Page 1

health careers booklet

1


r pa co m

mun

health

ity

am

promot

er

ae

tic tehnic

nan's

whar

physi

wor

2k

ker

m

ian doct or

e 5k m

ar py ph a r e h ot

nursing & midw

2

ic

th heal

r ma

anaesthe

ed

macy

lth ifery oral hea

3


CONTENTS 1 tahi

NCEA. HE TAONGA, HE TANIWHA?

03

2 rua

CAREERS IN HEALTH HAUORA CAREERS radiographer - MEDICAL RADIATION TECHNOLOGIST ambulance officer - paramedic midwifery health promoter physiotherapist pharmacy anaesthetic technician occupational therapy oral health community health worker nurse doctor dietitian podiatrist other career options

05 11 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38

3 toru

entry requirements to studying health science

40

4 wha

what next?

42 5


Welcome to the Kia Ora Hauora health careers booklet.

T

he Kia Ora Hauora programme is designed specifically to help you find a pathway to a successful career in health.

A career in health is loaded with opportunities to learn, grow, achieve, but it also provides you with the chance to contribute to your community by enabling you to care for and look after your Whānau and others who require health services. As a rapidly growing industry in Aotearoa and abroad, health is an ideal place for you to realise your capability and reach the potential we know you possess. So our job is to make sure you get there, by offering you information and useful resources that will support you. In this booklet you’ll find various health jobs you can choose to pursue and what you’ll need to pass in NCEA to get there. But don’t stop here. This is just the tip of the iceberg. There are hundreds of different jobs in health, so check out more at www.kiaorahauora.co.nz.

NCEA. HE TAONGA, HE TANIWHA?

1 tahi

Ka tuku nga whakamoemiti ki te runga rawa. Ka tangi mo nga mate kua wehe atu A, ka tau iho nga mihi ki nga kaimahi hauora Māori kua wharikihia nei tenei huarahi ma tatou.

W

hen it comes to navigating the NCEA system we know it can be tricky. Besides choosing the right subjects you also need to select the appropriate NCEA standards. The NCEA standards you study will influence your educational stream, and what further study and career paths may be open to you when you finish school. The best standards to take are Achievement Standards because they give you the opportunity to achieve at the highest level (Merit or Excellence) and will help you towards obtaining Approved Standards. Approved Standards count towards achieving University Entrance (UE), and will help you to get into your chosen health study course. Noreira, whaia kia tata. Whakamaua kia tina.

There are

different

hundreds

jobs in hea

so check o

www.kiaor

of

lth, ut more at

ahauora.co .nz

We need you now. Kei a koe te wa! 6

7


2 rua

CAREERS IN HEALTH HAUORA CAREERS

8

9


RADIOGRAPHER - medical radiation technologist What does a Radiographer do? Ever had an Xray? If so, the person who took the Xray was a Radiographer, who are also called Medical Radiation Technologists MRT. MRTs work in radiology facilities where they examine patients, taking into account the doctor’s comments, the patient’s physical condition and any previous examinations the patient may have had. Together, with a radiologist (doctor), the MRT decides on the best procedure, which may be a general x-ray examination or a more specialised imaging technique like a mammogram, or ultrasound. The images taken by the MRT are then studied by the radiologist, who will use them to make a diagnosis.

Salary: New graduates $46,000 a year. Senior medical radiation technologists can earn $60,000 - $84,000 or more.

What subjects should I take at school? • • • •

Chemistry Biology Physics English, te reo Māori, Maths, Computing and Information Management will also be helpful

How do I get into it?

10

Tricia Keelan, Health Manager

You can study to be a radiographer at either Unitec (Auckland), at the Universal College of Learning (UCOL), or at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT).

You will need to study one of the following degrees which will take you three years to complete, • • •

A Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Imaging Technology) (UCOL) A Bachelor of Health Science (Medical Imaging) (Unitec) A Bachelor of Medical Imaging (CPIT)

Your training will also be divided between the tertiary institute and hospitals, where you’ll be supervised by medical professionals.

