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CONDUCTING THE BRIEFING AT START/END OF TRAINING

Start of training 1

After timely entry onto the field, all players will gather around their coach, to form a circle arm-in-arm.

2

The purpose of forming a closed circle is to convey to the children the concept of a united group, a common purpose, friendship, and that by uniting and helping one another they can achieve great results.

3

During this briefing the children should be encouraged to give their best during the training session and should, in an age-appropriate manner, be informed regarding the goals for the session.

4

During the briefing, children should be assured that they will be engaging in a great training session where they will be real players, allowing them to learn things and improve their skills.

5

The initial briefing should vary in duration according to the ages of participants, weather conditions, and other variables. It should last between one and three minutes.

6

The initial briefing will end with the group's characteristic "chant", promoting increased connection and bonding of the team.

End of training 1

At the end of each training session, all the children will once again surround their coach in the same manner as the start-of-training briefing: in a circle, arm-in-arm.

2

During this final briefing the children should be congratulated for their effort and given any constructive criticism to improve the next session.

3

The children should also be reminded during this briefing that the exercises and games played during the session served to improve their skills and make them better players.

4

The final briefing for every session should end with the group's signature shout: "olè", "juve", "gol", etc. This should be viewed as a way to strengthen team bonding.

5

With groups of older boys, this time should be used as a "cool-down": At this time, stretching and cool-down exercises can be done.

6 During winter or other adverse weather conditions, the briefing can take place in the locker room to keep the children from getting too cold.


Briefing and debriefing