St Ives Local, January/February 2022

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FREE

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 | ISSUE 42

Clay and community:

Leach Pottery centenary show

Plastic fantastic:

Making use of washed-up junk

Out on the Towans:

Echoes of the Bronze Age

LIVE LOCAL, LOVE LOCAL, SHOP LOCAL


Let us let yours Your Cottage,

3 Bedrooms,

2 Bathrooms,

1 Pet.

But to us so much more than just a holiday let. We give you a team

that lives and breathes your location

(A kind friendly face

, not a big corporation)

And though we market your home on a national scale We’re just a quick call  away or a simple email While we offer advice and a few hints and tips So yours is the home on everyone’s lips Cherished and loved and enjoyed and looked

after,

As it’s filled full of memories, friendship and laughter.

Original Cottages. The clue’s in the name. Let with us and fall in love with local at stivesholidays.com

St Ives

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Welcome...

The sunrise on the cover says it all. It’s a new year, and a new start. What will 2022 bring? After the past couple of years, it seems dangerous to speculate, especially as, at the time of writing, the new Omicrom variant is making its presence felt. The cover is, as usual, by local photographer and lifeboat launcher John Chard. Follow him on Facebook to catch up with his daily videos from St Ives, As he noted in a recent video: “Good idea to wear the old face masks, I think. I’ve never stopped wearing mine. We don’t want another lockdown for next season. Need that like a hole in the head…” Hear, hear!

Keep logging onto our website — stiveslocal.uk — and following our social media channels (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter). Send us your stories, reports, What’s On listings, or just observations. It’s your magazine!

There’s plenty to read this issue, such as the culmination of the centenary celebrations for the Leach Pottery – such an iconic institution in St Ives. There’s news, too, of the next stage in the plans by surf therapy charity the Wave Project for a beach school at Gwithian Towans.

Liz and Darren Norbury

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Thanks to readers, contributors, and advertisers who supported us in 2021. May we wish everyone a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

Editors 07444 199081 | hello@stiveslocal.uk

Contents 4 to 6 8 10 12 14 15 18 to 21 22 24 and 25 26 28 30 32 34

News The Wave Project St Ives Farmers’ Market Food St Ives Archive St Ives Museum What’s On Art Leach Pottery Out on the Towans Travel Plastic Free St Ives Gardens Books

While we aim to provide a quality publication for local reference, we cannot be held responsible for the services or reputation of any of the advertisers or for any content or advertisements or editorial herein. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited without prior written permission from the publishers. The magazines are produced on paper sourced from FSC approved paper mills and printed using vegetable-based inks. They are happy to be recycled, but please pass to a friend first!

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A cookbook for a good cause The UK Sepsis Trust has offered its thanks to Dr Deborah Phillips, after she donated proceeds of sales of her cookbook, Scrumptious St Ives, to the charity. Deborah’s own experience of sepsis ended her academic career and forced her into early retirement. She now works with her partner Paul Connor on his fruit and vegetable stall at St Ives Farmers’ Market, which gave her the inspiration to create her book of healthy recipes. In a letter to Deborah, UK Sepsis Trust fundraising officer Beth Hill wrote: “Thank you for your incredible support. The cookbook sounds amazing, and I would love to see any pictures you have of it.” Sepsis is an extreme reaction to infection and is a

life-threatening emergency. The UK Sepsis Trust aims to raise public awareness of the condition, support those affected by it, educate health professionals, and instigate political change. In a 2010 survey, only 34 per cent of those questioned had heard of sepsis, but now the figure is more than 80 per cent.

Scrumptious St Ives is available from St Ives Farmers’ Market, St Ives Library and St Ives Bookseller. See Deborah’s recipe for Cauliflower and Cornish Blue Cheese Soup on page 12.

Award for Carbis Bay chef Connor Blades, from Ugly Butterfly by Adam Handling, in Carbis Bay, has been named UK Young Chef of the Year. Adam was actually one of the judges, although he played no part in the voting. He said: “Judging chef of the year has been super exciting. I didn’t have voting rights in the competition as two of my team were in the final ten, so it makes it even more special that my fellow judges picked Connor Blades as the winner. “Connor really cares about the industry, cooks amazing dishes, and works beautifully in a team. I

always think of the relationship between chefs and waiters as being quite romantic, and the partnership he created with the waiter team was inspiring. “Connor Blades is the future of hospitality, and I know for a fact that he’s the future of my restaurants.”

Citizens Advice sessions return Citizens Advice sessions have returned to the St Ives Library and Information Centre.

Sessions are being held on alternate Tuesdays between 10am and 1pm. If there is demand, the frequency may change to weekly. Anyone wishing to use the service can simply call in during these times and they will be seen on a first come, first served basis.

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Citizens Advice is a charity providing free, independent, and confidential advice on a wide range of subjects for everyone in the community. Help and advice is provided in relation to consumer issues, benefits, debt, work, housing, family and relationships, law and courts, immigration, and health. Alternatively, you can visit the Citizens Advice website at

citizensadvice.org.uk.

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Little Seahorses Childcare & Education & Early Years Teachers Quality Nursery, St. Ives Children’s Centre From birth to 5 years Open 8am to 6pm weekdays

Hi tide Kidz Club

After school and holiday club From 4 to 10 years.

Tel: 794222 littleseahorses.co.uk

littleseahorseschildcare@yahoo.co.uk

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Kyle takes up Guildhall events role St Ives Guildhall has welcomed Kyle Percy to its team as venues and events manager. Alongside all aspects of the Guildhall’s day-today operations, Kyle, working closely with cultural services manager Emma Gibson runs programming and events at the venue and across town council-managed spaces and services. Kyle brings to this new post a wealth of experience in the events and entertainment industry gained over the past ten years, ranging from live music and performance to the visual arts. He is the co-founder of Liverpool-based events company Boss Night, which blend live music, performance, and football supporter culture. He was artistic director at The Royal Standard, a

contemporary art gallery and artist studios in Liverpool, where he oversaw exhibitions and live events featuring both British and International artists. He also worked in the curatorial team at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, famous for its collection of works by St Ives artists and artists of the St Ives Art Colony, such as Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth, and Alfred Wallis. Follow the Guildhall on Instagram

@stivesguildhall.

Volunteers sought for woodland project After a few successful volunteer sessions on Fridays at Penderleath Community Woodland, the new community group is asking interested members of the public to come along to take part in future volunteer work parties. Penderleath Community Woodland is situated at Cripplesease, in the shadow of the iconic Giew Mine. Several fields to the west of the B3311 have been kindly given to create a woodland and it is hoped the local community will become involved. So far the group have planted more than 470 trees and are busy maintaining them, clearing grass and brambles which threaten to overwhelm them. The group have also dug a tree nursery and are working towards planting more trees this winter. The work sessions take place every Friday from 10am until noon and everyone is welcome. On the first Saturday of the month the session takes

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place on that day from 2pm to 4pm, instead of Friday. If you’re coming by car, park at Giew Mine, Cripplesease and cross the road, where you’ll see the field full of tree shelters. If you’e cycling or walking from the St Ives direction, look for the first metal gate on the right after ascending the hill towards Giew Mine.

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Come and join us!

Every Wednesday at 10:45 am Rhyme Time – 30 minutes of music, singing and stories for preschool children Other weekly activities include Yoga and Pilates classes Events for January and February: Saturday 8 January 10am to 12:30pm Friends of St Ives Library ‘Super Saturday’ with coffee, cake and chat Wednesday 12 January 7pm An Evening of Words and Wine with Friends of St Ives Library Saturday 5 February 10am to 12:30pm Friends of St Ives Library ‘Super Saturday’ with coffee, cake and chat Please keep an eye on our social media channels @StIvesLibrary for latest updates or pop in!

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Beach School: A project to change lives Detailed plans have been submitted by surf therapy charity the Wave Project for a beach school at Gwithian Towans – thought to be the first of its kind in the world – which would support vulnerable local children who struggle to engage with traditional school lessons. The concept of combining outdoor learning and surfing is already in operation at the Wave Project’s local projects across the country – but this would be the first time that a physical facility has been erected for this purpose. Children currently referred to the Wave Project classes attend for one full day per week during term time. Beach School would enable the course to be delivered to up to 75 children each week.