Will I get a job after studying? Medical imaging is a fast growing health profession, and needs qualified employees now. Medical Radiation Technology (MRT) has two branches medical imaging and radiation therapy. Both branches are extremely important. Medical imaging uses a wide range of very special equipment to help diagnose injury or disease, and to assist in patient management and treatment. Radiation therapy is the branch of MRT that treats patients who have cancer. People qualified in and wanting jobs in both areas will have no problem at all getting jobs in New Zealand and throughout the world.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz 11


AMBULANCE OFFICER - Paramedic What does an Ambulance Officer or Paramedic do? Ambulance officers attend to ill and injured people at accident sites or in medical emergencies, and transport them to hospitals and other suitable medical facilities. They also provide transport for patients between hospitals, and from homes to hospitals.

Salary: $36,500 for a St John graduate $55,000 for a paramedic $61,000 for an advanced paramedic

what subjects do i take at school ?

How do I get into it? Ambulance officers hold different qualifications depending on how much study they have successfully completed. To be an ambulance officer you can train at either Auckland University of Technology (Auckland) or Whitireia Community Polytechnic (Wellington) and will study the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Paramedic). The degree will take you three years to complete. Alternatively, you can train directly through St John, who offer a range of training programmes up to and not including the bachelor level training. These are outlined below.

aut or vut

In Years 11, 12 and 13 make sure you keep doing Sciences.

If you haven’t taken the right subjects at school, don’t give up, as most universities and polytechnics offer bridging courses that will help you gain the right entry requirements.

St John ADVANCED PARAMEDIC

PARAMEDIC

St John AMBULANCE OFFICER

St John PRIMARY CARE 2

St John PRIMARY CARE 1

Advanced Paramedic Bachelor in Health Studies Paramedic Paramedic Ambulance Officer National Certificate Primary Care 2 Certificate in Advanced Driver Training Certificate in Ambulance Practice Primary Care 1 Certificate in Pre Hospital Emergency Care

You will also need to have a current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certificate, have a clean driver’s licence and be physically fit.

12

Carlton Irving, Whakatohea

Will I get a job after studying?

St John

Training provided by St John

It’s a good idea to keep doing Te Reo Māori, English and Maths as well, because these are subjects that will help you get most careers in Health.

Whenever someone calls 111 with a life threatening emergency, they send us out and we go sort them out ... ... every day you’re doing something different, you get to help people and save lives, and that makes you feel good about yourself.

You see them on sports fields, at events and in communities. They’ll be attending accidents and emergencies, treating ill and injured people, transporting whānau and accident victims to hospitals and clinics, or liaising with other emergency services, such as fire and police. Job prospects get better and better for ambulance officers and paramedics. There is more money for services; more demand for ambulance officers and the role of the ambulance officer is seen to be more important than it ever has been.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz or www.stjohn.org.nz

13


midwifery What does a midwife do? Midwives provide care and support to women during pregnancy, labour and birth, and up to six weeks following birth. They also provide advice for mothers, such as information on breastfeeding and good parenting. Midwives can choose to be self-employed or work for a District Health Board or a Māori Health Organisation.

Salary: $40,000 - $70,000 a year

What subjects do I need to take at school? There are subjects you should try and do to help set yourself up for a career as a midwife. In Years 11, 12 and 13 make sure you keep doing Science, especially chemistry and biology. Te Reo Māori, English and Maths are also useful subjects to have if you can fit them in as they will help you get into most careers in Health. Heoi anoi, If you haven’t taken the right subjects at school, don’t give up, as most universities and polytechnics offer bridging courses to prepare you for study.

How do I get into it? To become a midwife you need to complete a Bachelor of Midwifery, which is offered at a number of places including, • Otago Polytechnic • Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology • Massey University 14

• •

Waikato Institute of Technology Auckland University of technology

It will take you three years to complete. It’s not all in the classroom though. During this time you will also get supervised training in the workplace. If you live in a rural area you may also be able to study online, so check with the wānanga offering midwifery education. To practise as a midwife you will be registered with the Midwifery Council of New Zealand and hold a current Annual Practising Certificate. Māori midwives also have strong support network through Ngā Maia, the national body that represents Māori birthing.

Will I get a job after studying? The demand for Māori midwives is high because there are not enough Māori midwives to meet the huge demand from Māori communities. Many older midwives begin to work fewer hours and reduce their caseloads, so there is always room available for younger midwives to work full time. You can be self-employed, work for a District Health Board or for a Māori health organisation. Midwives can also become teachers. As a midwifery educator or midwifery adviser you could also provide education to others about the role and practice of a midwife. Your NZ qualification will also be recognised internationally so there are opportunities to work overseas as well.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz.

