Page 1

INSIDE general information syllabus of modules and topics

requirements class schedule

course policies

for the following Geography L21 section of 2S AY 201,2-201,3

with David Garcia THOR

layout and some photos by David Garcia. 2012.


GENERAL INFORMATION

THE UP DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY

course designation course title course credit

Geography 1,21, Landform Analysis and Map Interpretation 3 units for discussion, L unit for laboratory

instructor

David f onathan C. Garcia

email phone mobile consultation

davi dj onathan garcia@yahoo.com

981 8500loc.241,6 091.7 81.0 3524

by appointment in CSSP Faculty Center Room 41,6 during Mondays to Fridays, 1, to 4 pm

facebook group name

Geography

Established ln 1983, the Department of Geography specializes in teaching, research, and extension activitles oriented towards the propagatlon and application of geographic knowledge in various scales and sectors in the Philippines and abroad. Some of the

particular strengtl'rs

ol the departnrent are in mapping, field work, and field-

1,21,

based teaching. For more information, visit geog.upd.edu.ph

COURSE GOALS Lay and discuss the foundations

LEARNING GOALS

ofthe disciplines of Geography and

Geomorphology and familiarize students with different earth systems;

cognitive geographical and geomorphological ideas, methods, critiques, and applications, including mapping and

witing

Train students in map interpretation and use; Introduce sfudents to various tools for landfom measurement, land-

psychomotor

form analysis, applied research, and decision making;

field and map skills.

Expose students to urgent issues, realities, and applications

ofgeo-

affective

morphological studies such as hazard mitigation, multicriteria evalua-

appreciation of Geography, Geomorphology, earth systems, mapping,

tion, site selection, and conceptual modelling;

landform analysis, and the applications related to the course.

Enable students to acquire geographical literacy through scholarly research.


MODULES AND TOPTCS MODULE I GEOGRAPHY AS A DISCIPLINE In this module, you shall be acquainted

MODULE 2 MAPS

lntroducing Geography

Maps have been the quintessential human expression of our ever expanding world. Instead of memorizing capitals and country names, we will focus on the reasons why maps have been useful both for noble and sinister ends in the following topics:

Paradigms and Histories of Geography Fields and Organizations of Geography B as ic Ge o gr aphi cal Co n cepts Research Methods in Geography

Maps Map Design Map Interpretation

with the proper fundamental concepts and skills for geographical thinking. Topics in this module are:

Critical Cartography

MODULE 3 GEOMORPHOLOGY AS A DISCIPLINE In this module, you shall be equipped with the theoretical foundations of landform analysis and you shall be able to question the subjects through these

topics: Geomorphologr at the Outset ldeas, Paradigms, Histories Basic Framework, Parameters, Techniques AGeneral Framework

MODULE

4

SYSTEMS AND SCAPES This is the meat of the course. At this module's end you should be able to criticaly understand the following:

geomorphic system, rocks and structure of rockbodies, slope systems, fluvial systems, groundwater systems, coastal systems, eolian systems, glacial systems,and. more. This module is painstakingly great.


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You are a geographer in a party.'While drinking cocktail, you are asked, "what do geographers do?" Another person says, "what is the capital of Kazakhstan? *evil

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You politely answer the first question with ,"geography is the study of spaces" and slam the second with "l don't know the capital of Kazakhstan, but I know very well why that nation-state was created." Now, you're the dance floor royalty.

Trivias and capitals are for quiz bees. Heck, the real geography is why and how the what is where!

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K-t' storages of vast amounts of information.

Their power lies in their function of showing things as well as hiding things. i.....

Given such, you will be able to ctiticize and apppgciate maps frqm your lqeal bookstore, favorite TV sefies, news prograrn, aiid nor.als map, which'rvill not contain more than 3 places at any episode.

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PREVIEW: COASTAL SYSTEMS Coasts, despite being threatened by hazards such as tsunamis and storm surges,

are home to a large portion of the world's population and major metropolitan areas. In that context, humans

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have continously added modifications, such as beach nourishment and reclamation, to make coasts liveable. Yet historical records show that both in the short and long runs, coastal dynamics have prevailed to destablize settlements and erode coastal land at increasingly fast rates due to their ever-changing nature.


PREVIEW: EOLIAN SYSTEMS Seas of sand and other dry regions are the popular images of eolian systems. Yet unbeknownst to many, these areas are not merely sandy places. Dunes migrate and can cover cities. Dust storms

frequently envelop productive lands. The windy and dry conditions of these landscapes merit our investigation.


