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QUARTERLY PUBLICATION OF DARTMOUTH PEAK PERFORMANCE & DARTMOUTH ATHLETIC SPONSORS FALL 2014

IN THIS ISSUE SUMMER D.R.I.V.E. KEEPS SOPHOMORES ON THE GO PAGE 10

PEAK PERFORMANCE TAKES SHAPE PAGE 16

SERVICE COMES NATURALLY PAGE 20

SMOOTH WATER PAGE 24

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NEITHER RAIN, NOR SLEET, NOR SNOW Dartmouth Football closed a 5-2 Ivy season last year with a rousing victory over Princeton in the snow at Memorial Field. The Big Green starts the 2014 season under the lights at home against Central Connecticut State. Dartmouth opens the Ivy season against Penn on October 4 at home.

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COURT PRESENCE Junior co-captain Katherine Yau and the Big Green women’s tennis team look to return to the top of the Ivy standings in 201415. Yau, a First Team All-Ivy selection last year, hails from Manhassat, New York.

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QUARTERLY PUBLICATION OF DARTMOUTH PEAK PERFORMANCE & DARTMOUTH ATHLETIC SPONSORS FALL 2014

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FEATURES 10 SUMMER D.R.I.V.E. KEEPS SOPHOMORES ON THE GO DP2’s sophomore summer leadership program continues to challenge athletes – intellectually and physically – during the beautiful Upper Valley summer 16 PEAK PERFORMANCE TAKES SHAPE Harry Sheehy’s vision for DP2 has become a reality


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PEAK Dartmouth Peak Performance 6083 Alumni Gym Hanover, NH 03755 EDITOR Drew Galbraith ASSITANT EDITOR Emily Cummings

20 SERVICE COMES NATURALLY TO FISHMAN Senior Adam Fishman brings his zest for helping others to the role of Jaeger Civic Intern this fall 24 SMOOTH WATER Dartmouth Sailing overcomes the odds on many fronts to become a college sailing power

COVER: Vollyball Co-Captain Paige Caridi ’16 was named Most Outstanding Player at the Greyhound Challenge while leading the Big Green to the tournament title.

Paige’s recruiting visit to Dartmouth was made possible by the generosity of Don Voss ’58 and Ken Witte ’77 through the Athletic Sponsor Program.

SENIOR WRITER Bruce Wood ADVERTISING Sam Hopkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bob Miller, Donnie Brooks, Claudette Peck, Steven Spaulding Katelyn Stravinsky PHOTOGRAPHY Rob Bossi, Mark Washburn, Gil Talbot, John Risley Problems or Accessibility Issues? dp2@dartmouth.edu © 2014 Trustees of Dartmouth College

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FROM THE DESK OF PEAK PERFORMANCE Drew Galbraith ’64a, Senior Associate Athletic Director for Peak Performance

The Class of 2015 varsity athletes will always occupy a special place in our hearts. They are the first group of athletes to have their entire four-year career impacted by Dartmouth Peak Performance. None of them knew that DP2 existed during their recruiting process. There may have been some mention by a coach, but the creation of DP2, while in the works for months, was not even announced until July of 2011, just weeks before the fall sport athletes arrived. So, why is this group special, beyond the fortuitous timing? This group of 200-plus athletes bought in. As a group, this class was trusting and optimistic from day one. While they experienced the growing pains of a new program and unique concept, these athletes stayed with us, provided constructive feedback, and were truly active participants in helping us re-define the studentathlete experience. We are by no means a finished product and we will always evolve, but in June, this class will be the first to complete a four-year DP2 experience, and for that, we will always be indebted to them. What has changed? Dartmouth became the first school to lead the NCAA in both of the academic measures that are used by the organization – Academic Progress Rate and Graduation Success Rate. The athletic profile continues to improve (see chart below). The student-athlete experience is fundamentally different – from the resources that are available to students, to the quality of coaching students are receiving, to the intentionality and purpose behind how our programs are run. Turn to page 18 to get Harry Sheehy’s thoughts as we head into year four. On behalf of the entire Dartmouth Peak Performance staff, which includes more than 30 professionals in areas as wide-ranging as sports medicine, strength training, leadership development and academic affairs, it is our pleasure to serve our

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student-athletes by playing a role in their development. This time next year, I promise to write a flowery piece about how special the Class of 2016 is in our hearts, as they are the first class to be recruited to the idea of DP2. But that’s another story. This year is going to be special at Dartmouth – on and off the field. As Harry Sheehy so often says, check the left side of the scores first, because that’s where you are going to find Dartmouth.

BIG GREEN RISING IN THE LEARFIELD SPORTS NACDA DIRECTOR’S CUP Each year, NCAA Division I athletic departments are ranked based on their placement in NCAA Championships across all NCAA sports. As recently as 2009-10, Dartmouth finished the year 128th across 330+ Division I schools and seventh among Ivy League schools. The last three years have seen a dramatic improvement for the Big Green’s fortunes. Last year, Dartmouth had its highest finish since 1998 and returned to the top three in the Ivy League for the first time in eight years.