The design for Beach School. Wave Project/Lavigne Lonsdale The application for detailed planning permission for the scheme follows a public consultation at the Gwithian site last summer. Joe Taylor, founder and CEO of the Wave Project said: “We’re delighted to move one step closer in our plans to launch our very first purpose-built beach school. We come across many children who are not able to achieve their full potential in conventional classroom environments, and too many end up dropping out of school altogether. “Beach School has been designed with the needs of these children in mind, offering them the chance to learn outside wherever possible, in an environment they find calming and supportive. “We really hope this facility will prove to be a model for other similar schools nationally and around the world, to help to reduce the number of children who fall out of the traditional education system.”

The design of the building, by Truro-based architects Lavigne Lonsdale, aims to encourage children to engage and interact with the surrounding natural environment. It also provides a habitat for native plant and animal species, by creating a dunescape environment within the site. This will include the planting of species that will help support the rare local scabious bee population. Bird and bat boxes will also be integrated into the buildings.

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The Wave Project is the UK’s first surf therapy charity. Initially funded by the NHS as a pilot project in 2010, it aims to improve the wellbeing and confidence of young people who face mental health issues or social exclusion. It offers a dedicated six-week course of one-toone surfing support, followed by the opportunity to join a social club to progress surfing and train to become a volunteer helpers or mentor. Find out more at www.waveproject.co.uk/

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St Ives Farmers’ Market A chat with Alana Bates of Penzance Vegan Kitchen What led you to set up a vegan bakery?

I’ve been a vegan for about a year – I started cutting out meat and dairy because of their impact on the environment and animal welfare. I’ve always wanted to run my own business, and after going to some really nice vegan restaurants in the summer, I decided to leave my job as a cook at Pensans Primary School. I had been working there for six years, and I enjoyed it, but I wanted to cook vegan food. I’ve been involved with political campaigning, and veganism is something I really believe in.

How did you turn the idea into reality?

I live in Long Rock, and I thought I’d start with Penzance Town Market. I phoned the BID (Business Improvement District) office, and they said they were doing a market for the Tour of Britain cycle race, and they wanted a vegan stall. I had five days’ notice to do all the cooking, but I was really lucky that I had that push – the cakes sold out on both days.

What do you most enjoy making?

I do pizza, sausage rolls and pasties, but what I’ve found, as a vegan, is that you don’t get many treats, so I make a lot of cakes, so that vegans can have something special, which their friends and family can enjoy too. I’ve always made birthday cakes for my children, and a non-dairy chocolate cake for my partner, who has been a vegan for six years. My chai cake always goes down well. It contains cloves, cinnamon, ginger – and turmeric, which my daughter says tastes like joss sticks! Instead of eggs, I use vegan yogurt, which gives a nice cakey crumb.

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What are your plans for Penzance Vegan Kitchen in 2022? I now have a website, so people can order cakes for special occasions, and cupcakes, muffins and cookies. My dream is to have a van, but I’ll definitely keep coming to St Ives Farmers’ Market, as it’s such a lovely community. I’d like to run some vegan cooking classes, so more people can learn the skills and pass them on. Many people who’ve tried to make vegan cakes say that they don’t rise. Something I’ve learned is not to open the oven until the cake is ready!

When people ask you why you’re a vegan, what do you tell them? When I’m on the stall, I talk to people about the environmental impact of animal farming. Many young people are taking up veganism as part of a whole lifestyle. I read a study which said that if everyone swapped out a meat meal once a week for a vegan meal, it would make a real difference to the environment.

www.pzvegankitchen.co.uk/

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Belgian Inspired Licensed Café Here at the family run Bier Huis, we are passionate about sharing the authentic dining and drinking rituals that Belgium has to offer! This hidden gem, tucked away in the St Andrews St Hideaway Quarter, offers the largest Bier collection in St Ives with over 75 bottled and 7 draft belgian varieties. Open daily from 12pm-10pm, you can expect to enjoy lunch or dinner with a relaxed atmosphere in grand surroundings. Our knowledgeable and friendly team are on hand to guide you through your journey of Belgian discovery! Bookings recommended through our website, takeaway Bier available all day.

01736 797074

admin@bierhuisgrandcafe.co.uk | www.bierhuisgrandcafe.co.uk

16 St Andrews Street, St. Ives TR26 1AH

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Cauliflower and Cornish Blue Cheese Soup Here’s another great winter recipe from Dr Deborah Phillips’s book, Scrumptious St Ives. Helford Blue cheese is ideal for this warming winter soup, but a good Stilton will do just as well. INGREDIENTS

1 medium sized cauliflower, washed, divided into florets 2 leeks, washed and sliced 2 medium sized potatoes, scrubbed and chopped into small chunks 1 bunch of fresh herbs: parsley, fennel, or coriander, washed and finely chopped Approx 175g blue cheese 1 inch grated ginger 2 crushed cloves of garlic Liquid stock: 3/4 to 1 litre milk, whole, soya, or coconut 1 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil Seasoning: sea salt and ground black pepper

METHOD

Heat the oil in a large pan, then add grated ginger, crushed garlic, and seasoning, followed by the potatoes and leeks. Gently stir fry for 5 minutes then add cauliflower and fresh herbs. Mix well and cook for

a further 10 minutes. Keep stirring. Finally, add the liquid and gently simmer for 10 minutes until all the ingredients are cooked. Cool, then blitz with a hand whisk or liquidiser. Check consistency – the soup should be smooth and not too runny. Add more milk/ water if required. Crumble half the cheese into the soup and return it to the heat. Stir in the cheese until creamy and smooth. Pour into bowls and crumble the rest of the cheese on top. The soup is good with a selection of breads and will freeze well for up to 3 months.

Salmon and prawn fettuccine with dill and lemon Here’s a New Year recipe from Daniel Rouncefield, AKA the Cornish Chef. In salmon, the omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, combined with potassium, greatly contribute to heart health, as they reduce artery inflammation, lower cholesterol levels, and maintain blood pressure levels. A great recipe for New Year! Daniel’s speciality is creating dinner parties in customers’ homes. Find out more at thecornishchef.co.uk INGREDIENTS

500g dill, chopped 1 lemon, zest and juice 200g salmon fillet, skinned and diced 150g frozen prawns, defrosted 50g crème fraiche Salt and pepper 100ml fish stock 250g fettucine 1 white onion, diced 1 clove garlic, chopped

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METHOD

In a large pan, bring water to the boil, add a pinch of salt, and cook the fettuccine for 10 to 12 minutes. While the fettuccine is cooking, in a frying pan add a little oil and sweat off the onion and garlic. Add the salmon and start colouring. Add the prawns and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Once the salmon is almost cooked through, add the fish stock, crème fraiche, lemon zest, and dill. Bring to the boil and finish with the lemon juice, which will thicken the sauce. If you like a thicker sauce, leave to simmer to reduce further. Once the fettuccine is cooked, drain and add to the sauce, adjust the seasoning, toss together, and serve.

