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THE OKLAHOMAN WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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COVERING OKLAHOMA SINCE 1907

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HISTORIC VICTORY FOR FALLIN, GOP Oklahoma elects first female governor; Republicans sweep state races BY MICHAEL MCNUTT AND DIANA BALDWIN

INSIDE

Staff Writers

STATE HOUSE

Republicans, already at record-high levels in the state House, picked up six more seats Tuesday.

Benefiting from voters upset with what they see as an overreaching federal government, Republican Mary Fallin on Tuesday was elected the state’s first female governor. GOP candidates also swept all statewide offices, another first, including lieutenant governor, insurance commissioner, labor commissioner, superintendent of schools, auditor and inspector, attorney general and treasurer. The Republican Party also has control of the Oklahoma House and Senate. Fallin, becoming only the second Oklahoma member of Congress to win the state’s top chief executive post, captured about 58 percent of the vote over Democrat Jari Askins.

PAGE 5A

STATE SENATE

Republicans appeared headed for victory in seven of 10 state Senate races as the party sought to solidify its control of the upper chamber. PAGE 5A

JUDICIAL

Voters retained Steven W. Taylor and James R. Winchester as Oklahoma Supreme Court justices. Four other judges also were retained. PAGE 6A

Gov.-elect Mary Fallin shares a moment with her daughter, Christina, her husband, Wade Christiansen, right, and her son, Price, on Tuesday during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

SEE HISTORY, PAGE 3A

Lankford cruises to win; incumbents retain seats

Voters soundly defeat State Question 744

[ PAGE 11A ] Republican James Lankford, a former

[ PAGE 2A ] The $830 million education

church camp director, cruised to victory in the 5th District race Tuesday, completing his improbable run with a convincing victory over Democrat Billy Coyle. Rep. Dan Boren, D-Muskogee, easily won reelection, as did Reps. Frank Lucas, R-Cheyenne, and John Sullivan, R-Tulsa. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Moore, won a new term after the July 27 primary since he didn’t have a general election opponent.

James Lankford signs an autograph Tuesday at the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

funding amendment, State Question 744, failed to get more than 20 percent of voter approval. The amendment to the constitution would have mandated that Oklahoma at least spend the regional average of six surrounding states per student on common education. It would have meant a boost of roughly $1,300 per student.

WINNERS OF STATEWIDE RACES: STORIES ON PAGES 3-4A

CALIF. POT VOTE

California voters rejected a measure that would have made their state the first to legalize the use and sale of marijuana. PAGE 11A

MORE ...

See returns from across the state. PAGES 9-10A

WEATHER



SUNNY High: 72 Tonight’s low: 35

BUSINESS, 6C

24-HOUR DEAL

Todd Lamb Lieutenant governor

Scott Pruitt Attorney general

Mark Costello Labor commissioner

Janet Barresi Schools superintendent

John Doak Insurance commissioner

Gary Jones Auditor and inspector

Ken Miller Treasurer

U.S. voters show frustration with blow to Democrats BY MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE INFORMATION SERVICES

WASHINGTON — Two years ago, Barack Obama promised change. Tuesday, the voters made a change of their own.

In a tidal wave of anger and anxiety, they voted President Barack Obama’s Democrats out of office from coast to coast, sweeping them out of power in the House of Representatives and slash-

TODAY’S PRAYER Lord, cast out all fear so we may stand strong and united in the day of testing. Amen. Advice Business Classified Comics

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Crossword Opinion Sports TV

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Volume 119, 302 Six sections Copyright 2010 The Oklahoma Publishing Co., Oklahoma City All rights reserved

ing their once nearinvincible numbers in the Senate. Democrats appeared likely to hold a narrow Senate majority. The vote changed the balance of power in Washington, slammed the

brakes on Obama’s agenda and ignited anew the central question of what the country wants from its government. It also reopened debate over whether either major political party is anywhere

near forging a durable majority coalition. One passionate phenomenon more than any other colored the politics of 2010 — the tea party

Visit www.wimgo deals.com for today’s deal: $20 for $40 worth of steak, salmon and nonalcoholic beverages at Avanti in Oklahoma City. Details on Page 2A.

SEE NATION, BACK PAGE

DEATHS

COURTS

2 children die in Norman fire

State sues websites

Norman fire officials are investigating the Tuesday fire that destroyed this house. The fire claimed a 7-year-old boy and 2-year-old girl, and three adults were hospitalized.

Oklahoma is suing to collect back sales taxes from Expedia, Priceline.com, Travelocity.com, Orbitz and other online travel reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms.

STATE, 15A

STATE, 15A PHOTO BY JERRY LAIZURE, THE NORMAN TRANSCRIPT/AP


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

NEWS, TOO

ONLINE AT NEWSOK

A closer look at today’s stories.

BEST OF THE BLOGS

Go online to blogs.NewsOK.com for the latest blog entries from The Oklahoman’s staff.

Fiery battle over SQ 744 ends in measure’s defeat

NEWSOK POLL

Results from the question: Should the Dallas Cowboys fire head coach Wade Phillips before this NFL season ends? Yes: 52 percent No: 48 percent Today’s question: Did you vote in Tuesday’s election? Vote at NewsOK.com.

VIDEO ON DEMAND

BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

MEETING PLACE Actor Zach Galifianakis talks with Brandy McDonnell about his success.

The $830 million education funding amendment, State Question 744, failed to get more than 20 percent of voter approval Tuesday night. Oklahomans have been bombarded with the message for the past two years that the state is nearly last, 49th, in what it spends per student on prekindergarten through 12th-grade education. “It’s a win, win for education,” said Heather Sparks, teacher of the year in 2009, said of the fact that State Question 744 lost. “We have let the public know, really put the giant spotlight on the fact that we are in the bottom five every year. We can do better if we have more resources. It needs to be a priority in our state.” Sparks, who teaches at Taft Middle School, said the lack of resources classrooms face — particularly when it comes to technology — is astounding. The amendment to the constitution would have mandated that Oklahoma spend at least the regional average per student on common education. It would have meant a boost of roughly $1,300 per student. State Question 744’s resounding defeat can be attributed to an opposition campaign spearheaded by Gov. Brad Henry, University of Oklahoma President David Boren and Oklahoma State University President Burns Hargis. “Both sides of the issue care deeply about our state and the quality of our education and the future of our young people,” Henry said Tuesday night at a campaign watch party. “We owe it to them to put aside our differences and come together, not as Democrats and Republicans, but as Oklahomans who care about the future of our state.”

To see the video, go to NewsOK.com/multimedia.

WHAT YOU’RE READING Top stories on NewsOK.com for the last 24 hours:

Gov. Brad Henry and his wife, Kim, arrive at a northwest Oklahoma City hotel Tuesday to tell opponents of SQ 744 that the proposal had been rejected by Oklahoma voters. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

There was no identified funding source for the additional $830 million a year required to fund State Question 744 beginning in three years. Henry called for the current leaders and newly elected leaders to put aside partisan politics and develop a plan to fund education. “We need to identify a funding source so that every other area of state government is protected and not sacrificed,” he said. Also failing Tuesday night was the counter-744 initiative that would have made it unconstitutional to base a state agency’s funding on what other states spend, or on other set equations. Rep. Leslie Osborn, who authored State Question 754, said she was thrilled SQ 744 was defeated, but disappointed that her bill was facing defeat because it would have prevented similar measures from being put on the ballot in future years. “If we beat 744 by the resounding numbers it looks like we’re going to, that secondary goal might take care of itself,” Osborn said, adding that other groups would be hesitant to spend millions on a funding question that

would fail. Oklahoma wasn’t alone Tuesday in having voters decide funding issues for education. Washington state voted on an initiative that would raise taxes on the so-called rich, reduce taxes for others and send any increased revenue to education. Florida voters were considering a constitutional amendment that would lift class size requirements similar to those that were lifted this fiscal year in Oklahoma by lawmakers due to budget cuts. And a voter initiative in Arizona would pull funding from early childhood programs and put it into the general fund for other purposes. In 2007 the Oklahoma Education Association lost a lawsuit against the state, alleging education funding in the state was inadequate and violated state law. The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled the OEA, one of the state’s largest teacher unions, didn’t have standing to sue. Then in 2008, members of the OEA began leading signature collection efforts on a petition to get State Question 744 on the 2010 general election ballot. The group Helping Oklahoma Public Education

(HOPE) turned in 238,000 signatures and spent $3.9 million over the past two years to get State Question 744 approved by voters. The largest contributor to the campaign was the National Education Association, a national labor union, giving $3.2 million. Outspent and playing catch-up to a yes campaign that had begun nearly a year earlier, the One Oklahoma Coalition began running a campaign based on the fact that there was no way to fund State Question 744. Television ads said 8,400 prisoners would be released from jail and seniors’ medications would be taxed and have to pay increased property taxes. The coalition stuck by the ads saying all of those were possible outcomes if the government had to reallocate nearly $1.7 billion toward education — a number that accounts for a 5 percent increase in regional education spending over the next three years. The One Oklahoma Coalition had raised about $1.3 million as of September 30 to oppose the state question, much of the money coming from construction companies, hospitals, chambers of commerce and banks.

1. Two children die in Norman house fire 2. Silver Alert issued for missing Oklahoma City man 3. Oklahoma elections: 5th District winner likely to be only new Oklahoman in Congress 4. OU coach Bob Stoops: Sooners staff familiar with new A&M quarterback Ryan Tannehill 5. Woman found shot to death in Oklahoma City 6. Oklahoma elections: Gubernatorial candidates make last-minute appeals 7. Oklahoma elections: Three in race for state schools superintendent 8. OU coach Bob Stoops doesn’t see road woes as ‘being an issue’ 9. Boeing to hire hundreds in Oklahoma for engineering divisions 10. Two killed in Oklahoma wrecks For a complete list of top viewed stories, go to NewsOK.com/top-ten.

TODAY’S EXCLUSIVE DEAL What’s your fancy? Steak? Tenderloin? Pomegranate Glazed Salmon? Enjoy fine cuisine with today’s daily deal: $20 for $40 worth of fare from Avanti Bar & Grill in Oklahoma City. Five percent of the proceeds from today’s deal goes to The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma. To learn more or place an order, go to www.wimgodeals.com.

SETTING IT STRAIGHT Sunday Hobby Lobby will have locations in 39 states after the first California store opens next year. A story on Page 4C in the Business section contained incorrect information. Monday A list of new laws on Page 4A contained incorrect information about the lights used by wreckers. Class AA wreckers can use flashing red or blue lights or a combination at the scene of an emergency and may be equipped with amber lights. When traveling from the scene, only amber lights may be used. Vehicles owned or operated by state, county or city agencies will use flashing amber lights for emergency or construction work. Tuesday Mela Bohannan was charged in 2007 with felony unauthorized use of a motor vehicle. The case is still pending in Oklahoma County. A story on Page 18A had incorrect information.

LOTTERY NEW ITEMS Recent additions to our “know it” topics: Paw-fect holidays: Did you know that 72 percent of Americans include their pets in their holiday plans? See how you can join in the fun. KNOWIT.NEWSOK.COM/PETS-OKLAHOMA

Health concern: Depression often sets in when winter arrives. As colder weather rapidly approaches, many health practitioners are keenly aware, the “winter blues” is more than just an expression. See the American Psychiatric Association’s updated guidelines on managing depression. KNOWIT.NEWSOK.COM/ FITNESS-AND-NUTRITION-OKLAHOMA

LET’S TALK Where Oklahomans help Oklahomans Let them know: “I salute all veterans. They deserved to be treated with great respect and honor for their contribution to the world and country. Thank you for giving us the freedom!” — crystal KNOWIT.NEWSOK.COM/ MILITARY-OKLAHOMA

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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History: GOP to control governor’s office, Legislature FROM PAGE 1A

“It feels wonderful,” said Fallin, a congresswoman from Edmond, saying she was deeply humbled and honored. “I’m a small-town girl from Tecumseh, Oklahoma,” she said. Fallin said she would start “immediately on right-sizing government.” “One of the first things I’ll do is to address our financial challenges that we have within our state,” Fallin said outside her suite at the Oklahoma City Marriott, site of the Oklahoma Republican Party’s watch party. “I talked on the campaign trail about having a governor’s task force to look at ways to make government more efficient and more effective. “I’ve identified people throughout the state that I hope will come alongside me and work with me to take an in-depth look at how we can create more efficiency and eliminate waste and any duplication in government, that we can put the money to our important priorities of our state such as education, transportation, law enforcement, corrections and mental health.” On the campaign trail, Fallin used just about every opportunity to demonize Democratic President Barack Obama and the Democratic Congress for passing the health care measure earlier this year and for being against the oil and gas industry, a huge player in Oklahoma’s economy. Fallin repeatedly said she would “stand up to Washington” and the biggovernment policies of Obama. Askins, the state’s lieutenant governor, tried to distance herself from the president, who failed to win any of Oklahoma’s 77 counties two years ago. She said she opposed the health care law for more than a year and said on several occasions she never even met the president. Askins tried to put the focus on her ability to continue the workhorse-like

Republican Party supporters celebrate Tuesday as Gov.-elect Mary Fallin speaks on stage at the watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

attitude she developed as a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives and lieutenant governor. She told supporters at the Crowne Plaza Hotel that she had congratulated Fallin. “I pledged to her my support and offered her that anytime that I could share or help Oklahoma she could count on me, just like the people of Oklahoma could count on me for 30 years of public service,” Askins said. “I also believe the voters of Oklahoma have spoken.” Askins said Oklahomans’ unhappiness with the president and Congress played a part in her race. “A lot of what happened in Washington did have an effect on what happened,” she said. “We worked very hard, and I feel I am very different from the Democrats in Washington.” Republicans gained a majority in the House after the 2004 elections for only the second time in history and took control of the Senate for the first time in state history after the 2008

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jari Askins receives a hug Tuesday after giving a concession speech in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

elections. The Republican Governors Association spent about $500,000 on ads supporting Fallin, portraying Askins as an Obama liberal. Askins and Fallin raised more than $8 million between them. Askins, who loaned her campaign $1.125 million, raised $4.07 mil-

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

lion and Fallin raised $3.95 million. Askins, 57, proposed a biennial budget cycle that would require more businesslike budget planning and review of existing revenues and expenditures. She also said she would work to develop a comprehensive fiscal review process. Fallin said she would

improve the economy by working to reduce workers’ compensation costs and legal fees and would seek to improve education to ensure Oklahoma has highly skilled work force that attracts good jobs. She also said she would work to scale back taxes on individuals and businesses.

Fallin, elected the state’s first female lieutenant governor in 1994, will succeed Gov. Brad Henry, a Democrat, who could not seek a third four-year term because of term limits. Fallin will take office in January. Fallin, 55, was elected to the state House in 1990 and after winning reelection ran for lieutenant governor. She became the first Republican and the first woman to be elected lieutenant governor. Fallin ran for and captured the 5th Congressional District seat in 2006 when Ernest Istook stepped down to run for governor. Fallin opted against seeking re-election to run for governor. She announced her candidacy in February 2009. Until January, Fallin will hire a staff and name key advisers as she works on developing a balanced budget for the next fiscal year, which is expected to have a significant revenue shortfall. She also will have hundreds of appointments to consider.

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Republican Pruitt defeats Priest for top attorney post BY RANDY ELLIS Staff Writer rellis@opubco.com

Todd Lamb, with his wife, Monica, left, wave to supporters during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Lamb captures victory over Senate colleague BY MICHAEL BAKER Staff Writer mbaker@opubco.com

Republican candidate Todd Lamb won a decisive victory over his Democratic challenger in the race between two state senators for the post of lieutenant governor. Sen. Lamb won more than 60 percent of the vote on Tuesday over Sen. Kenneth Corn, who had less than 35 percent of the vote with nearly all the votes counted. Independent Richard Prawdzienski, of Edmond, collected less than 5 percent. Lamb was emboldened by an election night that saw great gains for Republicans in Oklahoma. He said he looked forward to working with Republican

Gov. Mary Fallin. “The voters of Oklahoma want a conservative government,” Lamb said. “As lieutenant governor, I want to concentrate on a conservative climate. I want to focus on job retention, job recruitment and tourism.” Lamb, 38, R-Edmond, was elected to the Senate in 2004 and was the first Republican majority floor leader. He also served three years working for former Gov. Frank Keating and is a former U.S. Secret Service agent. Lamb will be the first male Republican elected lieutenant governor since statehood in 1907. Mary Fallin was the only previous Republican elected to the position. Lamb’s victory came despite an advertisement

by Corn that tried to connect Lamb to a corruption investigation of state lawmakers. The Democratic district attorney behind the probe said Corn’s attack was “completely false.” Corn, 34, D-Poteau, cannot seek re-election to his Senate post because of legislative term limits. Corn and Lamb each raised about $1.1 million. Prawdzienski, 62, filed paperwork saying he didn’t plan to raise more than $500. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the Senate and may cast tiebreaking votes in that chamber. The lieutenant governor also would serve as governor in case of death, resignation or removal of the governor.

Republican Scott Pruitt defeated Democrat Jim Priest on Tuesday to win the race for Oklahoma attorney general. Pruitt had an easy victory with 65 percent of the vote. “I’m excited and very thankful to the people of Oklahoma,” Pruitt said at his victory watch party. “The people of Oklahoma, I think, have sent a very strong and clear message that they want an advocate in the attorney general’s office, an advocate that’s willing to give

meaning to the Constitution and to push back against Obamacare,” Pruitt said. Pruitt said he looks forward to joining attorneys general from other states who are fighting new federal health-care policies. Pruitt, 42, of Broken Arrow, said he also plans to make fighting methamphetamine trafficking a major goal of his office. “It’s something the attorney general needs to partner with local district attorneys to make sure we combat that aggressively,” he said. Advocating the state’s water interests also is likely to be a major issue over the

next four years, he said. Pruitt will succeed Democratic Attorney General Drew Edmondson, who made an unsuccessful run for the governor’s office. During the campaign, Pruitt touted his business experience serving as general managing partner of the Oklahoma RedHawks. Pruitt has been a practicing attorney for 17 years and served as a state senator from 1998 to 2002. He graduated from Georgetown College in Kentucky with a bachelor’s degree in political science and communications. He obtained a law degree from the University of Tulsa in 1993.