BIG GREEN FINISH IN THE DP2 YEARS YEAR 2011-12

NCAA DIVISION I 79

IVY LEAGUE 5

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he tree was tall. Very tall. The bag bearing the wooden token he was tasked to retrieve wasn’t in the tree canopy, but it was up there. Way up there. In spite of his fear of heights – perhaps because of his fear of heights – the Dartmouth sophomore volunteered to ascend the thick, black rope hanging from an upper limb of the tree. The student-athlete listened intently and watched closely as Steven Spaulding, Dartmouth’s assistant athletic director for leadership, explained the Texas prusik method of ascent with a sling, a harness and a locking carabiner. Spaulding had the sophomore and 80 or so other student-athletes out on the river as part of a summer DP2 initiative that goes by the acronym DRIVE. Standing for Development, Resilience, Ingenuity, Valor and Excellence, DRIVE is a seven-week program combining classroom lectures with four afternoons of “experiential exercises” intended to identify and develop leaders and leadership qualities. The rope climb was one of six challenges the teams were racing each other to complete as part of an experiential exercise that was billed as “Top Secret.” The early August afternoon began with preassigned teams of student-athletes racing canoes to Gilman Island, on a quiet stretch of the Connecticut River south of the Ledyard Bridge. Some stations required the entire team to participate. Others, like the rope climb, needed just one. Safety helmet on his head, gloves on his hands and teammates watching from below, the sophomore who bravely stepped forward and accepted the rope challenge inched slowly and methodically upward. Dangling high above the forest floor, however, he eventually felt his fear of heights begin to wash over him. “The tree climb was probably the most intense challenge in terms of the experience of being suspended 40 and 50 feet up a tree on a single rope,” offered Spaulding, a West Point graduate and former Airborne Ranger. “It’s about the ability at that moment to receive instruction and to overcome fear. To do something that you had never done before, stay focused on what is most important, and to accomplish the task. “That one particular athlete was really struggling with the challenges of breathing, self-regulating and then finding his way down. That’s at the core of what the rope climb was all about. When you are faced with really tough, difficult moments in life you see it through. That’s what good leaders do.” Suspended perhaps 50 feet off the ground, the sophomore listened to Spaulding’s instructions, gathered himself, stared down his fear and returned safely to the ground. It was a watershed moment. “He did it up on the rope and he will do it later on in a boardroom when something is really really important, when people’s livelihoods are on the line, and he needs to stick with what he believes is right,” said Spaulding, proud of what he witnessed. “It was a tremendous victory.” For the sophomore, but also for DRIVE, which takes a different approach than some other programs. “There are leadership programs in the country where you will come to a particular center and you will be given the concepts,” Spaulding explained. “Then you go away and that is it. You have to apply them on your own, or not. “You can’t train concepts in a vacuum and have the experience of the P E A K | FA LL 201 4

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THE IDEA IS TO LINK CONCEPTS TO ACTIONS. LEADERS DON’T LIVE IN THE CONCEPTUAL.

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individual immediately be extracted from that context and expect them to learn what it is you are trying to teach. You need to be able to sit them down, give them some things they can use and have them go away and try them.” Spaulding kicked off the second year of DRIVE with a session headlined “Be, Know, Do,” the Army model for leadership. He brought in women’s ice hockey coach Mark Hudak, a fellow West Pointer, to break down the three-point approach that emphasizes character (Be), knowledge (Know) and action (Do). Although there wasn’t an experiential exercise per se after the first week, the student-athletes left Floren with an assignment, as they did whenever there wasn’t a corresponding experiential. “One week it might be to go up to Gile Mountain and reflect on what their goals are for the next two years at Dartmouth,” Spaulding said. “What are their goals? What do they see their lives being five or 10 years from now? What is their 30-year vision? What do they want their lives to have counted for? Who do they want to see themselves surrounded by?” Dartmouth Athletic Director Harry Sheehy, who wrote a book in 2002 called Raising a Team Player, spoke the second week of the DRIVE program on “The Importance of Character,” the foundation of leadership in the opinion of Spaulding and many others. That was followed several days later by the first experiential exercise, “Olympics of the Mind,” which took place on Memorial Field and required the student-athletes to problem solve various challenges. Lectures on, “Knowing and Leading from Values,” and “Principled, Centered Leadership,” were followed by an exercise called, “Mission Impossible,” at Pine Park, which runs through Hanover Country Club. Leading into the Gilman Island exercises were lectures on “Personal Skills,” and “People Skills,” with repeated emphasis on making communication ABC – Accurate, Bold and Concise. The guest speaker preceding the Gilman Island event was Phil Hanlon ’77, the 18th president of Dartmouth College. Takeaways from Hanlon’s talk included: • “You are not leading teams, you are leading people.” • “Don’t confuse loud and strong. They are almost opposites. A strong leader is calm.” • “If you find it is about you, you are in the wrong business.” • “Saying you want 100 percent attendance at workouts is a concrete goal. That’s good. Saying you want to change the ‘culture,’ is too undefinable.” In a quiet moment Hanlon summed up his appreciation for DRIVE’s leadership instruction this way: “I had no formal training. I envy you.” After Hanlon left, and while the students were gathering their 12

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things and beginning to rise from their seats, Sheehy charged down the aisle of the Floren Varsity House smart classroom like a contestant on The Price is Right. Leadership, he wanted to remind the athletes, is important enough that a busy Ivy League president carved out time to address them about it. “You don’t have to be perfect as a leader,” Sheehy emphasized for the benefit of the student-athletes. “It can be developed.” Two days later at the Connecticut River they would go about doing just that in an exercise that had been billed as, “Top Secret.” “The idea,” Spaulding explained in the shadow of Ledyard Canoe Club boathouse before the athletes arrived, “is to link concepts to action. Leaders don’t live in the conceptual.” Colorful mesh pinnies were pulled on as mixed teams of studentathletes filtered down the hill from campus. Mismatched canoes and paddles were lugged out of the boathouse. Orange life vests were donned. “Teammates,” said Spaulding, who using his favorite word for his charges, “I’m going to be giving you instructions once you are in the water. Get a boat and get in the water.” Pre-assigned captains for each team were given hunterorange baseball caps and called forward by Spaulding while their teammates clambered aboard the canoes. The captains were given 8x11 waterproofed sheets explaining the afternoon’s challenges along with maps featuring an aerial view of Gilman showing where each activity would take place. The teams would race the canoes to Gilman, pull the boats up a steep embankment and navigate them through a cat’s cradle of rope strung among trees. After leaving the canoes at a landing on the other side of the island, they had to climb an eight-foot wall, signal and receive a one-word message from teammates on another island using semaphore flags, retrieve the token from the tree, find orienteering flags hidden around the island, move heavy white, plastic barrels filled with water up a hill, and with an axe cut a sixinch section off a log before racing the canoes back to Ledyard. The wall climb was about basic teamwork, Spaulding explained. The semaphore about economy and efficiency of communication. The tree climb about facing a severe challenge. The scavenger hunt about delegating one teammate to complete a task. The water-filled barrels, which weighed more than 250 or so pounds, were about “deciding who was strong enough and determined enough to move them up the hill and whether I could send other teammates to do other tasks while some of us move the barrels,” Spaulding said. The teams could do the tasks in any order, with leadership and communication – the focus of the week – key to success. “Everything on the island was designed with the idea that in a