Leanne O’Brien, Midwife

15


health promoter What does a health promoter do?

How do I get into it?

Health promoters plan and develop ways to help people improve and manage their health. They connect with whānau, groups, communities, government and other agencies to work on ways to improve things that contribute to ill health. Health promoters also educate people on how to prevent disease.

To become a Health promoter you’ll find it’s useful to have a tertiary qualification. You might get a Bachelor’s Degree (three years) in health or social sciences or education. You’ll also find knowing about related areas like child health, youth work, or nutrition can be very helpful.

Examples of health promotion include • tobacco control • improving nutrition • improving oral health • promoting physical activity (e.g. push play etc)

There are also short-term, part-time and extramural courses in health promotion and public health that are available at many tertiary institutions from entry- level to postgraduate level. Training time to become a Health Promoter varies. This depends on the courses you choose, and how much relevant experience you may have.

Salary:

Will I get a job after studying?

How much you will earn as a Health promoter will depend on your qualifications and experience, who you’re working for and where you’re working. You might start out earning around $29,000 per year, but once you’re a Health Promotion Manager you might earn up to $95,000 per year.

As a Health promoter you might work in government, for district health boards, in workplaces like Primary Health Organisations or in the community. There are also great opportunities to work with Māori health organisations who work, especially in areas that affect Māori, like diabetes, healthy lifestyles for healthy hearts, oral health, smoking, housing and environmental issues.

What subjects do I need to take? Make sure you leave secondary school with marks that will let you enter tertiary education. Useful subjects for prospective Health promoters include English, te reo Māori, Science, Health, Geography, Media and Design.

The opportunities for Māori Health promoters are good because the Government wants to see more Māori working in key parts of health, including health promotion.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz.

These are subjects you should keep taking throughout school - keep your options open, study hard and make sure you apply for tertiary study before you leave school.

16

Melany Tainui, Health Promoter

17


physiotherapist what does a physiotherapist do?

Physiotherapists have a huge role to play in helping people retain or regain their physical function following a sports injury, accident, surgery or poor health.

They identify physical and neurological problems and how to manage them. They may do this through manipulation, specialist massage, giving the patient special exercises or by using high-tech equipment to promote recovery. Physiotherapists also educate people on how to prevent injury. The variety makes physiotherapy a very rewarding and diverse profession.

Salary: Salary expectations for a physiotherapist are between $60,000 and $80,000 a year, depending on where you work, who you may work for and how much experience you have.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • • •

English Biology Chemistry

• • •

Physics Maths Te Reo Māori

While at school, try to keep as many of these subjects up, especially the science subjects as these will continue in your first year of study at University.

How do I get into it? To become a physiotherapist you need to have completed a 4 year degree in either, 18

Bachelor of Health Science (Physiotherapy) from the Auckland University of Technology or Bachelor of Physiotherapy (BPhty) from the University of Otago.

Then physiotherapists must register with the Physiotherapists Board of NZ (www.physioboard.co.nz) and keep up their Annual Practising Certificate.

Will I get a job after studying? There is a shortage of physiotherapists in New Zealand, so there are many career opportunities available in hospitals, health centres and clinics, private practices and community centres. There are also lots of different kinds of physiotherapists and, once you’ve qualified, you can choose the work place and patients that suit you best. For example physiotherapists can work in: • • • • • •

sports physiotherapy • acute trauma acupuncture • mental health hand therapy • women’s health occupational health and therapy (workplace) paediatrics (children) neuro-rehabilitation (brain and nervous system).

Where can I f ind out more?

www.kiaora hauora.co.n z or www.health careers.org .n z or www.care ers.govt.nz

“ Tumeke nga

mahi hauora

Karaitiana Ripaki-Tamatea, Physiotherapy student

Karaitiana Ripaki - Tamatea, Physio student 19


pharmacy What does someone working in Pharmacy do? Pharmacists are experts on medicines. They prepare, mix and dispense medicines that doctors prescribe for patients. They share information with patients about how to manage their health and help ensure patients know how to take their medication properly. The other roles in Pharmacy include Pharmacy technicians and Pharmacy assistants. Pharmacy technicians help pharmacists to prepare and give out medicines. Pharmacist assistants help pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, and are usually the first point of contact for customers. They advise customers on basic health and beauty care.