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MODULES AND TOPICS: ASSIGNED READINGS PER TOPIC MODULE/TOPTC

ASSIGNED READING

Geography as a Discipline

Arild Holt-fensen, chapter

L

Matthews and Herbert, chapters 1,,2,3,5 Gomez and fones III, chapter 2 Pattison, Robinson, Clifford et. al Maps

Gomez and fones III, chap 16 Crampton, chap 1, Aber et. al chaps 1, 10

Monmonier, Tlmer Geomorpholos/ as a Discipline

Huggett [book), Gregory, Hamblin and Christiansen, Wylie, Meinig Smith et. al, Sharp, Geomorphlist, Sherman, Mason, Rhoads, Bradshaw, Worsley, Tadaki et. al, Mitchell, Castree, Ginn and Demeritt, Huggett fiournal article), Thornes, Dramis et. al

Systems and Scapes

Thorn and Welford, O'Neill, Curtis, Marcotullio and Boyle, Huggett [book), Gregory, Hamblin and Christiansen, Strahler, Moss, Fisher and Unwin fchap 6), Serote fchaps 1, and2), Wisner fchaps 1, and2),


MODULES AND TOPICS: BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS, CHAPTERS, JOURNALS, AND OTHER WORKS Three words: read or perish.

Bradshaw, M. Process, Time and the Physical Landscape: Geomorpholorytoday.

Geography. 1982.

Castree, Noel. Nature. Roudedge. 2005.

Clifford, Nicholas, et. al. Key Concepts in Geography. Sage. 2008. Crampton, Jeremy. Mapping: A Critical Introduction to Cartography and GIS. Wiley-Blackwell. 2010. Dramisa, Francesco eL al. Nature and Aims ofGeomorphological

Mapping. Developments in Earth Surface Processes. Elsevier. 2011.

Fisher, Peter and David Unwin. Re-presenting GIS. Wiley. 2005. Geomorphlist. [s Geomorpholory within Geography or Geolory? n.d. Ginn, Franklin and David Demeritt. Nature: A Contested Concepl Sage. 2009. Gomez, Basil and John Paul Jones [[. Research Methods in Geography. Wiley-Blackwell. 2010.

Gregory, Kenneth. The Earth's Land Surface. Sage.2010. Hamblin, W. Kenneth and Eric Christiansen. Earti's Dynamic SJAtems. Prentice Hall. 2003. Holt-Jensen,

Arild. Geography: History and Concepts.

Sage.

2009.

Huggetl Richard. Fundamentals of Geomorpholory. 2007. Huggetl Richard. Cranks, Conventionalists, and Gemorpholory. Area- 2OO2Marcotullio, Peter and Grant Boyle. Defining an Ecosystem Approach to Urban Management and Policy Development. UNU. 2003. Mason, G.R. The Role

ofGeolory in the Sixth-form Geomorpholory Course. Geography. 1972.

Matthews, fohn and David Herbert. Geography: AVeryShort Introduction. Oford. 2008. Mayhew, Susan. Dictionary of Geography. Oxford. 2004. Meinig, D.W. The Beholding Eye: Ten Versions ofthe Same Scene. n.d. Mitchell, Don. There's No Such Thing as Culture: Towards a Reconceptualization ofthe ldea ofCulture in Geography. 1995. Monmonier, Mark. Howto Lie with Maps. UniversityofChicago. 1991. Moss, Michael. Landscape Synthesis, Landscape Processes and Land Classification, some Theoretical and Methodological Issues. GeoJoumal. 1983.

O'Neill, Roberl Is ItTime to Burythe Ecosystem Concept? Ecolory. 2001. Pattiso4 William. The Four Traditions ofGeography. loumal of Geography. National Council for Geographic Education. 1964. Rhoads, Bruce. The Dynamic Basis

Robinson,

J.

ofGeomorpholory Reenvisioned. Geography. 2006.

tâ‚Źwis. A New Look at the Four Traditions of Geography. lournal of Geo graphy- 7972-

Serote, Ernesto. Property, Patrimony, and

Tenitory: Foundations ofLand Use Planning in the Philippines. SURP.2004.

Sharp. Geomorpholory - The Science ofToday's Geolory. n.d.

Sheman, Douglas. Methodoloryin Geomorpholory: Traditions and Hypocrisy. AAG. 1999. Smith, eL al. Landscape Developmenl Collective Amnesia and the Need for Integration in Geomorphological Research. Area. 2002. Strahler, Arthur. Geomorphic Terminolory and Classification of Land Masses. Journal ofGeolory. 1946. Tadaki, Marc, et. al. Nature, Culture, and the Work ofPhysical Geography. Wiley. 2012. Thorn, C.E. and M.R Welford. The Equilibrium Concept in Geomorpholory. AAG. 1984. Thornes, J.B. Evolutionary Geomorpholory. Geography. 1983. Wisner, Ben, eL al. The Roudedge Handbook ofHazards and Disaster Risk Reduction. Roudedge. 2012.

Wo6ley, Peter. Whither Geomorpholory. Area. 1979. Wylie, John. Landscape. Roudedge. 2007.


REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY

GRADE CONVERSION

requirement count credit

equivalent

2oo/o

points 95-100 90-94 86-89 82-85

loo/o

7A-Al

2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 3.00 4.00 5.00

exams 3 plates 20 case study I fieldwork \

5oo/o 2oo/o

Below is a graphical representation

50% EXAMS

I I l

74-77 70-73 65-69 60-64 51-59 00-50

1.00

t.25 1.50

r.75

20% PLATES 2o%PLArEs 20%CASE STUDY 2o%cAsEs'

ronFrELDwoRK

HOW IS MY FINAL GRADE CALCULATED? are hard and unforgiving. Read, discuss in class, review. You should study well.

plates

are the laboratory activities ofthe class. Consistent reading, review, class participation and attendance in class will give you easier times in accom plishing the plates. Also, answering plates is a form of review for the exam. The plates are compiled in a work book

case study

is an individual effort with two outputs: report and a research paper.

fieldwork

is a two-day out-of-class event.