de-structured environment, what were they going to select to do and how were they going to do it,” said Spaulding. “How were they going to communicate their plan? How would they tackle the course as a whole? “This was the least structured (experiential) in terms of, ‘You have to do, this, this and this.’ It was decentralized for the purpose of putting them into a situation where they had to communicate.” When the exercise was over one team was a clear winner. Team Yellow, captained by alpine skier Anne Strong and featuring field hockey, basketball, lacrosse, soccer, softball, volleyball, ice hockey and football players as well as a sailor, a rower and a cross country runner, finished well ahead of the other teams. “The yellow team flipped their boat early on,” Spaulding recalled a day later. “They faced a number of difficulties and challenges, but one thing that they did well was in their communication. The leader spoke and their teammates listened. There might have been a few inputs, but decisions were made and then everybody did what they were supposed to do. “The teams that had everybody talking over top of each other, where everybody had their own ideas, sort of traveled around in little Charlie Brown groups with a cloud of dust kicking up behind them and they lost. They were in last place or next to last.” After the canoes had been returned to the boathouse, the life vests stowed and the athletes sent back up the hill to grab dinner, Spaulding and his team of facilitators – strength coaches and athletic department personnel – talked about what they had witnessed. Which teams worked together best, and which struggled. Who stepped up and who might have backed down. “When you see teams that work effectively, they are teams that speak, that listen, that make decisions and then act,” Spaulding said. “After this kind of exercise teams are evaluated against one another, they are presented with data and graphs, and then we have a conversation as to why it went the way it did. Did the team build trust? Are they able to work in conflict? Were they committed? How accountable did they hold each other? How results-oriented were they?” Spaulding does not believe in pulling his punches. In his view, several teams failed the Gilman Island challenge and he would not shy away from telling them that. “We can get awfully kumbayah about leadership,” he said. “I will say things like, ‘Strong leadership,’ or, ‘You were a poor team. We failed.’ “Those are things successful people need to hear. Winston Churchill said success is failing and failing, over and over again, and never losing your sense of enthusiasm. I think that is really important. Anybody who has ever been anything in terms of success in any arena can tell you, they have failed more than most. They just kept going. “I often say to our student-athletes, ‘The only thing that separates me and you is 25 years of mistakes.’ You make lots of mistakes, and that’s what this is about. Get out there and fail. Make mistakes, but give it your best. If you aren’t giving it your best then you are not going to learn anything. Face some setbacks, learn from your failures and let’s move forward.” Like a sophomore who conquered a lot more than a rope climb on Gilman Island. P E A K | FA LL 201 4

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VICTORY TO THE STRONG (TEAM)

THE WINNER OF THE GILMAN ISLAND CHALLENGE WAS THE TEAM CAPTAINED BY SKIER ANNE STRONG. “Annie’s leadership style is interesting,” said Steven Spaulding, assistant athletic director for leadership. “I think what President Hanlon said about not confusing loud with strong was a really important message. From what I’ve observed of her, she was very calm throughout. She didn’t have a real loud, charismatic leadership style. But she very clearly was thinking through the entire scenario of what needed to be done. “As soon as she decided on things, everybody said, ‘Yeah, that’s good, let’s do it,’ and that’s what got done. Her communication was simple, but strong. Her decision-making ability was good, as was her ability to self regulate and keep her head. Ultimately the team gave her the power. She was able to think calmly through the situation and make the best rational decisions that she could along the way, despite a number of difficult setbacks that they had.” Strong offered a step-by-step explanation of the approach that allowed Team Yellow to win the competition by more than 15 minutes over the next finisher:. “Going into the exercise, I was pretty nervous because I had no idea what we were going to do,” she said. “I knew that one of the focuses would be on communication – specifically ABC: Accurate, Bold, Concise communication. “Also, from past exercises, I knew it was really important to pay attention to Steven’s mission statement and guidelines for the exercise.” It didn’t hurt that yellow got off to a good start, which was no accident. “Our first goal of the day was to canoe to Gilman as fast as possible, and so we worked really hard on our paddling skills and synchronization right away,” Strong said. “We had a guy in the back who knew how to steer, and someone else was calling out our row strokes the entire time. “After we were moving fast, and in a straight line, I gave the team the rest of our instructions. The most important part of Steven’s speech was that we could do the exercises in any (order), and that we could split up. When we got to the island, our team was really good about making fast decisions, and executing them without hesitation.” Their strategy differed from some of the teams that followed. “We did all of the challenges that didn’t require the whole team first, and we split everyone up to go do them,” Strong said. “We saved the barrel roll for when the whole team was there because we just needed a lot of people to move them up and down the hill, and then we did the wall climb last because the whole team had to cross the wall. “We had some issues (capsizing), but we were able to stay calm, and everyone was really good about listening to what was being 14

