcast

Embboideeed Phatee-Book Coyee.

different-coloured floss

with gold.

with

The upper figure is worked with olive silk. Round the embroidery is a

The frame

.1.

Frame of carved white

Fig. 2.

border of marabout feathers, twisted white Fig. 3.

outlined

Medallions for Note-Books, Card-Cases, Purses, &c,

98.

fan.

are

satin

lines.

black satin embroidered with silver thread and black silver

on the

patterns

brown, and the centre with

braid and netted fringe of brown,

Nos. y^ and y6. Nos. 77 and 82.

The

cord.

83

6,

stitch,

number

the other

and so on.

the original size.

buttonhole and interlacing satin

On

fringed

The

For

flowers

the stems, calices, and


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ABT NEEBLEWOBE,

84

The

stamina in satin, and overcast with marone crewels. cast stitch,

leaves are

worked

The

with two shades of green and two of red-brown crewels.

and over-

in satin

pattern

is

especially

suited for dinner-mats.

No. 79.

Work-Basket of Willow Work, mounted upon a bamboo cane

the top with straw braid.

with satin

The embroidery on and red

stitch in blue, pink, white,

the

bamboo

at

the front consists of applique of cretonne covered silk.

The bag

itself is

old-gold satin, drawn

up with

Embeoidbbed Table-Cotee.

100.

Round

and edged

Case foe Lettee-Papee.

99.

a cord to match.

stand,

stand

is

twisted a gold cord, and the fnnges and tassels

should match in colours the embroidery.

No. 83. with stalks

crewels in

olive

Embroidered Screen. and

silk.

The

irises

and brownish wools.

screen, with a woollen fringe border

A

Three-leaved screen, covered with olive velvet, embroidered are

worked

in

shaded yellow-brown

The embroidery all round. The

woollen fringe edges the bottom of the screen.

should be lined nails

should

silk,

the leaves

and

and then nailed on the

have handsome

gilt

heads.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK. No. 84. cloth

little

worked and

blue

(Outline

embroidered with purse

below the is

Antimacassar.

landscape,

his

hat

with yellow, and

the

shades

several

with yellow

bonnet

and Point Russe.)

and crewels.

silk

with blue-grey and

Stitch

of olive

the

silk,

girl's

with pink

silk.

Ground of white oatmeal

For the sedge and

dress

A

and

silk

swan with white

the

85

crewel

the boy's

silk,

with brown

fringe

is

grass,

are

lilac

knotted on

is

The water worked with the

silks,

to each

branch

the

used.

blouse

and

and

apron

end of the

antimacassar.

1

1

.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Photogeaph-Staio).

Tabie-Cotee.

102.

No. 85. Table-Cover. (Crewel

Table-cover of olive plush with a stripe of claret plush

Stitch.)

Lines of embroidery and separate

7 inches wide round the edge at about 3 inches from the fringe. flower-patterns

are

worked upon the

foundation of holland in crewel

pink and white yellow

silk,

silk

stitch.

The

with dark red centre

and afterwards lined

The upper

claret plush.

flowers are

in

worked

knotted stitch

in chain stitch.

The

;

holland

border

embroidered upon a

alternately with blue

the leaves are is

is

and white or

worked with

then wet with solution of gum-arabic,

and when dry the flowers are cut along the outline and sewn on to the plush with chain yellow

I

silk.

The

outer part of the flowers

is

and

olive

worked with blue and the inner with white

stitch silk

;

of

the


ABT NEEDLEWORK.

86 ribs are overcast with silver thread,

The

be worked upon the red plush.

separate flowers should

hoUand

The

in crewel.

convolvulus

is

the inner calices with dark olive, and the outer with yellow

colours used are several

;

112

and

The

cover

is

Emeeoideeed Beading-Desk

It

is

c6.— Basket Wobk-Stand.

The

large

(Open).

— Readixo-Desk

(Slut).

Foe Detail jee Ko.

97.

then cut out and sewn on to the plush with chain stitching of yellow

lined with claret sat'n

Nos. 86

upon

114.

I

silk.

first

Foe Details see

104.— Ckateback.

with olive

worked

the small flower with blue, and the leaves

105

^s^os.

also

shades of copper and olive-green.

embroidered with several shades of bronze

103.

These are

silk.

and edged with a fringe of the colours used

in

silk.

the embroidery.

Mat worked upon dark red cloth with gold crewels and black silk. The pattern a portion of which we give in the original size in No. 86 is very easy to execute, and most eflective when finished. and

89.

