Page 1

DAVID BURNS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS BEYOND BOUNDARIES

CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT

FIRST YEAR STUDIO - RIVERDALE PARK

REGENERATIVE LANDSCAPES FIRST YEAR STUDIO - HIGH PARK

PERMEATING LANDSCAPES SECOND YEAR STUDIO - DUFFERIN GROVE

HYDRAULIC INTERFACES SECOND YEAR STUDIO - NEW ORLEANS

NISSOLOGICAL CODES

THIRD YEAR STUDIO - KEY WEST, FLORIDA

SITE OF CONVEYANCE

MASTER’S THESIS - WINNIPEG, MANITOBA

WATERFRONT ACCESSWAY SITE TECHNOLOGIES

KING STREET WEST CONTEMPORARY URBAN ISSUES

ECOLOGICAL TRANSECTS FIELD ECOLOGY

RIPARIAN RESTORATION CONTEMPORARY

TECHNICAL ANALYSIS


RIVERDALE PARK BEYOND

TORONTO, ONTARIO

WINTER 2012

BOUNDARIES

High Park is unlike any other habitat in the City of Toronto. Its 400 acres contain the most significant areas of original prairie and oak savannah communities in the Toronto region. Today only 1% of these original pre-settlement communities remain in all of Ontario, and therefore High Park is designated an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest. Due to its size and proximity to the Lake Ontario waterfront, High Park not only contains and attracts a diverse range of flora and fauna, it is also considered a destination park for the 1 million human visitors it recevies each year. The balance between the conflicting forces of ecological restoration and protection and human use is in dire need of attention. By losing half of its rare plant species over the past 90 years, one third of its nesting bird species over the last 50, and over half of its iconic Black Oaks in decline, High Park and the western waterfront must create a symbiotic relationship between human use and regeneration.


Allotment Gardens

Ramp and Terrace Mulching Facility

Water Filtration Channel

Tree Fields

Community + Shipping Hub Retention Ponds

Production Facility Greenhouses

Propagation Fields


HIGH PARK REGENERATIVE TORONTO, ONTARIO

WINTER 2012

LANDSCAPES

High Park is unlike any other habitat in the City of Toronto. Its 400 acres contain the most significant areas of original prairie and oak savannah communities in the Toronto region. Today only 1% of these original pre-settlement communities remain in all of Ontario, and therefore High Park is designated an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest. Due to its size and proximity to the Lake Ontario waterfront, High Park not only contains and attracts a diverse range of flora and fauna, it is also considered a destination park for the 1 million human visitors it recevies each year. The balance between the conflicting forces of ecological restoration and protection and human use is in dire need of attention. By losing half of its rare plant species over the past 90 years, one third of its nesting bird species over the last 50, and over half of its iconic Black Oaks in decline, High Park and the western waterfront must create a symbiotic relationship between human use and regeneration.

1851 Ecosystems Oak Savannah Oak Savannah (Present)

2012 Niagara Escarpment

Road Network Carolinian Forest Extent


Emerging Prairie (former Norway Maple Grove)

Ecological Learning Centre Streetcar Loop Emerging Oak Savannah (former recreation fields)

low

high

Emerging Hemlock Forest

high

(former dogpark and allotment gardens)

Allotment Gardens high

low

SLOPE

Performance Space

low

DISTURBANCE

EXPOSURE

Emerging Maple-Beech Forest (former hillside gardens)

DRY MEADOW

High Park Citizen’s Advisory

DRY MEADOW High Park Nature Centre

Sponge Garden DRY SAVANNAH

Volunteer Stewardship Program

HARDWOOD MIXED FOREST

Constructed Wetlands

City of Toronto Urban Forestry

MIXED DECIDUOUS FOREST City of Toronto Urban Forestry

MOIST LOWLAND FOREST

High Park Citizen’s Advisory Committee

Land Bridges MEADOW MARSH

High Park Nature Centre

Recreation Fields Consructed Marshlands SHALLOW MARSH

Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

Urban Beaches 1:4000 0m

100

200

300

400

500

600

700


tree removal and thinning

PREPARATION

soil regeneration

meadow planting

IMPLEMENTATION

sedge planting

reforestation marsh construction

SUCCESSION


DUFFERIN MALL PERMEATING TORONTO, ONTARIO

FALL 2012

LANDSCAPES

A simple glance of an aerial photograph of the Dufferin Mall site reveals a stark contrast between open space (green) and structure (grey). This spatial and programmatic segregation obstructs further or potential urban experiences whether it be at work, home, or at play. Dufferin Mall is often referred to as an informal community centre while Dufferin Grove proudly states it is a community centre without walls. By breaking the structural and formal barriers of these two disperate sites, a much richer and integrated entity transpires.

FORMAL CODES / OPERATIONS

1

CURRENT

mall typology simply defined in terms of large retail anchors connected by an enclosed armature of small stores.

6

BUNDLE

a community centre and library anchors the site to the north; bundling the armature. the armature transforms into a loop borrowing from the site’s history of a former race-track facility.

2

SPLIT

enclosed armature is split open or ‘day-lighted’ to allow exterior events to accumulate thus maximizing space functions.

7

EXTRUDE

3

PUSH

retail removed from the public street realm is pushed to dufferin street to animate and define the urban edge.

8

ANNEX

4

STITCH

existing street grid and context stitches the site together and defines blocks; establishing neighbourhood connections and cohesiveness.