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said, and then committing to the idea that someone came up with. There were never questions asked.” Because Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon had to reschedule, Strong missed his presentation a couple of days before the exercise. But what she later learned of his message resonated with her. “I totally agree with what he had to say,” she said. “Sometimes those who lead by example, but maybe speak less, are the people that teammates gravitate towards. Loud may come off as scared (or) frantic . . . but when someone is calm, teammates don’t question their trust in the person.” Not surprisingly, Strong is a believer in the lessons being taught through the DRIVE program. Even without having heard Hanlon’s talk, she echoed his sentiment with regard to the importance of taking time to hear what others have to say. “One of the biggest things that I have gotten out of DRIVE is that a hugely important aspect to communication that is often glossed over is listening,” she said. “Everyone on your team probably has the same goals as you, and so everyone will probably have a good idea about how to reach that goal. It’s important to hear people out. “Another important thing the program has taught me is the importance of execution. It’s better to execute fully at 100 percent, and not be totally sure if it’s the right strategy you are following, than to not execute at all. Being aggressive about the decisions you make and following them through” is critical. Football lineman Jacob Flores was a member of Strong’s Team Yellow. Like Strong he believes the lessons it has taught are valuable, off and on the playing field. “The river experience was probably my favorite so far,” he said. “Spauldo wanted us to focus on ABC communication (Accurate, Bold, Concise) and I thought my team did a really good job with that, even though it was tough to hear in the canoe. “I think … that this translates to football because communication is paramount on the offensive line. The ABC type of communication is something that I think we talk about on the O-line but, after DRIVE, I’ll be aware of noticing ways that we can improve our communication as a unit.”


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PEAK PERFORMANCE TAKES SHAPE HARRY SHEEHY’S VISION FOR DP2 HAS BECOME A REALITY.

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EDITORIAL

ccomplished Williams graduate that he is, Dartmouth Athletic Director Harry Sheehy knows better than to try to reinvent the wheel while he’s reinventing the wheel. Confused yet? Sheehy will tell you members of his own department certainly were – confused, that is – when he first pitched the concept behind Dartmouth Peak Performance, which is intended, in a way, to reinvent the student-athlete experience. “The poor senior staff,” Sheehy said with a smile and a shake of his head. “As I would try to explain what DP2 could be, they looked at me like I was from Mars, because I didn’t have a clear picture yet. I knew what I wanted out of it, but I didn’t know what form it would take. I also didn’t know the magnitude it would be able to approach.” Credit Fritz Corrigan ’64, not only for the leadership gift that helped the DP2 wheels get on the ground but for providing the clearest description of where it was intended to go. And credit Sheehy for being smart enough to not reinvent that wheel. “Fritz said, ‘I want to give every Dartmouth student-athlete an unfair competitive advantage,’ ” Sheehy recalled. “I think that’s a great quote. With DP2 we are trying to put our kids six months to a year ahead of the competition.” The roots of DP2 trace back to Sheehy’s own career as a college basketball standout and his subsequent roles as men’s basketball coach and athletic director at Williams. “My experience as a student-athlete was overwhelmingly positive, but when I think back college athletics have changed so much,” said Sheehy. “As I’ve watched athletics evolve, as a player, as a coach, and now as an athletic director, it became clear to me – particularly during my time as an AD – that we were underserving our athletes.” If Sheehy had that feeling at Williams – even with the Ephs’ unprecedented successes at the Division III national level – his awareness of the need to do more for student-athletes became acute when he came to Dartmouth and the Ivy League. “It bothered me because it takes a lot to play a Division I varsity sport and it takes a lot more at a place that is this rigorous academically,” he said. “These kids are passionate about what they are doing. They want to do it. But we are asking them to do a lot. “To me, that means my part of the equation is to make sure that the experience is as holistic as possible. That means bringing programming and resources to bear on each and every aspect of their life to positively impact their ability to reach their potential.” While helping Dartmouth teams win is important, the ultimate goal of DP2, in the vision Sheehy shared with his once-mystified senior staff, is bigger picture. “Coaches and administrators control the experience to a degree,” he said. “So what are we doing with it? What is our vision for that experience? Is it to play a sport? Or is it to create young men and women who are going to go change this world, which my

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generation has already screwed up? “Phil Jackson said there’s more to life than basketball, but fortunately there is more to basketball than basketball. Fill in any sport. That’s our responsibility. That’s why I became so passionate about this early on in my time here.” With that as the vision, Dartmouth has become the laboratory for an experiment Sheehy wasn’t sure his alma mater would ever be. “We didn’t have the resources at Williams to do this,” he said. “One of the reasons I came to Dartmouth was this kind of program and trying to impact student-athlete lives in a positive manner. At Williams, the hard-sell was going to be, ‘OK, you have won the Directors Cup 10 straight years, why do you need $500,000 to run this program?’ “That’s the wrong question. Because then what you’re saying is it is actually about the winning. To me, that wasn’t what it was about. If it was, I could have stayed at Williams because we were going to win. We were built to win there.” The question that fired up Sheehy was, “We have these programs that are educational in nature, but are we reaching the potential we have for them to impact students? “We weren’t. Having said that, many, many of the experiences at Williams were great and students will rave about their experience. But to me, we were not fulfilling our responsibility as administrators and coaches, because the school wasn’t going to give us those resources.” Even before Corrigan boiled the dream of DP2 down to its essential mission, Sheehy found a way to convey the concept when it mattered most. “I shared this idea with (former President Jim Kim) in a golf cart about 6 in the morning one day, and I give tons of credit to him on this,” Sheehy said. “It never would have happened without his immediate buy-in. He said, ‘Man, oh man, I think we can raise money for that.’ I said, ‘I am pretty sure we can too, Jim.’ “But these places move slowly. The great thing about President Kim, and I am finding about Phil Hanlon too, is they want change. Jim looked at it and went, ‘Oh my gosh, this is a no-brainer.’ He was out selling it before it existed.” With the green light from Kim, Sheehy went about trying to clarify his evolving vision of DP2 for his staff. “Those poor guys,” the athletic director said. “They walked out five days in a row thinking, ‘What the heck is he thinking?’ “What changed it was an annonymous gift of $500,000. Money clarifies. All of a sudden, what was theory about, ‘I think we can do this,’ became, ‘What are we actually going to spend money on?’ That was a gift from a parent of a student. It was an incredible catalyst for us to get off our duffs and to say, ‘OK, let’s go out now and make some mistakes.’ As John Wooden used to say, ‘The team that makes the most mistakes wins.’ “Very early, I had said to Jim Kim, ‘This can’t be a website with some quotes and platitudes. This has to be touchable. We have to be able to feel this and touch this. We have to be able to move the