Attorney General-elect Scott Pruitt stands with family as he speaks Tuesday at the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

STATE SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT

Barresi triumphs in schools chief race BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

For the first time, an elected Republican will lead the state Department of Education. Janet Barresi won a commanding victory Tuesday for state schools superintendent. Barresi ran on a platform of education reform, drawing on her experience founding two charter schools in Oklahoma City. “We’re going to get some rest and then start the busy work of transition,” Barresi said.

“We are going to be assembling a first-rate team, focusing on budget issues making sure we get as much money in classrooms as possible.” With 84 percent of the precincts reporting, Barresi had 55 percent of the votes to Democratic candidate Susan Paddack’s 38 percent. Richard Cooper, an independent candidate, received 7 percent. Paddack, a state senator who has two years remaining in her second term, said she will continue her life’s work in education by serving her district in the Senate.

STATE TREASURER

“The results tonight clearly reflect that people are not happy with what’s happening at the federal level,” Paddack said. “I think someone said ‘it’s a tsunami tonight.’ ” For the last 20 years, Sandy Garrett has held the superintendent’s post. Garrett, a Democrat, won four consecutive elections beginning in 1990 for the state’s top education seat, but she declared early this election season that she would not seek a fifth term. “The children of Oklahoma don’t have time for politics and political

games,” Barresi said of being the first Republican in the post since one was appointed for a short time in 1988. “Every one of us has to work together for the children of Oklahoma.” Barresi, 58, said the secret to the academic success of her charter schools was the mandate-free control her administrators and board had over decisions regarding the budget, curriculum and the hiring and firing of teachers. After the transition, and dealing with what is shaping up to be a difficult budget year, Barresi said the real reforms will begin.

Janet Barresi, standing with her sons Joe and Ben, speaks Tuesday at the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

STATE LABOR COMMISSIONER

OC professor cruises to victory

State Treasurer-elect Ken Miller talks to supporters Tuesday at the Republican watch party. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

BY MICHAEL BAKER Staff Writer mbaker@opubco.com

State Rep. Ken Miller won a decisive victory Tuesday night in the race for Oklahoma treasurer. Miller, R-Edmond, won about 65 percent of the vote with nearly all the votes counted. Miller defeated Democrat Stephen Covert. “We’re just going to celebrate the win tonight,” he said. “Tomorrow we’ll begin working with Treasurer (Scott) Meacham. I’m inheriting a very professional staff and office.” Meacham did not seek re-election. Throughout his campaign, Miller touted his

experience in both the public and private sector. Miller, chairman of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee, is serving his third term in the Legislature. He is also an economics professor at Oklahoma Christian University and holds a doctorate in political economics. Covert, of Midwest City, who was largely an unknown Democratic candidate, worked as a CPA and owns and operates Certified Data Processing Contractors in Midwest City. During the campaign, Miller raised more than $525,000 in his election bid. Covert raised less than $25,000.

Labor Commissioner-elect Mark Costello is surrounded by family as he waves to supporters in his win over Lloyd Fields at the Republican watch party Tuesday in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

Costello defeats incumbent Fields BY SUSAN SIMPSON Business Writer ssimpson@opubco.com

Republican Mark Costello easily beat incumbent Lloyd Fields for state labor commissioner. With the majority of precincts reporting, Costello garnered more than 60 percent of votes. “I’ve chosen to run in the right year,” said Costello, 54. “I think the voters of Oklahoma have spoken well about the type of government they want.” During the campaign, Costello poked fun at Fields’ headlines-

grabbing behavior — including a bizarre run-in at a party in 2008. Fields reportedly tried to steal singer and bull rider Colby Yates’ guitar before being tackled by security guards and taken by police to a detox center. Fields later apologized and called the incident “a joke.” Fields, 53, also drew attention in July for storming into a state employee group’s office and tearing up his candidate questionnaire because he was angry an opponent received a campaign donation from the group. “I think I had a pretty soft target when it came to Mr. Fields,” Costello said.

“It made it pretty easy for us to draw attention to his foibles and foolishness.” Fields said Democrats didn’t have much chance at statewide races this year. “There’s a Republican tint to it this year,” Fields said. “It’s hurt everyone statewide.” In 2006, Fields barely beat Republican Brenda Reneau for the job. He said he helped make workplaces safer during his term, while running an agency that lost state dollars and employees. “I’ve done my job,” Fields said. “We’ve accomplished a lot.”

STATE AUDITOR AND INSPECTOR

STATE INSURANCE COMMISSIONER

Jones’ 3rd try proves success

Doak defeats Holland in close race BY DON MECOY Business Writer dmecoy@opubco.com

BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

The third try proved successful for Republican Gary Jones as he defeated incumbent Democrat Steve Burrage for the state auditor and inspector position. With the majority of the precincts reporting, Jones received about 56 percent of the vote compared to Burrage’s 44 percent. Jones said his first priority once he takes office will be to increase transparency by completing more county audits. “I’m going to sit down and determine how we get caught up,” Jones said. “We’re behind on the county audits and really need those if we want to know what’s going on.” Jones, of Cache, said he wrestled with the decision to run for the post a third time. Jones was defeated in 2002 and 2006 by Democrat Jeff McMahan. McMahan was convicted of accepting bribes and conspiracy to deprive

State Auditor and Inspector-elect Gary Jones hugs his wife, Mary Jane, Tuesday at the Republican watch party. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

I’m going to sit down and determine how we get caught up. We’re behind on the county audits and really need those if we want to know what’s going on.” GARY JONES

Oklahomans of their right to honest public service and is currently serving a federal prison sentence. Gov. Brad Henry appointed Steve Burrage to fill the position in 2008 when McMahan resigned.

This was Burrage’s first attempt at statewide office and the third for Jones. Jones formerly served as Oklahoma Republican Party chairman and county commissioner for Comanche County.

Political newcomer John Doak ousted incumbent Insurance Commissioner Kim Holland on Tuesday to complete a sweep of statewide elective offices for Republicans. Doak’s race was the closest among those for statewide office, as he held 54.6 percent of the vote with 90 percent of 2,229 precincts counted. Doak, 47, of Tulsa, focused on his conservative leanings during a campaign in which he labeled Holland a liberal for her service as a Barack Obama

delegate during the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Doak is a plaintiff in the Oklahoma lawsuit that challenges the constitutionality of the federal health care reform mandates. He also supported State Question 756, which would prohibit penalties against Oklahomans who refuse to obtain Obamabacked federally mandated health care. Holland, 55, was appointed in January 2005 to finish the unexpired term of Insurance Commissioner Carroll Fisher, who had been indicted and dismissed. The Democrat was

elected four years ago with 52 percent of the vote. “We knew it was going to be down to the wire,” Holland said. “We are staying confident to the end.” Holland said she was proud of her campaign, and of her service as insurance commissioner. “We’ve run a campaign that was positive, that was based on the issues,” she said. “I would not do anything differently.” Holland collected $700,671 for her campaign, outspending Doak, who raised $497,640. Doak has worked in the insurance industry for 21 years with retail and executive experience.

Taking a closer look Left: Michael Hardesty uses a magnifying glass Tuesday as he votes at his precinct in Oklahoma City. AP PHOTO


OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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Republicans make gains at Capitol STATE HOUSE

STATE SENATE

GOP likely to retain record Party gap widens in Senate BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Republicans, already at record-high levels in the House of Representatives, picked up six more seats Tuesday, knocking out three Democratic House members in the process. Rep. Kris Steele, RShawnee, the designated speaker for next year’s session, said he is “ecstatic” that there will be 68 Republicans in the 101-member House next session. ”We’re thankful that the people of Oklahoma have put their confidence in the Republican caucus,” Steele said. Democratic Reps. Den-

nis Bailey, of Broken Bow, Ken Luttrell, of Ponca City, and Wallace Collins, of Norman, lost re-election bids. Republicans also picked up three seats that were vacated by Democrats Ryan Kiesel, of Seminole, Lucky Lamons, of Tulsa, and John Carey, of Durant. All three did not seek reelection. Steele said all House Republicans held onto their seats, including Reps. Randy Terrill, R-Moore, and Mike Christian, ROklahoma City, who are part of a political corruption investigation. No criminal charges have been filed. Republicans this past

session had a 62-39 majority in the House. After the primary, 36 Republicans and 18 Democrats either were unopposed or had won their races. The remaining 47 seats were decided Tuesday. House Republicans gained the majority in 2004 for the first time since the 1921 session, when the GOP had 55 members, compared with 37 Democrats. Rep. Scott Inman, DDel City, the designated House Democratic leader next session, said he had been hoping Democrats could hold onto their 39 seats and perhaps pick up a seat or two.

BY RANDY ELLIS Staff Writer rellis@opubco.com

Republicans appeared headed for victory in seven of 10 state Senate races Tuesday as the party solidified its control of the state upper chamber. Republican Mark Allen defeated Democrat Neil Brannon by 524 votes in one of the closest state Senate races of the evening. Allen will assume the District 4 seat representing Le Flore and Sequoyah counties. The seat was previously held by Democrat Kenneth Corn who ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor this year. Republicans gained con-

trol of the state Senate for the first time in state history just two years ago when they obtained a 26-22 majority over Democrats. Republicans went into Tuesday’s election knowing they would continue to be the majority party since they had 25 state Senate seats locked up before voting started. Another 10 seats were up for grabs. Late Tuesday, it appeared Republicans might capture seven of those 10 seats, which would bring their total to 32. There are 48 seats in the Senate. Incumbent state Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, DDurant, conceded defeat early in the evening. In the most closely

watched state Senate race of the night, Republican Ralph Shortey defeated Democrat Randy Rose by a vote of 57 percent to 43 percent to win the Oklahoma City Senate District 44 seat that opened when Democratic state Sen. Debbe Leftwich decided to not seek re-election. Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater has been investigating whether Republican state Rep. Randy Terrill of Moore conspired with Leftwich to create an $80,000 a year job in the state medical examiner’s office for her in exchange for Leftwich not seeking re-election. Both have denied wrongdoing.

English-only, health care, A FEW SIGHTS FROM METRO POLLING SITES Sharia law measures pass BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

Above: Mary Stephens votes at Woodcrest Baptist Church in Guthrie. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Left: Genevieve and Leno Soliz sign in to vote Tuesday at precinct 497 at 1140 SW 29 in Oklahoma City. The precinct is one of the smallest in the metro area and usual has 20 to 40 voters for the entire day, but by 2 p.m., more than 100 had cast votes. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Voters in Garvin County approve liquor by the drink BY BOB DOUCETTE Staff Writer bdoucette@opubco.com

For proponents of legalizing liquor by the drink in Garvin County, Tuesday’s vote can be described with two words: Bottoms up. Garvin County voters approved a proposal to allow the sale of liquor by the drink, 4,647 to 4,301. “This will allow us to compete,” said Glenn Prater, of the group Garvin County Citizens for Development. “We’ve been at a competitive disadvantage in our restaurants, and it spilled over to our hotels.” Prater said Garvin County was the only dry county along Interstate 35 until Tuesday’s vote. The county became the 50th “wet” county in the state. Passage of the measure means that Garvin County restaurants and bars will be able to sell liquor and mixed drinks in the same manner that establishments in Oklahoma’s other 49 wet counties do now. Twenty-seven “dry” counties remain.

Although state voters approved the option to sell liquor by the drink in 1984, counties still have the right to remain dry. Joel Downing, pastor of Pauls Valley’s Higher Ground Church and an opponent of the plan, said he doesn’t expect much of a windfall locally. “I think the changes will come slowly,” he said. “Murray County didn’t change a lot (when the measure passed there), and McClain County didn’t either. No new restaurants came in.”

Other elections

Moore voters overwhelmingly approved extending a sales tax for four years to fund street improvements, with 69 percent voting in favor. Bryan County voters passed a plan that would spend up to $3 million to expand the county jail. Voters in Alfalfa, Dewey, Haskell and McCurtain counties approved proposals to fund and establish enhanced 911 services. Funds would come from fees attached to phone bills.

› ›

Oklahoma voters approved a trio of Republican-backed statewide measures Tuesday. The measures make English the state’s official language, allow Oklahomans to opt out of a health care system and ban Oklahoma courts from considering international or Islamic law for case decisions. They are among 11 state questions voters decided Tuesday. With 82 percent of precincts counted, yes votes accounted for 76 percent of the official English language measure, 70 percent of the international law measure and 65 percent of the health care opt-out measure. A Republican majority Legislature overrode Gov. Brad Henry’s vetoes of those three measures to get them on Tuesday’s ballot. State Question 751 mandates that official state actions be conducted in English, with a few exceptions. Oklahoma joins about 30 other states that have adopted similar measures, according to Tim Schultz, director of government relations for U.S. English, Inc., a national citizen action group with about 1.8 million members. Exceptions to the official English language measure would be made for American Indian languages, or if federal law requires the use of other languages. The measure also prevents lawsuits from being brought against the state or subdivisions of the state if a state agency fails to use a language other than English. Sen. Patrick Anderson, REnid, who was involved with rewriting the measure, said English already is essentially the language Oklahoma officials use to conduct business. The measure was intended to protect the state against lawsuits that could be costly to taxpayers, such as a court order that would require the state to provide street signs in another language, Anderson said. Sen. Harry Coates, RSeminole, described the initiative as a “meek and mild measure.” “It doesn’t have any meat to it,” Coates said. “It just says if we’re going to do business in Oklahoma, we’re going to do it in English.” David Castillo, executive director of the Greater Oklahoma City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, said the English-only measure was unnecessary. “I think it’s politicians just trying to make a point with all the immigration issues,” Castillo said. Rey Madrid, president of the Oklahoma City Council of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said he is opposed to the measure because he believes it will cause discrimination and racism. “Oklahoma, like many other states, is a state of immigrants,” Madrid said. “Why try to deny that?”

I think it’s politicians just trying to make a point with all the immigration issues.” DAVID CASTILLO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Oklahoma, like many other states, is a state of immigrants. Why try to deny that?” REY MADRID

PRESIDENT OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY COUNCIL OF THE LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS

AT A GLANCE SQ 746: VOTER ID It would require voters to show identification at the polls. It passed. Those without the required identification could sign a sworn statement and cast a provisional ballot.

SQ 747: STATEWIDE OFFICE TERM LIMITS It would limit the number of years officials may serve certain statewide elected offices. It passed. The measure imposes an eight-year limit on the office of the governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, treasurer, labor commissioner, auditor and inspector, insurance commissioner and superintendent. The corporation commissioner is limited to 12 years.

SQ 748: LEGISLATIVE APPORTIONMENT It would change the makeup of the threemember legislative Apportionment Commission. It passed. The measure removes the attorney general, state superintendent and treasurer from the board and makes it a seven-member commission appointed by the governor, Senate president pro tempore and House speaker.

SQ 750: PETITION SIGNATURES Early results for this measure were split, with about half of voters in favor of the measure and half against it. If approved, the measure would change the number of signatures required for initiative and referendum petitions. It would require the number of signatures to be based on the percentage of votes cast during gubernatorial elections, instead of alternating between votes cast for governor and for president. The measure would likely decrease the number of signatures required during some years because presidential elections tend to produce more votes.

SQ 752: JUDICIAL NOMINATIONS It adds two at-large members to the Judicial Nominating Commission, which nominates candidates for judge or justice when a spot opens. It passed. The members would be appointed by the Senate president pro tempore and the House speaker. They cannot be lawyers or have a lawyer in their immediate family.

SQ 757: INCREASE RESERVE FUNDS Early results for this measure were close, with about 51 percent of voters in favor of the measure, which would increase the amount of surplus revenue that goes into the state’s constitutional reserve fund from 10 percent to 15 percent of certified general revenue funds. About 49 percent of early votes had come in against the measure.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Incumbents take lead in Oklahoma County BY BRYAN DEAN

Steven Taylor

Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

James Winchester

Voters retain justices, judges BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

Voters Tuesday retained Steven W. Taylor and James R. Winchester as Oklahoma Supreme Court justices. Voters also retained four judges on the Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals — Deborah B. Barnes, Doug Gabbard II, John F. Fischer and Larry E. Joplin. They had no opponents. Voters only were deciding whether they stayed. With most of the ballots counted, each had 60 percent or more of the votes. Oklahoma voters never have kicked anyone off the appeals courts. Taylor, 61, of McAlester, is the best known of the six on the retention ballot this year. He was the judge who presided over bombing conspirator Terry Nichols’ 2004 state trial. “I have the blessing of a job that I love,” Taylor said. “I just really appreciate the confidence of people allowing me to continue to do the work that I love.”

Oklahoma County Commissioner Ray Vaughn votes Tuesday at the polling place at Spring Creek Assembly of God in Edmond. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

District 1 Oklahoma County Commissioner Willa Johnson got a scare Tuesday as she narrowly held off a political newcomer to keep her job for another four years. Johnson, a Democrat, nearly fell victim to the statewide Republican landslide, bringing in about 52.5 percent of the vote against Republican challenger Sam Crosby. At times during the vote tally, Johnson’s lead fell to less than half a percent. District 3 Commissioner Ray Vaughn, meanwhile, had no such problems. Vaughn, a Republican, won more than 70 percent of the vote against Democratic challenger Thomas Parkhurst. “There is every chance that many of the Republicans who probably would have voted for me in a normal time just voted a straight Republican ticket,” Johnson said. “I absolutely chalk it up to the times we are in and put it behind me.” Vaughn said voters returning incumbent county officials to office shows that their confidence in the county is growing. “What it says to me is that people see that the county is working together,” Vaughn said. “The elected officials and the budget board, we are all working together. “We are trying to raise the bar down here and be professional, and it’s paying off.”