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HOLISTIC THERAPY CENTRE

AROMATHERAPY REFLEXOLOGY REIKI COUNSELLING MINDFULNESS COACHING ENERGY HEALING THERAPY All appointments are with Jane Ioannou, a fully insured holistic practitioner for 30 years. By appointment only. 07967 656 127 | info@janeioannou.co.uk | www.janeioannou.co.uk

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St Ives Archive: A Life of Service In 1959, a well-travelled and enterprising Dutch lady came to live in St Ives, in a new house at the bottom of Steeple Lane, which she had mostly designed herself. Her name was Florence Nankivell, and she was to live in the town for the next 22 years. Born Florence Muysken in 1901 in Amsterdam, where her father was the managing director of a steel works, she came to Britain in 1921 to study social work. On her return to Amsterdam, she worked for an organisation which helped girls arriving from other European countries looking for domestic service work to avoid falling into the clutches of pimps. In 1930, while on holiday in Trinidad, she met a Cornishman, Howard Nankivell, a civil servant, and they married two years later. Florence threw herself energetically into Trinidadian life. An accomplished pianist, she gave concerts to raise funds for good causes, and became involved in social work among the families of the employees of the oil and sugar companies, who endured poor housing and low wages. In 1937, the Butler Riots broke out among the workers, and Howard was demoted and sent to Cyprus because he had sided with them. Before joining him in Cyprus, Florence and their two children went to Britain for a short stay, but due to whooping cough, the children had to be quarantined. Never one to be idle, Florence became involved in a Quaker organisation working to rescue Jewish children from Nazi Germany. Being a fluent German speaker, she travelled – at considerable personal risk – to Berlin to arrange their evacuation to Britain. On 2nd December 1938, a group of children arrived at Harwich after a rail journey to the Hook of Holland and by boat across the North Sea. This was the first Kindertransport. A couple of weeks later, Florence’s husband was killed by a mysterious fall from a train in France. In 1940, she and the children moved to Oxford, where she worked as a volunteer at the Admiralty – then based in the Bodleian Library – and as a temporary member of the Land Army,

picking potatoes. After the war, she was asked by several social work and women’s societies to address them on her work in Trinidad and the West Indies. Having married a Cornishman, Florence wanted to live somewhere where she felt she belonged – and people could pronounce her surname – and the family moved to Polzeath in 1947. She joined local clubs and societies, including the Cornwall History Society and the Old Cornwall Society, and gave lectures on the Netherlands, dressed in traditional Dutch costume. In 1954, a chance meeting with archaeologist Dorothy Dudley resulted in Florence joining the West Cornwall Field Club. She was the prime mover in opening up the club to become the Cornwall Archaeological Society in 1961, and in 13 years as secretary, she organised digs at sites throughout the county, including Castilly Henge, the Rumps Cliff Castle, and Carn Brea hillfort. In recognition of her services to archaeology in Cornwall, Florence was made a Bard in 1962, taking the name Scryvynas an Gledhyoryon – Excavator’s Secretary. After moving to St Ives, she joined the Arts Club, attended pottery classes in Penzance and helped with the resurrection of the Zennor Wayside Museum. Throughout her life, wherever she went, Florence contributed her considerable talents to the service of the community.

Dr John Sell

St Ives Archive is based at Wesley Methodist Church, St Ives Road, Carbis Bay, St Ives, TR26 2SF. For information about current opening hours, phone 01736 796408, email admin@stivesarchive.org, or visit www.stivesarchive.org. The Archive opened in 1996 and is staffed by volunteers. We are always looking for people to join our enthusiastic team – there are opportunities to learn new skills, carry out research, assist visitors and take part in fundraising events. We offer a valuable service for anyone wishing to obtain historic information about the town, free of charge. The Archive holds over 35,000 photographs and numerous documents covering fascinating subjects such as art, maritime heritage, tourism and traditional customs, and we also have extensive resources relating to the history of St Ives families. Why not come and visit us? Registered charity number 1136882

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St Ives Museum: A brief history of the building by Andy Smith, Honorary Curator

Take a walk from Smeaton’s Pier to Porthgwidden, and your route will take you through Wheal Dream and past Bamaluz. Along the way, you will come across St Ives Museum. This wonderful collection of historical artefacts related to the town are housed in a building which itself is of significant historical interest. The building, which overlooks the rear of Sea View Place and Bamaluz beach, has its origins in the fishing industry: in the 19th century, when it served as a pilchard pressing cellar, and part of this has now been recreated within the museum. After falling into disuse for many years as the fishing industry declined, the building had by 1915 become the Island Laundry, complete with a boiler room which is now buried under the small Wheal Dream residents’ car park. This was the first of two relatively short-lived elements of its history: with the advent of silent pictures, it became a cinema for a brief period.

life of St Ives. Operated for the first 25 years by the National Sailors Society, it was absorbed into the Worldwide British Sailors Society in 1940. Affectionately known as “the Mission”, the building became a popular place for fishermen, other seafarers and St Ives townsfolk to meet, talk and enjoy social activities. Many will remember the table tennis, snooker and billiard tables from their younger days! Snacks were available, and on occasion the Mission hosted concerts, no doubt supported by Mr J T Barber with the Mission Minstrels. Two periods of weekly worship were decreed when the Mission opened in 1919 – 2.30pm on Sundays and 6.30pm on Wednesdays, and this was maintained until its closure in 1968. The building’s ground floor provided facilities for other purposes such as the Powell and Wells Pottery, which in turn gave way to Troika of St Ives in 1962.

In 1919, a letter in the St Ives Times of 4th April announced that the National Sailors Society had rented “the Spacious Accommodation above The Old Island Laundry in Wheal Dream”, with Mr William Lyon appointed as Port Missionary. The building went on to play an important part in the

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In 1969, the building became the home of St Ives Museum, and has remained so for the last 52 years. Much of the building’s story cannot be told in this short article – but it is sufficient to say that it is held in deep affection by the people of St Ives.

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Liz’s Quizzes

Liz is back with her St Ives Local quiz! Catch her live at the Castle Inn, St Ives, on Monday evenings; the Bird in Hand, Hayle, on Wednesday evenings; the Balnoon Inn, on Thursday evenings; and the Cutty Sark, Marazion, on Sunday evenings. For full details, and to book tables where necessary, follow St Ives Liz’s Quizzes on Facebook. 1. The name of which popular sauce, when translated,

means ‘pound’? 2. Which British graffiti artist describes himself as a ‘quality vandal’? 3. Writing’s on the Wall was the theme song to which James Bond film? 4. According to the nursery rhyme, where was Simple Simon going when he met The Pieman? 5. What is the name of the concert hall on the River Thames which was opened in 1951? 6. In which country is Cancun airport? 7. In the Tales of Beatrix Potter, whose garden does Peter Rabbit stray into? 8. What was the Spice Girl name of David Beckham’s wife? 9. What type of creature is a Manx Shearwater? 10. The Ebor Handicap is a flat race held in which city? 11. How many raindrops are there on the Met Office symbol for light rain? 12. Sacremento is the capital of which American state? 13. Bird, clear, and smash are all terms in which indoor sport? 14. What could be a 14 in London, a 10 in New York, and a 42 in Paris? 15. Forever After is the fourth film in which series? 16. In the novel Jane Eyre, what is Mr Rochester’s first name? 17. When he emerged from the magic lamp, how many wishes did the Genie grant Aladdin? 18. Alex James and Dave Rowntree were members of which British band? 19. Babylonia is an historical region in which modern day country? 20. What name is given to the needle of a vinyl record player? 21. Anna Scott was the name of the character played by Julia Roberts in which film? 22. In which century did Art Nouveau become popular? 23. What is the main vitamin found in oranges? 24. Which animal appears in the name of the 2018 and 2019 Grand National winner? 25. What number is represented by the Roman numeral MM? 26. Who wrote the 1966 play A Song at Twilight? 27. In the Christian Church, Pentecost is celebrated seven Sundays after which day? 28. Which Greek letter shares its name with that of a river mouth? 29. What is the more common name given to somnambulism? 30. The name of which Greek god means a brief sleep when spelled backwards?

Answers on page 46

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What’s On January and February MONDAYS

St Ives Community Foodshare

Tiddlers

Baby and toddler group which meets weekly in term time, 10am-11.30am, at St John’s Church vicarage garden. All under-5s welcome – no need to book. More information at stiveschurch.org.uk

Iyengar Yoga

In the Greta Williams room, St Ives Library, 9.30am. All levels welcome. £9.

Hayle Memory Café

At Hayle Rugby Club, 2pm-4pm, on the first and third Monday of every month.

Carbis Bay Contract Bridge Club

Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, 7 Trencrom Lane, Carbis Bay 2pm-5pm. Come and play bridge with a friendly local group. Beginners welcome. £2.50 per session (includes tea and biscuits). For more information, call Graham on 01736 762512 or visit carbisbaybridge.co.uk

Liz’s Quizzes

At The Castle, Fore Street, St Ives. 7.30pm. Booking advised via Liz’s Facebook group: tinyurl.com/3s3ney7b

Christian Meditation

St Ives Community Choir

Rehearsals from 6.30pm to 8.30pm at Carbis Bay Memorial Hall. The choir sing in four-part harmony and new members are always welcome. No auditions are required, just enjoy singing. For more information, phone Lynda on 01736 796832, mobile 07871 805526, email sichoir@btinternet.com or visit stivescommunitychoir.org.uk.