9

DEPRESS

interior open spaces give way to further retail and offices creating a double corridor within.

the current running track to the northwest is annexed to provide a residential community.

semi-private permeable courtyards weave throughout the site connecting public and private spaces as well.

underground parking located under these buildings.

to compensate for lost greenspace, greenroofs are created instead.

light penetrating into courtyards naturally light units and provide interior views.

5

ANCHOR

a new broad retail armature is created that is anchored to the south by a new community recreation and fitness centre.

10

BRIDGE

lastly, further community anchors within dufferin grove bridge the two sites together and provide safe and accessable connections to form a cohesive site. the connections are primarily established through an elevated pedestrian and cycling network.


DESIGN SCHEMATICS ORGANIZATION

ZONES

anchor

residential

retail

residential

armature

commercial

park

community

BLOCKS

0

100

200

CIRCULATION

400 m

vehicular pedestrian

BUILDING TYPOLOGIES BLOCK

A

PERMEABLE PERIMETER

BLOCK

B

OPEN SPACES

HYDROLOGY

CONNECTED TERRACE

commercial/residential residential 75 units 105 m² unit size 11 m high (3 floors) 2200 m² courtyard single-loaded

42 residential units 8 commercial units 100 m² unit size R 240 m² unit size C 11 m high (3 floors) private terraces

park paths

circuit

drainage flow


PROGRAMMATIC LAYERS

PROGRAM METRICS COMMERCIAL

LEVEL 4

53,033 m²

OFFICE

19,434 m²

30%

11%

[35,000 m² > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 70,000 m²]

[15,000 m² > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 30,000 m²]

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 2

RESIDENTIAL

65,220 m²

COMMUNITY

11,530 m²

37%

7%

[50,000 m² > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >150,000 m²]

[10,000 m²> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >80,000 m²]

RECREATION

PARKING

LEVEL 1

GROUND LEVEL

14,470 m²

1280 spaces

9%

6%

[10,000 m² > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 40,000 m²]

[800 spaces > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 1600 spaces]

UNDERGROUND

FAR

1.2

POPULATION

920

DENSITY

14 units/acre

commercial / office

gathering space

community centre / office


OPEN SPACE LAYERS

GREENROOFS + TERRACES [PRIVATE]

ELEVATED PEDESTRIAN NETWORK

PUBLIC PARKS SEMI-PUBLIC COURTYARDS

residential / retail

commercial / office

commercial / office


CITY PARK HYDRAULIC

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANNA

WINTER 2013

INTERFACES

Although waterbodies and waterways are prevelant in and around New Orleans, the relationship between the city and these features is extremely disconnected. The heavily engineered and controlled system of pumps, canals, and levees gives little breathing room for the natural function of these waterways. In the northwestern corner of Drainage Basin 1 where the 17th, Orleans, and London avenue canals drain into Lake Pontchartrain lies the most unique instance of this fragmented relationship. The canals traverse land that is amongst the most lowest and steadily subsiding in all of New Orleans as they rise above their surroundings encased in concrete for nobody to hardly notice. Moving forward, this study of

site and

type begins to scratch the surface between the interface of these outfall canals and their adjacencies.

FUNCTIONAL LAYERS Hydrology

Circulation

city park / orleans canal

roadways

bayou st. john

pathways

Program

Habitat

sports fields

marsh

dog park + equestrian

bottomland forest

golf course + trails

upland forest

1:5000 0

150

350 m


Lake Vista Neighbourhood


SPILLWAY 1

TYPICAL CONIDTION Three spillways radiating from a the truncated Orleans Avenue Canal begin the journey of water as it leaves Pump Station 7. There is a heirarchy of spillway function that corresponds to weather conditions where Spillway 1 circulates continously with water, Spillway 2 is utilized during frequent storms, and Spillway 3 is reserved for major, more destructive events. Each weaves amongst program and habitat restoration while allowing users to engage and become close to them, something ironically uncommon for a city surrounded by water. A spectacle is created when water emerges into the spillways through flood gates and water levels rise and fall. A new understanding of the role water has within this city is intended to be strengthened and celebrated. The journey ends at the northwest

corner of the park

where a proposed pump station then lifts the water back into the canal where it carries on to Lake Pontchartrain.

FLOOD CONDITION


SPILLWAY 2

TYPICAL CONIDTION

SPILLWAY 3

FLOOD CONDITION

TYPICAL CONIDTION

FLOOD CONDITION


CITY PARK RIPARIAN

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANNA

SPILLWAY ONE

WINTER 2013

PLANTING PLAN

0’ - 2’

2’ - 4’

4’ - 6’

6’ - 8’

RIPARIAN ZONE

CYPRESS + TUPLEO SWAMP

BOTTOMLAND FOREST

LIVE OAK + PALMETTO FOREST

9 lbs

11

10

7 lbs

40

6

7

11

6

9

4

Ai

Qp

Nb

Ig

Ll

Cl

Cl

Sr

Pt

Sm

Qv

Kv

Ll

Mr

Pc

5

63

13

50

4

30

16

27

25

5

7

34

Se

Sc

Qn

Fa

Nb

Mc

Td

Ll

Ca

Ga

Qh

Ll

7 lbs Co

9

23

7

6

8

16 lbs

6

Fp

Sr

Ls

Qh

Sm

Gv

Pt

Ps

Pv

Pf

Rh


PLANTING SCHEDULE RIPARIAN QUANTITY

CODE

BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

SIZE

SPACING

NOTES

13

Qn

Quercus nigra

Water Oak

15 gal. 1 1/2” -2” cal.