Cindy Truong

Truong named district judge BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

Former prosecutor Cindy Truong won Tuesday in a bitter race to become Oklahoma County’s next district judge. Truong, 35, of Oklahoma City, defeated retired prosecutor Pat Crawley. With most of the ballots counted, Truong led 95,809 to 73,200. Her victory is the latest milestone in what her campaign called “an Oklahoma success story” that began when she arrived from Vietnam in 1986. “It just proves that if you work hard and you believe in yourself, anything could happen,” she said. “Oklahoma is a great state to be able to do that. They’re not judging me based on my race, my age, my gender, but based on my character, my record and my qualifications.” She used a campaign slogan that she was law enforcement’s choice. Crawley, who had the endorsement of the Oklahoma City Fraternal Order of Police, contended she actually had little law enforcement support.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Election results ✓= Winner (i) = incumbent (ind.) = independent (R) = Republican (D) = Democrat T = tie

FEDERAL RACES U.S. SENATOR

2229 of 2,229 precincts Jim Rogers (D), 265,775, 26.13% Ronald Dwyer (ind.), 7,805, 0.77% Stephen Wallace (ind.), 25,042, 2.46% √(i) Tom Coburn (R), 718,404, 70.64%

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 1

349 of 349 precincts Angelia O’Dell (ind.), 45,646, 23.19% √(i) John Sullivan (R), 151,155, 76.81%

DISTRICT 2

570 of 570 precincts √(i) Dan Boren (D), 108,184, 56.52% Charles Thompson (R), 83,215, 43.48%

DISTRICT 3

571 of 571 precincts Frankie Robbins (D), 45,684, 22.01% √(i) Frank Lucas (R), 161,916, 77.99%

DISTRICT 5

328 of 328 precincts Billy Coyle (D), 68,947, 34.98% Clark Duffe (ind.), 3,454, 1.75% Dave White (ind.), 2,721, 1.38% √James Lankford (R), 122,009, 61.89%

STATEWIDE RACES GOVERNOR

2229 of 2,229 precincts Jari Askins (D), 409,206, 39.55% √Mary Fallin (R), 625,433, 60.45%

LT. GOVERNOR

√Danny Morgan (D), 6,993, 61.97% John Husted (R), 4,292, 38.03%

DISTRICT 34

17 of 17 precincts √Cory Williams (D), 4,890, 51.47% Ryan Smith (R), 4,610, 48.53%

DISTRICT 35

31 of 31 precincts Rodger Ensign (D), 3,240, 29.17% √Dennis Casey (R), 7,867, 70.83%

DISTRICT 36

26 of 26 precincts Greg Brown (D), 4,671, 44.14% √Sean Roberts (R), 5,911, 55.86%

DISTRICT 37

23 of 23 precincts (i) Ken Luttrell (D), 4,534, 47.42% √Steve Vaughan (R), 5,028, 52.58%

DISTRICT 43

18 of 18 precincts J. Hemminger (D), 2,393, 18.57% (i) Colby Schwartz (R), 10,490, 81.43%

DISTRICT 44

16 of 16 precincts √Emily Virgin (D), 5,575, 63.63% Kent Hunt (R), 3,187, 36.37%

DISTRICT 45

16 of 16 precincts (i) Wallace Collins (D), 5,823, 47.98% √Aaron Stiles (R), 6,313, 52.02%

DISTRICT 46

24 of 24 precincts Zachary Knight (ind.), 2,692, 19.70% √Scott Martin (R), 10,972, 80.30%

DISTRICT 49

33 of 33 precincts Samson Buck (D), 5,201, 49.83% √Tommy Hardin (R), 5,237, 50.17%

DISTRICT 53

16 of 16 precincts Amy Corley (D), 5,272, 39.05% √Randy Terrill (R), 8,230, 60.95%

DISTRICT 56

36 of 36 precincts Maya Torralba (D), 2,532, 26.09% √Phil Richardson (R), 7,173, 73.91%

2229 of 2,229 precincts Kenneth Corn (D), 334,663, 32.51% Richard Prawdzienski (ind.), 35,652, 3.46% √Todd Lamb (R), 659,175, 64.03%

DISTRICT 58

AUDITOR AND INSPECTOR

46 of 46 precincts Stephen Skacall (ind.), 1,948, 23.01% √Gus Blackwell (R), 6,517, 76.99%

2229 of 2,229 precincts Steve Burrage (D), 449,095, 44.06% √Gary Jones (R), 570,104, 55.94%

ATTORNEY GENERAL

2229 of 2,229 precincts Jim Priest (D), 357,114, 34.89% √Scott Pruitt (R), 666,327, 65.11%

STATE TREASURER

2229 of 2,229 precincts Stephen Covert (D), 339,224, 33.43% √Ken Miller (R), 675,438, 66.57%

STATE SUPT. OF SCHOOLS

2229 of 2,229 precincts Susan Paddack (D), 386,958, 37.72% Richard Cooper (ind.), 65,228, 6.36% √Janet Barresi (R), 573,652, 55.92%

41 of 41 precincts Wilson Adamson (D), 1,558, 14.22% √Jeff Hickman (R), 9,398, 85.78%

DISTRICT 61

DISTRICT 64

12 of 12 precincts Michael Corrales (D), 1,433, 23.84% √Ann Coody (R), 4,577, 76.16%

DISTRICT 66

18 of 18 precincts Eli Potts (D), 3,502, 49.31% √Jadine Nollan (R), 3,600, 50.69%

DISTRICT 1

31 of 31 precincts (i) Dennis Bailey (D), 3,984, 49.17% √Rusty Farley (R), 4,118, 50.83%

DISTRICT 2

27 of 27 precincts (i) Glen Smithson (D), 4,003, 45.50% √John Bennett (R), 4,794, 54.50%

DISTRICT 3

24 of 24 precincts √James Lockhart (D), 4,713, 53.01% Roger Mattox (R), 4,178, 46.99%

DISTRICT 4

19 of 19 precincts √Mike Brown (D), 5,555, 63.00% Dwayne Thompson (R), 3,262, 37.00%

DISTRICT 9

17 of 17 precincts Eric Cullen (D), 3,407, 25.58% √Marty Quinn (R), 9,913, 74.42%

DISTRICT 10

28 of 28 precincts Nick Brown (D), 3,468, 35.40% √Steve Martin (R), 6,329, 64.60%

DISTRICT 15

35 of 35 precincts √Ed Cannaday (D), 5,893, 63.93% Paul Parrott (R), 3,325, 36.07%

DISTRICT 17

49 of 49 precincts √Brian Renegar (D), 5,739, 57.89% Micah Thompson (R), 4,175, 42.11%

DISTRICT 18

36 of 36 precincts √Donnie Condit (D), 4,816, 50.57% Kyle Burmeier (R), 4,708, 49.43%

DISTRICT 21

27 of 27 precincts Nathan Williams (D), 4,623, 48.24% √Dustin Roberts (R), 4,961, 51.76%

DISTRICT 22

34 of 34 precincts √Wes Hilliard (D), 6,007, 60.69% Allie Burgin (R), 3,891, 39.31%

DISTRICT 29

25 of 25 precincts David Narcomey (D), 2,203, 21.72% √Skye McNiel (R), 7,942, 78.28%

DISTRICT 30

21 of 21 precincts Donna Vogelpohl (D), 2,460, 24.15% √Mark McCullough (R), 7,726, 75.85%

DISTRICT 32

27 of 27 precincts

DISTRICT 18

54 of 54 precincts Janice Aldridge (D), 6,526, 34.01% √Kim David (R), 12,660, 65.99%

DISTRICT 42

37 of 37 precincts Mike Kelly (D), 6,932, 31.67% √Cliff Aldridge (R), 14,953, 68.33%

DISTRICT 44

33 of 33 precincts Randy Rose (D), 4,509, 42.66% √Ralph Shortey (R), 6,060, 57.34%

DISTRICT 46

33 of 33 precincts √Andrew Rice (D), 7,546, 68.27% Joshua Jantz (R), 3,507, 31.73%

DISTRICT ATTORNEY DISTRICT 6

51 of 51 precincts Thomas Salisbury, 5,237, 30.32% √Brian Hermanson, 12,038, 69.68%

DISTRICT 10

44 of 44 precincts Jeff Jones, 8,980, 47.42% √Rex Duncan, 9,956, 52.58%

DISTRICT 11

36 of 36 precincts Alan Gentges, 5,296, 27.33% √Kevin Buchanan, 14,081, 72.67%

DISTRICT 27

115 of 115 precincts (i) Jerry Moore, 19,245, 41.06% √Brian Kuester, 27,621, 58.94%

DISTRICT 2, OFFICE 1

59 of 59 precincts √Doug Haught, 9,967, 54.51% Richard Phillips, 8,317, 45.49%

DISTRICT JUDGE DISTRICT 7, OFFICE 7

DISTRICT 14, OFFICE 9

DISTRICT 14, OFFICE 13

DISTRICT 14, OFFICE 14

DISTRICT 17, OFFICE 1

69 of 69 precincts Marion Fry, 8,176, 45.10% √Jonathan Sullivan, 9,951, 54.90%

22 of 22 precincts Brittany Novotny (D), 2,958, 34.11% √Sally Kern (R), 5,715, 65.89%

67 of 67 precincts √Willard Driesel, 7,992, 53.18% J. Longacre, 7,036, 46.82%

DISTRICT 85

DISTRICT 20, OFFICE 1

21 of 21 precincts Gail Vines (D), 3,990, 31.21% Edward Shadid (ind.), 1,346, 10.53% √David Dank (R), 7,449, 58.26%

78 of 78 precincts √Dennis Morris, 13,198, 56.17% Thomas Walker, 10,298, 43.83%

DISTRICT 87

141 of 141 precincts Jonathan Nichols, 33,633, 42.40% √Tracy Schumacher, 45,690, 57.60%

DISTRICT 88

141 of 141 precincts √Greg Dixon, 42,935, 54.09% John Mantooth, 36,445, 45.91%

DISTRICT 91

141 of 141 precincts Jeff Bryant, 26,548, 33.76% √Tom Lucas, 52,085, 66.24%

DISTRICT 93

141 of 141 precincts Charles Broadway, 27,756, 35.55% √Lori Walkley, 50,324, 64.45%

16 of 16 precincts Wanda Peltier (D), 2,184, 44.52% √Mike Christian (R), 2,722, 55.48%

DISTRICT 94

19 of 19 precincts √Scott Inman (D), 4,811, 59.67% Kyle Coulter (R), 3,252, 40.33%

DISTRICT 21, OFFICE 1

DISTRICT 21, OFFICE 2

DISTRICT 21, OFFICE 3

DISTRICT 21, OFFICE 4

DISTRICT 23, OFFICE 1

54 of 54 precincts √Cindy Ashwood, 16,503, 63.15% Robert Thompson, 9,632, 36.85%

DISTRICT 24, OFFICE 3

DISTRICT 95

93 of 93 precincts √Ken Adair, 17,448, 59.25% John Maley, 11,999, 40.75%

DISTRICT 97

STATE SUPREME COURT JUSTICE

15 of 15 precincts Michael Walker (D), 2,889, 34.52% √Charlie Joyner (R), 5,481, 65.48% 34 of 34 precincts √Mike Shelton (D), 8,514, 83.87% Daniel Stankiewicz (ind.), 1,638, 16.13%

DISTRICT 98

23 of 23 precincts Dennis Weese (D), 2,569, 23.85% √John Trebilcock (R), 8,204, 76.15%

DISTRICT 101

12 of 23 precincts Johnny Laudermilk (D), 2,087, 30.26% (i) Gary Banz (R), 4,811, 69.74%

STATE SENATE 55 of 55 precincts Neil Brannon (D), 9,450, 48.65% √Mark Allen (R), 9,974, 51.35% 69 of 69 precincts Jay Gumm (D), 8,925, 43.24% √Josh Brecheen (R), 11,714, 56.76%

2,229 of 2,229 precincts Vote to Not Retain, 336,098, 38.40% √Vote to Retain, 539,256, 61.60%

DISTRICT 3, OFFICE 2 JOHN F. FISCHER

2,229 of 2,229 precincts Vote to Not Retain, 326,472, 37.26% √Vote to Retain, 549,681, 62.74%

DISTRICT 4, OFFICE 2 LARRY E. JOPLIN

1,628 of 2,229 precincts Vote to Not Retain, 329,486, 37.54% √Vote to Retain, 548,174, 62.46%

STATE QUESTIONS SQ 744

Education budget initiative √Failed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 828,499, 81.41% For Proposition, 189,127, 18.59%

SQ 746

Voter ID √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 257,486, 25.66% For Proposition, 745,967, 74.34%

DISTRICT 2 STEVEN W. TAYLOR

1861 of 2,229 precincts Vote to Not Retain, 311,574, 35.12% √Vote to Retain, 575,495, 64.88%

DISTRICT 5 JAMES R. WINCHESTER

1628 of 2,229 precincts Vote to Not Retain, 307,579, 34.98% √Vote to Retain, 571,820, 65.02%

COURT OF CIVIL APPEALS DISTRICT 2, OFFICE 1 DEBORAH B. BARNES 2229 of 2,229 precincts

COUNTY AND LOCAL RACES ADAIR CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

English Language √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 239,875, 24.46% For Proposition, 740,824, 75.54%

SQ 752

Judicial Nominating Commission √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 358,875, 37.17% For Proposition, 606,732, 62.83%

SQ 754

Budgetary Decision Making √Failed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 614,145, 62.92% For Proposition, 361,859, 37.08%

SQ 755

Court Decisions √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 296,903, 29.92% For Proposition, 695,568, 70.08%

SQ 756

Health Care System √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 347,908, 35.27% For Proposition, 638,455, 64.73%

SQ 757

Constitutional Reserve Fund √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 479,289, 48.98% For Proposition, 499,230, 51.02%

ASSOC. DIST. JUDGE

18 of 18 precincts Thomas Hadley, 1,707, 43.83% √James Wolfe 2,188, 56.17%

COUNTY TREASURER

FORT TOWSON

3 of 3 precincts √Keith Davis (D), 1,271, 58.01% Haskell Kindle (R), 920, 41.99%

ALFALFA COUNTY TREASURER

11 of 11 precincts Cynthia Diefenback (D), 613, 30.94% √Valerie Vetter (R), 1,368, 69.06%

ALFALFA COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Enhanced 911 service 11 of 11 precincts Against Proposition, 526, 25.94% For Proposition, 1,502, 74.06%

ALFALFA COUNTY PROP. 2

√Measure Passed Wireless 911 service fee 11 of 11 precincts Against Proposition, 610, 30.20% For Proposition, 1,410, 69.80%

SQ 748

SQ 751

CHOCTAW

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

13 of 13 precincts Mike Abel, 2,169, 40.92% √Michelle Kirby-Roper 3,132, 59.08%

Petition Signatures √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 477,988, 49.60% For Proposition, 485,637, 50.40%

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18 of 18 precincts √Arlene Minchey (D), 2,225, 55.46% Kim Young (R), 1,787, 44.54%

BECKHAM

Term Limits √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 299,750, 30.12% For Proposition, 695,509, 69.88%

...