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THREE YEARS IN, DP2 IS STILL EVOLVING, BUT SHEEHY IS CONFIDENT IT HAS FOUND ITS STRIDE. pieces around and get the right people on board.’ ” Soon, leadership, sports medicine, strength training, psychology, nutrition, yoga, academic support, career connections and more pieces began to come together under the DP2 umbrella. As a result of all those meetings with Sheehy and Drew Galbraith, who would be tapped to head up Peak Performance, Sheehy’s onceconfused senior staff soon came to fully understand and embrace DP2. Others took longer. “The first couple of years,” Sheehy recalled, “I would get comments like, ‘It’s a PR thing. What is DP2? Is it chocolate milk? I think we are past that kind of skepticism.” Three years in, DP2 is still evolving, but Sheehy is confident it has found its stride. “We knew it was real but we had to get the student-athletes to look and say, ‘This is different. This is not the same way we were acting before.’ I think now we are largely there in terms of buy-in from studentathletes and coaches. “And frankly, it is silly for a coach not to utilize this stuff, whether you want to use the phrase DP2 or not. To have the resources of DP2 and not use them wouldn’t make sense, and most coaches get that now.”

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IN THE NAME OF SERVICE SENIOR ADAM FISHMAN BRINGS HIS ZEST FOR HELPING OTHERS TO THE ROLE OF JAEGER CIVIC INTERN THIS FALL P E A K | FA LL 201 4

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EDITORIAL “It is all about the quality of the person that we get in that position because kids are different,” Sheehy said. “I think Adam will be terrific there. He was very invested in improving the culture of the lacrosse team. He has a heart for service, so I think it is a great spot for him.” Fishman was selected this spring as a finalist for the Yeardley Reynolds Love Unsung Hero Award, presented to one men’s and one women’s Division I lacrosse player each year. He was chosen for being, “at the forefront of Dartmouth Lacrosse’s community service efforts, helping lead the team to over 300 hours of service this past year through an organized service trip to Nicaragua, a weekly volunteer program at David’s House, a Scoop for Loot fundraiser for Lacrosse the Nations, and more.” Fishman, who has been a volunteer cabin counselor at Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, had his volunteer spirit nurtured at Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix. “They try to turn out not just academics, but well-rounded individuals, and service plays a huge part of that,” he said. “It is called being, ‘A Man for Others.’ Service plays a huge part of that. “Every junior does a service project that takes up an entire semester. Freshman and sophomore year you have service projects as well. Your senior year it culminates with a seminar-like class where you reflect on it all, what type of person you will be after after Brophy, and the lessons that you have learned there.” Because scheduling conflicts kept Fishman from being able to make a service trip to El Salvador while he was at Brophy he has been particularly excited about opportunities that have come his way at Dartmouth, including one when he joined with teammates to help build a house in an impoverished Nicaraguan village, and to bring the joy of lacrosse to the children of the community. “Through the ‘D Plan’ I was able to marry service with Spanish, lacrosse and education, all interests of mine,” he said. “That started at Brophy with wanting to participate in something like that, but Dartmouth really provided the opportunity.” Last fall Fishman was program and activities coordinator for Lacrosse the Nations in Costa Rica, helping shape the organization’s involvement in the country. Locally he has taken part in the Indian River Mentoring Program in a school system near Hanover, helped out with Special Olympics, volunteered at David’s House (the Lebanon facility that provides a home for families with children at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center), bicycled 100 miles twice in the Prouty cancer fund raiser and more. As the program chair for his fraternity he is charged with organizing service events in the area. As the Jaeger Civic Intern, he hopes to personalize the volunteer efforts of Dartmouth athletes. “There can be a trend of cookie-cutter community service where you go and do something and feel accomplished because you did something for someone else,” he said. “But there can be a lack of engagement there. “This summer men’s basketball and women’s soccer every Monday are going to Kendal, the retirement community, and they are not just doing stuff for residents but they are doing stuff with residents and sharing experiences.. We are trying to move away from just reeling off hours of service, and trying to make it a meaningful experience.”

This role provides a chance to speak to people who have a different vantage point, one that you don’t normally encounter at Dartmouth. It’s very eye-opening.

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ith its quaint downtown shops, neat neighborhoods and abundant natural beauty, Hanover is often referred to as the “quintessential New England college town.” Factor in low unemployment, safe streets and a major medical center nearby and it is easy to understand why Hanover has been recognized by national media outlets as being one of the best places in the country to live. It is just as easy for Dartmouth students to be lulled into believing their Shangri-La on the Connecticut is representative of the entire Upper Valley region. Senior lacrosse attackman Adam Fishman of Phoenix, Ariz., knows better. As a sophomore Fishman took a class called Poverty and Public Policy that exposed him to the work of the Upper Valley Haven, “a non-profit, private organization that serves people struggling with poverty by providing food, shelter, education, clothing and support.” Fishman’s class offered a glimpse outside the Dartmouth bubble at the the work of the Haven, which in fiscal year 2014 provided food for 3,655 Upper Valley households and provided shelter for 42 families with children as well as 114 more adults. “The Haven offers a life development course that provides useful tools for people who want to get things together,” Fishman explained. “For our class we interviewed a number of individuals who had spent time at the Haven who had done the program, and looked at ways to improve it. “It was a chance to speak with people who had a different vantage point, one that you don’t normally get to encounter at Dartmouth. It was very eye-opening.” Fishman’s appreciation for the very real challenges facing some residents of the Upper Valley and his interest in enlisting fellow Big Green athletes in efforts to make a difference in the lives of others has led to him being selected as Dartmouth’s latest Jaeger Civic Intern The Jaeger Civic Internship program, which operates in conjunction with Dartmouth’s Tucker Foundation, honors the legacy of Richard “Dick” Jaeger ’59, the former director of admissions who served as the college’s athletic director from 1989-2002. Jaeger continues to be an active volunteer in the Upper Valley, an interest that began long before his retirement as AD. Fishman succeeds cross country skier Natalie Flowers in the Jaeger role, and Athletic Director Harry Sheehy believes he was an inspired choice.