Salary: Pharmacists: • Interns (pharmacists who are completing their year of work experience after graduation) earn between $29,500 and $35,500 a year. • Newly qualified pharmacists usually earn $50,000 or more. • Experienced pharmacists can earn up to $80,000 or more Pharmacy technicians & Pharmacy assistants: Pay for these roles vary depending on hours of work and the level of experience and training.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • • 20

Joanne Hikaka, Pharmacist

Chemistry Biology

• •

Maths Physics

How do I get into it? •

To become a Pharmacist you need a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Auckland or the University of Otago (4 years). The University of Auckland has alternative entry schemes such as MAPAS for Māori and Pacific students. Then once you have finished your Bachelor’s degree you’ll have to work as a paid intern for a year either a hospital or a community pharmacy to become a registered pharmacist To become a Pharmacy technician you need to complete a 2 year Certificate in Pharmacy (Technician) through Academy New Zealand, or alternatively a part-time correspondence course while you are working, through the Open Polytechnic of NZ. To become a Pharmacy assistant you receive training on the job in the community pharmacy. You can also complete the 1 year certificate in Pharmacy (assistant) while you are working, through Open Polytechnic of NZ or Academy New Zealand.

Will I get a job after studying? It is highly likely you will get a job in any of these pharmacy careers as they are highly sought after. As a pharmacist for example, you can work in the hospital or community, you can own your own pharmacy, or you can work in other pharmacyrelated work such as medical writing, pharmaceutical manufacturing, sales or clinical trial work.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz Check out other information about Māori pharmacy students and Māori pharmacists on the Pharmacy Council’s website www.pharmacycouncil.org.nz and www.mpa.maori.nz. 21


Anaesthetic Technician What does an Anaesthetic Technician do? Anaesthetic technicians work with doctors and specialists to provide the best care for patients, before, during and after operations. Once you’ve qualified you’ll know how to: • • • •

check and set up life support and anaesthetic machines check and prepare the equipment required order and prepare medical supplies make sure equipment and consumables are maintained in a safe, ready-to-use condition.

Salary: • • •

$27,000 - $37,000 a year for trainee anaesthetic technicians. $40,000 and $54,000 for qualified anaesthetic technicians. $71,000 for those who perform additional duties beyond the job description or who have a higher level of responsibility.

How do I get into it? You will need to undertake a Diploma in Applied Science (Anaesthetic Technology) while you are working in a hospital approved as a training place. So check with your local hospital for placement opportunities. This pathway has a real upside, you will earn a reasonable income every year you are training. It will take 3 years to complete. Your formal study will be done through Auckland University of Technology (AUT), which is the only New Zealand University that offers this course.

Will I get a job after studying?

As mentioned previously, you will study to be an anaesthetic technician while on the job. This means you are employed with the health organisation you train with.

What subjects do I need to take at school? You will need to stay at school at least till the end of Year 12. You will need 42 credits in NCEA Level 3, with a minimum of 14 credits in Maths at Level 1, or higher, and a minimum of 8 credits in English or Te Reo Māori. Keep your science subjects where ever possible, especially physics if you can. If you haven’t taken the right subjects don’t worry as you can do catch up courses at Auckland University of Technology to put you back on track.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org .nz or www.careers.govt.nz Jason Smith, Youth Worker

22

23


Occupational Therapy What does an Occupational Therapist do? Occupational therapists assess and treat people who are limited in their ability to undertake the activities of everyday life. This might be because of illness, mental health needs, injury or circumstance. They help people to regain lost functions, develop their abilities and social skills, and maintain and promote independence in their everyday lives. As an occupational therapist you might work in a health centre, a school, a residential care facility, a Māori health organisation, in the community, in primary health, in a hospital, or have your own practice.

Salary: As an occupational therapist you can earn between $50,000 and $65,000 a year, depending on where you work, who you work for and how much experience you have.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • Science • English • Maths If you haven’t taken the right subjects don’t worry as you can do a 1 year foundation programme, before you start your degree at AUT where the programme is offered.