3 feet O.C.

container grown

11

Qp

Quercus phellos

Willow Oak

15 gal. 1 1/2” -2” cal.

3 feet O.C.

container grown

5

Se

Salix exigua

Sandbar Willow

6’ -8’ cuttings 1/2” cal.

12 feet O.C.

3 dozen stakes / bundle

50

Fa

Forestiera acuminata

Swamp Privet

3’ -4’ cuttings 1/4” cal.

3 feet O.C.

live stakes

63

Sc

Sambucus canadensis

American Elderberry

3’ -4’ cuttings 1/4” cal.

3 feet O.C.

live stakes

3 lbs seed

Ai

Asclepias incarnata

Swamp Milkweed

-

1 lb / 30 m²

sown in coconut fibre

3 lbs seed

Kv

Kosteletzkya virginica

Seashore Mallow

-

1 lb / 30 m²

sown in coconut fibre

3 lbs seed

Mr

Mimulus ringens

Monkey Flower

-

1 lb / 30 m²

sown in coconut fibre

CYPRESS + TUPELO SWAMP

5

BALLED AND BURLAPPED DETAIL

Ga

SLOPE PLANTING - WATER LOCUST

stake and wire support

QUANTITY

CODE

BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

SIZE

SPACING

NOTES

5

Ga

Gledistia aquatica

Water Locust

7’ -8’ x 3’ -4’ 2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

B + B

new top soil

14

Nb

Nyssa biflora

Swamp Tupelo

30 gal. 2” -2 1/2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

former grade

16

Td

Taxodium distichum

Bald Cypress

15 gal. 1 1/2” - 2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

root ball

25

Ca

Callicarpa americana

American Beauty Bush

5 gal. 2 feet

3 feet O.C.

container grown

27

Ll

Lyonia lucida

Fetterbush

5 gal. 2 feet

3 feet O.C.

container grown

30

Mc

Morella cerifera

Wax Myrtle

5 gal. 2 feet

1 lb / 30 m²

container grown

2 lbs seed

Ig

Iris giganticaerulea

Giant Blue Iris

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

2 lbs seed

Ll

Leersia lenticularis

Catchfly Cutgrass

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

2 lbs seed

Pc

Pluchea camphorata

Marsh Fleabane

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

exisiting soil

SCALE 1:50 0

150

350cm

BOTTOMLAND FOREST QUANTITY

CODE

BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

SIZE

SPACING

NOTES

13

Cl

Celtis laevigata

Hackberry

15 gal. 1 1/2” -2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

9

Fp

Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Green Ash

15 gal. 1 1/2” -2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

7

Ls

Liquidambar styraciflua

Sweetgum

30 gal. 2” -2 1/2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

74

Ll

Ligustrum lucidum

Glossy Privet

5 gal. 2 feet

3 feet O.C.

container grown

11

Qh

Quercus hemisphearica

Laurel Oak

30 gal. 2” -2 1/2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

34

Sr

Serenoa repens

Saw Palmetto

10 gal. 3 feet

3 feet O.C.

container grown

3 lbs seed

Co

Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

2 lbs seed

Ps

Panicum strigosum

Rough hair Witchgrass

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

2 lbs seed

Pf

Paspalum fluitans

Horsetail Paspalum

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

LIVE OAK + PALMETTO FOREST

BRUSH FASCINE DETAIL

5 Se

RIPARIAN PLANTING - SANDBAR WILLOW

live willow bundles

live willow stake

QUANTITY

CODE

BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

SIZE

SPACING

NOTES

12

Pt

Pinus taeda

Loblolly Pine

15 gal. 1 1/2” -2” cal.

6 feet O.C.

container grown

10

Qv

Quercus virginiana

Live Oak

45 gal. 3 1/4” cal.

6 feet O.C.

17

Sm

Sabal minor

Dwarf Palmetto

10 gal. 3 feet

3 feet O.C.

container grown container grown

5 lbs seed

Gv

Galium verum

Bed Straw

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

5 lbs seed

Pv

Panicum virgatum

Switchgrass

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

3 lbs seed

Rh

Rudbeckia hirta

Black-eyed Susan

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

3 lbs seed

Sp

Spartina patens

Wire Grass

-

1 lb / 30 m²

hydroseeding

dead stout stake

SCALE 1:50 0

150

350cm


High Park is unlike any other habitat in the City of Toronto. Its 400 acres contain the most significant areas of original prairie and oak savannah communities in the Toronto region. Today only 1% of these original pre-settlement communities remain in all of Ontario, and therefore High Park is designated an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest. Due to its size and proximity to the Lake Ontario waterfront, High Park not only contains and attracts a diverse range of flora and fauna, it is also considered a destination park for the 1 million human visitors it recevies each year.


pop: 8,155

pop: 8,005

STOCK ISLAND pop: 6,923

15%

pop: 3,811

20%

MIDTOWN

BOCA CHICA KEY

PROJECTED SEA LEVEL RISE 1 FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE (2040) 2 FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE (2070) 3 FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE (2100)