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ACADEMIC NOTES In addition to working to develop the volunteer programs at Dartmouth, Fishman has played an important role in helping improve the image of lacrosse both nationally, and on the Dartmouth campus. In the 2012-13 school year, “We had more rules violations than I would want to say,” he admitted. “This year we completely eliminated them, which is remarkable. I really think that the group has bought in. The direction is great, and I think the class of leaders we have is off the charts. “There’s a coaching change and that is outside our control, but I am very confident in the leadership and direction of the program. The group is very, very bought in.” Fishman is hopeful that after a difficult year – for the team and personally – brighter days are ahead. As a sophomore, the former Arizona all-state player who did a prep year at Lawrenceville enjoyed a productive season. He poured in 11 goals and added 10 assists to finish second on the team with 21 points. The spring of 2014 wasn’t as much fun. “Junior year was very tough, aside from wins and losses because injuries consumed my entire season,” he said. “Right before we came back for the winter term I pulled my hamstring pretty badly, which ended up putting me out for the first half of the season. Then I came back and played in one game and got injured during practice, which put me back into the whole rehab routine.” Fishman ended up playing in just one game as a junior although he showed the difference he might have been able to make by scoring two goals and adding an assist in a midseason loss to Cornell before going back on the shelf. “I had to find my role in other ways, which ended up getting me very involved with service on the team,” he said. “I was trying to find

ways to better our program and ways that I could have an impact without being on the field. I would have loved to help us win more games, but I tried to have an impact in ways that I could while rehabbing, even if that was pretty limited.” Finally healthy, Fishman is excited about the opportunity to make a difference on the field. At the same time he values the opportunity to help Big Green athletes make a difference in the lives of others. His dream is to tap the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee – an organization that includes representatives for each varsity team – to spread awareness of, and grow opportunities for service. As the Jaeger intern, Fishman sits on the SAAC executive board, which he thinks will give him a bully pulpit to push for service. “Harry Sheehy always talks about comprehensive excellence and it starts with DP2, which does so much to put our athletes in position to be successful on and off the field,” Fishman said. “I think the SAAC is an awesome bridge between each team and DP2. In addition to helping us improve the individual programs it can be a network for service. I am very excited about the prospect of SAAC reps being able to have an influence on teams and help Dartmouth stand out. “Every school has great athletics, and every school in the Ivy League has Adam Fishman’s recruiting great academics, but something that visit to Dartmouth was really sets Dartmouth apart is we made possible by the are in a community that is kind in generosity of Eugene the middle of nowhere. It provides a Carver ’50 and the Class of unique opportunity to engage with 1949 through the Athletic the community around us and I Sponsor Program. think service can be the tool to do that.”

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EDITORIAL

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SMOOTH DARTMOUTH SAILING OVERCOMES THE ODDS ON MANY FRONTS TO BECOME A COLLEGE SAILING POWER

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IMAGINE THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMAHUNTSVILLE ICE HOCKEY TEAM WINNING THE NCAA DIVISION I CHAMPIONSHIP or NYU deciding to field a beach volleyball team and actually beating up on schools like Pepperdine and University of the Pacific, which play the sport at a varsity level. While Dartmouth sailing doesn’t have to deal with quite the kind of challenges the only varsity hockey team in the south faces, or that a beach volleyball team in the Big Apple would be up against, no one would expect a landlocked school sandwiched in the winter wonderland between Boston and Montreal to be a sailing powerhouse. But it is. Last spring the Dartmouth women’s varsity sailing team became the first in a decade to earn back-to-back Inter-Collegiate Sailing Association national championships when it edged Yale at the Sperry Top-Sider Women’s Nationals on the Severn River in Maryland. The Dartmouth women also won the national title in 1992 and 2000. Dartmouth men’s sailing won national championships in 1933, 1941 and 1942 (with famed America’s Cup skipper Bus Mosbacher at the helm) as well as in 1974. The coed team, which won the national title in 1992, finished third in the country in 2013. So how does the Big Green do it? “In the end, what allows us to get over the big hump of having a successful sailing team in a place like Hanover is the people involved and the culture that has evolved over a long period of time,” said senior Ian Storck, who will serve as a team captain this fall. “It is about really focusing on the process and not worrying about shortterm outcomes. That and a lot of tough, hard workers.” The Ivy League’s northernmost school has found success on the water because those “tough, hard workers” who sail for Dartmouth are unfazed by the long winters. It thrives because Big Green sailors and coaches steadfastly refuse to use climate and geography as excuses. It wins because the program makes effective use of the advantages afforded the program by Dartmouth Athletics and the Friends of Dartmouth Sailing.