Tapestry


ART NEEDLEWORK. No: 88. consist

of

Band

Embroidered

old-gold

cloth,

velvet,

for

a

Window - Drapery

— EilBEOIDEEED

the

any suitable design.

band of the

curtain

at

curtain.

the sides.

A

The deep

Old-gold thick

The

curtain

should

worked with coloured

ChAIE.

IIO.-^EjIBROIDERT for ALjXAXACE.

109.— EilBBOIDEEY FOE ALJTAlfACK. in

or Portiere.

or satin, and the band of ruby plush

107.

silks

87

valance at the top silk

is

of ruby plush

and worked

like

cord with grenat and gold tassels loop back the

deep old-gold fringe trims the edge of the curtains and valance

;

this


AUT NEEDLEWOBK.

'88

fringe has a grenat heading

of

silk

braid twisted into some fanciful

design,

which

binds

also

the edges of the embroidered band.

Nos. 87 and 90. the design of which

work the

Mat.

we

(Embroidery.)

give a fourth

interlaced bars in crewel

III.

Stitches

of blue

with silk,

gold

and

centre

worked with reseda turned

silk

down and worked

of cream-coloured

lace.

knotted in

in

stitch

crewel

flowers stitch

in

No.

mat of white

87.

silk

FOE TaPESTEY

are

of

all

gold

and overcast

MaT

worked thread. stitch

and

open hem-stitching with blue

gauze, embroidered from

Trace the pattern on the

with light and dark brown

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EilBEOIDEEX

The

thread.

part

Squai-e

silk,

silk,

and

working the separate

No. 9I.

in

chain stitch

The

grass,

with

leaves,

in point russe. silk.

Round

the

The

several

shades

and stems are gauze

edge

is

is

then

a border


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEBLEWOBK, Nos. 9 1 and

1 1 1

The

centre design

may be

No.

1 1

1

No.

Tapestry Mat, with a cross in the centre and embroidered flowers.

.

a basket of flowers, a

and overcast

(Crewel

Sofa-Cushion.

92.

of gold

stripe

jasmine flowers and buds the

stitch,

are

eacTi

side

stitch

inches long

as

shown

Chairback.

by 24 wide.

Square

cushion

of

olive

embroidered from a South Kensington design.

The

being

put in

Stitch.)

leaves

with gold

Embeoideey roB No.

of the embroidery, and the cushion

Nos. 93 and 94.

hem

Overcast

worked with bronze, and the

knotted

pompons, and passementerie

40

and

satin,

112.

cloth,

dog, or anything else the worker chooses.

little

shows the surrounding flowers.

plush with diagonal

down

89

is

with olive

silk.

A

silk

silk

crewel

in

braid

is

sewn

104.

finished off at the

comers with

tassels,

in the illustration,

(Embroidery

The narrow

in

Satin Stitch.)

Chairback of rough Turkish

hemmed an The design.

edges are

an embroidery of which No. 94 gives half the the ground, and worked with two shades of blue embroidery cotton is

knotted, and feather stitch, as well as in point russe.

in

inch deep. pattern chain,

The narrow border

is

is

Above

the

traced on to

overcast, crewel,

worked with the


— —

ART NEEDLEWORK.

93

same cotton edge of the

In chain

hem

No. 95.

and crewel

At

stitch.

each end

a crocheted lace edging.

is

Square

(Embroidery.)

Toilet-Cushion.

over half of which

114.

.

th2

brocade

and filhd up are

in

arc

with bronze

.

Detail of No.

Foot-Kest.

115.

chain stitch and point light

The niUTow silk,

Fob Detail see No.

edged with braid woven

worked with dark and

of olive-green.

covered with

cushion

The

placed a triangular part of brocaded olive damask.

113.— ToiiET-CxJSHioif.

of

a crocheted insertion, and at the lower

is

and

pink

scallops

edged with

braid as that mentioned above.

separate patterns

117.

ic_;

(Kiubroidcry).

with

dark red plush,

,

coloured

.

.

and

silk

-,

gold

-

.

,

silver

thread,

The

flowers

with different

shades

or

russe with coloured silks and gold thread. silks,

round an

the stems, leaves, and this

part

olive-green

Along the

triangle

sprays

of the work are worked

braid

where

woven it

in

loops

.• .

and

in

chain

with

the

stitch

same

meets the plush the two braids are


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEBLEWOEE. sewn on

In a

Greek border, and the cushion

and old-gold

No. 96. silk,

and with

silk

balls

is

finished

off

plush, or velvet

in

two or three shades of rather

in

pale green

in

black, dark red,

light green with

with a darker outline, and

1 1 6.