PERCENTAGE OF LAND COVER FLOODED 100%

70.2%

75%

50%

25%

SITE

2.5%

SEA LEVEL RISE

barren

7.3% water

7.5%

12.5%

scrub/grass wetlands

developed

5%

NEW TOWN

25%

pop: 8,511

70%

OLDTOWN


1

EXISTING CONDITION

LAND USE SHUFFLE RESIDENTIAL TO CONVSERVATION

OLD TOWN OLDTOWN

MIDTOWN

NEW TOWN

MIDTOWN

STOCK ISLAND

NEW TOWN

STOCK ISLAND

BOCA CHICA KEY

BOCA CHICA KEY

recreation recreation

2

2’ SEA LEVEL RISE

3

MOBILE HOMES

4

EXPORT HOMES

5

IMPORT ECOLOGY

public institutions institutions

industrialindustrial commercial commercial

residential residential

vacant vacant lots

LAND USE INVENTORY LAND USE

ZONES UNDER THREAT FROM 2 AND 3 FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE

IMMEDIATE fixed mobile

commercial

TRANSITION

DECONSTRUCT RELOCATE

contaminated clean/stable

ATTENUATE RESTORE

habitat RETAIN

conservation educational

materials

institutional program

military

EXPORT

utilities

vacant lots

EVENTUAL vital function

EXPORT INFILL common function habitat TRANSPLANT

PLANNING MATRIX

resource generation logistics manufacturing recycling centre urban cores habitat fostering

6

program

public

residential

seagrass salt marsh mangrove surge barriers

ARMATURE

industrial

recreation

HABITAT elevation

SEA LEVEL THREAT

TEMPORARY USE food growing social services recreation disaster relief commodity storage

DECONSTRUCTION

7

LAND USE SHUFFLE


1

CENTRAL RECEIVEING PIERS

2

COMMUNITY MARINAS

3

DISTRIBUTION NETWORK

4

ECOLOGICAL LINKS


MODULAR FRAMEWORK The basis of the Armature structure

relys

on

a

modular

steel

framework. The framework is manufactured in Trumbo Point, Key West where it is packaged and delivered to the desired site. The structure is

expandable

and

vertically

both

horizontally

allowing

for

the

communities changing needs.

STANDARDIZED UNITS Once

the

framework

is

assembled

land use is inserted through the application of standardized units. Each unit is measured 5m x 15m and can accomodate any land use type. Units

can

be

consolidated

both

horizontally and vertically within the framework to serve the programmmatic function within.


THESIS

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA

WINTER 2014

SITES OF CONVEYANCE

In 2013, the Global Nature Fund designated Lake Winnipeg as the World’s most threatened lake of that year. Situated in the heart of North America, Lake Winnipeg reflects a growing issue across the continent, and the world - Eutrophication.

Eutrophic waters are evident of an ailing watershed; to develop a solution we must look upstream along the paths of conveyance. These waterways are conduits of excessive contamination from overburdened landscapes and urban centres.

This thesis proposes to utilize these waterways as infrastructures that heal instead of degrade ecosystems, while conveying a broader understanding of resource management and natural processes.


LEVEE TRANSFORMATION STRATEGIES

EXPAND

GRADE

SLICE

COMPRESS

TAP

FLOOD

RESTORE

CONVEY

RETAIN

CLEANSE

INFRASTRUCTURE PROCESS


LANDSCAPE COMPONENTS wind powered water pump cattail cleansing cells

excess water storage

nutrient rich water

rising floodwater

groundwater recharge

cattail biomass export

CATTAIL FARM

CATTAIL FARM

FLOOD CONDITION

TYPICAL CONDITION

AGRICULTURE

GROVE

Wheat Triticum aestivum Oats Avena sativa Soybeans Glycine max Corn Maize everta Canola Brassica napus Flax Linum usitatissimum

Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa Trembling Aspen Populus trembuloides Red Osier Dogwood Cornus sericea Wild Black Currant Ribes americanum Little Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium Switchgrass Panicum virgatum

DRY PRAIRIE Big Bluestem Andropogon gerardii Black Eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta Canada Wild Rye Elymus canadensis Giant Hysop Agastache parvifolia Little Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium Smooth Aster Symphyotrichum laeve

RIPARIAN TRANSECT AGRICULTURAL BUFFER

UPLAND FOREST

MOIST PRAIRIE

Basswood Tilia americana Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa Green Ash Fraxinus pennsylvatica Trembling Aspen Populus trembuloides White Spruce Picea glauca Wood’s Rose Rosa woodsii

Indigo Bush Psorothamnus fremonti Narrow Sunflower Helianthus angustifolius Swamp Milkweed Asclepias incarnata Wild Iris Iris pallida Yellow Primrose Oenothera biennis Yarrow Achillea millefolium

RIVERBOTTOM

DRY PRAIRIE

WETLAND

American Elm Ulmus americana Manitoba Maple Acer negundo Beaked Hazelnut Corylus cornuta Nannyberry Viburnum lentago Saskatoon Amelanchier alnifolia Chokecherry Prunus vigriniana River Birch Betula nigra Cottonwood Populus deltoides Highbush Cranberry Viburnum trilobum Tufted Hairgrass Deschampsia cespitosa Canada Brome Bromus purgans

Big Bluestem Andropogon gerardii Black Eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta Canada Wild Rye Elymus canadensis Giant Hysop Agastache parvifolia Little Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium

Water Plantain Alisma plantago Bur-reed Sparganium eurycarpum Awned Sedge Carex atheudes Toad Rush Juncus bufonius Summer-Cypress Kochia scoparia Pussy Willow Salix discolor Common Cattail Typha latifolia Arrow Grass Triglochin palustris Blue Grama Bouteloua gracillis Slough Grass Beckmannia syzigachne Canada Brome Bromus purgans Marsh Reedgrass Calamagrostis canadensis