4 of 4 precincts √Danny Braden (D), 1,132, 61.09% Wayne Davis (R), 721, 38.91%

SQ 747

SQ 750

DISTRICT 84

16 of 16 precincts Hollis Harper (D), 3,453, 25.30% √Mike Reynolds (R), 10,197, 74.70%

DOUG GABBARD II

DISTRICT 8

DISTRICT 16, OFFICE 1

12 of 12 precincts √Al McAffrey (D), 4,173, 69.56% Dominique Block (R), 1,826, 30.44%

DISTRICT 3, OFFICE 1

Legislative Apportionment √Passed 2,229 of 2,229 precincts Against Proposition, 403,682, 41.58% For Proposition, 567,219, 58.42%

24 of 24 precincts √Jeannie McDaniel (D), 5,404, 53.40% Molly McKay (R), 4,715, 46.60%

13 of 13 precincts Dana Orwig (D), 4,367, 45.90% √Jason Nelson (R), 5,147, 54.10%

Vote to Not Retain, 316,505, 35.93% √Vote to Retain, 564,318, 64.07%

107 of 107 precincts Bret Burns, 16,095, 41.64% √Jason Hicks, 22,555, 58.36%

DISTRICT 78

DISTRICT 6

26 of 26 precincts Ed Smith (D), 3,424, 39.09% √Tom Newell (R), 5,336, 60.91%

37 of 37 precincts √John Sparks (D), 10,505, 52.62% Sharon Parker (R), 9,459, 47.38%

285 of 285 precincts (i) Kurt Glassco, 72,743, 50.99% √Jon Patton, 69,911, 49.01%

DISTRICT 27

DISTRICT 28

DISTRICT 16

DISTRICT 72

DISTRICT 4

19 of 19 precincts Chris Odneal (D), 3,809, 40.21% √Josh Cockroft (R), 5,664, 59.79%

61 of 61 precincts Darryl Roberts (D), 7,987, 37.33% √Frank Simpson (R), 13,407, 62.67%

285 of 285 precincts Carl Funderburk, 52,884, 36.76% √Bill Musseman, 90,997, 63.24%

DISTRICT 23

20 of 20 precincts Mark Manley (D), 2,300, 32.39% √Sue Tibbs (R), 4,801, 67.61%

DISTRICT 14

DISTRICT 71

INS. COMMISSIONER

STATE HOUSE

62 of 62 precincts Dale Christenson (D), 8,641, 37.63% √Eddie Fields (R), 14,324, 62.37%

285 of 285 precincts John Eagleton, 57,295, 38.54% √Linda Morrissey, 91,373, 61.46%

17 of 17 precincts Seth Watkins (D), 3,187, 32.01% √Glen Mulready (R), 6,768, 67.99%

19 of 19 precincts √Seneca Scott (D), 3,326, 75.85% Randall Reese (R), 1,059, 24.15%

LEGISLATIVE RACES

DISTRICT 10

DISTRICT 68

20 of 20 precincts Jeff Tracy (D), 3,909, 40.37% √Daniel Sullivan (R), 5,774, 59.63%

2229 of 2,229 precincts Kim Holland (D), 464,247, 45.52% √John Doak (R), 555,677, 54.48%

69 of 69 precincts √Roger Ballenger (D), 10,560, 53.82% Janica Edmonds (R), 9,061, 46.18%

303 of 303 precincts Pat Crawley, 73,294, 43.30% √Cindy Truong, 95,966, 56.70%

LABOR COMMISSIONER

2229 of 2,229 precincts Lloyd Fields (D), 362,753, 35.83% √Mark Costello (R), 649,672, 64.17%

DISTRICT 8

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

ASSOC. DIST. JUDGE

BLAINE CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

5 of 5 precincts Mike Allen (D), 493, 48.05% √Melba Nance (R), 533, 51.95%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

4 of 4 precincts √Raymond Scheffler (D), 503, 58.15% Farrell Boyd (R), 362, 41.85%

BRYAN

√Measure Passed Water and sewage sales tax increase 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 75, 44.38% For Proposition, 94, 55.62%

CIMARRON CIMARRON COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Head of household tax exemption 7 of 7 precincts Against Proposition, 267, 26.57% For Proposition, 738, 73.43%

CLEVELAND CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

25 of 25 precincts Jim Robertson (D), 8,315, 48.75% √Rusty Sullivan (R), 8,743, 51.25%

COUNTY TREASURER

91 of 91 precincts Mona Nelson (D), 29,543, 41.61% √Jim Reynolds (R), 41,452, 58.39%

MOORE

√Measure Passed Street improvement sales tax extension 21 of 21 precincts Against Proposition, 4,254, 31.06% For Proposition, 9,441, 68.94%

COAL CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

3 of 3 precincts √Alvin Pebworth (D), 487, 64.76% Wesley Brown (R), 265, 35.24%

COMANCHE COUNTY ASSESSOR

ASSOC. DIST. JUDGE

43 of 43 precincts Grant Edwards (D), 9,414, 44.42% √Richard Strickland (R), 11,778, 55.58%

COUNTY CLERK

17 of 17 precincts Gail Turner (D), 3,891, 50.00% John Bordelon (R), 3,891, 50.00%

29 of 29 precincts Chris Jones, 3,706, 38.65% √Rocky Powers 5,882, 61.35% 29 of 29 precincts √Tammy Reynolds (D), 5,767, 55.97% Glenn Russell (R), 4,536, 44.03%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

9 of 9 precincts √Jay Perry (D), 1,797, 63.36% Robert Brewer (R), 1,039, 36.64%

BRYAN COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed County jail expansion 29 of 29 precincts Against Proposition, 3,596, 34.52% For Proposition, 6,821, 65.48%

CANADIAN MAYOR OF EL RENO

14 of 14 precincts Rita Anderson, 170, 4.42% David L. Hill, 182, 4.74% Jerry Robertson, 1,024, 26.65% √Matt White, 2,467, 64.19%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

16 of 16 precincts Debbie McDonald (D), 3,436, 38.83% √Don Hawthorne (R), 5,413, 61.17%

COTTON COTTON COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Hotel/motel tax 12 of 12 precincts Against Proposition, 652, 35.63% For Proposition, 1,178, 64.37%

CRAIG CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

7 of 7 precincts √Roy Bible (D), 742, 58.80% Todd Taylor (ind.), 520, 41.20%

Continued on Page 10A


10A

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OKLAHOMA ELECTIONS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Election results Continued from Page 9A

√For Proposition, 1,570, 73.36%

TUTTLE PROP. 6

CREEK COUNTY ASSESSOR

43 of 43 precincts Veronica Wedel (D), 7,108, 35.47% √JaNell Enlow-Gore (R), 12,934, 64.53%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

43 of 43 precincts Dana Hudgins (D), 3,002, 39.71% √Newt Stephens (R), 4,557, 60.29%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

43 of 43 precincts Lane Whitehouse (D), 3,137, 49.25% √Danny Gann (R), 3,233, 50.75%

COUNTY TREASURER

43 of 43 precincts Jeff Sparks (D), 8,623, 43.26% √Byron Davis (R), 11,308, 56.74%

CUSTER CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

5 of 5 precincts Jim Powers (D), 924, 41.29% √Lyle Miller (R), 1,314, 58.71%

CLINTON WARD 2 CITY COUNCIL

Terms for city manager making city purchases. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 362, 20.34% √For Proposition, 1,418, 79.66%

TUTTLE PROP. 7

√Measure Passed Establishes Tuttle Ambulance Service. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 340, 16.31% √For Proposition, 1,745, 83.69%

TUTTLE PROP. 8

√Measure Passed Allow city council to establish boards and committees. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 245, 11.86% √For Proposition, 1,820, 88.14%

TUTTLE PROP. 9

DEWEY CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

5 of 5 precincts √Stacy King (D), 384, 62.95% Robert Etheridge (R), 226, 37.05%

COUNTY SHERIFF

4 of 4 precincts Tom Wilcox (D), 271, 15.28% √Lanny Sander (R), 1,502, 84.72%

DEWEY COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed 911 wireless telephone fee 11 of 11 precincts Against Proposition, 658, 35.49% For Proposition, 1,196, 64.51%

DEWEY COUNTY PROP. 2

√Measure Passed Establish an enhanced 911 service. 11 of 11 precincts Against Proposition, 662, 35.80% For Proposition, 1,187, 64.20%

ELLIS CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

5 of 5 precincts Vance Woods (D), 195, 40.79% √Terry Fagala (R), 283, 59.21%

GARVIN COUNTY SHERIFF

24 of 24 precincts Steven Brooks (D), 4,197, 47.83% √Larry Rhodes (R), 4,577, 52.17%

GARVIN COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Liquor by the drink 24 of 24 precincts Against Proposition, 4,301, 48.07% For Proposition, 4,647, 51.93%

GRADY CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

No precinct data available Roy Testerman (D), 2,420, 35.10% √Windle Hardy (R), 4,474, 64.90%

MINCO COUNCILMAN WARD 4, POSITION 1 No precinct data available Bill Braunig, 126, 22.58% √D. Bruce Campbell, 432, 77.42%

MINCO COUNCILMAN WARD 4, POSITION 2 No precinct data available √Delvin Albers, 303, 53.16% David Walje, 267, 46.84%

NINNEKAH PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Combine position of clerk and treasurer No precinct data available Against Proposition, 110, 32.84% √For Proposition, 225, 67.16%

TUTTLE PROP. 1

Alter number of city council No precinct data available Against Proposition, 315, 14.66% √For Proposition, 1,833, 85.34%

TUTTLE PROP. 2

√Measure Passed City duty compensation No precinct data available Against Proposition, 917, 43.01% √For Proposition, 1,215, 56.99%

TUTTLE PROP. 3

√Measure Passed Limiting city council’s authority No precinct data available Against Proposition, 777, 36.53% √For Proposition, 1,350, 63.47%

TUTTLE PROP. 4

√Measure Passed City council vacancies No precinct data available Against Proposition, 389, 18.21% √For Proposition, 1,747, 81.79%

TUTTLE PROP. 5

√Measure Passed Sets terms for hiring a city manager. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 570, 26.64%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

7 of 7 precincts Bill Evans (D), 1,374, 24.73% √Mark Sharpton (R), 4,181, 75.27%

MULHALL PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Town clerk/treasurer appointment 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 20, 22.47% For Proposition, 69, 77.53%

MAJOR ASSOC. DIST. JUDGE

OKMULGEE

MAUD PROP. 2

WAGONER

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

34 of 34 precincts Howard Antwine (D), 1,502, 43.79% √J.W. Hill (R), 1,928, 56.21%

OKMULGEE COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Household good tax exemption 34 of 34 precincts Against Proposition, 2,780, 27.30% For Proposition, 7,404, 72.70%

OSAGE CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

15 of 15 precincts √Bob Jackson (D), 2,473, 58.35% Randall Jones (R), 1,765, 41.65%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

11 of 11 precincts √Jim Clark (D), 2,427, 50.77% Dan Matlock (R), 2,353, 49.23%

MARSHALL

TUTTLE PROP. 10

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

PAWNEE

TUTTLE PROP. 11

√Measure Passed Hotel/motel tax for tourism 1 of 1 precincts Against Proposition, 60, 44.78% For Proposition, 74, 55.22%

23 of 23 precincts Jackie Gooch (D), 4,273, 33.88% √Tisha Hampton (R), 8,340, 66.12%

TULSA PROP. 2

32 of 32 precincts √Joyce Hathcoat (D), 8,067, 56.77% Shirley Matlock (R), 6,144, 43.23%

DELAWARE

WEST SILOAM SPRINGS

COUNTY ASSESSOR

MAUD PROP. 1

14 of 14 precincts √Tim Haworth 1,574, 54.46% John McCue, 1,316, 45.54%

Rules for de-annexing property No precinct data available Against Proposition, 398, 19.13% √For Proposition, 1,683, 80.87%

9 of 9 precincts David Poindexter (D), 1,824, 41.86% √Doug Smith (R), 2,533, 58.14%

LOGAN

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

102 of 102 precincts Thomas Parkhurst (D), 23,434, 27.81% √Ray Vaughn (R), 60,839, 72.19%

√Measure Passed Filing a petition with the city clerk. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 391, 18.93% √For Proposition, 1,675, 81.07%

1 of 1 precincts √Don Rodolph, 373, 52.83% Terry Wheeler, 333, 47.17%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

Taylor Kaufman, 28, 4.55% Brenda Perry, 43, 6.98% Naomi Tricomi, 13, 2.11% Jack Turner, 96, 15.58% Donna Valentine, 76, 12.34% Gregory Wilson, 109, 17.69% L. Laurice Wilson, 34, 5.52% Gregory Wolfe, 129, 20.94%

√Measure Passed Corrects a misspelling in the city charter. No precinct data available Against Proposition, 334, 16.08% For Proposition, 1,743, 83.92%

GREER GRANITE SCHOOLS PROP. 1

$225,000 bond for buses and other school vehicles No precinct data available Against Proposition, 209, 45.83% √For Proposition, 247, 54.17%

GRANITE SCHOOLS PROP. 2

$75,000 bond for insulation in school buildings and a new gym floor No precinct data available √Against Proposition, 233, 51.10% For Proposition, 223, 48.90%

HARPER CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

No precinct data available Lawrence Jordan (D), 160, 41.13% √Cody Hickman (R), 229, 58.87%

HASKELL HASKELL COUNTY PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Establish an enhanced 911 service No precinct data available Against Proposition, 1,340, 39.06% √For Proposition, 2,091, 60.94%

JACKSON CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

24 of 24 precincts Dale Dunn (D), 936, 37.86% √Marty Clinton (R), 1,536, 62.14%

COUNTY TREASURER

24 of 24 precincts Sandra Anderson (D), 1,984, 33.88% √Renee Howard (R), 3,872, 66.12%

JEFFERSON ASSOC. DIST. JUDGE

11 of 11 precincts √Dennis Gay 916, 51.61% Jon Staton, 859, 48.39%

KAY CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

11 of 11 precincts Vicky Purdy (D), 1,926, 47.43% √Tyson Rowe (R), 2,135, 52.57%

4 of 4 precincts √Chris Duroy (D), 812, 50.85% Tom Allen (R), 785, 49.15%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

PAYNE

MCCURTAIN CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

MCINTOSH CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

9 of 9 precincts √Michael Burns (D), 1,337, 66.55% David Throckmorton (R), 672, 33.45%

MUSKOGEE CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

11 of 11 precincts √Dexter Payne (D), 3,121, 63.42% Bruce Harper (R), 1,800, 36.58%

MUSKOGEE PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Fire chief residency requirements 19 of 19 precincts Against Proposition, 2,674, 28.64% For Proposition, 6,664, 71.36%

MUSKOGEE PROP. 2

√Measure Passed Reset ward boundaries 19 of 19 precincts Against Proposition, 2,848, 31.59% For Proposition, 6,167, 68.41%

NOBLE CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

17 of 17 precincts Kirt Sharp (D), 617, 48.43% √Mark Sanders (R), 657, 51.57%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

NOWATA

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

12 of 12 precincts Bud Frost (D), 451, 43.08% √Tim Kilpatrick (R), 596, 56.92%

LINCOLN CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

9 of 9 precincts Wayne Corter (D), 1,271, 38.86% √Don Sporleder (R), 2,000, 61.14%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

8 of 8 precincts Terry Young (D), 1,721, 47.95% √Lee Doolen (R), 1,868, 52.05%

COUNTY SHERIFF

23 of 23 precincts √Charlie Dougherty (D), 5,595, 52.53% Todd Beesley (R), 5,056, 47.47%

CARNEY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2 of 2 precincts Leroy Corn, 56, 9.09% Karla Dimick, 10, 1.62% Vickie Gilliam, 22, 3.57%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

COUNTY TREASURER

12 of 12 precincts √Bonnie Workman (D), 2,414, 74.03% Steve Kloehr (R), 847, 25.97%

OKFUSKEE CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

7 of 7 precincts √Danny Wilson (D), 669, 64.14% David Davis (R), 374, 35.86%

WELEETKA PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Sales tax increase 3 of 3 precincts Against Proposition, 80, 43.96% For Proposition, 102, 56.04%

OKLAHOMA CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

107 of 107 precincts √Willa Johnson (D), 27,990, 52.52% Sam Crosby (R), 25,301, 47.48%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

6 of 6 precincts √Michael Brittingham (D), 983, 66.55% Butch Morris (R), 494, 33.45%

ROGERS COUNTY ASSESSOR

34 of 34 precincts Brian Wilson (D), 6,399, 27.14% √Scott Marsh (R), 17,181, 72.86%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

9 of 9 precincts Dan DeLozier (D), 3,485, 49.91% √Blake Lewis (R), 3,498, 50.09%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

11 of 11 precincts Leon Hershberger (D), 2,980, 38.08% √Kirt Thacker (R), 4,846, 61.92%

NORTHWEST FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT

12 of 12 precincts Bob Azbill, 1,470, 44.86% √Matthew Henson, 1,807, 55.14%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

PITTSBURG

√Measure Passed Establish an enhanced 911 system 32 of 32 precincts Against Proposition, 2,200, 26.56% For Proposition, 6,084, 73.44%

PUSHMATAHA

9 of 9 precincts √Ray Watts (D), 2,262, 63.93% Dennis Treat (R), 1,276, 36.07%

38 of 38 precincts Angela Lockwood (D), 7,816, 40.37% √James Cowan (R), 11,544, 59.63%

MCCURTAIN COUNTY PROP. 1

MCCURTAIN COUNTY PROP. 2

√Measure Failed City clerk appointees 4 of 4 precincts Against Proposition, 136, 56.20% For Proposition, 106, 43.80%

SEQUOYAH

15 of 15 precincts Bobby Farley (D), 2,313, 37.91% √Bill Deering (R), 3,788, 62.09%

√Measure Passed 911 emergency telephone fee 32 of 32 precincts Against Proposition, 2,332, 28.08% For Proposition, 5,973, 71.92%

√Measure Passed Permanent sales tax 4 of 4 precincts Against Proposition, 114, 46.91% √For Proposition, 129, 53.09%

COUNTY ASSESSOR

12 of 12 precincts √Jim Freeny (D), 2,072, 78.54% Marvin Skipper (ind.), 566, 21.46%

LE FLORE

15 of 15 precincts Ceb Scott (D), 2,546, 68.20% Bobby McKinzey (R), 1,187, 31.80%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

MAYES

17 of 17 precincts Mike Frank (D), 99, 5.97% √Lance West (ind.), 811, 48.94% Randy Ritthaler (R), 747, 45.08%

11 of 11 precincts √Derwin Gist (D), 3,046, 76.02% Ike Davis (ind.), 961, 23.98%

COUNTY TREASURER

9 of 9 precincts Jessie Jones (D), 811, 48.33% √David Wilkins (R), 867, 51.67%

9 of 9 precincts Wade Parker (D), 1,658, 44.34% √Ryan Ball (R), 2,081, 55.66%

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

MCALESTER

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

TULSA COUNTY ASSESSOR

273 of 273 precincts Nancy Bolzle (D), 61,748, 37.54% √Ken Yazel (R), 102,720, 62.46%

Ward 6 City Council 11 of 11 precincts √Sam Mason, 356, 51.08% Ralph Stephan, 115, 16.50% Ben Uennedy, 226, 32.42%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 1

POTTAWATOMIE

√Measure Passed Economic Stabilization Reserve 219 of 219 precincts Against Proposition, 33,776, 33.41% For Proposition, 67,308, 66.59%

CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

11 of 11 precincts √Buck Day (D), 20,578, 89.32% Kenneth McDaniel (R), 2,460, 10.68%

89 of 89 precincts Wilbert Collins (D), 17,175, 38.07% √John Smaligo (R), 27,938, 61.93%

TULSA PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Primary election dates 219 of 219 precincts Against Proposition, 43,080, 43.14% For Proposition, 56,779, 56.86%

COUNTY ASSESSOR

38 of 38 precincts Jason Rousselot (D), 6,214, 30.24% √Sandy Hodges (R), 14,337, 69.76%

COUNTY TREASURER

38 of 38 precincts Gloria Marshall (D), 8,277, 40.22% √Dana Patten (R), 12,304, 59.78%

WASHINGTON CO. COMM. DISTRICT 3

8 of 8 precincts Raymond Raley (ind.), 965, 25.68% √Mike Dunlap (R), 2,793, 74.32%

COURT CLERK

24 of 24 precincts Lynne Harris (D), 5,680, 35.23% √James Weaver (R), 10,443, 64.77%

BARTLESVILLE

√Measure Passed City charter changes 19 of 19 precincts Against Proposition, 5,110, 46.30% For Proposition, 5,927, 53.70%

OCHELATA PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Natural gas system 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 56, 37.33% For Proposition, 94, 62.67%

OCHELATA PROP. 2

√Measure Failed Lenn Gas Compnay franchise 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 115, 79.31% For Proposition, 30, 20.69%

OCHELATA PROP. 3

√Measure Passed Utilities Authority indebtedness limit 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 63, 42.28% For Proposition, 86, 57.72%

WOODS WAYNOKA PROP. 1

√Measure Passed Sales tax continuance 2 of 2 precincts Against Proposition, 69, 24.47% For Proposition, 213, 75.53%


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

NATIONAL ELECTIONS

MUSKOGEE REPUBLICAN MET LITTLE OPPOSITION IN RACE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

...