St Ives Jazz Club

Western Hotel, St Ives, 7.30pm. Guest bands every second Tuesday of the month (watch the club’s Facebook page for details), Big Kettle Jazz (live music) every other Tuesday.

Phoenix Singers

Meet at Hayle Day Centre, Commercial Rd, Hayle, 7.30pm to 9.30pm. A friendly and lively group singing mainly pop, rock, and ballads, New members – especially tenors and basses – are welcome. If you would like to join, or book Phoenix for an event, call 01736 797708, or visit phoenixstives.co.uk

At the Lady Chapel, St Ia Church, 7.30pm-8.15pm. Visitors and newcomers welcome. For details, visit stiveschurch.org.uk

Badger Inn Quiz Night

TUESDAYS

WEDNESDAYS

DDMix

Steeple Woodland Nature Reserve Work Party.

A full body aerobic workout using dance styles from around the world, with Martha Huntley at Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, 10.45am. Details at tinyurl.com/526jc5x2

Friends of the Towans

A friendly group of volunteers carrying out practical conservation tasks around St Ives Bay, 10am-2pm. All welcome. For details, visit friendsofthetowans.co.uk, and to book, phone Martin Rule on 07854 123877.

Move It or Lose It

An exercise class to improve flexibility, aerobics, balance, and strength, with Martha Huntley at Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, 10.45am. Details at tinyurl.com/526jc5x2

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At Palemon Best Recreation Park, 12.30-1pm. Collect free sell-by date food that’s too good to go in the bin.

Fore Street, Lelant, 8.30pm. Proceeds to Children’s Hospice South West.

Everyone is welcome to come along to take part in light exercise in a beautiful location with like-minded people. Meet by the wooden gate on Steeple Lane at 9.30am. Tools and gloves are provided but please wear clothing suitable for the weather conditions. More details from Alwyn Jones, 01736 793468, steeplewoods.org and the Facebook page.

St Ives Tai Chi Club

At St John’s-in-the-Fields Church, 7pm to 8.30pm. Run by experienced teachers of Lee-style Tai Chi and qigong. Beginners are welcome and there are discounts for block bookings. Find out more at tinyurl.com/2p987z4e

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Liz’s Quizzes

At the Bird in Hand, Hayle, 7.30pm. Booking advised via Liz’s Facebook group: tinyurl.com/3s3ney7b

Global Wednesdays

At the Western Hotel, 8pm. Global Jamming welcomes all musical performers, both local and visiting, to a weekly collaborative and inclusive evening of jams and performances to celebrate music from near and far. Hosted by local event organisers Global Jamming. Further information at globaljamming.org or see Facebook Global Jamming.

Badger Inn Bingo Night

Fore Street, Lelant, 8.30pm. Proceeds to Children’s Hospice South West.

THURSDAYS St Ives Farmers Market

At the Guildhall, 9.30am-2pm.

date food that’s too good to go in the bin.

Liz’s Quizzes

At the Balnoon Inn, 8pm. Booking advised via Liz’s Facebook group: tinyurl.com/3s3ney7b

Global Thursdays

At the Western Hotel, 8pm. Global Jamming welcomes all musical performers, both local and visiting, to a weekly collaborative and inclusive evening of acoustic jams and performances to celebrate music from near and far. Hosted by local event organisers Global Jamming. Further information at globaljamming.org or see Facebook Global Jamming

FRIDAYS Penderleath Community Woodland

Work sessions every Friday morning, 10am until noon, at Penderleath Community Woodland, Cripplesease. All are welcome to come along to help carry out maintenance of the young trees, with a view to planting more this winter. If driving, park in the car park at Giew Mine, Cripplesease, and cross the road where you’ll see the field full of tree shelters. If cycling/walking from the St Ives direction, it’s the first gate on the right after ascending the hill towards Giew Mine. On the first Saturday of the month the session switches to the Saturday (2pm-4pm), so no Friday session that week.

St Ives Community Foodshare

At St John’s in-the-Fields, 5.30pm. Collect free sell-by date food that’s too good to go in the bin.

SATURDAYS Friends of the Towans

A friendly group of volunteers carrying out practical conservation tasks around St Ives Bay, 10am-2pm. All welcome. For details, visit friendsofthetowans.co.uk, and to book, phone Martin Rule on 07854 123877.

Yoga Dance

A relaxing class which helps flexibility, designed for the over-40s, taught by Khalid Beg. Currently taking place online at 10am. To find out more, phone 01736 757919 or visit endrianyoga.com

St Ives Memory Café

At Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, 2pm-4pm, on the first and third Thursdays each month. For further information, call 07999 239865

St Ives Community Foodshare

At St Ives Rugby Club, noon. Collect free sell-by

St Ives Sailing Club

The club welcomes watersports enthusiasts, novice, experienced, local, or on holiday. We are offering free membership for 2021 to local residents of St Ives. We have storage for your craft, whether you sail a dinghy, kayak, or paddleboard. Feel free to come along and see us on a Saturday 12:30 pm at the Sailing Club, The Sloop car park. More details at stivessailingclub.com

St Ives Community Foodshare

At St Ives Rugby Club, 8pm. Collect free sell-by date food that’s too good to go in the bin.

SUNDAYS St Ia Church

Said Eucharist, 8.30am; Parish Eucharist, 10am.

St John’s in the Fields

Morning service, 10am; Wild Church, a service for

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all ages, in the vicarage garden beside the church, 11.30am.

St Ives Community Foodshare

At St Ives Rugby Club, 11.30am-noon. Collect free sell-by date food that’s too good to go in the bin.

EVENTS Intensive Throwing at the Leach Pottery Regular sessions throughout January and February

Learn new skills and techniques, whether you’re a student potter, keen amateur or complete beginner. Cost: £490 for 5-day course, £335 for 3-day course. Visit www.leachpottery.com for more information and to book.

St Ives Old Cornwall Society 3rd January, 7pm

At Carbis Bay Memorial Hall. Members’ evening. There will be a picture quiz followed by various contributions from members. Annual membership £8.50, casual attendance £2.

St Ives U3A 18th January, 2pm

At Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, Trencrom Lane. Talk by the Samaritans. Followed by tea or coffee and biscuits. Newcomers welcome.

St Ives U3A 1st February, 2pm

At Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, Trencrom Lane. Speaker to be confirmed. Followed by tea or coffee and biscuits. Newcomers welcome.

St Ives Feast 7th February (to be confirmed)

A celebration of the anniversary of the consecration of St Eia Parish Church in 1434, including the traditional game of Hurling the Silver Ball. Check for up to date information at stivestowncouncil-cornwall.gov.uk

St Ives U3A 15th February, 2pm

St Ives U3A at Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, Trencrom Lane. Speaker to be confirmed. Followed by tea or coffee and biscuits. Newcomers welcome.

St Ives Old Cornwall Society 14th February, 7pm

Tony Mason to show a video he has made about life Downlong. Annual membership £8.50, casual attendance £2.

Barnoon Arts 15th February, 2pm

Learn how to make charms and jewellery, by casting crystal resin into moulds and shells, £30, including materials. Details at www.barnoonarts.uk

Barnoon Arts 16th February, 2pm

Abstract drawing with Peter Giles. £25. Details at www.barnoonarts.uk

Please email What’s On entries for March and April to hello@stiveslocal.uk by 10th February. Keep an eye on our website stiveslocal.uk for up-to-date listings.

ART AND EXHIBITIONS Anima Mundi Until 15th January

John Robinson: CNUT The title of this exhibition makes obvious reference to one of Robinson’s paintings in the show, a bizarre and grandiose portrait, where the artist is king and appointed ruler of his kingdom. Jarno Vesala: solo exhibition The Company of Others contains two new installation works. Portrait of a Father and Daughter, a ‘mono no aware’ installation work incorporating life-size sculpture and projection, reflects on the ephemeral transcience of existence. Pala Taloa (Piece of a House) continues a personal narrative through a visual and emotive layering of intimate encounters, once again slowing down the passage of time to hold on to the intimate. Street-an-Pol, St Ives TR26 2DS www.animamundigallery.com/ Barnoon Arts

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Robert Jones’ childhood playground. After studying at Falmouth College of Art he worked as a tutor until an exhibition at Newlyn Orion Art Gallery encouraged him to concentrate on his painting. He has written a book on the life and art of Alfred Wallis.