How do I get into it? To become an Occupational Therapist you can study at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) for a Bachelor of Health Science (Occupational Therapy). 24

Georgina Davis, OT and Kevin Brown, OT (Left - Right))

I didn’t do so well in the school system, when I was 20 I enrolled in one of those bridging courses, worked to get good grades, finished with ‘A’s overall ... I chose Occupational Therapy and haven’t looked back since.

Kevin Brown, Ngāpuhi

Or you can study in Hamilton or Dunedin through Otago Polytechnic towards a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy. This programme, allows both fulltime and part time study options. It will take you three years to complete the degree (fulltime). Throughout your studies you will have work placement programmes so you can get out and learn about applying occupational therapy in the real world - or at least in Auckland, Hamilton and Dunedin!

Will I get a job after studying? There is a real shortage of Māori occupational therapists throughout New Zealand, so there are many career opportunities available. Your New Zealand qualification will also be recognised in many other countries, so if you’re keen on travel, you can always seek opportunities abroad.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz or www.matatini.co.nz or www.churchurbro.co.nz 25


Oral Health What does someone in oral health do? Oral health is an important part of a person’s overall wellbeing. If your mouth is unhealthy, your overall well being will suffer too. There are many people who contribute to keeping our mouths healthy. • •

• • •

Dentists study and treat problems with peoples’ mouths, teeth, gums and jaws Dental therapists provide tamariki and rangatahi with everyday dental care and help promote good oral health Dental hygienists treat gum disease and help people take care of their teeth and gums Dental technicians create and repair devices for people Dental assistants help dentists as well as therapists and hygienists to carry out their job

From year 12 and 13 make sure you keep doing Chemistry, Biology and Physics. Dental hygienists and dental therapists Biology, Chemistry and English are the key subjects. It’s also a good idea to keep doing te reo Māori, Maths as well, because these are subjects that will help you progress in any health career. Dental technician Biology, Chemistry, Maths and also physics are good subjects. Dental assistant Biology and English are useful. Heoi anoi, If you haven’t taken the right subjects at school, don’t give up, as most universities and polytechnics offer bridging courses to prepare you for study.

Salary:

How do I get into it?

As a dentist you can earn,

• • •

$65,000 in your first year. $100,000 in your fifth year. $100,000 to $250,000 a year in your own practice.

Dental hygienists and dental therapists can earn between $40,000 and $75,000 per year, depending on which career they choose, how they work and who they work for.

What subjects do I need to take at school? Dentist From year 9 – year 11 it’s useful to take Science, Maths and English. 26

• • •

Dentist: 5 year degree in dental surgery from the University of Otago. Dental therapist: 3 year Bachelor of Health Science (Oral Health) from Auckland University of Technology (AUT) or Bachelor of Oral Health from the University of Otago Dental hygienist: 3 year Bachelor of Oral Health from the University of Otago Dental assistant: on-the-job training through the NZ Dental Association Dental technician: Bachelor of Dental Technology from the University of Otago

Will I get a job after studying?

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz. Find out more on the New Zealand Māori Dental Association web site www.teaomarama.org.nz or check out the Dental Council of New Zealand www.dcnz.org.nz.

One thing I always tell Māori who are interested in health, is that it’s really important to start science papers as soon as you can. If you want to be your own boss, be one of the highest money earners in New Zealand, and travel with your career, then choose dentistry, it’s an awesome career.

Pauline Koopu, Ngāti Konohi, Ngāti Kahu

There is a shortage world-wide for qualified oral health professionals, so job prospects are strong here in New Zealand and overseas. 27


Community Health Worker What does a community health worker do? Community health workers work with clients, whānau and communities, supporting them wherever they are - in homes, hospitals, kura, kōhanga, marae and clubs making sure they have a voice, that they are safe and they get the health services they need.

Salary: Salaries vary, but most community health workers earn between $22,000 and $35,000 per year.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • • • •

Science Maths English Te Reo Māori.

Having a combination of these subjects will help you keep your options open for a great health career in the future.

How do I get into it? To become a community health worker it is good to have undertaken some post-school training in client and community care, social work, health, mental health and Māori health. There are relevant courses being offered by tertiary institutions throughout Aotearoa. Length of study can vary depending on the course/s you choose. Relevant study can last one semester, one year or much longer. 28

And it’s not just what you do in school that counts - what you do out of school will also help. Useful experience to have if you want to become a Community Health Worker includes: • • • •

voluntary work for youth work agencies. teaching, counselling, social work, community work, church work or other work that involves helping people. work within an iwi/Māori community or social service coaching young people in a sport.