11A

Lankford takes Fallin’s seat in Congress’ 5th District BY CHRIS CASTEEL Washington Bureau ccasteel@opubco.com

James Lankford, left, and Sen. Tom Coburn talk during the Republican watch party Tuesday at the Marriott in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Coburn wins second term in U.S. Senate BY CHRIS CASTEEL Washington Bureau ccasteel@opubco.com

WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn on Tuesday captured his second and final term in the U.S. Senate, where he has used the considerable power given to each senator to slow down hundreds of bills and rail against the federal government’s reach. Coburn, R-Muskogee, had only token opposition for a second six-year term as Democrats essentially took a pass on challenging the popular physician. Coburn’s Democratic opponent, Jim Rogers, of Midwest City, is a perennial candidate who does little campaigning. With 76 percent of the

precincts reporting, Coburn had 71 percent of the vote. Rogers had 26 percent; independents Stephen P. Wallace, of Tulsa, Ronald F. Dwyer, of Tulsa, split the rest. Coburn said he was “humbled and grateful for the trust” Oklahomans placed in him. “Oklahomans sent a loud and clear message to the political establishment in Washington that we cannot continue to live beyond our means,’’ Coburn said. “I pledge to my fellow Oklahomans that I will continue the work they first sent me to do in the Senate six years ago — hold Washington accountable and govern by the founding principles that created this great experiment

called America.” Coburn, who served six years in the U.S. House in the 1990s before honoring a term limits pledge, promised in 2004 that he would serve no more than 12 years in the Senate. He used this campaign to repeat what he has stressed for his entire political career — that Washington spends money recklessly and is threatening the nation’s future. And, though he claims President Barack Obama as a personal friend, Coburn has been harshly critical of the president’s policies. Since he didn’t have a competitive race this year, Coburn donated $1 million from his account to the national Republican effort to win Senate seats.

California voters reject measure to legalize recreational marijuana BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Warned of dangers and legal chaos, California voters Tuesday rejected a measure that would have made their state the first to legalize the use and sale of marijuana. The spirited campaign over Proposition 19 had pitted the state’s political and law enforcement establishment against determined activists seeking to end the prohibition of pot. It was by far the highest-profile of the 160 ballot measures being decided in 37 states. Other measures dealt with abortion, tax cuts and health care reform. On a night of conservative advances in much of the country, Massachusetts voters spurned a chance to cut their taxes — rejecting a proposal to lower the state sales tax from 6.25 percent to 3 percent. Critics said the cut would have forced the state to slash $2.5 billion in services, including local aid to cities and towns. California’s marijuana proposal — titled the Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act — would have allowed adults 21 and over to possess up to an ounce of pot, consume it in nonpublic places as long as no children were present, and grow it in small private plots. Proposition 19 also would have authorized local governments to permit commercial pot cultivation, as well as the sale and use of marijuana at licensed establishments. Proponents pitched it as a sensible, though unprecedented, experiment that would provide muchneeded revenue for the cash-strapped state, dent the drug-related violence in Mexico by causing pot

prices to plummet, and reduce marijuana arrests that they say disproportionately target minority youth. The state branches of the NAACP and the League of United Latin American Citizens endorsed it, as did several retired police chiefs. However, every major newspaper, both political parties, the two candidates for governor and all but a handful of leading politicians came out against it. Federal officials said they would continue enforcing laws against marijuana possession and sales if the initiative had passed. Even facing defeat, Prop 19 supporters said they were buoyed by a new Gallup poll showing that national support for legalizing marijuana has reached an all-time high of 46 percent. Gallup said majority support could come within a few years if recent trends continue. In South Dakota, voters

rejected a measure to legalize medical marijuana — a step already taken by California and 13 other states. A medical marijuana measure also was on Arizona’s ballot, and Oregon voters were deciding whether to expand the state’s current medical marijuana law by authorizing state-licensed dispensaries. Among other notable ballot issues on Tuesday: Washington state’s voters repealed taxes on candy, soda and bottled water adopted by lawmakers last year — a move that could eliminate a projected $352 million in revenue over five years. Voters rejected a proposal to impose a state income tax on any income above $200,000, or $400,000 for couples. In the littlest state, voters chose to keep the longest formal name — opting to stay as Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, instead of just Rhode Island.

WASHINGTON — Republican James Lankford, the former church camp director who felt called to replace Mary Fallin in Congress, was elected to the 5th District on Tuesday, completing his improbable run with a convincing victory over Democrat Billy Coyle. With two-thirds of the precincts reporting Lankford, of Edmond, had 61 percent of the vote to Coyle’s 36 percent. Independents Clark Duffe and Dave White, whose name remained on the ballot even though he dropped out of the race and endorsed Lankford, shared the rest. Three of Oklahoma’s incumbents in Congress — Reps. Dan Boren, D-Muskogee; Frank Lucas, R-Cheyenne; and John Sullivan, R-Tulsa, easily won re-election on Tuesday; the fourth, Rep. Tom Cole, RMoore, didn’t have a general election opponent. Lankford said Tuesday night that he looked at the campaign as a yearlong job interview. “Now it’s time to get to work,’’ he said. Lankford said that he met thousands of people through the small group meetings he held around the district and that they were comfortable with him and his message and helped spread the word about him. He said he would immediately start assembling a congressional staff and seek out like-minded freshmen when he comes to Washington for orientation in two weeks. Lankford, 42, ran the Falls Creek camp for 14 years for the Southern Baptist Convention of Oklahoma, but decided to run after reading about Fallin’s intent to leave Congress to run for governor. With no political experience, Lankford began his campaign last year with the help of some friends and fellow Baptists and built an organization that had little money but a lot of savvy about the Internet; the campaign used social media tools like Facebook and Twitter to get his message out.

James Lankford talks with members of the media during the Republican watch party at the Marriott in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

By the July 27 GOP primary, it was clear Lankford had a strong following. In the Aug. 24 runoff, he easily dispatched former state Rep. Kevin Calvey, and money started rolling in from the local establishment and special interest groups. He topped $1 million last month. Coyle said he fought as hard as he could for the seat and probably would have done better if it hadn’t been such a tough election year for Democrats. He said no one gave him a chance to win but that he took that as a challenge. “I gave it my heart and soul,’’ he said. “I do give James Lankford all the credit. He’s a nice guy and I wish him the best of luck.” Boren, the only Democrat in Congress from Oklahoma, spent more than $1.5 million trying to hang on to his seat in a district that, though overwhelmingly Democrat, voted overwhelmingly against Barack Obama in 2008. With nearly complete returns, Boren had 56 of the vote and beat Republican Charles Thompson, of Hulbert. Lucas got 78 percent of the vote to beat Democrat Frankie Robbins, of Medford. Lucas will return to Washington in 2011 as chairman of the Agriculture Committee. Sullivan beat Independent Angelia O’Dell, of Tulsa, getting 79 percent of the vote in incomplete returns. Cole won a new term after his July 27 primary because he had no general election opposition.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

MONOLOGUE

OPINION OUR VIEWS | CONSULTANTS VIE FOR CONVENTION CENTER

Ball is rolling on top piece of MAPS 3 plan OST concerns have forced a slight change to a complementary piece of MAPS 3. The biggest piece is in the early stages but is coming along. Oklahoma City Council members voted last week to tweak the design of the pedestrian bridge that will span the Interstate 40 Crosstown Expressway when that highway is completed in a few years. The bridge isn’t part of the MAPS 3 projects voters approved 11 months ago. But the bridge will connect the north and south sides of a 70-acre park, which is on the MAPS 3 projects’ list. Original plans for the Skydance Bridge had cables extending from an 18-story sculpture to the bridge below. The plan approved last week changes the design to make it a free-standing structure. Meantime, the price tag for a new downtown convention center — the biggest and arguably most important MAPS 3 project — is $280 million. It will be several years before it’s completed, but it may not be long before the facility begins to take shape. That’s because eight firms from around the U.S. are competing to be the consultant for planning the convention center. The fact this job has attracted a national response from competing firms can only be good for the city, in ensuring it gets the best deal available. The importance of a new convention center can’t be overstated. The other pieces of the $770 million MAPS 3 lineup are important in their own right and will make

C

The University of South Carolina will offer a new class devoted to Lady Gaga. Or you can just take your parents’ tuition money and flush it directly down the toilet.” JIMMY FALLON

“LATE NIGHT WITH JIMMY FALLON”

YOUR VIEWS

Day of gratitude Any city that aspires to climb into the top 25 nationwide has to have a facility that attracts large conventions on a regular basis. our city a better place to live. But any city that aspires to climb into the top 25 nationwide has to have a facility that attracts large conventions on a regular basis. A steady diet of conventions generates revenue and buzz — and if done right, plenty of both. The old Myriad was retrofitted into the Cox Convention Center about a decade ago. But it’s too small to attract the kind of conventions a major league city needs. Hence the need for a new and much bigger one. Selection of the consultant is part of the initial process of getting the project off the drawing board. The most crucial step is deciding where the building will be located. Some want it to be handy to Bricktown; others believe it would be better to place the convention center closer to what used to be called the Ford Center, nearer to where the new green space will emerge. That’s a decision for another day. Now it’s time to focus on the consultant, who can help guide a process that eventually will turn another of Oklahoma City’s big dreams into reality.

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

We’ll take ’em: High-paying jobs are headed this way

Cut rate: On defense, U.S. can’t follow Brits

It seems a good many Boeing employees aren’t all that excited about the prospects of moving to Oklahoma when their jobs begin doing the same early next year. We’re sorry to hear that, although the good news is that bright Oklahomans figure to benefit as a result. Steve Hendrickson, Boeing’s director of government operations, told city business leaders Monday that he expects “hundreds” of the high-paying jobs to go to people hired locally. And he means highpaying — an average of $130,000 per year. Boeing announced in August that it was moving its C-130 Avionics Modernization and B-1 programs, and the 550 engineering jobs associated with them, to Oklahoma City from Long Beach, Calif. The aerospace giant already has about 1,000 employees in our state; moving these programs here will save Boeing money and help its competitiveness in the market. Hendrickson admitted that workers in California were “reluctant, surprised and apprehensive” when they heard about the company’s move. “There are some enthusiastic employees embracing it, but others, not so much,” he said. We can’t match the ocean beaches in Southern California, and Long Beach may have us beat on yearround weather. But the quality of life is good here, the cost of living is far superior and our traffic is a breeze by comparison. Hendrickson said Boeing is “not done announcing” other moves. Here’s hoping Oklahoma stays on the company’s list of best options. And if Californians don’t want them, we’ll certainly take all the goodpaying jobs the company has to offer.

Britain’s plan to dramatically cut government has had many people wondering whether similar deficit reduction could work in the United States. It could, but there’s a caveat to the Brits’ acrossthe-board spending slash — deep gashes in defense spending raise questions about whether Britain can defend itself and meet military obligations around the world. By 2015-16, British military spending reportedly will fall from 2.7 percent of the country’s total economic output to 2 percent. All armed services will lose uniformed personnel, and spending on weapons systems and platforms will fall. Prime Minister David Cameron says Britain will not reduce efforts in Afghanistan, but Theodore Bromund of the conservative Heritage Foundation writes that the cuts pose a “risk to Britain’s ability to deter, fight and win wars.” There also could be ripple effects. Others in NATO will find it easier to justify their own military cuts, Bromund writes, and Britain could become more reliant on the U.S. “Britain will become increasingly focused on providing boots on the ground while relying on the U.S. to supply the transport, logistics, and heavy weapons,” he writes. “Simply put, Britain is slowly giving up on conventional deterrence.” The United States doesn’t have that luxury. There’s no military benefactor to cover for U.S. defense cuts on a similar scale — the cue Pentagon opponents no doubt will take from Great Britain. While we’re not reflexively opposed to cutting military spending, national defense is government’s primary duty and shouldn’t be considered a big, easy target for funding other, lower-priority programs.

A resolution presented to Congress would require employers to give veterans time off on Veterans Day in order to observe this holiday and also to be recognized for their military service. After being referred to a House committee and subcommittee, the issue appears to have been dropped. A majority of employers don’t allow veterans to take the day off, on a holiday designed for them! And if they do allow it, a penalty of sorts (they must use a sick day, vacation day or get no pay) is incurred. Giving one day out of the year to show our gratitude toward those who’ve shown us their patriotism, love of country and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good isn’t too much to ask. With Veterans Day coming up soon, how can an issue such as this just die in committee? Kevin Mullins, McLoud

‘JESUS IN DISGUISE’ Regarding “Shack-a-thon in Edmond has students at UCO outdoors” (feature, Oct. 27): I’d like to give all of the participating UCO students a round of applause. As a student who took part last year in a UCO student Erick Silva similar event at St. sits outside his shack Gregory’s Uniduring annual Shack-aversity in Shawnee, Thon. I appreciate what the UCO students are doing. From my own experience, sleeping in a box toward the end of fall was the coldest, longest, most sleepless night I’ve had. However, it was a sacrifice worth doing. The ability to experience, even to a degree, what the homeless regularly experience was to put myself in their shoes. It was to take myself out of my generally spoiled life and look at it from another’s perspective. It was to be in solidarity with the less fortunate around us. For these UCO students, it’s a beautiful time to be in solidarity with each other. As Mother Teresa, the missionary to the poorest of the poor, would say, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one ... each one is Jesus in disguise.” UCO is doing just this by camping out and “begging” in order to help feed the homeless. Samantha Bugos, McLoud

GREAT EXPECTATIONS I don’t like paying taxes, but it’s necessary if I’m to get the things I’ve come to expect from government. I expect highways and bridges to be safe and to fly without fear of crashing. I expect assistance when natural or man-made disasters strike and to have clean water and safe, nutritious food. I expect the armed forces to keep us safe from enemies, and I expect that banks and loan companies will be prevented from cheating me. When people get sick, I expect them to get all necessary treatment regardless of their financial worth. I expect children to get the best education in the world. I expect people who fall on hard times to be helped, and I expect people who rob, cheat and steal with the gun or pen to be prosecuted. I expect businesses to create safe work environments. I expect pensions to be fully funded and protected from misappropriation. I expect my Social Security and Medicare benefits to be paid. I expect government to look out for everyone, not just those with money and power. And I would happily pay a few dollars more in taxes if government would guarantee that everyone has a job. A.A. Austin, Del City

ABOLISH FEDERAL AGENCY In a debate between candidates for the 5th District congressional seat, the question was asked whether the candidates favored abolishment of the U.S. Department of Education. Both candidates said no. I can see that with Democratic nominee Billy Coyle but not with Republican James Lankford. The Department of Education and the National Education Association are inextricable partners. This hasn’t been a good thing. How can conservative representatives be content to allow this faulty system to continue? Ever since the department was created during the Carter administration, education quality has declined. Many Oklahomans have been clamoring for years to get education returned to the states. We’re fed up with liberals having absolute control over our education system and we want it changed. Claude Chambers, Earlsboro


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

NATION | WORLD Al-Qaida’s mail bomb plans were probably shot in dark

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AT A GLANCE

French President Nicolas Sarkozy, left, and Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron exchange defense deal documents Tuesday. AP PHOTO

Britain, France unite forces What would Napoleon or Lord Nelson make of this? Britain and France struck a historic defense deal Tuesday aimed at preserving military muscle in an age of austerity, pledging to deploy troops under a single command, share aircraft carriers and collaborate on once fiercely guarded nuclear programs. The often skeptical neighbors insist an era of unprecedented cooperation is a pragmatic fit for two cash-strapped allies, though many question if the storied enemies of the battles of Agincourt and Waterloo truly can overcome centuries of mutual suspicion.

HERE’S A LOOK AT THE AGREEMENT

The deal is to last 50 years. › Timeline: What it covers: It forms a joint rapid reaction ›force, sharing warhead testing facilities and tack-

ling together the threats from cyberwarfare and the militarization of space. It will include a pool of at least 5,000 troops, including special forces, able to deploy under a commander from either nation. Reasoning: British Prime Minister David Cameron told his Cabinet the deal would save hundreds of millions of pounds (dollars) as Britain seeks to clear its national debts, while French President Nicolas Sarkozy said he believed the pact will help protect all of Europe. Nuclear assets: The nations will share specialist laboratories at the U.K. Atomic Weapons Establishment in Aldermaston, southern England, and a new center at Valduc, southeast of Paris. U.S. reaction: The U.S. said the deal would secure the standing of two major NATO powers. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Defense Secretary Robert Gates both have recently raised concern about the impact of cuts to European defense budgets.