Until 8th January

New Gallery: Associates’ Winter Exhibition A variety of sculptures, ceramics, paintings, drawings, photographs, and prints from Associate Members of the Penwith Society of Arts.

Until 8th January Leach Pottery

Belgrave St Ives Until 8th January

Winter exhibitions: Pictures and 3D Works A mixed exhibition of modern British, St Ives modern, and contemporary works by artists associated with the gallery. This annual exhibition offers clients the opportunity to buy carefully selected and accessibly priced paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, furniture, and ceramics for the Christmas holiday period. You can view the exhibition on the gallery website, or in person by appointment (call 01736 794888 or email info@belgravestives.co.uk).

Leach Pottery Until March

Clay and Community exhibition, showcasing a range of ceramic pieces created by children, and novice and experienced potters across the country as part of the Leach 100 centenary celebrations. For more details, see the feature on our centre pages. Higher Stennack, St Ives TR26 2HE | 01736 799703 www.leachpottery.com

New Craftsman Gallery Until 4th January

Gregory Warren Wilson and Friends: Stargazing Gregory’s work plays with the translucent nature of glass. Conceived in multiple layers, sometimes as many as six, his designs allow light to interact with the glass spatially, sparkling, scintillating, and appearing to shimmer as you look at them. Accompanying Gregory’s works will be a new collection of paintings by Martha Holmes, Neil Canning, and Carol Hosking-Smith, with jewellery by Sam Photic. 24 Fore Street, St Ives TR26 1HE newcraftsmanstives.com

Penwith Gallery Until 8th January

Studio Gallery: Robert Jones Born in Newquay, the beaches and cliffs were

Main Gallery: Members’ Winter Exhibition A diverse exhibition of sculptures, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and prints from the members of the Penwith Society of Arts Back Road West, St Ives TR26 1NL www.penwithgallery.com

Tate St Ives Until 16th January

Petrit Halilaj: Very Volcanic Over This Green Feather Petrit Halilaj’s work investigates cultural identity, nationhood, and heritage, and ideas of personal and collective memories and freedoms. Halilaj lives and works between Germany, Kosovo, and Italy. His work encompasses sculpture, video, drawing and text, as well as traditional fabrics and materials.

Ongoing

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #1136 Curved and straight color bands, 2004 Sol LeWitt was seminal in establishing the notion of ‘conceptual art’ during the 1960s. This is one of a number of highly coloured wall pieces he made. It includes seven vibrant colours to create an overwhelming chromatic environment that envelopes the viewer. The curve, snakes along the wall. Every band in the wall drawing is of the same width and there is no area left empty of colour.

Until 9th January

Sammy Lee: Aviary Tate St Ives’s Winter Light commission 2021 is a virtual, data-driven environment by artist Sammy Lee. The computer-simulated birds are projected onto the ceiling of Tate St Ives’s entrance every evening and streamed online 24/7.

Until 6th January

Adam James: Kemeneth Adam is a British artist whose work brings people together, often using ‘live action role play’. Kemeneth – the Cornish word for community – is an artist’s project developed by James in collaboration with St Ives communities and Tate St Ives. Porthmeor Beach, St Ives TR26 1TG tate.org.uk/visit/tate-st-ives

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Record-breaking auction of St Ives School artworks

Funds raised from the sale of the private collection of St Ives-based artist Wilhelmina Barns-Graham will help support a new generation of artists – a cause close to her heart.

Barns-Graham (1912-2004) was a pivotal figure in the St Ives School. Her collection of paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, ceramics and jewellery reflected her friendships with other artists and makers who lived and worked in the town in the mid-20th century, including Terry Frost, Barbara Hepworth, Patrick Heron, Roger and Rose Hilton, Bernard and Janet Leach, Ben and Kate Nicholson, Alfred Wallis and Bryan Wynter. At the auction of the Wilhelmina BarnsGraham Collection at the Mall Galleries in London, Hepworth’s Figure and Mirror, 1948, achieved a new world record for a picture by the artist. Charlotte Riordan, head of contemporary and post-war art at auctioneers Lyon & Turnbull, said: “The St Ives School was a diverse, important and exciting moment. Barns-Graham’s collection is a special insight into who, what, where, and why this was the case. It also contextualises Barns-Graham herself as a significant figure in this history.” In 1987 Barns-Graham established a charitable trust (WBGT) which aims to promote and broaden the understanding and reputation of her work, as well as supporting artists in their work and education. Since 2006, the WBGT has gifted artworks by Barns-Graham to museums and galleries across the UK, and donated over one million pounds in grants, awards and exhibition sponsorship. It has made contributions to summer schools for artists in her native Fife

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Red and Violet, 1961, by Wilhelmina Barns-Graham

and St Ives, and to Tate St Ives’ education programme, offered bursaries to support travel abroad for students and provided financial assistance to enable them to complete their studies successfully. Working closely with the Royal Scottish Academy and Porthmeor Studios in St Ives, WBGT supports residencies for more established artists, encouraging career development and new ways of thinking and working. Rob Airey, director of the Trust, said: “Funds raised from this sale will allow the Trust to extend this ambitious financial support for artists and art education, which was so central to Barns-Graham’s wishes for the Trust, and who need support now more than ever as we emerge from the devastating impact of Covid 19. It will also enable us to increase the accessibility to both the art and archive collections through conservation, publications, exhibitions and web-based resources.”

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Tate St Ives in Colour, light installation by Peter Hudson 2019 © Tate Photo by Kirstin Prisk

What’s on Tate St Ives £5 Locals Pass

Cornwall residents get unlimited year-round entry to Tate St Ives and the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden for just £5.

Petrit Halilaj Until 16 January 2022

In April 1999 Petrit Halilaj made thirty-eight drawings using coloured felt-tip pens on paper. He was thirteen years old and living with his family in a refugee camp in Albania, displaced by the Kosovo War. Halilaj has revisited these childhood drawings at Tate St Ives. The images are magnified and rearranged as giant hanging cut-outs in the gallery, combining poignant images of rural landscapes and animals with scenes of war. https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-st-ives/exhibition/petrit-halilaj

Petrit Halilaj: Very volcanic over this green feather, installation view at Tate St Ives, 2021. Photo: Tate Photography (Matt Greenwood)

Artist Rooms: Sol LeWitt

Bands of vibrant acrylic paint incorporating every primary (red, yellow, blue) and secondary (green, orange, purple) colour across the curved gallery space. https://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-st-ives/display/artist-rooms-sol-lewitt

Winter Light Commission: AVIARY Until 9 January 2022

Free to view in the entrance of Tate St Ives is brought to life with AVIARY, a light project by artist Sammy Lee. Projected into the dome of the entrance, the flocking behaviours of computer-generated birds are determined by real-time data. AVIARY is a multi-media installation at Tate St Ives and a 360° livestream online. https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-st-ives/exhibition/sammy-lee-aviary

Adam James: KEMENETH Until 6 February 2022

Tate St Ives and around St Ives | AR app free to download KEMENETH – the Cornish word for community – responds to recent experiences of living in Cornwall. The project is developed by Adam James (born 1978, UK) in collaboration with St Ives communities and Tate, presenting immersive ‘augmented reality’ (AR) environments around St Ives. Using a smartphone app, outdoor public spaces around St Ives are brought to life with an immersive experience. Check our website for full details. https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-st-ives/exhibition/ adam-james-kemeneth


Leach Pottery:

© Matthew Tyas

A centenary celebration of clay and community Two years of celebrations to mark the centenary of St Ives’ world-renowned Leach Pottery have culminated in Clay and Community, an exhibition of works created by talented children, and novice and experienced potters, from across the country. As part of the Leach 100 programme, young artists were invited to submit a drawn design or photographs of maquettes for a new ceramic piece on the theme of A Pot for Sharing. More than 150 children took part in the Schools Challenge, and it was art and design pupils at Norwich School who took home the coveted gold prize of a four-day workshop at the pottery. Their innovative and unique bubble pottery plates were inspired by the Covid 19 pandemic, referencing the ‘social bubbles’ that we all became so familiar with. The Clay and Community exhibition also features ceramics developed at National Raku Parties hosted during the Leach 100 celebrations by 29 partners of the Leach Pottery across the UK, to give people the chance to experience the fast and dramatic method of firing that inspired Bernard Leach to pursue pottery.