'

-

Nos. 97 and 106.

round the edge with a cord of dark red

of the same colours.

This design, which consists of grapes,

satin, cloth,

-91

'

117.

leaves,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ElIBKOIDEKY

Basket Workstand.

straw baskets, varnished brown and yellow.

may be worked upon brown. The vine-leaves are

tendrils,

dark blue, or

darker veinings, the grapes and tendrils are

may be executed

EMBEOIDEEED

and

crewels or silks or both.

in

CHAIEBACIi:.

FOTl

ISTo.

IIJ^

'

.

.

The stand is ot willow, fitted The upper basket, which has a

with lid,

tvv-o

willow

ornamented

is

with lambrequins of red cloth, which are embroidered from No, 97 (the original size) in crewel, The flower buttonhole, feather, and chain stitch with thick Oriental wool in pale colours. is

worked

in

pink and blue wool of several shades, the pink

soutache and spangles. stitchings

of

red

silk.

The The

lance-shaped leaves smallest

leaf

is

are

worked

worked with

leaves being outlined in

this

with gold

tea-green wool with feather

last-named

silk

only.

The


ART NEEDLE WOBK.

92

branching stems are worked connecting

the

in spirals,

with yellow

in

The round

shaded blue wool.

stems being

chain stitch of blue

in

The edging of each lambrequin

silk.

dots are formed of gold soutache silk;

the spangles are sewn on

a tea-green woollen braid, which

is

edged with a narrow gold braid, and a yellow bead galloon sewn on with cross and white

and

with red

being

satin,

of the

braid.

The

lid

is

first

the

wadded and then

lined in the

covered

is

with pleated red

satin,

are of pleated satin,

basket,

and also the handle.

them.

Tassels are

velvet

cut

it

98.

with gold

and

out

Embroidered

stitch

it

Brush over the wrong

No. 99. Case plush,

fine

available

Prayer-book gold,

1

00.

floss silk

on to the side

worked

and

in

work

then

This case

worked

lined

The

colour.

hidden by looped

122.

is

twisted round

is

it

and

design

is

embroidered

in loose

is

This

stem

on

dark

draw the design on cartoon-paper, over

stick

of wood,

it

in

crewel

and

stem

stitch.

on the book.

and covered with bronze-brown

fit

Table of

the table.

light oak, carved in Renaissance style.

It is lined

with strong calico and old-gold

embroidered after the design is

for the flowers

and

stalks.

illustrated, in crewels

The

stitch

and over-sewn with

fine

with

centre of each flower

knotted stitch with the darkest shade of colour corresponding to the flower.

tendrils are

is

the centre of the front.

in

Table with Embroidered Cover.

pink, blue, olive, and red.

First

silk.

with thick gum-arabic

Letter-Paper.

This

Cover.

velvet,

Previous to the lining the plush

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

lining are

similar

point.

thread, and

has a cover of bronze plush cut exactly to

satine.

is

for

same

the

ornamented with tea-green and red wool, which

with a small embroidered oval

No. It

Is

hung upon every

cantille,

a

ruched at the top.

Foe Detail see No.

118.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gaeden Fuenituee.

No.

edges of the

is

the upper basket

Inside

with buttons of

The

of blue

concealed by a looped braid

edge of the lambrequins there

tufted

same manner.

is

also

The bottom of the The insides are lined with cloth, embroidered like the lambrequins. The upper edge of the turned back at the top to form a heading.

sides of the basket

lower basket

At

of tea-green and pink wool at every point.

tassels

inside

joining of the lambrequins to the basket

and brown moss wool.

of pink, blue, braid,

The

silk.

stitches

is

gold thread.

The stalks The same


ART NEEDLEWORK.

9.3

thread marks the ribs and veinings of the flowers and leaves.

cord sewn on with fine yellow

lined with gold

fringe of bronze wool,

No. loi.

1

02,

The

Embroidered Photograph-Stand. silks

be twisted round with gold

No.

Worked

design

then out-

is

the edge of the cover

a knotted

is

and gold wire.

silk,

and worked with crewel

Round

silk.

The whole

white pink, pale

in

and

cord,

Table-Cover.

stand

covered with

is

The ebony

and gold.

green,

olive silk serge

frame should

some metal

finished off at each corner with

Cover of

dark red velvet,

with embroidery

at

motif.

both ends.