WETLAND TRANSECT NATURAL RUNOFF FILTER


FLOATING WETLAND PODS: APRIL

PROCESSING TERMINAL: JULY


CATTAIL FARM: MAY

NETWORK FLOW St. Mary’s Road to Winnipeg public boat launch public parking

water monitoring wetland pod processing

private resouce distribution

wind powered pumps red river control structure habitat regeneration

riparian settlements

constructed wetlands

floodway control structure

communal greenhouses primary circulation

riparian restoration

cattail farms

floating wetland pods

agricultural fields cattail plots

rail to Duluth, MN

Seine St. Mary’s Road to Winnipeg


e River

HABITAT TRACT: SEPTEMBER

Trans Canada Highway #1 to BC

resource storage

wind powered water pumps

barge wharf

biomass processing

filtering wetlands

cattail farms

filtering wetlands

water monitoring

biofuel station

soccer fields cattail plots communal greenhouses

baseball diamonds

water retention cells

habitat regeneration

rail to Toronto, ON

Trans Canada Highway #1 to ON


DRAWING PACKAGE

S1

NORTH EDGE BOULEVARD

L-5

SMALL SCALE DESIGN

FAll 2013

+76.27

+76.27

+76.42

+76.42

680 mm 6800 mm

+76.46

3750 mm

+76.46

0

400

76.25

76.25

00

160

76.00

2500 mm

2000 mm

76.00

9000 mm

75.75

3000 mm

75.50 75.25

75.75

80 m² north terrace 03

tree planting

north rain garden

3000

L-5

75.50

6000 mm

75.00

75.25

2000 mm

74.75

74.50

04 L-5

350

74.25

75.00

750 mm

0

armourstone wall

9000 mm

m

00 m

105

stair detail

2500 mm

74.75

01 L-5

74.50

74.00

74.25 74.00

7500

40 000

73.75

73.75

5000

73.50

73.50 73.25

22000 mm

The objective of this assignment was to design an accessway upon a speculative waterfront site while all

run-off

on

site.

The

design

was

73.00

12000

to

comprise of two seating terraces, a continuous ramp of

13000

managing

73.25

4000 mm

5000

90 m² south terrace

73.00

south rain garden 7000 mm 72.75

no more than 8 percent slope, landings, and planted

2500 mm

72.75

02

rain garden

L-5

areas.

00

130

72.50

0

400

2000 mm 72.50

The deliverables were to include a labeled drawing

6000 3000

72.25

5000

+72.08

+72.08

6000

accomodate the drawing package.

WATERFRONT PROMENADE

S1

model roughly 8.5”x11” of the proposed design was to

72.25

15000

plan and associated details. Additionally, a lazer-cut

+71.28

L-5

package of the design layout, grading plan, planting

+71.28

layout plan 1:150

0

1.5

6

10m


NORTH EDGE BOULEVARD

+76.27

+76.27

+76.42

+76.42

+76.46

+76.46 +76.46

76.46+

76.25 76.25 76.2

+

TOW + +76.41

.50

e

7%

lop

5

.50

75.75

e

slop

+75.06

+76.35

75.50

+75.03

BOW 74.85

75.67+ 75.50

+75.65

7% slo

pe

74.75

TOW + +76.37

%

BOW

75.00

BOS

pe

slo

5 steps @ 25 cm

+75.19

74.75

0

75.0

10

+75.18

+76.25

75.22+

+75.20

74.25

76.25+

TOS

+76.40

74.50

75.25

TOW

75.23+

75.25

75.00

76.00

ss-s

75.55

.25

75

+75.69

75.25

BOW

75 75

75.7

75.50

e

slop

6%

cro

0

76.0

slo

7%

75.75

2%

pe

18% slope

75.57

5

76.00

74.7

6%

5

74.00

74.50

e

slop

74.25

74.53+

slope

74.52+

73.75

74.00

12%

+73.52

subgrade drainage pipe outlet +74.70

74.50

5% slope

73.75 73.50

73.50 73.25

74.25

74.00+

6% slope

73.00

72

73.25

73.50

73.75

73.25 73.20+

+

cro

ss-s lop e

.7

72

2%

72

72.95

5

0

.2

73.17+

5 0

8% slope

73.0

72.75

73.00

+73.22

pe

7% slo

.5

74.75 +

BOW

5 72.7

TOW

72.21 +

72.75 pe

6% slo

0 72.5

+72.47

7% slope

TOS

+73.75

72.50

73.81+

72.50

BOS

+72.33

72.30+

+ 73.75 72.25+

BOW

7 steps @ 25 cm

72.25

72.30+

1% slo

pe

72.25

TOW

72.25 72.19+

CB

subgrade drainage pipe outlet 72.16+

CB

+72.08

+72.16

72.16+

+72.08

72.08+

+72.08

WATERFRONT PROMENADE +71.28

+71.28

grading + drainage plan 1:150

0

1.5

6

10m


NORTH EDGE BOULEVARD

PLANT LIST ID TREES Bp

quantity

190

botanical name

betula papyrifera

common name

white birch

size

2.5” cal. B+B

+76.27

+76.27

+76.42

+76.42

+76.46

+76.46

76.25 76.25 76.00

PERENNIALS

76.00

Ac

130

asarum canadense

wild ginger

2 gal.