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© Leach Pottery

Leach, one of the great figures of 20th century art, played a pioneering role in creating an identity for artist potters across the world. The pottery which bears his name was founded in 1920, and remains a working studio at the heart of St Ives’ artistic community. The aim of the Leach 100 programme, launched in the Pottery’s centenary year, was to honour this significant milestone through a comprehensive programme of exhibitions, events and outreach work.

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inspiration from the central principles of Leach’s work in her own creations.

© Leach Pottery

As well as Clay and Community, these included an exhibition of the work of several artists who, after a rigorous selection process, received funding to create a body of work to present for display at the Pottery. Rosanna Martin and David Paton, both based in Cornwall, developed a joint brief entitled Mythical Taxonomies – A Cornish Recombinant Geology, which aimed to unlock the mineral energy embedded in materials, and to explore how this force relates to specific places, people and landscapes. They visited sites across Cornwall and produced kiln-fired sculptures, drawings, films, photographs, and text, exploring how humans connect and interact with the landscapes they inhabit. Resident artist Hyoson Kim created Moon Jars, a traditional form of Korean art. – Bernard Leach brought a Moon Jar to Britain, and it formed a central part of his own ceramics collection, and Hyosun takes

Leach Pottery director Libby Buckley said that Leach 100 was the culmination of a lot of hard work celebrating creativity in all its forms, and featured works created by people whose abilities range from beginner to seasoned potter. “Although the Leach 100 celebrations haven’t turned out exactly as we initially planned – due to the pandemic – our work has been successful in nurturing creativity and has given more people access to clay, which is fantastic. In addition, we are incredibly proud to have pushed artistic development through the commissions and residencies.

© Leach Pottery

“The Leach Pottery was founded in the spirit of friendship, cooperation and exchange. It is therefore fitting that we continue our extended centenary celebrations through this community-focused and communityled exhibition that brings our local and international friends together to celebrate such a historically significant site at such a momentous time. The community has always been pivotal to everything the pottery does and we are pleased to celebrate it in this way.”

The Clay and Community Exhibition is available to view at the Leach Pottery until March. To book a slot or to find out more, visit www.leachpottery.com © Leach Pottery

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Out on the Towans: Battling the blackthorn by Martin Rule, Towans Ranger

I hope you’re enjoying bracing walks on wild, open beaches and cliff paths.

landscape features – even ancient plough marks and animal footprints!

Our work on the Towans continues through the winter – in fact, this is when we carry out most of our practical habitat management. With plants dormant, birds not nesting and reptiles hibernating, this is the ideal time to cut back encroaching bushes – gorse, brambles, privet etc – to benefit the rare dune grassland species and enable them to expand.

The first Bronze Age houses ever found in Britain were discovered here in the 1950s, and we’ve been busy this winter cutting back dense clumps of blackthorn – some over 10 feet high – which risk damaging these features. Blackthorn has a vigorous root system and sends up many suckers, which can damage underground structures.

It’s not all about wildlife, however. A focus of our work this winter is up on Godrevy Warren, the high ground north of the Red River, just before it enters St Ives Bay. This is one of the richest archaeological sites in Cornwall, if not the country! People lived on this site from at least the Bronze Age until the 17th century – five main periods of settlement have been identified through extensive archaeological digging from the 1940s to the 1960s. Settlements were each abandoned in turn, due to large amounts of sand blowing onto the site. This has preserved many

This site is private and is managed under a Countryside Stewardship scheme, funded by Natural England. I’m developing a plan for organised walks and events, so people can enjoy this special place and learn more about it. Details will appear in due course on our website – https://friendsofthetowans.co.uk/ – where you can also learn more about the history of the Warren – and our new Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/ FriendsoftheTowans You can’t fail to notice the beautiful white cattle grazing here. This is a rare breed – Whitebred Shorthorn or Cumberland White – and these pedigree animals are owned and looked after by the fantastic Gerald Babcock of Pendeen. Gerald also grazes Shetland and Dartmoor ponies on sites across the Towans during the winter. Grazing is crucial to help keep the grassland healthy. It removes the old ‘thatch’ in the grass, enabling other plants to germinate, and helps the rabbits get a head-start in grazing some areas even shorter. It’s the short-turf areas that support most of the rare and delicate plant species. A further benefit of grazing is that it greatly reduces the risk of summer fires, by removing a lot of the dry fuel close to the ground. We always welcome new volunteers, so if you’d like to join us in looking after the Towans, just drop me an email at

martinrule@talktalk.net 26

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Travel: A year of dreams and plans It’s been a difficult year for everyone who enjoy travelling, with Covid tests and quarantine as much a part of a trip abroad as packing a suitcase. Those who work in the industry have been hit particularly hard by the restrictions and the red lists brought about by the pandemic. But throughout 2021, St Ives Local columnists Jo and Paul Mooney, who own Cornish company Stunning Escapes, have remained enthusiastic and optimistic, despite the disappointment of having to postpone many of their customers’ holidays – and their own. Jo and Paul are currently on a long-awaited holiday with their 10-year-old twins in the United States. We look forward to hearing all about it when they return – but in the meantime, we thought we’d look back at some of their articles, which, over the last 12 months, have given us a window on the world at a time when we’ve travelled not much further than our own backyards.

with a new variant of the virus.” A year on, little has changed – but that doesn’t stop us dreaming of exotic locations, and at the beginning of 2021, Paul and Jo were keen to tell us all about one of their favourites – Mauritius. They described the pristine

In January, Paul and Jo observed: “Many of our customers are looking forward to trips this year, while others are more cautious and waiting to see how things unravel over the coming weeks, especially now we are faced

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more eco-friendly. “There will always be a dilemma between travel and sustainability, but we’ve seen first-hand the good travel can do,” they wrote.

beaches and coral seas, the watersports and waterfalls, the lovely and friendly people – and a giant tortoise nursery! At the height of lockdown, Paul and Jo noticed that many of their customers were booking ‘bucket list’ trips, due to a pent-up desire for adventure Their May/June article focussed on one of these holidays – a luxury rail journey across the Canadian Rockies, during which “there is every chance you will see grizzly bears, and eagles soaring above you!” Jo and Paul’s article for the March/April issue looked at ways in which travellers can minimise the environmental impact of their trip, and highlighted countries around the world – from Scotland and Denmark to the Maldives and the Galapagos – which are going the extra mile to make tourism

It was a theme they returned to in July, explaining that they are supporting a social enterprise holiday company which funds nature restoration projects, and championing “hotels with soul” which help to regenerate the environment which surrounds them. For their September/October article, Jo was delighted to describe her first voyage back to adventure since the Covid era began – a trip on board Golden Horizon, the world’s largest square-rigged vessel, which called at Fowey, Falmouth, Dover, Torquay and the Isle of Wight. The luxurious ship was decorated in a style designed to make passengers feel they had travelled back in time to 1913 – but this was 2021, and Jo had a nervous 30-minute wait on land for the results of her lateral flow test. This was soon forgotten when she was welcomed on board Golden Horizon with a glass of champagne! In November, with the end of the year in sight, she and Paul found that demand for travel was skyrocketing, and they were recommending St Lucia for winter sunshine, Christmas market cruises on the Rhine, and the ski slopes of Canada. The discovery of the new omicron variant at the end of the month was a reminder that Covid19 is still with us – but Paul and Jo remain hopeful that there are exciting times ahead for everyone who loves travel as much as they do.