After tracing the design on the material work the flowers with maize, yellow, and old-gold in crewel

shades

stitch,

of

the

the

leaves

same wool

1 1 g.

and buds

in

The

intertwisted.

olive crewel wool, the

and dark

pale

border

is

worked

in

stem

120.

and the waved

both

and the dots

Nos. 103 and 105. it

with olive wools.

is

of

BA(J.

wood

The

ends are ornamented

of maize, yellow, old-gold, and olive wool.

tassels

Embroidered Reading-Desk.

open and shut)

—POMPADOTJE

This reading-desk (of which

in the

The

shape of an album.

we

give

inside

polished and the outside covered with red-brown plush with an embroidered design on the

After tracing the design from No. 105, embroider

stem

stitch,

outlining the design with gold cord.

Nos. 104, 112, and 114. blue satin 25 inches long and insert

a

piece

of

imitation

with feather stitching

in

Dust-Beush Holdee.

line in outline stitch, also

with a netted fringe of olive wool, with balls and

two designs showing

in

WoEK-BaSKET.

I2I.

satin stitch,

stitch

stalks

silk

j

it

with coloured crewel

No. 103 shows

Embroidered Chairback. 1 1

inches wide.

At

is

lid.

and crewel and

open, and No. 105 shut.

For the chairback take a piece of

each end cut off 3 inches of the satin and

guipure measuring 3 inches wide.

the satin

it

silk

is

This

is

sewn on

then worked from the design given in No.

to

1x2

the in

satin

crewel


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEBLEWOBK.

94

and stem

stitch

water-lily

and buds of

with

No. 112

are

and calyx of the bud

leaves, stalks,

No. 114 worked

filoselle.

split

the leaves should be marked in stem stitch with

border

may be worked

back

edged with imitation guipure.

is

No. 107. dark

Embroidered Chair.

and

tufted

velvet,

olive

silver-grey,

for

and

and

the

The

border.

pink

pale

silk,

the

of several shades; the veinings of

silk

of a darker shade.

silk

pink or white, with leaves

in

small design

white,

in

and brown

olive

in

the

gives

The

design for the

The

of olive-green.

stalks

chair-

Chair of polished brovvm wood, cushioned and covered with

with

fastened

The back and seat are covered The lighter leaf designs are cut out

yellow

pale

The arms

buttons.

are

similarly

cushioned.

with an embroidered Afghan of a finer kind of olive

velvet.

of gold

are of claret

and pink

colour,

satin,

and the underpart of grey

surrounded with warm-coloured Small flowers

the appliquc-work

The

the overlying leaves of the large flowers

velvet,

the side flowers of peacock-blue velvet

the calices and the short side leaves of olive velvet.

122.

a darker cord.

satin,

in

Embeoideet foe Gaedex Ftjesituee Xo.

silk

The

cord.

lighter

and leaves are embroidered knotted, and stem stitch in

crewel,

crewel

in

applied and

all

118.

of the

parts

These are

design are outlined with silks

on various parts of

the various colours of the appliques.

arabesques are formed of two rows of gold cord connected by long cross stitches of olive

The Afghan

silk.

some contrasting colour of cashmere or merino, and

each end with a gimp-headed fringe of wool

at

finish

should be lined with

and

combining

silk

all

the colours of

the embroidery.

Nos. 108, 109, and 110.

Almanack with Embroidered Frame.

thick cardboard covered with embroidered plush

from No.

1 1

stitch.

The

worked

in

floss

silk.

o

;

it

is

flower

traced at

the

on the material corner

is

(olive).

The

in

heliotrope

several shades of blue silk, the leaves with olive,

The

figures are then outlined with fine gold cord,

design for the same frame

may be

taken

fi-om

No,

109.

made of

is

design for the embroidery

and then worked

worked

The frame

crewel, knotted, and

in

silk

;

the

5-petalled

sewn on with yellow design

is

silk.

traced

taken basket

flowers

and the branching stems

The

is

on

in

are

brown

Another coloured


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ART NEEDLEWORK. the edelweiss

velvet,

crossed with

small

is

and white centres

stem

stitch

with olive

No3.

113 and

four

formed of white chenille with a cream centre worked

brown

silk,

The forget-me-nots stitch. The stems and

knotted

in

from No.

117

.

yellow centres

The

stalks

there

plush arranged

satin

satin

knot of

The

A

same material.

the

stitch

in

and

crewel

in

covered with

is

Between the

plush

Veinings

point

in

silk

each

at

pink or blue,

in

of fine

gold

russe.

under-side of the

on

embroidered

is

silk.

In the middle of the cushion

olive.