RECRUITING

As a senior captain of the Columbia sailing team in 2002-03, fifth-year Big Green coach Justin Assad helped the Lions be the top

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Ivy team. In part because he was focused on city schools, he will tell you he didn’t truly “get” Dartmouth sailing until his senior year of college. “I foolishly never really looked closely at Dartmouth,” he admitted. “It was kind of perplexing to me that they had success until I competed on Lake Mascoma as a senior. Once you’ve seen it, it makes sense. It is a great setup for college sailing.” No one had to tell that to Storck, who came to Hanover from St. Anthony’s High School in Manhasset, N.Y. “I had a somewhat unique situation in that I have a brother who went to Dartmouth and graduated in ’07,” he said. “When he was in school the team was very successful. He was a multiple-time AllAmerican. They were probably as successful as we are now. “Through that lens I kind of knew that if you have the right group of people at Dartmouth it was possible to overcome the weather.” That’s true, but it didn’t stop certain other schools from reminding Storck how late the ice lasts on the water in Northern New England. “The time when you hear that kind of thing, to be honest, is when you are visiting other schools as a recruit,” he said. “They will just straight bring it up. They will ask where you are looking and if you bring up Dartmouth, they would be like, ‘Yeah, they’ve got a good program, but they are limited in how much they can practice in the spring.’ “It is obviously a consideration, but it’s a decision that is outweighed by the type of school, and type of team that we have.” Senior skipper Deirdre Lambert – selected the Quantum Women’s Sailor of the Year for the second year in a row last spring – came to Dartmouth from Cheverus High School near Portland, Maine. As a northern New Englander, she didn’t have to be told about winters in the Upper Valley, although she was. Ironically, by Dartmouth sailors. “When I visited the people on the team definitely talked about it, because the year before I was a freshman had been a particularly cold winter,” she said. “But the people on the team made it sound like it wasn’t a big concern. They said it is just what they do. It is fine, so I wasn’t super concerned about it.” If the Hanover-area weather scares off some potential recruits,


that’s hardly unique to sailing according to Assad, who will take over solo head coaching duties this fall after sharing them with John Storck – Ian’s older brother – for the past four years. “We try to recruit kids who think Dartmouth will be the best place for them and that is typically not a kid who is going to be afraid of the cold, whether they are going to be sailors or not,” the coach said with a chuckle. “Most of the kids who are interested in us have usually done a little bit of their own research, so they know. “We work hard in the initial series of conversations to paint the picture realistically. We emphasize some of the strengths of the sailing program and the academic program in general, which includes the opportunity to study abroad as a sophomore and still be able to compete in two full seasons. There’s also the opportunity to pursue competitive internships in junior winter and still be back for our whole spring season.” Eventually, the Dartmouth coaches pull out the hammer with regard to the perceived disadvantages of the weather. “John Storck used to wave his hand across all of the All-America plaques on the wall,” Assad offered, again with a laugh. “He’d say, ‘It didn’t slow any of those guys down.’ What he would say is, ‘The lake didn’t start freezing just this year.’ “I think what speaks a lot to the prospectives is the program has been so successful for so long reaching back even before Captain (Bill) Hurst and Art Allen were running it in the ‘80s and ‘90s. There is so much tradition and long-standing success that kind of speaks for itself.”

NO EXCUSES

It is one thing to bring accomplished and promising sailors to campus. It is another thing to mold them into championship teams. The Dartmouth program does it by taking advantage of a little secret: The fall season - on Mascoma Lake - is just as long as it is anywhere else. “A lot of the training in college sailing is in the fall,” explained Ian Storck. “It is much longer than the spring season for everybody, including us. We have just as much of the fall season as everyone else. That’s when you get your freshmen up to speed and get everyone on the same page. “Some people might think it is a hindrance when it’s cold while you are sailing, and we’ve had practices when it is 30 degrees. But those are just as productive as the 70-degree days in September. It really is a testament to the toughness which is present in a lot of Dartmouth athletes. There is a mental toughness that allows us to make the most out of those fall days.” While it is indeed rare for ice-out to come early on Mascoma, the Dartmouth sailing program has developed work-arounds. “During the fall we do a lot of work that will keep us competitive in the spring,” explained Assad, “and so when spring comes we try to be as efficient as we can. You basically try to really think hard about what your weaknesses are, what areas you really want to focus on improving, and work on those.” A training trip south in December and another during the

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March break help shake off the rust, and that’s followed by weekly trips to Boston and Burlington Bay or Lake Champlain with rotating crews of sailors before the ice leaves Mascoma. The team hits the lake as soon as it is free of ice. “The water might just be 33 degrees but their smiles are though the roof,” Assad said. “You would think it was summer sailing for them.”

ON THE WATER

Given the talent on the team, the hard work that takes place in the fall and the focus even before Mascoma is ready, Dartmouth is usually in good position to qualify for nationals. Thanks to the spring sailing calendar, Assad explained, there’s enough time between qualifying and nationals for the Big Green to get up-tospeed with the best programs in the country. “We have a full competition schedule in the spring and treat most of our regular-season events like practice,” said Storck. “We have a really good attitude about not stressing how we finish at those events because, in all honesty, it doesn’t really matter that much. The scores of those events don’t count, so we are really just

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trying to get better. Because we have such limited practice time, that pays dividends once we do get liquid water.” It is on those valuable practice days between qualifying and nationals that the “liquid” Mascoma becomes a surprising asset. “The lake is an excellent training venue for practice,” said Assad. “It is flat water and a small lake, so we deal with a lot shifting conditions and varying breeze strengths. That, I think, trains the kids well for competing in odd conditions. A lot of college sailing happens close to land, so it is often in very shifty conditions. Having the opportunity to practice where we do, in those conditions, is actually very beneficial. “When we get a north-northwest or a south-southeast breeze, we can do straight-line sailing and go fast,” the coach continued. “We always try to take it advantage of those days when we have them, and we try to embrace some of the less traditional sailing conditions when we get a westerly or a more fickle, early fall breeze.”