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Plastic Free St Ives:

Support local eco-friendly businesses by Emma Fashokun, Cornish Gems Guest Experience and Corporate Social Responsibility Manager Even though the world is beginning to take notice of plastic-strewn beaches and injured marine creatures, we know that the gradual degeneration of plastics into microplastics will be a blight on our environment for decades – and even centuries. But history has shown us that with every crisis comes innovation, and as a plastic free community, we have been inspired by the efforts of local makers and businesses to reduce the impact that plastic has on our coast, our marine life and our planet. S W Elle – Recycled fishing gear macrame plant hangers

Handmade in St Ives by Elle, these beautifully constructed decorative plant hangers are suitable for interior or exterior decoration. Using discarded fishing rope, Elle meticulously crafts knotted hanging bakers, bracelets, key rings and bespoke pieces. Find more information on her Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/S.W.ElleCornwall/

Cornish Spliced – Recycled and repurposed fishing rope dog leads

From a local grandfather and granddaughter team comes Cornish Spliced, cleaning beaches in the area and making products with the abandoned rope that they find on our shores. Not only are they clearing the beaches of plastic, but Grandad is passing on his splicing skills, and we’ve spotted more than one handsome dog modelling this great product! For information and suppliers follow them on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/Cornishspliced/

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Plastic Oceanic – Recycled, reclaimed plastic jewellery and household items

Founded by Penryn-based surfer and diver Dan Edwards, Plastic Oceanic has an impressive array of items which are beautifully made using unrecyclable plastic collected from the seas off the Cornish coast. The range includes necklaces, coasters and keyrings, and all products are available to order from their website. https://www.plasticoceanic.com/productcategory/necklaces/

Waterhaul – Sustainable, recycled eyewear

Newquay-based Waterhaul was formed by marine conservationists looking for practical solutions to the problem of the mass of ocean plastic they encountered. Waterhaul recycles collected plastic into stylish sunglasses and optical eyewear, and combines reasonable prices with frames and styles to suit everyone. https://waterhaul.co/ Just like these local companies, which are helping to reduce the plastic waste that litters the coastlines of Cornwall, we can all reduce our carbon footprint by buying local and supporting our local economy. Finally, a call for volunteers. The Plastic Free St Ives committee would love to hear from like- minded individuals who would like to get involved in our work. The past two years have seen us continuing to spread the word, mostly remotely, but we do hope that 2022 allows for more face-to-face meetings and public events, such as beach cleans. To get in touch, please message us via our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/plasticfreestives/

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CTC St Ives Locals 144x202.indd 1

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14/06/2021 12:51

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Garden Stories: Growing Links The organic vegetables, fruit, herbs and flowers which fill the Vegbags produced by the Community Garden at Gulval are all harvested from sites within 15 miles – and many are grown in the garden itself. In this sheltered, south-facing space, experienced horticulturalists and novice gardeners work together to plant or harvest broccoli and beans, apples and aubergines, peppers and pears, tulips and tomatoes, strawberries and salad leaves. Proceeds from the sales of the Vegbags are ploughed back into the work of Growing Links, the Community Interest Company which manages the garden. The seeds of the scheme were sown more than 10 years ago, with the launch of the PEaT Project, designed to give practical help to people interested in growing their own produce but with little idea how to go about it: the letters in the title stand for Plant, Eat and Teach. A local farmer offered a field, which was initially divided into four plots. This was later divided into around 20 allotments, together with an acre of communal growing space, and the Community Garden also became the hub of a variety of other projects run by Growing Links. These include the Street Food Project, which provides a daily hot meal and a friendly chat for local homeless and vulnerable people. When the first lockdown began last year, the project had to change from communal eating to a system of dropping off food parcels. It also needed to raise money for PPE, which became essential for volunteer distributors. Growing Links can help people who are unemployed to find work, and provide meaningful activity for those who are unable to work because of physical or mental health

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problems. There are also practical sessions in organic horticulture and applied permaculture. The organisation’s ethos is that working in the open air is beneficial for mind, body and soul – as is good food. Vegan pizzas are often on the menu at the Community Garden’s regular open days, along with hearty soup, freshly-baked bread and gorgeous cakes. In the early days, on-site facilities were basic, consisting only of an ancient army tent. There is now a Portakabin with a fitted kitchen, and a polytunnel where salad leaves are grown, to keep them safe from the attention of the local rabbit population. Other wildlife is more welcome – visiting birds include wagtails, finches, blue tits and robins – as are volunteers. For anyone interested in growing organic food, there’s always something to do, but it’s also a space to come and find some peace and quiet. Sessions for volunteers take place on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10am to 3pm each week. Growing Links is funded largely by volunteers and supportive local businesses, and donations are always welcome.

Visit www.growinglinks.org.uk to find out more, and for more information about weekly £10 organic Vegbags, email vegbags@growinglinks.org.uk

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Book Review To Paradise by Hanya Yanagihara £20

From the author of the modern classic A Little Life, this is a bold, brilliant novel spanning three centuries, and three different versions of the American experiment, about lovers, family, loss and the elusive promise of utopia. It is driven by Yanagihara’s understanding of the aching desire to protect those we love – partners, lovers, children, friends, family and even our fellow citizens – and the pain that ensues when we cannot.

House of Sky and Breath by Sarah J Maas £16.99 (published 15th February, signed copies available)

The action-packed second book in Maas’ richly inventive adult fantasy series. Magic, Fallen Angels and Demons; romance, friendship and war- this is just as addictive as her previous books, and you will be clamouring for more as soon as you finish it.

The Paris Bookseller by Kerri Maher £16.99

Paris, 1919. Young, bookish Sylvia Beach knows there is no greater city in the

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by Alice Harandon, manager of St Ives Bookseller

world. But when she opens an English -language bookshop on the bohemian Left Bank, Sylvia can’t yet know she is making history. A vivid evocation of the famous female-owned Parisian bookshop and its owner’s mission to publish Joyce’s Ulysses. Kerri Maher writes a love letter to books, bookshops and book lovers everywhere.

Bibi: A Flamingo’s Tale by Jo Weaver £12.99 (published 17th February)

Wise old flamingo Bibi has been with her flock for as long as anyone can remember. When the lake dries up, the flamingos are forced to leave their babies behind and fly away to find water. Bibi bravely volunteers to guide the baby flamingos on foot across the barren salt flats to reunite them with their parents. But when one little flamingo starts to fall behind, Bibi teaches everyone a valuable lesson about community and the importance of being there to help one another in times of need. A beautifully illustrated celebration of old age and community.

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TREGLISSON, WHEAL ALFRED ROAD, HAYLE TR27 5JT

LOCALLY GROWN PLANTS

Exotic and unusual plants, including Acacias, Anemones, Agapanthus, Bananas, Cannas, Eucalyptus and Restios. Patio plants, hanging baskets, tubs and containers. Fruit trees, vegetables and herbs. Large range of ornamental trees, fruit trees, native hedging, soft fruit, grapevines, figs and wisteria arriving soon. We look forward to seeing you! Opening times:- Monday to Saturday 9am until 5pm Sunday – 10am until 4pm (FOLLOW SIGNS FROM LIDL) TEL: 01736 752888 MOB: 07817 435705 FACEBOOK: @HAYLE PLANTS ejmichell@btconnect.com (FREE PARKING AND DOGS WELCOME)

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Even though it may seem an age away, here at Sweet Williams Florist we can definitely hear the faint beating of Cupid’s wings – and we’re pleased to announce that we’re taking orders for Valentine’s Day! So if you’re looking for the perfect arrangement for that special someone in your life, please do get in touch.

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The Vine Elim Pentecostal Church Meets at: Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, Trencrom Lane, TR26 2TQ,

www.thevine-stives.org.uk

Tel: 07597 555630 Email: hellothevinechurch@gmail.com Registered Charity 251549

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Tips to help sell your home in 2022 New year is traditionally a time of taking stock. And for homeowners, that can mean looking to either move or improve. If you’re thinking of the former – perhaps to take advantage of the high price you can achieve by selling at the moment – what steps should you be taking to make your property as saleable as possible? Here are a few ideas… Kerb appeal: what does your home look like as people drive past? Do window frames have peeling paint? Does the roof look good, with no missing tiles? Are walls painted? Does that front door look inviting? The garden: is it neat and tidy? It’s a good idea to weed and make sure hedges are trimmed and fences hole-free. And make sure wheelie bins have a store of their own, or are placed out of sight.