The

sewn

is

The

olive.

old-gold

satin.

button

itself

and buds are worked

flowers

embroidered with

brass

cushion

may. be seen.

shades of

several

in

rounded with a narrow pleating of old-gold with

worked

the form of a Maltese cross.

satin

and knotted

stitch,

plush

olive

in

old-gold

stitch.

and leaves are worked

a

is

in

The

Embroidered Toilet-Cushion.

117.

with

stitch,

silk.

crewel or

in

crewel

in

in satin stitch with blue

leaves, are

.

of the cross pieces of pleated

arms

worked

are

stitches.

silk

of copper-coloured

pieces

95

It

cushion

corner

to

covered

is

form

sur-

is

feet

for

the cushion.

Embboideex roB a Whatnot,

1x3,

No. 115. worked

manner

part of

with

pink,

flower

blue,

and

is

worked

sewn on with

fine

brown shaded

silk

fastened

yellow

silk.

and Smyrna

down with

a gimp of olive wool and

The

olive.

in

The

lift

leaves,

long

cut

;

pink

with the

pink,

olive velvet,

on the

it

velvet,

points

of

a

Each

branching

leaves

buds worked

The

figure

are

is

Wooden

in

worked

cushion

is

balls at intervals.

pink.

the same olive

outlined with gold cord, in crewel

stitch

with

covered with puffed

olive

setting-on of the embroidered centre

with small woollen

darker

which are worked with brownish and

silk.

The

centre of

a

out and place

it

silk,

4 shades of

stitch in gold thread.

a deep ball fringe, finishes the cushion. to

pale

dark red

olive buttons. silk,

in

calico

with

inner leaves of the large flower are in blue satin

stitches of

have an overlying leaf worked

silks,

satin,

this

The

crewels.

in

and the outer with crosswise

The upper

oblong cushion,

Trace the design on white

in crewels.

then worked over the calico stitch,

An

Embroidered Foot-Rest.

A

is

hidden by

second plain gimp, with

handles, covered with floss silk and cord, serve

the cushions.

No.

116.

Embroidered Chairback.

measuring 12 inches broad by 25 long.

For

Down

this

chairback

the middle

is

take

a

piece

of old-gold

satin

a strip of imitation guipure insertion;


AUT NEEDLEWORK.

96 the satin

After tracing

illustration.

The

away from beneath.

cut

Is

in several shades of

olive

on the

it

in

satin

crewel

chairback

work the

and stem

is

then embroidered in the design shown in

flowers in white

stitch.

filoselle,

the leaves and stalks

Finish the chairback with an edging of

guipure lace»

Nos. table,

ii8 and 122.

and small

Garden Furniture.

footstool,

all

This pretty garden

suite comprises

of cane, worked in a mosaic pattern.

The

design for the antimacassar thrown over one of the lounge-chairs.

on a ground of ecru-coloured Java canvas

in

strips,

worked

Illustration

pattern

partly in crewel,

chairs, circular

122 gives the is

embroidered

chain stitch, and

124.— Centeepiece or Embeoideey eoe a Whatnot.

point russe, and partly in It

consists

of

a

cross

a plaited stitch of

seam and a double

Beginning from the middle of the of plaited

stitch

as

follows:

*

strip,

Pass

brown wool row of

pass over

7

interspersed with an open-work design.

threads and

the thread slantwise

high and 2 broad, and then back from right to

left

stitch,

plaited

over

from

4

with

open-work between.

work the narrow way

left

to

right

over

ro\T

threads

6

threads high and 2 broad

a

;

repeat

Miss 5 threads of canvas, and work another row of plaited stitch. Two similar rows Then proceed for the open-work pattern are worked up the second half of the centre strip. For the centre pattern leave the 4 centre threads unnoticed and draw out 4 threads as follows

from

*.

:

lengthwise on either side, so that there

is

only

i

strand

left.

With

the

horizontal

threads a


AET NEEDLEWORK. cross

seam must be worked with brown wool

on the right

threads

are

To

cross.

taking in the

the centre

4 threads, taking 4 crossway threads Between the rows of plaited stitch pull

and 4 canvas threads on the wrong.

side

The

out 3 vertical threads of canvas.

4

in

do

pattern

worked on the horizontal

is

ecru-coloured

pass the

this

97

thread

under the 4th and

The

and 2nd threads, and bringing them to the outside.

ist

embroidered according to the pattern given

Illustration

in

122, which

The narrow

or silks in satin and chain stitch and point russe.

threads, so that the

is

next 34 threads