AIDING THE CAUSE

In recent years the sailing team has solidified its status as a full-


“ fledged varsity and – although it practices a half hour away from campus – has become a more visible presence within the Dartmouth Athletics Department. “There was a time when we were sort of a pseudo-varsity, but that has changed,” said Storck. “Over the last 10 years or so we’ve become a real varsity sport and the culture has shifted. I think that everybody now probably takes the concept of being a varsity athlete a lot more seriously on the varsity sailing team than years ago.” Added Lambert: “Back in the day sailing was that weird sport that nobody really knew anything about or paid attention to. But I think with more recognition within the school athletic news it is becoming more of a mainstream sport. “With DP2, especially, there has been a difference. We have a strength coach now, which we didn’t have my freshman year and the coaches wrote out our workouts. In a few years before I came the sailing team didn’t even lift and that has definitely helped a lot. Last summer we lifted with the Nordic team. To be able to train alongside them was cool.” A successful fundraising effort also made a big difference, enabling the Dartmouth sailing team to purchase 18 new Z420, and 18 new FJ boats. “We used to have just six 420s and when we would train in them we couldn’t have the whole team working together,” said Assad. “The new 420s are a new design and we actually had the first college fleet of them. They are lighter and a little higher performance and are the same boats we sailed at both championships.” The addition of the new boats meant a lot to the team. “I think it is really cool the athletic department and the Friends got behind these new two fleets,” Lambert said. “Most schools only raise enough money to have one new fleet every six or nine years, but the fact that we got two new fleets in one year speaks volumes about the support there is for sailing at Dartmouth, and wanting to grow the program and make it one of the best in the country.”

NOT JUST ONE OF THE BEST

The Dartmouth women’s team took third in the always-tough New England Inter-Collegiate Sailing Association championships and the coed team placed second. Those finishes brought the Big Green teams each a berth in the nationals and time to get the necessary work in on Mascoma before the nationals at the end of May. The first day of the 2014 nationals broke cool and rainy,

conditions not unfamiliar to the Big Green. With Lambert and Avery Plough ’14 sailing the A-Division boat and Kelsey Wheeler ’14 and Lizzie Guynn in the B-Division, Dartmouth trailed Yale by three points after the first of the two days of competition. “That’s not a lot in sailing,” explained Lambert of the differential. “We were pretty pleased with how the day had gone results-wise, but we knew there were a lot of areas to improve on, even though it seemed like we had done well. There were definitely mistakes that we made and things that we could do better.” Lambert and Plough took care of that in light air the next day, winning four of their final five races to finish as the low-point A-Division team with 60 points to Yale’s 101. Navy was third with 112. Despite having given Dartmouth the lead, the A-Division sailors knew the championship wasn’t a sure thing unless the B-Division team could protect the lead over the Bulldogs. “We sailed the last race and after that race we were 10 points ahead of Yale,” recalled Lambert. “We were watching the finish of Kelsey and Lizzie’s race, hoping that they could remain within 10 points of the Yale boat, and they did. The Yale boat beat them by only five places, so we ended up winning by five points. It was kind of a nailbiter but super exciting.” Dartmouth would go on to finish eighth in the Gill Coed Dinghy Nationals, one slot ahead of Navy. “We were a little disappointed with that, but sailing can be a funny sport,” said Assad. “You can train as hard as you can and it can still come down to the conditions of the day and what your strengths and weaknesses are. “The coed team sailed really well all year and came in second at the New England championships, which is important because it’s the hardest conference in college sailing, for sure.” The future is bright for both teams according to Storck. “We are returning a lot of awesome people,” he said. “Really, the culture is what put us over the top the last couple of years and that’s not changing, “We have a ton of really hard workers and people who don’t really care about the odds being stacked against us.” That kind of talk is wind in Athletic Director Harry Sheehy’s sails. “I think there has been a great job of building a really good culture on a team,” he said. “It wasn’t that way in my first year here. This group has worked hard. I give them all the credit in the world. “It shows you sometimes the things that you might think make it impossible for us to succeed don’t really make it impossible. They are speed bumps. They are not mountains.”

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DARTMOUTH ATHLETIC

SPONSORS WHO ARE THE ATHLETIC SPONSORS?

Athletic Sponsors include more than 1,000 Dartmouth alumni, parents and supporters who love Dartmouth, who love sports, who either played or watched athletics as undergraduates, and who feel that Dartmouth should be a leader in the classroom and on the field. We are men and women in our 20’s and our 90’s and we are represented by nearly every class. WHY DO WE DO WHAT WE DO?

We know that success on the playing surface begins long before the contest starts... it has its genesis in recruiting. Without outstanding talent, success can only be an occasional dream. We are therefore committed to providing Dartmouth coaches with the resources they need to recruit exceptional student-athletes. We also know that Dartmouth has a unique and powerful trump card. The campus is close to irresistible when experienced in person. That’s Dartmouth’s edge! The trick is to get impact scholar-athletes face to face with this great institution to make a decision for Dartmouth. That’s the primary focus of what we do. We fly student-athletes to Hanover and send coaches to their homes. HOW IMPORTANT IS THIS TO THE COLLEGE?

Very! While the NCAA allows one paid visit to campus, the Ivy League legislates that those expenses cannot be budgeted items. That’s where we come in. We provide the non-budgeted funds. Every year we fly in about 250 potential impact athletes, and of those recruits accepted by the Admissions Office, the vast majority (about 90%) decide to enroll at Dartmouth. WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT?

Satisfaction and pride! You’ll be sent our official online newsletter Peak, and your name will be listed in the next season’s home football programs. If you choose certain membership levels (see box at right) you will also be informed of a specific athlete whose recruiting trip your donation made possible, so you can follow his or her progress through four years at Dartmouth. Most important, all Sponsors share the rewards of helping young men and women make a decision to embark on the very special “Dartmouth Experience.” That’s the real reason our program has grown from 6 members in 1955 to more than 1,000 today!

Sponsors and Friends enjoy the complimentary pre-game tent overlooking Memorial Field at each home football game

MEMBERSHIP LEVELS

ADDITIONAL BENEFITS

$300-$599

Assigned a recruit every 3-4 years

$600-$1199

Assigned a recruit every 1-2 years and listed on our Leadership display in Alumni Gym

$1200-$4999

Assigned recruit annually, Leadership display & special recognition in football program

$5000 & up

Assigned recruit annually, Leadership display, special recognition in the football program & VIP Reception at Homecoming

To contact the Athletic Sponsor Program office, please call 603-646-2463 or email Athletic.Sponsor.Program@Dartmouth.edu


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