Ms

110

matteuccia struthiopteris

ostrich fern

2 gal.

Bp 3

75.75 Custome Meadow Mixture CMM

75.50

Custome Meadow Mixture CMM

Ac 50

50

75.50

north rain garden

75.00

CMM

CUSTOM MEADOW MIXTURE (Sow @ 22 kg/ha) Botanical Name Common Name Rudbeckia hirta Black Eyed Susan Andropogon gerardii

Big Bluestem

Asclepias syriaca Sorghastrum nutans Schizachyrium scoparium Panicum virgatum Monarda fistulosa

Common Milkweed Indian Grass Little Bluestem Switchgrass Wild Bergamot

% 9 9 15 30 20 15 2

75.75

Ms

75.25

75.25

75.00

74.75

74.50 sod

74.25

74.75 74.50

74.00

74.25 74.00

73.75

sod

73.75

SEEDING NOTES

73.50

1. LAYOUT OF PLANT MATERIAL TO BE EXECUTED BY THE CONTRACTOR AND APPROVED BY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT PRIOR TO INSALLATION. 2. ALL PLANTS SHALL BE PLANTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPROPRIATE PLANTING DETAILS ON THE DRAWINGS AND WRITTEN SPECIFICATIONS.

73.50 73.25

3. ALL PLANTS ARE TO BE PLANTED IN APPROVED TOP SOIL FREE FROM WEEDS, SUBSOIL, ROOTS, STONES, LUMPS OF CLAY AND TOXIC MATERIAL. 4. PLANT SO THAT NURSERY SOIL LINE MATCHES FINISHED GRADE AFTER SETTLING.

73.25

73.00

5. GENTLY TRAMP SOIL WHEN BACKFILLING TO REMOVE AIR POCKETS. 6. BUILD SOIL SAUCER AROUND OUTER EDGE OF PLANTING HOLE. SAUCER SHALL BE SOAKED WITH WATER AND COVERED WITH MULCH.

Bp

73.00

3

7. REMOVE ALL NURSERY TAGS, METAL OR PLASTIC BINDINGS, AND VINE SUPPORTS.

Ac

south rain garden

80

72.75 Ms 60

72.75

SEEDING NOTES

72.50

1. SEED ANNUAL RYEGRASS AS A NURSE CROP FOR EROSION CONTROL AND TO SUPPRESS WEED GROWTH DURING THE FIRST SEASON. 2. SEED NURSE CROP MIX SOWING RATE TO BE 22-25 kg/ha or 250G PER SQ. M.

sod

72.50

3. SOWING SHOULD TAKE PLACE IN THE FALL, BETWEEN OCTOBER 15TH TO LATE NOVEMBER. 4. AREA SHOWN FOR SEEDING ARE APPROXIMATE. ACTUAL AREAS TO BE DETERMINED ON SITE IN CONSULTATION WITH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT.

72.25

72.25

Custome Meadow Mixture CMM

Custome Meadow Mixture CMM

+72.08

+72.08

WATERFRONT PROMENADE +71.28

+71.28

planting plan 1:150

0

1.5

6

10m


150

C.I.P. CONCRETE

600

PRUNING - by 1/3 to remove damaged or objectionable branches following proper horticultural practice. DO NOT PRUNE LEADERS.

900 50x5 mm stainless steel flat

150 150

GUYING - 1 wo 51(2”)x51(2”)x6(1/4”) steel T-bars, minimum 2.438(8’-0”) long, and drilled to receive #10 wire threaded through 13(1/2”) rubber hose to support tree. Point “T” flat black.

100 FINISHED GRADE

1800

500

200

WRAPPING - Approved tree wrap from top of ball to 305(12”) above first branch. Secure with binder twine, wound opposite to wrapping. Secure top, middle and bottom.

TOPSOIL

TREE GUARD - for rodent protection, tree guard to be 150mm diameter PVC tubing.

COMPACTED GRANULAR ‘A’ TO 98% S.P.D.

CUT AND REMOVE - burlap from top 1/3 of ball.

COMPACTED SUBGRADE TO 98% S.P.D.

FERTILIZER - Two 21 gram Agriform tablets for each 25(1”) of trunk diameter.

300x50 timber joist 100x100 timber stud

400

300

1. STONES TO BE BUTTED TIGHTLY TOGETHER, LAID ON COMPACTED SUB GRADE TO 98% S.P.D. OR UNDISTURBED SUBGRADE. 2. TOP OF ARMOURSTONE MUST ALWAYS BE LEVEL TO THE TOP OF THE ADJACENT CONCRETE PLATFORM 3. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

SAUCER - Build up earth saucer on downhill side. Earth saucer to be compacted. REMOVALS - All tree wraps are to be removed after the tree has been planted. All tree ties and stakes are to be removed one year after planting.

400

SCARIFY BOTTOM AND SIDES OF PIT

tree planting on slope detail

L-5

100

hot dip galv. structural bracket

FILTERCLOTH

GRADE - Maintain original grade of tree base after planting or slightly higher to suit site soil conditions.

0

150x50 timber bearer 200

NOTES:

150

03

timber facing

400

1000mm

275 01

04

stair detail

L-5

armourstone wall

L-5

0 0

40

120

400 cm

40

120

400 cm


KING STREET TORONTO, ONTARIO

FALL 2012

URBAN EDGE ANALYSIS The following urban design strategies are guidelines to ‘thicken’ the street edge of King Street West allowing for an enhanced street life. As of now the condition between private built form and public street life is rather stark and un-engaging.