Will I get a job after training? Job prospects just keep getting better for community health workers as their value becomes clear throughout communities and government departments. Community health workers can make such a huge and positive difference in the lives of people and their whānau and communities. As a community health worker you’ll find work in: • District Health Boards (DHBs) • Mental Health and Addiction Services • not-for-profit organisations and charitable trusts • primary health organisations • marae and spiritual/religious-based organisations • schools, universities and polytechnics • community facilities

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz.

Rapiata Ria, Community Heal th Worker

29


nurse What does a nurse do? Nurses promote health, prevent disease, and help patients cope with illness by providing special care. Nurses also support patients, whānau, and communities and help individuals and groups take steps to improve or maintain their health. There is a huge variety of nursing roles available. Some of these roles include: •

Primary Health care nurses or community health nurses, work in areas like tamariki health (e.g a plunket nurse) youth health (e.g a school nurse) Māori health, mental health and addictions, and general health to name a few. Hospital nurses work in emergency departments, operating theatres, in paediatrics (the children’s ward) other hospital wards and intensive care units, providing care to wide range of patients with complex health issues and needs. Nurses in hospital can also work as educators, training and mentoring other nurses and health professionals in specific areas of healthcare. Work overseas in Aid and relief organisations.

Salary: Nurses salaries vary between $40,000 $55,000. You can earn more depending on years of experience and the role you fulfil.

What subjects do I need to take at school? You will need to keep Maths, English, Chemistry and Biology while at secondary school. Heoi anoi, If you haven’t taken the right subjects at school, don’t give up, as most universities and polytechnics offer bridging courses to prepare you for study. 30

Jo Marino, Ngāti Porou, Te Arawa, Tuhoe, Tuwharetoa, Ireland, Nurse

I studied with Manukau Institute of Technology, Bachelor of Health Sciences - Nursing ... some of us were scared to take up nursing because you worry that you have someone’s lives in your hands. And you do, but you also have the opportunity to help them make their lives better.

Jo Marino, Ngāti Porou, Te Arawa, Tuhoe, Tuwharetoa, Ireland

what do I need to get into it? You will need to complete a 3 year Bachelor of Nursing degree. Most tertiary institutes offer nursing degree programmes, so check out one nearest you.

Maori support As a Māori nursing student and as a Māori nurse you will also get support and ongoing learning opportunities through Te Kaunihera o Ngā Neehi Māori - the Māori Nurses Association.

Will I get a job after studying? There is a global shortage of Nurses so it is very likely that you will have a range of options for employment when you finish your training. Māori health professionals are especially in high demand, with the government, district health boards and community health services wanting to see an increase in the proportion of Māori in the health workforce.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz www.healthcareers.org.nz www.careers.govt.nz www.matatini.co.nz www.churchurbro.co.nz www.ngamanukura.co.nz - Ngā Manukura o Apōpō, National Māori Nursing & Midwifery Workforce Development Programme

www.nzcmhn.org.nz - New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. 31


doctor What does a doctor do? Doctors look after people’s health and wellbeing by diagnosing and treating their health problems. There are many different kinds of doctors, some work in the community like General Practitioners (GP). Others specialise in areas like, • Psychiatry (mental health) • Public health (preventative medicine and health) • Surgery • Emergency and trauma medicine, to name a few.

Salary: Depending on years of experience and specialty this will vary. As a GP the range is between $65,000 to $100,000. For other types of doctors, as a first year doctor you may earn $88,000 which increases as your years of experience accumulates.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • • • • •

Physics Biology Chemistry English Maths

How do I get into it? You need to complete the first year of the Bachelor of Health Sciences or the Bachelor of Science majoring in Biomedical Science to gain entry into the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (5 years).

32

These qualifications are offered through the University of Auckland and Otago. In your 6th year you are based in a hospital as an intern and earn a small salary. The University of Auckland also has alternative entry schemes such as MAPAS for Māori and Pacific students. These programmes also provide good support and mentoring for Māori students during study at both the University of Auckland and the University of Otago.