A Yemeni policeman takes a position Tuesday outside the state security court in San‘a, Yemen, after U.S.-born radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki was put on trial in absentia, accused of plotting to kill foreigners. AP PHOTO

WAR ON TERRORISM | DISABLED CELL PHONES WERE WIRED TO SHIPPED EXPLOSIVES BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Even after a suspected test run in September, last week’s attempted mail bombings from Yemen were a shot in the dark for al-Qaida, which could not have known exactly where its packages were when they were set to explode, U.S.

Gunman targets fifth site

officials said Tuesday. When investigators pulled the Chicago-bound packages off cargo planes in Britain and the United Arab Emirates on Friday, they found the bombs wired to cell phones. The communication cards had been removed and the phones could not receive calls, officials said, making

it likely terrorists intended the alarm or timer functions to trigger the bombs. Investigators believe alQaida mailed three innocent-looking packages from Yemen to Chicago in mid-September to watch the route they took. Authorities were investigating whether Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born Ye-

meni cleric, was involved. He has inspired a string of attempted attacks against the West. The cleric is a fugitive, targeted by a U.S. kill-orcapture list. Yemeni authorities put him on trial in absentia Tuesday, charging him as a new defendant in the October killing of a French security guard.

STATE DEPARTMENT AUDIT LOOKS TO MILITARY’S EXIT

Report questions safety of U.S. staffers in Iraq

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY ROBERT BURNS

WOODBRIDGE, Va. — At

least one shot was fired overnight at a Coast Guard recruiting office in northern Virginia, police said Tuesday, the fifth case since last month of unexplained gunfire targeting military-related buildings in the Washington area. There were no injuries and only minor damage at the mall site, Prince William County police said. Police said the gunfire did not shatter the front glass. The FBI has blamed four previous shootings on an unknown assailant who they say could be harboring a grievance against the Marines. Three of the five attacks since mid-October hit Marine -related facilities. Nobody was injured. Outside the Coast Guard office Tuesday, law officials could be seen searching, some crossing the ground about 10 abreast while others looked through grass on their hands and knees.

AP National Security Writer

WASHINGTON

The Obama administration could be overstating what American diplomats can do to contain Iraq’s ethnic and sectarian tensions without U.S. military forces, a State Department audit concluded Tuesday, raising fresh concerns about the planned pullout of American troops next year. The auditors also questioned whether American diplomats who remain behind will be adequately protected against insurgent violence, and their report faulted Washington for its planning of the transition from a U.S. military-led mission in Iraq to one run by American civilians in 2011. The audit’s findings echo worries expressed by some American defense analysts and former diplomats. They say hard-won security gains in Iraq could

UPDATE In the latest outbreak of violence, bombings and mortar strikes killed dozens and wounded scores across Baghdad’s mostly Shiite neighborhoods Tuesday. The bloodshed came just two days after gunmen in the Iraqi capital held a Christian congregation hostage in a siege that ended with 58 people dead.

crumble if American military forces leave on schedule.

Stability not seen In its report, the State Department’s office of inspector general said stability in Iraq may be years away. It warned that the failure of Iraqi political leaders to form a unity government has interfered with the “urgent task” of planning for Washington’s post-2011 diplomatic role. Stephen Biddle, an Iraq watcher at the Council on Foreign Relations, said it will be difficult for U.S. diplomats to keep a lid on Sunni-Shiite and Arab-

Kurd rivalries in the absence of a sizable American military presence. The report said the first six months of 2012 are likely to be “especially dangerous as extremists test U.S. resolve and Iraqi security forces’ capabilities.” It questioned whether the U.S. can meet President Barack Obama’s goal of ensuring a safe work environment for remaining U.S. personnel in Iraq in 2012. “Security risks are expected to increase,” the report said. The U.S. now has just under 50,000 troops in Iraq, down from a wartime high of 170,000.

Future teachers must show, not just tell BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Standing at the edge of a pond surrounded by her class of fourth-graders, Jasmine Zeppa filled a bucket with brown water and lectured her pupils on the science of observing and recording data. Many of the children seemed more interested in nearby geese, a passing jogger and the crunchy leaves underfoot. Zeppa’s own professor from St. Catherine University stood nearby and recorded video of it all. “I think it went as well as it possibly could have, given her experience,” professor Susan Gibbs Goetz said. Her snap review: Zeppa, 25, could have done a better job holding the students’ attention but did well building on past lessons. Zeppa is among the first class of aspiring teachers

Professor Susan Gibbs Goetz videotapes aspiring teacher Jasmine Zeppa during a recent science lesson in St. Paul, Minn. AP PHOTO

who are getting ready for new, more demanding requirements to receive their teacher license. A new licensing system is being tested in 19 states that includes filming student teachers in their classroom and evaluating the video. Candidates also must show they can prepare a lesson, tailor it to different

levels of students and present it effectively. Most states only require that would-be teachers pass their classwork and a written test. Supporters of the new system say the Teacher Performance Assessment Program is a significant improvement, while others are a little more cautious in their

praise, warning that it’s not guaranteed it will lead to more successful teachers. The assessments also place responsibility for grading the would-be teachers with teams of outside evaluators who have no stake in the result. Currently, teachers-intraining are evaluated by their colleges, which want their students to get their teaching licenses. Minnesota is set to be the first state to adopt the system, in 2012. Massachusetts, Ohio, Tennessee and Washington plan to implement it within five years. Fourteen more states are running pilots. The assessment program is a joint project by a consortium of Stanford University, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

› ›

ASSOCIATED PRESS

IN BRIEF NATION

ELECTRICAL TROUBLE DELAYS LAUNCH CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The final launch of space

shuttle Discovery has been delayed again, this time because of an electrical problem. NASA decided early Tuesday evening to bump the liftoff until at least Thursday. The decision came less than 24 hours before the scheduled launch today. The space agency has until Sunday — possibly as late as Monday — to send Discovery to the International Space Station. Otherwise, it will have to wait until December because of sun angles. Gas leaks had already forced a two-day postponement for Discovery’s last trip into orbit.

NO ALZHEIMER’S BENEFIT SEEN IN DHA CHICAGO — Researchers are reporting disappointing

news about omega-3 fatty acid pills and Alzheimer’s disease. Pills containing the fatty acid DHA are promoted as boosting memory. They didn’t slow mental and physical decline in older patients with mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease. Those results are in a multimillion-dollar governmentfunded study released Tuesday in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association.

DELAY PAINTED AS GROUP’S LEADER AUSTIN, Texas — Prosecutors Tuesday tried to imply to jurors that former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was the driving force behind a political action committee authorities say was involved in illegally funneling $190,000 in corporate donations into Texas legislative races eight years ago. DeLay’s attorneys countered at his trial on charges of money laundering and conspiracy to commit money laundering that he had little involvement in committee operations. DeLay has denied wrongdoing. If convicted, he could face up to life in prison.

WORLD

BOMB SENT TO GERMAN CHANCELLOR BERLIN — German police disarmed a mail bomb Tuesday that was sent from Greece to German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s office, hours after similar small bombs exploded outside the Russian and Swiss embassies in Athens in attacks blamed on far-left Greek extremists. Greek police destroyed five more suspected bombs in Athens, and two local men have been charged.

HURRICANE TAKES AIM AT HAITI PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — A hurricane may hit Haiti this week, adding to the woes of a nation where cholera is spreading and more than 1 million earthquake survivors have only a plastic tarp or tent to protect them. A U.S. Navy vessel, the Iwo Jima, was steaming toward Haiti on Tuesday to provide disaster relief in case Tropical Storm Tomas strikes late in the week as forecast, possibly as a Category 2 hurricane.

ITALY’S PREMIER RILES GAY GROUPS ROME — Premier Silvio Berlusconi dismissed calls Tuesday to resign over his involvement with an underage Moroccan runaway — and even created a new uproar by claiming it was better to love beautiful girls than gays. His comments sparked outrage from gay rights groups and fueled new calls for him to step down.

OFFICIALS MAY TAKE BABY OF GIRL, 10 MADRID — A 10-year-old girl has given birth in southern Spain and authorities are evaluating whether to let her and her family retain custody of the baby, an official said Tuesday. The baby was born last week in Jerez de la Frontera, said Micaela Navarro, Andalusia region’s social affairs minister. FROM WIRE SERVICES


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

FROM PAGE 1A

Nation: Voters point at money woes

Hopefuls report last-minute funding BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Three campaigns for statewide candidates reported last-minute contributions on Election Day. Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jari Askins received $4,500 Tuesday, putting her total at $4.08 million, the most raised during this election cycle, according to reports from

FROM PAGE 1A

grass-roots rebellion, aimed first at establishment Republicans, then at the Democrats who controlled Washington until Tuesday. Tea partybacked Senate candidates won in Florida and Kentucky — holding those seats for the GOP — but fell short in Delaware, where Republicans hoped to pick up the seat once held by Vice President Joe Biden. Ultimately, though, Tuesday’s vote was most about Obama, and about the country that sent him to the White House with great hopes, then watched in mounting frustration as unemployment increased despite his massive expansion of government spending and debt. “This president has overpromised and underdelivered. People expected more change than they got,” said Larry Sabato, the director of the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia. “Americans are trying to issue a midterm correction to Obama, to nudge him back to the middle, where they thought he was when they elected him. They’re surprised he’s as liberal as he’s been.” Most presidential parties lose seats in the House of Representatives in the president’s first midterm election; since 1960, the average loss has been 22.6 seats. Over the past 80 years, only two presidents have seen their party gain House seats in their first midterm elections — Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1934 and George W. Bush in 2002. Each had unusual circumstances — voters rallied to FDR’s Democrats as he marshaled the federal government to fight the Great Depression and to Bush’s Republicans in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks. However, the wholesale rejection of Obama’s party Tuesday was deeper and more emphatic than average. Why? One key reason is the economy. Although it’s rebounded weakly from its collapse, the recovery has been painfully slow, and unemployment remains high at 9.6 percent. For voters, the economy eclipsed all other issues Tuesday, according to exit polls; more than 80 percent of voters said they’re worried about the country’s direction and about half said they think that Obama’s policies are hurting the country. Any president should expect to be punished in a bad economy. Facing his first midterm elections during the recession of 1982, Ronald Reagan’s Republican Party lost 26 House seats. “If the unemployment

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Kentucky Republican Senate candidate Rand Paul rubs the head of his son, Robert, 11, on Tuesday after filling out his ballot in Bowling Green, Ky. AP PHOTO

rate were 6 percent, we wouldn’t be having this conversation today,” said Lee Miringoff, the director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. A second major factor: Obama and Democrats in Congress overreached. After winning control of Congress in 2006 and the

White House in 2008, Democrats thought the country wanted a sweeping expansion of government programs, as in FDR’s New Deal in the 1930s and Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society in the 1960s. Liberals surely did. But most independents didn’t, and conservatives rejected it as socialism.

the state Ethics Commission. The biggest contributor of Tuesday’s contributions was Jeff Wilmes, an Altus automobile dealer, who gave $2,500 to Askins, the state’s lieutenant governor. Republican gubernatorial candidate U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, of Edmond, raised $3.95 million. Republican lieutenant governor candidate Todd Lamb, a state senator from

Edmond, reported lastminute contributions of $6,010, putting his total at $1.12 million. Democratic lieutenant governor candidate Kenneth Corn, a state senator from Poteau, has raised $1.15 million. Insurance Commissioner Kim Holland, a Democrat, reported receiving $2,000 Tuesday, making her total $702,671. Her Republican challenger, John Doak, has raised $497,640.


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 15

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 WEST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO LEFT FROM THE HOUSE, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 21A

PARAMEDIC STUDENTS BLAST THROUGH EXPLOSIVES LESSON

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

OKLAHOMA CITY

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone who has information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FLU SHOTS OFFERED FREE The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots and free health screenings. For information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188.

An Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic, right, sets off a bomb Monday as Rockie Yardley, left, an Edmond Police Department bomb expert, and two paramedic students watch. Paramedic students joined with the Edmond police bomb squad for a training exercise on responding to explosions. For the story, see Page 16A. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

ONLINE

Metro-area high schools show wide range on ACT scores

SHARE YOUR NEWS

BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

Advanced Placement U.S. history students Laenie Fletcher, left, and Hannah Wilson read along with their teacher, Christine Curtright, at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state.

Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman SEE EXAM, PAGE 16A

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Post your Yukon- or Oklahoma City-area news immediately online at NewsOK.com by adding yukon@ newsok.com or okc@newsok.com to your e-mail list. For details, go online to knowit.newsok.com/ oklahoma-city or knowit.newsok.com/ yukon.

INDEX Deaths Records

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EMSA, bomb technicians team up to teach safety BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic students this week got an explosive lesson in what law enforcement officers face at crime scenes. Nine paramedic students spent the day Monday with Edmond police officers and members of their bomb squad. It was the first time EMSA and a law enforcement agency have joined forces to help train paramedics about crime scene investigations, how to help an injured bomb technician and what to look for in explosives, said Maj. Heather Yazdanipour, an EMSA paramedic and instructor. “Today has been invaluable,” Yazdanipour said. “There is a lot of power

packed into today. What better way to learn but to seek out the experts.” Edmond officer Michael King also is an EMSA paramedic. He was instrumental in getting the class together. “It is a great learning experience,” King said. “EMSA and the law enforcement community react to situations every day. Very seldom do they get together outside of the scene. This gives them the ability to work better together.” Some of the students dressed in 90-pound bomb technician suits, while others learned how to remove the $12,000 piece of protective gear. They later learned about the different kinds of explosives and what to look for when they arrive at a crime scene involving an explosion. Three of them got to set off different

and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be college-ready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other four-year schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of students who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, accept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced Placement courses students take. “One of the main things we do here is really encourage a rigorous program and hold students to high expectations, whether in AP or pre-AP classes,” Keirns said. “We really want our students to be fully prepared when they leave us.” Putnam City high schools also showed a wide range of average scores on the ACT test. Putnam City North tied for eighth in the state with five other schools with an average score of 22.9. Putnam City High School had a score of 20.5, while Putnam City West High School scored 19.3. Putnam City Academy, the district’s alternative school, scored 17.8. Melton said looking at schools with high vs. low scores is not really an accurate way to judge success, however. “You have to drill down into what percentage of those kids are taking the tests, what percentage are going onto college and what percentage are taking the rigorous course work,” he said. Students can prepare for the ACT in a variety of ways, but what really counts is the courses they take, Melton said. Students who take biology, chemistry and physics, for instance, typically perform at college-ready levels on the ACT, he said. The rigor of a course also counts, said Steve Lindley, Putnam City School District spokesman. “What really makes the difference in ACT is four years of rigorous courses,” Lindley said.

Lindley and Melton both said students need to start thinking about doing well on the ACT in middle school.

IN BRIEF ST. ELIJAH PLANS ANNUAL FOOD FEST St. Elijah Orthodox Christian Church will host its annual food festival and holiday bake sale from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the church, NW 150 and May Avenue. Guided tours of the church and specialty booths also will be available. For more information, go to www.stelijahokc.com. FROM STAFF REPORTS

CALENDAR THURSDAY

MONDAY

Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509.

McEvoy’s Toastmasters, 6:30 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa, 787-1598. El Reno School Board, 5:30 p.m., administration building, 100 S Bickford. Kingfisher City Council, 5:30 p.m., city hall, 301 N Main. Mustang School Board, 7 p.m., education center, 400 N Clear Springs Road. Piedmont School Board, 6 p.m., administration building, 713 Piedmont Road.

FRIDAY Paramedic students Tori Spencer, right, and Jennifer Coker look at a stick of dynamite Monday during a demonstration on explosives. PHOTOS BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

kinds of explosives at the police firing range. “All explosives burn fast,” said Rockie Yardley, a police department bomb expert. “There are different sizes. None of them are good.” Yardley warned the students to be aware of what is around them because

Exam: Requirements vary FROM PAGE 15A

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

“If you’re thinking about doing well on the ACT, your junior year is too late,” Melton said. “The die has been cast.”

homemade bombs are becoming more popular. “We are rescuers at heart,” Yardley said. “Just stop and think. Take it slow.”

Tree Sale, 8 a.m., Moore Community Center, 301 S Howard, 793-5090.

SATURDAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave.


THE OKLAHOMAN

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Craft, book sales set for Saturday in Yukon FROM STAFF REPORTS

YUKON — A paperback book sale and craft festival are planned Saturday. The events are being organized by the Mabel C. Fry Library and the Yukon Parks and Recreation Department. The Pumpkin Harvest Craft Festival will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive. Entry is free. The book sale will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the library next door. Both venues are in the vicinity of State Highway 66 and Mustang Road. The craft festival will feature more than 40 vendors from across the state. Taco soup and baked goods also will be for sale, Yukon Parks and Recreation Department officials said. The Friends of the Li-

African Children’s Choir to perform FROM STAFF REPORTS

The African Children’s Choir will perform at 7 p.m. Sunday in the Douglass High School auditorium, 900 N Martin Luther King Ave. For tickets, call 524-3800.

brary Paperback Book Sale will feature paperback books at 50 cents each. A box of romance novels will be priced at $5. Craft books will be available at

various prices. For more information on the craft festival, call 3508937. For more information about the book sale, call 354-8232.


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EVENT CELEBRATES CULTURES

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org. For more information and additional events, and to post details about new events, go to wimgo.com.