Cleaning is key. Kitchens and bathrooms should sparkle. Clean out that grout, mop tiled floors, clean carpets, and make sure window glass is gleaming. And make any minor repairs needed. Replace that missing door knob or repair that broken shelf in the built-in wardrobe. Adding large wall mirrors can make rooms look lighter and bigger.

When you’re inviting people in to view, it obviously makes sense that the house is as tidy as possible. Prospective buyers want to look around and imagine the home as theirs, with their own decoration and trappings. Tidy bits and bobs away, in storage if necessary, to create as light and airy a viewing as possible.

It’s worth paying special attention to the kitchen. If it’s particularly old, it could be worth replacing to increase your property’s value. It really is the heart of the home. Even just replacing cabinet doors, or counter tops, can give a kitchen a good refresh. On the day of viewing, make the house as welcoming as possible. If there’s an open fire, get it lit. Baking bread and putting the coffee pot on in the kitchen are well-known for making a house smell homely, but why not give them a try? Here’s hoping you get a quick sale in 2022!

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HERE FOR YOU IN St Ives Whether it’s a place to save your pennies, a place to call your own or just peace of mind, we’re here to point you in the right direction.

MEET THE TEAM AT YOUR LOCAL AGENCY Lanhams Property Management 11 High Street St Ives, TR26 1RS 01736 792 129 Yorkshire Building Society is a member of the Building Societies Association and is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. Yorkshire Building Society is entered in the Financial Services Register and its registration number is 106085. Head Office: Yorkshire House, Yorkshire Drive, Bradford BD5 8LJ. ybs.co.uk

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Ten tips to teach your children about money Finance can be a difficult topic to tackle with children – but teaching them to have a healthy relationship with money from a young age is important. Financial experts from money.co.uk have compiled these tips for parents. 1 Start with the basics

How you introduce money to your children will partly depend on their age. A good place to start is getting children comfortable handling cash and coins. Explain to them how money is used to buy things, and that it must be earned before it can be spent.

2 Speak openly about small financial decisions

Talk to your children about the items you buy while shopping, so they begin to understand the decisions you make. Ask older children to keep a running total of the things you buy. This can help them to understand how the cost of small items can add up, and that not everything is affordable on a budget.

3 Try simple games and toys

Creating easy monetary games such as counting pennies can help children understand the value of different denominations of money. Ask your child to match the number of 1p coins in a pile to the price of a higher value coin, such as 10p or 50p.

4 Set a good example

Children learn money habits from their parents. Showing them that you are checking the receipt after you shop, or putting money into savings, can start developing positive habits from a young age.

5 Use pocket money as an incentive

Giving children pocket money when they do chores around the house helps them learn more about the value of money, where it comes from, and what it takes to earn it.

6 Show them how to save

If your child has shown interest in an expensive purchase, you could set them up with an oldfashioned piggy bank where they can ‘deposit’ their earnings, or a chart for them to fill out so they can track how much money they have.

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7 Reward them with interest

Paying small amounts of interest on the money your child has saved is a helpful way to encourage them to keep saving. Older children will be delighted to learn that the interest they earned last week can be used to earn more interest if they save until next week.

8 Use trips to the shop to learn about saving v spending

Allow your child full control of their own money on the understanding that if they don’t have enough, they won’t be able to borrow any more. The more they feel in control of their own finances, the more they will be able to make sensible decisions when it comes to spending or saving.

9 Use digital tools

There is a whole range of online tools for teaching older children about online banking and using cards for payments. Parents can set strict spending limits, monitor what their children are buying and where they are spending their money.

10 Help children to sell old toys

Ask your child to go through their toys, books and clothes, and set aside some which they no longer want. You can then sell these on their behalf through online auction sites such as eBay or Facebook Marketplace. Not only is this a great way for your child to feel independent, it presents an opportunity to discuss how to use the internet safely. Salman Haqqi, personal finance expert from money.co.uk, says: “Creating an environment in which you are able to speak more openly with your children about your financial decisions is vital to engaging them on the value of money. Showing them how to make choices when shopping will set up good habits and understanding of managing money. A healthy relationship with finances starts at a young age, and children learn most of their habits from their parents.”

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THE CREDIT CONTROL SPECIALIST customer relationships.

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• • • • • • • •

Corns & calluses Hard skin removal Fungal treatment Thickened nails Nail cutting Toenail reconstruction Toenail recorrection Medi-Pedi available

CLINIC every Tuesday 12 - 5pm St Ives RFC, TR26 1ER (FHP registered, SAC. Dip) To book appointment, call: 07946 117 007 or E: stivesfootcare@outlook.com (& home visits)

ASTROLOGY READINGS @cosmicforecast BOOK: cosmicforecast.earth

How will new customers find you? Ask about rates in our classified ads section 07444 199081 hello@ stiveslocal.uk

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Quick Crossword

Coffee Time Puzzles Across 7 Ape (7) 8 Decree (5) 9 Harass (5) 10 Intoxicating liquor (7) 11 As before (5) 13 Appears (7) 15 Common sight in Saudi Arabia (3,4) 16 Run away (5) 18 Hearing distance (7) 21 Strode (5) 22 Farewell (5) 23 Rooms (7) Down 1 Previous to birth (8) 2 Bump off (4) 3 The Pope (4) 4 Instructors (8) 5 Desire (4) 6 Fashions (6) 7 Stately (5) 12 Repair (8) 13 Snake-like fish (3) 14 Enormous (8) 15 Musical dramas (6) 17 Oceanic ins and outs (5) 19 Sudden assault (4) 20 Underground (4) 21 Seed containers (4)

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50210_


Covid-19 gathers like smoke. Open windows to disperse the particles.

In airless rooms, Covid-19 can build up over time, so it’s harder to avoid breathing it in. When you’re inside with others, open windows to let fresh air in. Just 10 minutes every now and Please mention St. Ives Local when contacting advertisers again is enough to help. 50210_AutumnBehaviours_A4_Poster_AW_1_a.indd 2

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Liz’s Quizzes, answers 1. Pesto; 2. Banksy; 3. Spectre; 4. The Fair; 5. Royal Festival Hall; 6. Mexico; 7. Mr McGregor; 8. Posh; 9. Bird; 10. York; 11. One; 12. California; 13. Badminton; 14. Dress size; 15. Shreck; 16. Edward; 17. Three; 18. Blur; 19. Iraq; 20. Stylus; 21. Notting Hill; 22. 19th; 23. Vitamin C: 24. Tiger; 25. 2,000; 26. Noel Coward; 27. Easter Sunday; 28. Delta; 29. Sleepwalking; 30. Pan.

Local Directory Arts Tate St Ives Builders’ Merchants Ocean Supplies Business Services CTCC Solutions Cleaning Services Clean Image David Morris Contract Services Community Organisations St Ives Community Land Trust St Ives Library Financial Services Yorkshire Building Society Floristry Sweet Williams Florist Food and Drink Bier Huis Grand Café

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Star Inn, Crowlas Funeral Directors Saints Funerals Garden Services and Nurseries Hayle Plants J C Landscapes Health and Fitness Copperhouse Clinic Endrian Yoga Hearing Services Cornwall Holistic Therapy Centre Holiday Accommodation Cornish Traditional Cottages St Ives Holidays Homes CTG Windows John Andrews Joinery Surface Rehab

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Your Trusted Local Installer Windows

Doors

St.Ives Call Graham & Paul today on 01736 798964 or visit www.stiveswindows.co.uk

Conservatories


Your Local Independent Builders Merchant. Trade & General Public Welcome.

We stock a large variety of building materials at competitive prices. Timber - Decking - Fence panels - Decorative aggregates Plumbing Electrical - Ironmongery - Tools and more… Free delivery direct to your door. Workwear Showroom. Workwear & Safety Footwear CARHARTT - SCRUFFS - DICKIES - OCEAN MARINE WEAR - BASE

Visit or give us a call today.

01736 796564

Ocean Supplies (St Ives) Ltd Unit 2A | Penbeagle Industrial Estate St. Ives | Cornwall TR26 2JH

www.oceansuppliesltd.com