Simple landscape design strategies can be implemented to soften urban transitions and negate unwelcoming exeriences. The areas between built form and the public sphere most heavily influences the creation of social activity and is optimal for design intervention.

The ‘thickening’ strategy is based on 4 areas of focus including pedestrian safety, ecology, permeability, and public life.

HISTORICAL SINGLE UNITS

15% BUILT FABRIC

DIVERSE ARRAY OF FACADE AND LANDSCAPE DETAILS. DENSITY OF ENTRANCES AND PORCHES FOSTER SOCIAL INTERACTION.

CONTEMPORARY ROWHOUSE

45%

BUILT FABRIC

MONOTONOUS FACADES AND LITTLE LANDSCAPE PERSONALIZATION. BLAND SEMI-PUBLIC LANDSCAPE DOES NOT ENGAGE WITH THE PUBLIC OR ALLOW NEIGHBOURLY INTERACTIONS.

MULTI-STOREY MIXED USE

40% BUILT FABRIC

LARGE-SCALE ARCHITECTURE DISREGARDS HUMAN SCALE. EXTREMELY LITTLE ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PUBLIC REALM.


SCREENING

DESIGN GUIDELINES

4 Blank facades facing the public realm install landscape buffers to soften hard edges.

KING STREET WEST

Landscape buffers reduce unsightly utilities and can also provide public seating and bicycle parking.

PROMOTE ECOLOGY

PUBLIC SEATING

1

5

Stormwater retention trenches create a landscape buffer between King Street and the public realm.

Public seating outside of businesses that do not need social spaces to operate.

Pedestrian movement separated between commuting (within the allee) and strolling (adjacent to shops) to allow differing speeds of public life.

EXISTING STREET CONDITIONS

Public seating animates exterior spaces and allows social and optional activities to occur.

RECLAIM PUBLIC REALM

ENABLE PUBLIC LIFE

‘THICKENING’ THE STREET EDGE

2

6

3 At intersections, building design creates niche spaces where public life can accumulate. These spaces suit such as public sculpture, paving and seating that sense of place.

features art and details, create a

TRANSIT ISLAND

2 5 1

Such spaces double as social nodes where people meet, are informed, or relax.

Public tranist mixed with artisitc seating and features liven street corners and attract customers.

CURB BULB-OUTS

3 Where applicable, transit islands protruding from curbs free the sidewalk of obstructions and provide safety.

Ideally, architecture along busy streets should articulate its facade toward pedestrian movement and gathering.

4

6

7

7 Curb bulb-outs at low volume street corners slow traffic and provide pedstrian safety. These bulb-outs can be pared with stormwater filtration areas and other aspects engaging public activity.


SECTIONAL ANALYSIS LONG POINT, ONTARIO

SPRING 2012

FIELD ECOLOGY COLLABORATION

SPECIES INVENTORY CANOPY

MIDSTORY

UNDERSTORY

Eastern Cottonwood

Populus deltoides

Red Osier Dogwood

Cornus sericea

Horsetail

Equisetum spp.

Balsam Poplar

Populus balsamifera

Prickly Wild Rose

Rosa acicularis

Marram Grass

Ammophila breveligulata

Wild Red Raspberry

Rubus idaeus

Beach Wormwood

Artemisia caudata

Common Yarrow

Achillea millefolium

American Dune Grass

Leymus mollis


SAND SHOAL FORMATION

PLANT COLONIZATION

AVIAN CORRIDOR

RECREATIONAL USE

wave action at a 30 degree angle gradually deposits sand and debris into a 40km long shoal, forming Long Point.

pioneer plant species adapted to sandy conditions, such as marram grass and little bluestem, begin to stabilize the dunes; a vast wetland beings to form on the leeward side of the shoal.

Long Point’s geographic situation and wetland network provides the ideal stopover conditions for migratory brids; the shoal becomes a significant migration corridor.

a seasonal tourism industry develops around Long Point’s beaches; sensitive ecologies are somewhat destablized due to heavy use, and the introduction of invasive species such as phragmites and dog strangling vice.

INTENSIVE MAINTENANCE Long Point is a shifting landscape; the future viability of constantly armouring the shore and transporting sand may pose a significant ecological threat.


SECTIONAL ANALYSIS TOMMY THOMPSON PARK, TORONTO

SPRING 2012

FIELD ECOLOGY COLLABORATION

SPECIES INVENTORY CANOPY

MIDSTORY

UNDERSTORY

European White Birch

Betula pendula

Red Osier Dogwood

Cornus sericea

Horsetail

Equisetum spp.

Manitoba Maple

Acer negundo

Yellow Twig Dogwood

Cornus sericea ‘Flaviramea’

Golden Rod

Solidago canadensis

Speckled Alder

Alnus rugosa

Common Reed

Phragmites australis

Cow Vetch

Vicia cracca

Big-Toothed Aspen

Populus grandidentata

Wild Amaranth

Amaranthus retroflexus

Paper Birch

Betula papyrifera

White Clover

Trifolium repens


SHORE INFILL

PIONEER ESTABLISHMENT

PRIMARY SUCCESSION

INCREASED BIODIVERSITY

construction debris is piled into Lake Ontario to create a breakwater in order to protect Toronto’s Inner Harbour

pioneer species travelling along wind vectors from Centre Island and Ashbridges Bay establish themselves on the spit’s marginal soil profile.

more species of flora and fauna begin to settle on the island; the debris and rubble begins to naturalize and attract avian species.

more complex species begin to inhabit the spit and increase local biodiversity; invasive species, such as carp, infiltrate the park.