TODAY

THURSDAY

What: Book Blast When: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Choctaw Ages: 6 and older

What: Pajama story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 2½ to 5

What: Local Author Series: Rodney Redus When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Del City Ages: Adults

FRIDAY What: Developmental screenings When: 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bethany Ages: Newborn to 5 years

Aseem Nevrekar, a student at the University of Oklahoma, performs with OU’s Arashi Taiko, an Asian drum band, at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam at Moore Public Library. The festival was one of several activities Saturday, including the annual Red Ribbon Parade against drug abuse. PHOTOS BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Above and left: Bagpiper Jessie Bills performs Saturday at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam in Moore.

Phil Clark, of Norman, browses through items for sale.

UCO to host dance festival FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — The University of Central Oklahoma Department of Dance will host more than 180 high school students and their teachers for two days of classes, workshops and performances during its first Oklahoma High School Dance Festival on Friday and Saturday. Participating high schools are Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Harding Fine Arts Academy, John Marshall High School, Luther High School, Norman High School, Norman North High School, Putnam City North High School, Southeast High School and U.S. Grant High School. In addition to taking classes in ballet, modern, jazz, hip-hop, flamenco and aerial dance from UCO faculty and alumni, six of the participating high schools will have the opportunity to join the UCO Kaleidoscope Dancers in performance. Dancers from Southeast, Norman North and Norman will perform with Kaleidoscope at 7:30 p.m. Friday, while students from Harding Fine Arts Academy, Bishop McGuinness and John Marshall high schools will perform with Kaleidoscope at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The festival also will include instructional workshops for high school dance teachers. Tickets to the concert are $14 for adults, $10 for seniors and non-UCO students and $4 for UCO students. To reserve tickets, call the box office at 9743375. Reservations are recommended.

INFORMATION For more information about the festival, call 974-5231 or e-mail jjacobson @uco.edu.

ACHIEVERS devices that have been submitted by companies worldwide. He plays a critical role in the design and monitoring of the clinical trials that ultimately lead to approval or disapproval of these retinal devices. Dr. Sam Dahr

PROFESSIONAL An Integris ophthalmologist has received a certificate of appreciation from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Sam Dahr has been the principal retinal consultant for the Ophthalmic Device Division of the FDA for the past three and a half years. In this role, he reviews applications for FDA approval of retinal

COMMUNITY SERVICE Four community activists and one nonprofit were honored by World Neighbors at the A Journey Around the World gala. Patty Johnston and Mark and Jerry Gautreaux were given the World Neighbors Namaste award, recognizing them for their contributions to World Neighbors and for representing the qualities of World Neighbors mission throughout the Oklahoma community. The

Dale Rogers Training Center is receiving the World Neighbors & KFOR Dignity award for the nonprofit category. The center provides training and job placement to promote independence for people with disabilities. The other Dignity Award winner is Charlotte Lankard, a marriage and family therapist. Lankard founded the nonprofit group Calm Waters, which provides grief support groups for children.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Other Legal Notices

Notice of Intent to Bid Rehabilitation and Construction Contracts For The Comanche Nation Housing Authority h The Comanche Nation Housing Authority (CNHA), Lawton, Oklahoma will be soliciting bids in the near future on housing rehabilitation and new construction work. The intent of this announcement is to identify qualified Indianowned contractors that may be interested in bidding on future work. All interested Indian-owned contractors will be placed on a list for use in future solicitations. Interested contractors may provide CNHA with a Statement of Intent to respond to future Invitation for Bid (IFB) or Request for Proposals (RFP). Contractors must be bondable and must provide required insurance documentation as well as Contractor’s License. For a detailed list of requirements, interested firms may contact the Comanche Nation Housing Authority at 580357-4956. The closing date for accepting the letter of intent is November 5, 2010 at the close of business, 5:00 pm CST.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Union Bank, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to (1) merge with First Coleman National Bank, Coleman, Texas, Graham National Bank, Graham, Texas, Citizens National Bank of Breckenridge, Breckenridge, Texas, First State Bank of Canadian, National Association, Canadian, Texas, First National Bank of Olney, Olney, Texas, Friona State Bank, National Association, Friona, Texas, Farmers National Bank of Seymour, Seymour, Texas and InterBank, Elk City, Oklahoma; and (2) purchase the assets and assume the liabilities of the banking offices of First National Bank of Borger, Borger, Texas which are located at 531 N. Deahl Street, Borger, Texas and 525 Morse Street, Stinnett, Texas. Each of the banking offices of the banks to be acquired by merger and the banking offices located in Borger and Stinnett, Texas to be acquired by purchase and assumption will become branch offices of Union Bank. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of our banks in helping to

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Other Legal Notices CITY OF MOORE BID NOTICE BID #101-008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Moore will receive sealed bids in the office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, Moore City Hall, 301 North Broadway, Suite 203, Moore, Oklahoma, 73160, for MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY. Bids will not be accepted after 1:45 P.M., CST, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2010. Bids will be made in accordance with the specifications, and these specifications are on file and available for examination, or may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, Moore City Hall. One (1) copy addressed to the Office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, will be submitted, and that copy must be sealed and clearly marked with the name of the bidding vendor and identified as follows: “SEALED BID #101-008” “MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY” The bidder must attend the mandatory pre-bid conference at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 22, 2010. The pre-bid conference will be held in the City Council Chambers, Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore, Oklahoma. Attendance is required in order to be qualified to submit a bid. Bids filed as provided herein will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 29, 2010, Moore City Hall, City Council Chambers, 301 North Broadway, Suite 126, Moore, Oklahoma 73160. All bids will remain at least forty-eight (48) hours thereafter, before a contract will be made and entered into thereon. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays], before the time set for the receipt of bids will not be considered. The City of Moore reserves the right to accept the bid which, in the judgment of the Staff, is the best for the application of needs, materials and services as covered in the specifications, and is deemed the best, overall, for the good of the City. The City of Moore reserves the right to reject any and all bids; waive irregularities and formalities in any bid submitted. In addition, the City of Moore reserves the right to contract with one or more parties to perform identical services as deemed appropriate. The City of Moore is an equal opportunity employer. Carol Folsom, Purchasing Agent 405/793-5022

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND PETITION FOR FORFEITURE PURSUANT TO PENAL CODE SECTION 186.4 COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, SUPERIOR COURT CASE NO: 1333867 TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, you are hereby notified that: On July 1, 2010, the District Attorney of Santa Barbara County initiated proceedings to forfeit property and assets pursuant to Penal Code section 186.4. The property and assets subject to the above-described proceedings includes cash, an automobile and other personal property. You are hereby notified that any interested person may file a verified claim with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara stating the nature and amount of their claimed interest. You must file this claim within thirty (30) days after receipt of this notice, or within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of the notice, if that person was not personally served or served by mail. You must serve a verified copy of your claim on the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office (Attention: Senior Deputy District Attorney Lee Carter) at 1112 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Failure to serve the District Attorney's Office within thirty (30) days from the date of filing the claimed interest with the Superior Court can result in a waiver of interest in the property or assets or delay of any legal proceedings. Failure to file a verified claim stating an interest in the property or assets with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara will result in a waiver of any interest in the property or assets without further hearing pursuant to Penal Code §186.5). The following property is subject to the above-described proceedings: $4,180.00 U.S. currency, a 2000 CADILLAC VIN 1G6KD54Y8YU202179 and all the contents of the 2000 CADILLAC, including clothing, cell phones and computers Dated: October 27, 2010 JOYCE DUDLEY District Attorney LEE CARTER Senior Deputy District Attorney

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meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application in writing to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198. The comment period will not end before December 6, 2010, and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Board’s procedures or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City at (816) 881-2633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are accepted by the Reserve Bank on or before the last date of the comment period.

Anyone having interest in the following vehicle should contact John @ 370-0845: 2002 Honda CRX VIN # JHMEC 1316HS026799 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT VIN# KMHCG35C22V196493 1992 MERCEDES 190E VIN# WDBDA29D1NF969454 Anyone having financial interest in 1964 Chev VIN# 41847R1218884 Contact Lloyd 405-388-2671 Anyone with legal/ financial interest in 2002 Saturn VIN 1G8ZN12862Z234296 call Sandra 350-2087 Anyone with interest in 1971 chev nova vin# 1142711138 to be sold for mechanics lien on 11-25-10 contact Gary 405-812-8209. Anyone with interest in 1974 Johnson boat motor Model # 50ESL74M, Serial #4040409, HP 50. Sale to be held on 11-25-10 contact Betty at 405-634-5897


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OCU set to honor distinguished alumni BY LESLIE BERGER NewsOK.com Contributor

The Oklahoma City University Alumni Association will honor outstanding alumni during Homecoming weekend festivities Saturday. The annual Distinguished Alumni and Athletic Hall of Fame Awards Dinner begins with a 6 p.m. reception, followed by dinner at 7 p.m. at the Devon Boathouse, 616 SE 6. This year’s honorees are law alumnus Carl Alexandre; business alumnus Frank Bruno; music alumnus Edgar Cruz; honors alumnus John Fletcher; dance/arts management alumnus Stephen Kovash; arts and sciences alumna Angela Monson; nursing alumna Marla PeixottoSmith; religion alumna Ekaterina “Katya” Marsakova Zoubkova; and Ath-

Carl Alexandre

Frank Bruno

and Training for the U.S. Department of Justice. Bruno was previously inducted into the OCU Athletic Hall Ekaterina of Fame. He is Marla PeixottoMarsakova Smith retiring after Zoubkova 59 years as letic Hall of Fame inductee co-owner of Bruno’s Home Furnishings. Phil McSpadden. Alexandre is the diCruz played string rector of the Office of bass for the OCU OrchesOverseas Prosecutorial tra, established his indeDevelopment, Assistance pendent record label,

John Fletcher

Edgar Cruz

Stephen Kovash

E.C.I. Recordings in 1987, and began his official recording career in 1989. Fletcher starred in a number of OCU productions and spent a year in OCU’s touring children’s theater troupe, the Let’s Pretend Players. He is assistant professor of theater history and women’s and gender studies at Louisiana State University. Kovash serves as the national acquisition manager for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Develop-

Phil McSpadden

ment and is a certified federal mediator and facilitator. Monson was elected chair of the Oklahoma City School Board last year after previously serving as a state senator and in the state House of Representatives. Peixotto-Smith earned her master’s in nursing degree from OCU’s Kramer School of nursing. She is retired as director of emergency services, outpatient services and the transplant program at St. Anthony Hospital. Zoubkova, a native of

Angela Monson

Ulyanovsk, Russia, transferred to OCU in 1994. She serves as pastor of the Tyumen United Methodist Church of the Salvation. McSpadden is a softball coach who has captured eight national championships and was a 2007 National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics hall of famer. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by calling 208-7787 or e-mailing rsvp@okcu.edu.

LESLIE BERGER IS OCU ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS.


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THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

HINTON

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

Fire: Damage was about $125,000 FROM PAGE 15A

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

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Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

CHOCTAW

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LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

› ›

nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

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PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

BUCHANAN

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Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 Resthaven Spaces 1 & 2, lot 128, section 3, Garden of Devotion. $3000/both plus transfer fee. 405-745-2257 Resthaven Cemetery, S. chapel, spaces 14, lot 370, section 12, market value $3495 ea. sacrife $2000 each. 405-943-5059 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com RESTHAVEN CEMETERY DOUBLE DIP LAWN CRYPTS (STACKED) $6000 794-0005 Resthaven Memorial Gardens 2 Plots $4300 for both, includes transfer fee. Call 405-823-8245 Resthaven Memory Gardens, OKC, spaces 1-4, lot 399, section 12, buy from owner, save 50%, $1400 ea, 918-492-1344. Resurrection Mausoleum, 2 crypts, row 11, tier 3, 1 north, $7600 value, sell for $6500, 405-340-1911, ask for Max. John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 2 plots in the Garden of Devotion $3000 for both. Call 405-948-3125 ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $1975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

METRO | STATE Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 15

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 NORTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO ESCAPED THROUGH A WINDOW, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 26A

PARAMEDIC STUDENTS BLAST THROUGH EXPLOSIVES LESSON

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

OKLAHOMA CITY

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone who has information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FLU SHOTS OFFERED FREE

An Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic, right, sets off a bomb Monday as Rockie Yardley, left, an Edmond Police Department bomb expert, and two paramedic students watch. Paramedic students joined with the Edmond police bomb squad for a training exercise on responding to explosions. For the story, see Page 16A. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the parish hall at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots while they last and free health screenings. A Spanish translator will be available. For more information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Metro-area high schools show wide range on ACT scores BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

Advanced Placement U.S. history students Laenie Fletcher, left, and Hannah Wilson read along with their teacher, Christine Curtright, at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state.

Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman SEE EXAM, PAGE 16A

ONLINE SHARE YOUR NEWS Post your Oklahoma City-area news immediately on NewsOK.com by adding okc@news ok.com to your email list. For details: knowit.newsok.com/ oklahoma-city.

INDEX Deaths Records

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

EMSA, bomb technicians team up to teach safety

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

IN BRIEF ST. ELIJAH PLANS ANNUAL FOOD FEST St. Elijah Orthodox Christian Church will host its annual food festival and holiday bake sale from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the church, NW 150 and May Avenue. Guided tours of the church and specialty booths also will be available. For more information, go to www.stelijahokc.com.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic students this week got an explosive lesson in what law enforcement officers face at crime scenes. Nine paramedic students spent the day Monday with Edmond police officers and members of their bomb squad. It was the first time EMSA and a law enforcement agency have joined forces to help train paramedics about crime scene investigations, how to help an injured bomb technician and what to look for in explosives, said Maj. Heather Yazdanipour, an EMSA paramedic and instructor. “Today has been invaluable,” Yazdanipour said. “There is a lot of power packed into today. What better way to learn but to seek out the experts.”

CALENDAR THURSDAY

A paramedic student looks at different types of explosives.

Edmond officer Michael King also is an EMSA paramedic. He was instrumental in getting the class together. “It is a great learning experience,” King said. “EMSA and the law enforcement community react to situations every day. Very seldom do they get together outside of the scene. This gives them the ability to work better together.” Some of the students dressed in 90-pound bomb technician suits, while others learned how to remove the $12,000 piece of protective gear.

Paramedic students Tori Spencer, right, and Jennifer Coker look at a stick of dynamite Monday during a demonstration on explosives. PHOTOS BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

They later learned about the different kinds of explosives and what to look for when they arrive at a crime scene involving an explosion. Three of them got to set off different kinds of explosives at the police firing range. “All explosives burn fast,” said Rockie Yardley, a police department bomb

expert. “There are different sizes. None of them are good.” Yardley warned the students to be aware of what is around them because homemade bombs are becoming more popular. “We are rescuers at heart,” Yardley said. “Just stop and think. Take it slow.”

Exam: College requirements vary FROM PAGE 15A

and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be college-ready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other fouryear schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of students who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, accept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced

Placement courses students take. “One of the main things we do here is really encourage a rigorous program and hold students to high expectations, whether in AP or pre-AP classes,” Keirns said. Putnam City high schools also showed a wide range of average scores on the ACT test. Putnam City North tied for eighth in the state with five other schools with an average score of 22.9. Putnam City High School had a score of 20.5, while Putnam City West High School scored 19.3. Putnam City Academy, the district’s alternative school, scored 17.8. Melton said districts can learn from the scores. “We take the data and use it to design curriculum,” he said. “We see where we can do a better job in emphasizing certain areas to help students be better able to succeed in college.” Students can prepare for the ACT in a variety of ways, but what really counts is the courses they

take, Melton said. Students who take biology, chemistry and physics, for instance, typically perform at college-ready levels on the ACT, he said. The rigor of a course also counts, said Steve Lindley, Putnam City School District spokesman.

Lindley and Melton both said students need to start thinking about doing well on the ACT in middle school. “If you’re thinking about doing well on the ACT, your junior year is too late,” Melton said. “The die has been cast.”

Moore School Board, 6 p.m., administration Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., building, 1500 SE 4. Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, Mustang School Board, 691-0509. 7 p.m., education center, 400 N Clear Springs FRIDAY Road. Tree Sale, 8 a.m., Moore Okarche School Board, Community Center, 301 7 p.m., superintendent’s office, 215 N Fourth. S Howard, 793-5090. Western Heights School Board, 6 p.m., 8104 SW SATURDAY 44. Oklahoma State Piedmont School Board, University-Oklahoma 6 p.m., administration City Farmers Market, building, 713 Piedmont 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Road. Ave. Tecumseh School Board, 7 p.m., Tecumseh High School library, 901 N 13. MONDAY Union City Board of McEvoy’s ToastTrustees, 7:30 p.m., 102 masters, 6:30 p.m., N Elm St. Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa, TUESDAY 787-1598. Deer Creek School Mid-Del Toastmasters, Board, 6 p.m., Deer 6:15 p.m., Midwest City Creek High School, 6101 Library, 8243 E Reno NW 206. Ave., 341-1938. Choctaw-Nicoma Park West Women’s School Board, 7 p.m., Connection, 11:15 a.m., 12800 NE 10. Sportsman’s Country El Reno School Board, Club, 4001 NW 39, 7405:30 p.m., administra7374. tion building, 100 S Choctaw City Council, Bickford. 7 p.m., city hall, 2500 N Kingfisher City CounChoctaw Road. cil, 5:30 p.m., city hall, Midwest City Council, 301 N Main. 7:10 p.m., city council Midwest City-Del City chambers, 100 N MidSchool Board, 7 p.m., west Blvd. school board center, Oklahoma City Council, 7217 SE 15, Midwest 8:30 a.m., city hall, 200 N City. Walker Ave.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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OCU set to honor distinguished alumni BY LESLIE BERGER NewsOK.com Contributor

The Oklahoma City University Alumni Association will honor outstanding alumni during Homecoming weekend festivities Saturday. The annual Distinguished Alumni and Athletic Hall of Fame Awards Dinner begins with a 6 p.m. reception, followed by dinner at 7 p.m. at the Devon Boathouse, 616 SE 6. This year’s honorees are law alumnus Carl Alexandre; business alumnus Frank Bruno; music alumnus Edgar Cruz; honors alumnus John Fletcher; dance/arts management alumnus Stephen Kovash; arts and sciences alumna Angela Monson; nursing alumna Marla PeixottoSmith; religion alumna Ekaterina “Katya” Marsakova Zoubkova; and Athletic Hall of Fame inductee

Carl Alexandre

Frank Bruno

Department of Justice. Bruno was previously inducted into the OCU Athletic Hall of Fame. He is retiring after 59 years as co-owner of Bruno’s Home Fur-

Marla PeixottoSmith

Ekaterina Marsakova Zoubkova

Phil McSpadden. Alexandre is the director of the Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training for the U.S.

nishings. Cruz played string bass for the OCU Orchestra, established his independent record label, E.C.I. Recordings in 1987,

John Fletcher

Edgar Cruz

Stephen Kovash

and began his official recording career in 1989. Fletcher starred in a number of OCU productions and spent a year in OCU’s touring children’s theater troupe, the Let’s Pretend Players. He is assistant professor of theater history and women’s and gender studies at Louisiana State University. Kovash serves as the national acquisition manager for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development and is a certified federal mediator and facilitator.