There are very few Māori doctors. We need you to help us. The money is great. The world will open up to you

Lincoln Nicholls, Doctor

Will I get a job after training? Graduating as a doctor is a great place to start your career in health because you can then work anywhere in Aotearoa and throughout the world, in hospitals, clinics and communities. Qualified doctors are one of the most sought after professions that exist. The demand to secure your services once you complete your study will be undeniable.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz. You should also visit the website of the Māori Medical Practitioners Association, www.teora.maori.nz for more information and advice.

“Tino taea a ngai

maori kia whai I tenei mahi.

Matt Wheeler, Med Student

33


dietitian What does a dietitian do?

How do I get into this job?

A Dietitian advises patients, communities and groups about their dietary needs for maintaining good health and managing food and nutrition issues. They play an important role in supporting other health professionals to help people make long term change to their lives for a healthier lifestyle. Dietitians usually work regular office hours but some oncall work may be required. You will find most Dietitians working in hospitals, in the community or in private practices. You do have to keep training in this role to remain registered and keep up to date with new research and techniques.

To become a Dietitian you need to have:

Salary:

If you choose to be a Dietitian you can travel and work anywhere in the world and get paid well while you’re doing it. This is also a great career to move into a variety of roles with. For example you can work in the food industry, food service management, health promotion and conduct research. There are less than 10 Māori trained Dietitians in the world. Therefore Māori Dietitians are a sought after commodity.

The starting salary for new graduates is around $43,000. Dietitians working in private practices usually earn between $43,000 and $100,000 a year, while those working in public health areas or in management usually earn between $43,000 and $90,000 a year. This is a guide only.

What subjects do I need to take at school? • • • •

English Maths Biology Chemistry

• •

a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Nutrition or a Bachelor of Consumer and Applied Sciences, majoring in Human Nutrition and Food Service Management (these take three years fulltime). PLUS a Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics (18 months-2 years).

Only the University of Otago offers the Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics, although there are training centres throughout the country so you don’t have to stay in Otago the whole time.

Will I get a job after studying?

Where can I find out more? www.dietitians.org.nz or www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz.

“ Dream big and follow

that dream wherever it will take you.

34

Tammy Kaiwai, Dietitian

Tammy Kaiwai, Dietitian

35


podiatrist What does a podiatrist do?

Will I get a job after studying?

Podiatrists diagnose and treat foot and lower limb problems. They also help people prevent problems. Their work includes routine foot care, the care of lower limbs for people with diseases such as diabetes, the diagnosis and treatment of sports-related injuries, nail and skin surgery and assessing foot and lower limb movement and structure.

There is a shortage of Podiatrists in New Zealand, because our population is getting older, because diabetes can often cause foot problems and because we love our sport.

Salary: Usually between $45,000 and $85,000 a year, depending on where they work, who they work for and how much experience they have. Experienced podiatrists in private practice can earn over $100,000.

What subjects do I need to take at school? The following are helpful subjects you could study while at school if you want to become a Podiatrist. • English • Maths • Biology • Chemistry

There are many career opportunities available for qualified podiatrists including: Podiatrists practise privately or in public health, and can work in specialised areas such as: • Foot ailments • High risk patient management • Sports injuries and biomechanics • Foot and nail surgery • Foot health education

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz or www.careers.govt.nz.

what do I need to get into it? You will study at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) for a Bachelor of Health Science in Podiatry. It will take you three years full time. Throughout your studies you will have work placement programmes so you can get out and learn about applying podiatry in the real world - or at least in Auckland! Work placements give you a good idea of where you’d like to work and how many opportunities there are for Podiatrists. 36

Lawrence Kingi, Podiatrist

37


other occupations available We’ve shown you a few of the amazing health careers available, but there are so many more. Check out these ones below.