HUMAN INTERVENTION the TRCA begins to intervene to protect the park from invasive species, as Toronto continues to urbanize, the fate of the park’s ecology will be tied to management practises that acknowledge its novel status.


RIPARIAN RESTORATION RESEARCH PROJECT

WINTER 2012

CONTEMPORARY PLANT TECHNOLOGIES Comparison Matrix

TREE ROOT WAD direction of river flow

rip rap

logs parallel to bank for stabilization

root wad

rip rap

Root wads are an excellent reuse of fallen trees within the restoration zone or from construction sites nearby. Although they require heavy machinery and labour most likely conducted by a contractor, they are the most successful in stablizing toes of riparian slopes. Installation of root wads is a relatively quick way to provide bank stability.

Over

time, sediment accumulates within the root fans and helps create bank structure to eroding slopes as well as provide aquatic habitat.

Ideal root wads should be at

least 10 feet long (with tree canopy removed) with optimal root fans of 5 to 6 feet in diameter. The roots are usually planted in a linear series of multiple trees in a manner that undulates with the natural curvature of the watercourse. By doing so this increases the chances of capturing higher amounts of sediment. Combining this simple technique with others such as vegetative matting and brush layering duals as a riparian

yes

vegetative tool as well.

no somewhat

FASCINES

live stakes

live fascine

vegetative matting

Fascines are bundles of dormant branches bound together to create a log-like structure that roots itself into the slope. The bundle is primarily used to revegetate although it has some stabilization characteristics. These linear structures that follow a slopes contour are commonly used as a transition between other riparian revegetative techniques like brush matting and live siltation. Another revegetative use is that the coarse structure captures wind blown seeds providing habitat for their growth. Bundles of dormant willow branches 3 to 4 feet long and 8 inches in diameter are easily created, requiring little skill and/or heavy equipment. Once a sizable amount of bundles have been constructed they are dug into trenches perpendicular to the slope and only burried approximately 3 to 4 inches into the ground. Fascine rows are secured by wooden stakes although these may be substituted for dormant willows or cottonwood speices. Multiple rows can be installed giving the slope a terraced quality.

root wad


TREE REVETMENT

BRUSH LAYERING

VEGETATED CRIBBING

native herbaceous planting dormant cuttings

dormant cuttings

tree revetments

grass roll

native herbaceous planting

live brush (vegetation included)

rip rap base

soil/gravel mixture

timber crib (untreated)

tree revetments

gravel base

This relatively cost effective technique is where downed trees are cabled to an eroding bank to help restore it to a vegetated environment and provide increased bank protection. The reinforced – typically spruce or other evergreen - brush traps sediment, slows water flow, provides immediate aquatic habitat, and creates a protected environment in which plant growth can be reestablished.

Cribbing as a form of revegation is usually reserved for conditions of increased erosion caused by high water velocities and/or flooding. The structural nature of this technique enables it to replace more passive strategies such as fascines or brush matting. Consequently, the installation is expensive, technically challenging, and requires heavy machinery.

Brush Layering is an appropriate system to use for revegetation of fill or a

The main function of tree revetments is to capture sediment and debris along outside stream-channel bends creating an environment conducive to revegetation. This technique can, but doesn’t always need, to be paired with revegetative strategies such as installing grass rolls - like what occured along the Kenai river - or inserting live cuttings into the revetments. Grass rolls are recommended where herbaceous plant material once thrived, usually along low velocity streams and lake shores. Their composition is made up of live sod wrapped in biodegradable fabric - usually coconut fibre - and twine. This technique is inexpensive and requires little training for fabrication and installation. The benefit is that the additional plant material takes hold within the debris as the tree revetment naturally degrades over time. The symbiotic relationship created ensures a successful outcome for riparian restoration.

Prior to installation the riparian area must be excavated and removed of any existing vegetation or large boulders. Non-treated timbers are then notched together to create a crib-like structure overtop of a large stone base along the banks. Cross-timbers may also be installed perpendicular to the bank for reinforcement. After construction, the structure is then back-filled with a soil-gravel mixture. The addition of gravel to the growing medium is essential for increased stability and less chance of erosion. Afterwards, live cuttings of fast-growing riparian vegetation are inserted into the growing medium. The vegetation is planted because as it grows the roots stabilize the banks and intertwine with the wooden crib.

compounded with ability to plant within the structure as well.

newly constructed slope.

It is typically used where water fluctuation is large

since it is required to gain access to the toe of the riparian slope for proper installation. The technique does not require as much heavy equipment as others but its complex layers and intricate construction provide great stability

Cuttings are layered on terraces perpendicular to the slope so that they will root into the bank or hillside. The live brush is then covered with soil so that only the growing tips protrude from the slope, helping to reduce the velocity and stress of flows against stream banks. An advantage of the system is that it allows the combination of the typical fast-rooting species like willow, cottonwood, and dogwood with site specific plant selections that may need a bit more protection and rearing to establish.


thank you. DAVID BURNS davidgjburns@gmail.com

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

Selected works from my Masters of Landscape Architecture from the University of Toronto 2014.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you