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adds Caplan, who also enjoys the youth concerts. “The kids are screaming at the top of their lungs and they’re a really fun audience to play for. You can see the excitement in their eyes and the energy in their voices.” Any unexpected, comical or spontaneous moments during a performance? When ticket holders buy a drink at the concession counter, it’s served in a covered plastic cup. “If you accidentally drop that, it’s the loudest thing in the world because the floor is marble and it bounces” says Cabrera. “I was conducting a soft piece and someone tried to take a sip from their cup and dropped it. It added this really hilarious percussive effect to this very delicate music. All you can do is chuckle when something like that happens.” Crawford remembers a time when Oscar and Carolyn Goodman read

“The Night Before Christmas” during a holiday performance: “They were sitting in these two big chairs on stage and Oscar had a giant martini glass sitting on a table between the two of them. Every time he was done reading, he would pick that glass up. It was very cute and people still talk about it.” How many musicians have been with the Philharmonic since the very first show? The answer is 15: Andre Long (piccolo), Beth Lano (French horn), Doug Beasley (French horn), Patrick Bowen (percussion), Kimberly Glennie (harp), Rebecca Sabine Ramsey (violin), Martha Gronemeier (violin), Shakeh Ghoukasian (violin), Kaye Sanderson (violin), Lauren Cordell (violin), Lee Schreiber (violin), Karl Reinarz (viola), Sharon Caldwell (viola), Robin Reinarz (cello) and Eddie Richards (bass). Who are the unsung heroes who work backstage? Director of Orchestra Operations Kevin Eberle is “really incredible in how he juggles so many things all at once,” says Caplan. “Not only with the musicians, but between the guest artists and management.” “He’s the one who hires the musicians and makes sure they have their music on time, their seating arrangements are right, and everything is perfect the way Donato wants it.” adds Crawford. “He has a thankless job.” Another backstage favorite is Dee Gillette, a longtime volunteer, who, at 89 years young, is trusted to keep an eye on the music cases, purses, and other personal items of the musicians while they’re on stage. “She’s part of the party. She’s part of the crew,” says Crawford. Which instrument in the Philharmonic is the most underrated? “It’s the oboe,” laughs Caplan. “We tune the orchestra. The scariest thing I have to do is play that one lone note at the beginning of the concert.” “Take a look at the double basses,” says Cabrera. “Those big string instruments that seemingly play a tenth of the notes the violins do, but they’re the bedrock. They provide this carpet of sound that if it wasn’t there, everyone would know.” Has the Philharmonic benefitted from the growth of Las Vegas? There are other places where the population is so stagnant, people don’t feel there’s room for growth,” adds Caplan. “We have some excitement that there is always going to be new audiences out there ready to discover us.” Is there room for the Philharmonic to expand its season? “Communities like Portland, St. Paul and Pittsburgh have first-class orchestras with a full season, performing pretty much every week,” says Caplan. “There’s no reason why we shouldn’t have that. I think it’s the goal of both the musicians and the board, but that’s going to take a lot of fundraising.” What can we expect from the new 2018-2019 season? “Doing Psycho live with orchestra, that’s new for us,” says Cabrera. “We’re really excited to start what we hope will be a series of movies with live accompaniment. We’re part of a consortium of orchestras that helped provide the commission fee for Philip Glass to write a new piano concerto we’re going to premiere this season. In the bigger picture, some of the most popular music that people love will be heard this season — Beethoven’s 9th, Bernstein’s West Side Story, Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet.” Any secrets to scoring a good seat at a Philharmonic performance? Subscriptions go on sale in April and are the first opportunities for inventory since single tickets don’t go on sale until the summer. Subscribers get the first pick of seats and can get the same seats guaranteed all season. A four-concert subscription is as little as 110, an intentionally approachable price point to make sure anyone can afford to experience art and culture in as egas. “The community has been very kind to give us 20 years,” says Crawford. “And we’re looking forward to the next 20.” www.davidlv.com | 45

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9/30/18 3:53 PM

Profile for Max Friedland

DAVID  

October 2018

DAVID  

October 2018

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