No reira e kare ma, whaia i tenei mahi rangatira, te mahi hauora

Promoter

Rangatahi Support Worker

Play

Audiologist

Administrators

Anaesthetic Technician

Cardiac Physiologist

Clinical Coder

Dental Hygienist

PsychologistSonographer

Dental Technician

Dentist Kaiawhina Midwife

Health Interpreter

Phlebotomist

Pharmacy Technician Peer Support Specialist Ambulance Medical Radiation Technologist Officer

Breastfeeding advocate

Dental Therapist

Physiotherapist

Social Health Manager Worker

Medical

Paramedic

Dietitian Dental Assistant

Doctor

Community support worker Registered Nurse

Health Care Assistant

Laboratory Technician Occupational Therapist

Pharmacy Assistant

WhÄ nau Support Worker

Scientist Podiatrist 38

r pa

Pharmacist

Speech Language Therapist

Psychiatrist

co m

mun

health

ity

am

promot

er

ae

tic tehnic

nan's

whar

physi

ic

th heal

r ma

anaesthe

ed

wor

2k

m

ian doct or

e 5k m

ar py ph a r e h ot

nursing & midw

ker

macy

lth ifery oral hea

39


to studying health science

3 toru

entry requirements

Getting into University.

U

niversity Entrance (UE) is the common educational standard established by the NZQA New Zealand Qualifications Authority. Achieving UE is the first step and minimum requirement for getting into university. It’s like getting your learners licence for University. The next important step is meeting the entry criteria for your chosen degree or programme of study.

Step 1. Gaining University Entrance (UE) To gain entry to a New Zealand University and some other tertiary providers using NCEA you will need at least:

Level 3 or Higher 42 credits, including a minimum of 14 credits in each of two subjects from the “approved subjects” category; with a further 14 credits from not more than two additional domains on the national Qualifications framework or approved subjects AND Level 2 or higher – 8 credits in English or Te Reo Maori, 4 credits in reading and 4 credits in writing AND

University Entrance

Level 3 or higher 42 credits

14 credits in one “approved subject”

14 credits in one “approved subject”

14 credits from not more than two additional domains on the NQF or “approved subjects”

Level 2 or higher 8 credits in English or Te Reo Māori (inc. 4 reading, 4 writing)

Level 1 or higher – 14 credits in Mathematics or Statistics and Probability or Pangarau.

Level 1 or higher 14 credits in Mathematics or Pāngarau

Step 2. Gaining entry into your programme. To study health science you may need to meet additional criteria to get into your programme of study. This is dependent on which institution you apply to and the programme you have selected. For all programmes you will need to have at least University Entrance.

let's see maori living careers in 40

health ! 41


4 wha

what next?

Am I doing the right subjects to study this health career? Fill out the list below and compare it to what is required for that job (you can look up what subjects are required for each health job at www.kiaorahauora.co.nz). My current subjects

Subjects Required

1. 2.

So you’ve learnt some new things about health careers, now what do you do with that information? The following document will help you learn more about the health careers that interest you.

What do you like about this health career / job, and why did you pick this one over the other 2?

3. 4. 5.

First of all…choose 3 health careers you have read about that interest you.

1.

2.

6.

What do your parents, friends, other whānau think about the health career / job? Talk to other people about it. You might be surprised what people know.

3.

where can i study to become this health role? You can check out www.kiaorahauora.co.nz or www.healthcareers.org.nz to see the different places you can study your chosen health role. These sites also offer advice if you haven’t got the entry requirements just yet.

What other assistance is available to help me reach my goal? e.g for scholarship information you can check out the Scholarship database on the www.kiaorahauora.co.nz website.

From these 3, choose one you like the most.

1.

42

Who do you know that might be able to give you some advice? (do you know someone that works in health or are you able to talk to a careers adviser?)

Once you’ve answered these questions check out other useful health careers information on the Kia Ora Hauora website: www.kiaorahauora.co.nz.

Where can I find out more? www.kiaorahauora.co.nz 43


Kia Ora Hauora National Coordination Centre Tuhakia Keepa Programme Manager info@kiaorahauora.co.nz Te Rau Matatini NGO Engagement Coordinator Hohepa Patea kiaorahauora@matatini.co.nz Northern Regional Coordinator northern@kiaorahauora.co.nz

7 whitu

contact us

Midlands Regional Coordinator Chae Simpson Chae.Simpson@lakesdhb.govt.nz Central Regional Coordinator Leigh Andrews Leigh.Andrews@ccdhb.org.nz

For more informatio n go

Te Waipounamu Coordinator Cazna Luke cazna@mokowhiti.co.nz

www.kiaora

Thanks to Pasifika Medical Association

to:

hauora.co.n

z

Test Flipper  

health careers booklet 1 nan's whare 5km anaesthetic tehnician doctor health promoter nursing & midwifery oral health 3 2 to studying he...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you