After the individual requirements are graded, the scores fin percentagesJ are entered into an electronic spreadsheet. The percentages are weighted and summarized thereafter. An example is below.

exams plates

9oo/o x

x case study 80%o x fieldwork 9oo/o X looo/o

IS THE FIELD TRIP

REQUIRED? The definite answer is yes. Your

participation shall be through field work. During the field work, mapping and scoping activities shall be done individually

50 20

45 20

2O

t6

10

9

90 points On the conversion scale, 9O is 7,25

and in groups for you to apply the concepts in the classroom. This semester, the field trip shall be in the Ilocos Region.


SCHEDULE NOVEMBER

FEBRUARY

8 13 15 20

5 Slope Systems 7 Fluvial Systems L2 Groundwater Systems L4 Coastal Systems L9 Eolian Systems 2L Glacial Systems 26 third exam 2A results of third exam and plate discussion

22 27 29

syllabus IntroducingGeography Paradigms and Histories ofGeography Fields and Organizations of Geography Basic Geographical Concepts Basic Geographical Concepts Research Methods in Geography Maps and Map Design Map Design

MARCH

WHAT DO I DO BEFORE A CLASS MEETING? The primary thing to is

read the readings. During class, the instructor will take less time defining and more time integrating sources from different books as well from his personal experiences.

DECEMBER

4 Map Interpretation and Critical Cartography 6 firstexam LL results of first exam and plate discussion 13 No class: Lantern Parade JANUARY

5 7 L2 L4 L9 2I 22

case studies

26

lastdayofclass

1,2,3 4,5,6 studies 7,8,9

case studies case

casestudies LO,LL,L2 case studies, L3,L4,Ls case studies, L6, 17, LA Last day for graduating students to clear deficiencies

class party 8 Geomorpholog5r as a Discipline 10 Ideas, Paradigms, and Histories 15 Basic Framework, Parameters, and Techniques L7 A General Framework APRIL 22 second exam 24 resultsofsecondexamandplatediscussion L6 DeadlineforGrades 26 midsemester 29 GeomorphicSystem 31 Rocks and Structure of Rock Bodies Basic Materials and Processes submission of case study topic

Therefore, construct your intellectual baseline by reading well before class time to give chance to everyone to critically reflect on concepts.

will spend less time memorizing and more time debating,

We

then.


COURSE POLICIES ONE

stx

The insFuctor does not acceptlate submissions. Submissions are

It is your responsibility to make sure that your requirements are re-

submitted/presented

during class time on the set deadline. [fa re-

YOU'RE SET!

ceived by the instructor and that your record oflates and absences is

quirement is not submitted in class on the set deadline, the grade for

conect. [t is also your responsibilityto communicate with your group-

that requirement is zero. Exams are taken only at the set dates.

mates regarding your group outputs.

TWO

SEVEN

Make-up eems are given only under the following circumstances:

Do not

Always remember the contents of these handbook. Implement them and talk to your instructor often.

textthe instructor after

B

holidat too. Only sensible in-

medical emergency. Please bring a note from a physician.

mightbe with his familyor enjoying

b. A

family emergency. Please bringa funeral or wedding announce-

quiries will be entertained. This is the format foryour text and online

ment, or other piece ofdoflmentation that explains c.

Conflictwith

a

university-sponsored

tie

situation.

event. Please ask a coach or an

messages:

Own this course! Know why and how the what is where!

pm and during non-class days. He

a. A

a

full name, subiecl section, class schedule, statement Break

this rule only in really exceptional cirflmstances.

adviser to write an excuse letter to explain the absence. d.

Conflictwith

a

religious observance. Please inform the instructor

well in advance. e. An

unexpected and unwanted or exceptionally weird circumstance

(such as being involved in a road accident). Bring a copy

EIGHT As much as possible,

ofthe police

reporL

ooPs!

letus do our correspondences in ourYahoo and

Facebookgroup pages. Text a classmate the instructor's Facebookaccountwall.

firsl

Do not post questions on

PM him instead. He's always

Provide one that is like the ex-

online.

ample below. The photograph

x

picture.

NINE

should be a recent

THREE

Mobile phones should be in silent mode. Ifyou have to receive a call or

The size ofthe index card should

Avoid being late foryou to avoid missingplates and group activities.

text anyone, you may do it outside the classroom.

be3x5inches.

FOUR

Enioythe experience of taking Geog 12Mtwon't be fun all the time

TEN Three lates is one absence. More than six unexcused absences means a grade of5. More than six excused absences means dropping

but it shall beworthwhile.

tie

course. No absence is a .25 upward step for your final grade.

FIVE Plagiarism is zero. Cheating is five.

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1,

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Geography 121 Syllabus  

This is for the Geography 121 class in the University of the Philippines in Diliman.

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