Phil McSpadden

Monson was elected chair of the Oklahoma City School Board last year after previously serving as a state senator and in the state House of Representatives. Peixotto-Smith earned her master’s in nursing degree from OCU’s Kramer School of nursing. She is retired as director of emergency services, outpatient services and the transplant program at St. Anthony Hospital. Zoubkova, a native of Ulyanovsk, Russia, transferred to OCU in 1994. She serves as pastor of the Ty-

Angela Monson

umen United Methodist Church of the Salvation. McSpadden is a softball coach who has captured eight national championships and was a 2007 National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics hall of famer. He has been recognized as national coach of the year by the National Fastpitch Coaches association three times. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by calling 208-7787 or e-mailing rsvp@okcu.edu.

LESLIE BERGER IS OCU ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Superintendent stresses safety FROM STAFF REPORTS

ALSO IN THE NEWS ...

WARR ACRES — Putnam

City School District parents on Monday night were reminded to be vigilant about their children’s safety in light of recent news of three cases of middle school students being abducted and molested in Oklahoma City. Superintendent Paul Hurst said Oklahoma City police believe there could be a connection between the cases and have formed a task force to investigate the incidents. “It is important that parents and families remind their children of personal safety rules,” said Hurst during the school

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED Superintendent Paul Hurst said The Care Share Program, a volunteer effort that assists families in need in Putnam City schools, is asking for more people and organizations to help children have a merry Christmas and a warm winter. Those interested in donating may do so by sending checks, made payable to Care Share, to the Putnam City Foundation, 5401 NW 40, Oklahoma City, OK 73122.

board’s meeting. “Ask children to walk to and from school with others, to never approach or speak to a stranger, and to report any suspicious person or persons to a trusted adult. We must work together to

keep children safe.” The girls were abducted Sept. 16 and 29 and Oct. 29 near May and Brookline avenues, SW 59 and Blackwelder Avenue and near Klein Avenue and NW 16.

Advisers say high school students should plan now for college years BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

It’s never too soon for high school students to start preparing for college, advisers say. Dee Dee Stafford, a college adviser at Putnam City North High School, said students need to take the most rigorous courses they can successfully handle, mainly Advanced Placement courses. “This is essential to be prepared for college and to be prepared to do well on the SAT or ACT, the admission tests for college,” Stafford said. Stafford also stresses to students that they need to take four years of math — algebra I, geometry, algebra II and pre-calculus or trigonometry. And the newest ACT research indicates that students score best on the test when they have taken biology, chemistry and physics, she said. Some counselors suggest students take the ACT or SAT as early as their freshman year. Others recommend waiting until students have had Algebra II, which is sometimes the junior year. Most advisers recommend taking the tests more than once to improve scores. Many four-year state colleges require an ACT score of 24 or higher for entrance. Stafford said she recommends students take the ACT at least once by the end of their junior year so they can begin applying to colleges by the beginning of their senior year. Students also should select a number of colleges to which they will apply, Stafford said. The exact number, however, depends on the teen. For scholarships, Stafford recommends students sign up early for one or two of

Architects to speak at OU FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Architects from Massachusetts, Michigan and Arkansas are scheduled to speak as part of the University of Oklahoma College of Architecture’s Fall 2010 Bruce Goff Chair of Creative Architecture Lecture Series. Presentations are scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m. today in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. The series is in conjunction with the “Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind” multimedia exhibit at OU’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, on display through Jan. 2. Goff was chairman of the OU School of Architecture from 1947 to 1955 and is considered a pioneer of the organic design movement, along with Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Sullivan. The speakers will be Sheila Kennedy, professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Craig Borum, associate professor at the University of Michigan, and Marlon Blackwell, head of the University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture. The event is part of the Creating Making Forum scheduled today through Friday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

Emily Lodes, a senior at Putnam City North High School, fills out her college application with the help of Chan Klingensmith. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

the free scholarship search engines. By the beginning of the year, parents of seniors need to have their financial information in order to apply for federal and state money. Oklahoma scholarship deadlines are Feb 1, Stafford said. Ann Thompson, a guidance counselor at Deer Creek High School, said students should work on their resumes the minute they start high school. These should include a record of their volunteerism, any extracurricular activities they’ve been involved in and any rewards they’ve received. “Even write down good deeds,” Thompson said. To help students decide an area of study, Stafford recommends the Career Interest area of the PLAN test given in 10th grade, or she advises students to explore websites like www.matchcollege. com or the College Board’s www.myroad. collegeboard.com.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

CAMPUS BRIEF OCU FILM SERIES CONTINUES

LANGSTON TO HOST DEBATE

The Oklahoma City University Film Institute continues its annual series at 2 p.m. Sunday with Sergei Dvortsevoy’s “Tulpan.” The screening will be in the Meinders School of Business Kerr McGee Auditorium, McKinley Avenue and NW 27. Admission is free. “Tulpan” won the Un Certain Regard award at the Cannes Film Festival and was one of the two most requested works on evaluation forms from last year’s OCU series. The Kazakhstan film is about Asa who returns to his sister’s nomadic brood to begin a career as a shepherd. But before he can tend a flock of his own, Asa must win the hand of the only eligible bachelorette for miles, Tulpan. For more information or future dates in the film series, go to www.okcu.edu/film-lit.

Langston University-Oklahoma City students will debate corrections and criminal justice issues with professionals from those fields from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the school’s campus, 4205 N Lincoln Blvd. The program is open to everyone. For more information, call 962-1667.

LICENSE PLATES AVAILABLE SHAWNEE — State-issued Oklahoma

Baptist University license plates are available for purchase through the Oklahoma Tax Commission. The license plates feature OBU’s Raley Chapel logo. To order an OBU specialty license plate, go to www.tax.ok.gov/ plates/sp140.html. FROM STAFF REPORTS


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Old metal becomes art at OU iron pour BY JAMES S. TYREE Staff Writer jtyree@opubco.com

NORMAN — University of Oklahoma art students and faculty transformed the cast iron from three antique bathtubs and a sink into artistic molded sculptures. They did so Friday outside OU’s North Base art studio, during the School of Art and Art History’s fall iron pour. Students spent part of the day smashing the iron into bits and melting them in a furnace that can reach 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. But that may not have been the most difficult task. “It is truly hard to find cast iron nowadays,” OU graduate student Mark Zimmerman said. “We were literally going on a hunt for it.” Jonathan Hils, an OU associate professor of sculpture, led the group as he does twice a year in melting and pouring iron into sculptured scratch molds. There were about 40 molds this time, each with its own design. The iron cools in the mold and takes the shape of its design. People from the community pre-ordered a mold from the school and some were there to watch the process. Alex Knox, a graduate student from Greenville, N.C., said the iron pour brings an archaic process into the contemporary world while building teamwork. She said despite the hard work involved, the energy from people working together “is great.” Graduate student Garrett Stowe, who completed his bachelor’s degree at

Alexandra Knox shovels iron at the University of Oklahoma School of Art and Art History iron pour. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

East Carolina University as Knox did, said the iron pour presents a golden opportunity for students. “If you want to use this material, you have one chance to do it in a semester,” he said. The iron pour was the first half of the School of Art and Art History’s Fuego Friday. A wearable art costume party and contest took place that evening at the Fred Jones Art Center.

Carl Billingsley and Mike Hill stoke the fire.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


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LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org. For more information, go to wimgo.com.

TODAY

SUNDAY

What: Book Blast When: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Choctaw Ages: 6 and older

What: Flute circle concert When: 2 to 3 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

What: Local Author Series: Rodney Redus When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Del City Ages: Adults

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Aseem Nevrekar, a student at the University of Oklahoma, performs with OU’s Arashi Taiko, an Asian drum band, at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam at Moore Public Library. The festival was one of several activities Saturday, including the annual Red Ribbon Parade against drug abuse. PHOTOS BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

What: Family Thanksgiving story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Ralph Ellison Ages: All ages

What: Pajama story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 2½ to 5

What: Elaine and Susan Hoffman and the Fabulous Shpielkehs When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: All ages

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

What: Developmental screenings When: 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bethany Ages: Newborn to 5 years

What: Create a professional resume When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Downtown Ages: Adults

SATURDAY What: Apple pie time When: 10 to 11:30 a.m. Where: The Village Ages: 5 to 12

What: Nutrition education and weight loss program When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: The Village Ages: Adults

Drummers with Arashi Taiko perform. Above and right: Bagpiper Jessie Bills performs Saturday at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam in Moore.

METRO ACHIEVERS half years. He plays a critical role in the design and monitoring of the clinical trials that ultimately lead to approval or disapproval of these retinal devices.

Dr. Sam Dahr

PROFESSIONAL An Integris ophthalmologist has received a certificate of appreciation from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Sam Dahr has been the principal retinal consultant for the Ophthalmic Device Division of the FDA for the past three and a

UCO offers new athletic program

COMMUNITY SERVICE Four community activists and one nonprofit were honored by World Neighbors at the A Journey Around the World gala. Patty Johnston and Mark and Jerry Gautreaux were given the World Neighbors Namaste Award, recognizing them for their contributions to World Neighbors and for representing the qualities of World Neigh-

bors mission throughout Oklahoma. The Dale Rogers Training Center is receiving the World Neighbors & KFOR Dignity Award for the nonprofit category. The center provides training and job placement to promote independence for people with disabilities. The other Dignity Award winner is Charlotte Lankard, a marriage and family therapist. Lankard founded the nonprofit group Calm Waters, which provides grief and divorce support groups for children. Based in Oklahoma City, World Neighbors is an organization striving to eliminate hunger, poverty and disease in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

INFORMATION For information about the program or to download an application, go to http://ceps.uco.edu/ programs/at, call McKibbin at 974-2959, or e-mail jmckibbin@uco.edu.

BY SARAH HILL NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Graduate Athletic Training Education Program is accepting applications for early admission. UCO’s program is the only one of its kind in Oklahoma and only one of 23 offered in the United States. The program was accredited earlier this year by the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. UCO’s program offers a master of science degree in athletic training. Since its creation, two students have graduated from the program. Currently 15 students are enrolled in the program. The deadline for early admission is Dec. 15. The final deadline to apply for admission is March 1. Applicants will not be admitted to UCO’s Jackson College of Graduate Studies until they have been accepted into the Graduate Athletic Training Education Program. A maximum of 10 students will be admitted into the program each year. The program’s academic plan of study must last a minimum of six semesters — two summer terms and four regular semesters. The first semester begins each summer in July. SARAH HILL IS A UNIVERSITY RELATIONS STAFF WRITER AT UCO.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Other Legal Notices

Notice of Intent to Bid Rehabilitation and Construction Contracts For The Comanche Nation Housing Authority h The Comanche Nation Housing Authority (CNHA), Lawton, Oklahoma will be soliciting bids in the near future on housing rehabilitation and new construction work. The intent of this announcement is to identify qualified Indianowned contractors that may be interested in bidding on future work. All interested Indian-owned contractors will be placed on a list for use in future solicitations. Interested contractors may provide CNHA with a Statement of Intent to respond to future Invitation for Bid (IFB) or Request for Proposals (RFP). Contractors must be bondable and must provide required insurance documentation as well as Contractor’s License. For a detailed list of requirements, interested firms may contact the Comanche Nation Housing Authority at 580357-4956. The closing date for accepting the letter of intent is November 5, 2010 at the close of business, 5:00 pm CST.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Union Bank, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to (1) merge with First Coleman National Bank, Coleman, Texas, Graham National Bank, Graham, Texas, Citizens National Bank of Breckenridge, Breckenridge, Texas, First State Bank of Canadian, National Association, Canadian, Texas, First National Bank of Olney, Olney, Texas, Friona State Bank, National Association, Friona, Texas, Farmers National Bank of Seymour, Seymour, Texas and InterBank, Elk City, Oklahoma; and (2) purchase the assets and assume the liabilities of the banking offices of First National Bank of Borger, Borger, Texas which are located at 531 N. Deahl Street, Borger, Texas and 525 Morse Street, Stinnett, Texas. Each of the banking offices of the banks to be acquired by merger and the banking offices located in Borger and Stinnett, Texas to be acquired by purchase and assumption will become branch offices of Union Bank. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of our banks in helping to

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Other Legal Notices CITY OF MOORE BID NOTICE BID #101-008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Moore will receive sealed bids in the office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, Moore City Hall, 301 North Broadway, Suite 203, Moore, Oklahoma, 73160, for MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY. Bids will not be accepted after 1:45 P.M., CST, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2010. Bids will be made in accordance with the specifications, and these specifications are on file and available for examination, or may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, Moore City Hall. One (1) copy addressed to the Office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, will be submitted, and that copy must be sealed and clearly marked with the name of the bidding vendor and identified as follows: “SEALED BID #101-008” “MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY” The bidder must attend the mandatory pre-bid conference at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 22, 2010. The pre-bid conference will be held in the City Council Chambers, Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore, Oklahoma. Attendance is required in order to be qualified to submit a bid. Bids filed as provided herein will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 29, 2010, Moore City Hall, City Council Chambers, 301 North Broadway, Suite 126, Moore, Oklahoma 73160. All bids will remain at least forty-eight (48) hours thereafter, before a contract will be made and entered into thereon. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays], before the time set for the receipt of bids will not be considered. The City of Moore reserves the right to accept the bid which, in the judgment of the Staff, is the best for the application of needs, materials and services as covered in the specifications, and is deemed the best, overall, for the good of the City. The City of Moore reserves the right to reject any and all bids; waive irregularities and formalities in any bid submitted. In addition, the City of Moore reserves the right to contract with one or more parties to perform identical services as deemed appropriate. The City of Moore is an equal opportunity employer. Carol Folsom, Purchasing Agent 405/793-5022

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND PETITION FOR FORFEITURE PURSUANT TO PENAL CODE SECTION 186.4 COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, SUPERIOR COURT CASE NO: 1333867 TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, you are hereby notified that: On July 1, 2010, the District Attorney of Santa Barbara County initiated proceedings to forfeit property and assets pursuant to Penal Code section 186.4. The property and assets subject to the above-described proceedings includes cash, an automobile and other personal property. You are hereby notified that any interested person may file a verified claim with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara stating the nature and amount of their claimed interest. You must file this claim within thirty (30) days after receipt of this notice, or within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of the notice, if that person was not personally served or served by mail. You must serve a verified copy of your claim on the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office (Attention: Senior Deputy District Attorney Lee Carter) at 1112 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Failure to serve the District Attorney's Office within thirty (30) days from the date of filing the claimed interest with the Superior Court can result in a waiver of interest in the property or assets or delay of any legal proceedings. Failure to file a verified claim stating an interest in the property or assets with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara will result in a waiver of any interest in the property or assets without further hearing pursuant to Penal Code §186.5). The following property is subject to the above-described proceedings: $4,180.00 U.S. currency, a 2000 CADILLAC VIN 1G6KD54Y8YU202179 and all the contents of the 2000 CADILLAC, including clothing, cell phones and computers Dated: October 27, 2010 JOYCE DUDLEY District Attorney LEE CARTER Senior Deputy District Attorney

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meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application in writing to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198. The comment period will not end before December 6, 2010, and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Board’s procedures or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City at (816) 881-2633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are accepted by the Reserve Bank on or before the last date of the comment period.

Anyone having interest in the following vehicle should contact John @ 370-0845: 2002 Honda CRX VIN # JHMEC 1316HS026799 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT VIN# KMHCG35C22V196493 1992 MERCEDES 190E VIN# WDBDA29D1NF969454 Anyone having financial interest in 1964 Chev VIN# 41847R1218884 Contact Lloyd 405-388-2671 Anyone with legal/ financial interest in 2002 Saturn VIN 1G8ZN12862Z234296 call Sandra 350-2087 Anyone with interest in 1971 chev nova vin# 1142711138 to be sold for mechanics lien on 11-25-10 contact Gary 405-812-8209. Anyone with interest in 1974 Johnson boat motor Model # 50ESL74M, Serial #4040409, HP 50. Sale to be held on 11-25-10 contact Betty at 405-634-5897


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Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

› ›

nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


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Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CHOCTAW

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

FROM PAGE 15A

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

HINTON

Fire: Damage was about $125,000

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

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PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

BUCHANAN

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

METRO | STATE Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 15

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 SOUTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO LEFT FROM THE HOUSE, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 21A

PARAMEDIC STUDENTS BLAST THROUGH EXPLOSIVES LESSON

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

OKLAHOMA CITY

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone who has information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FLU SHOTS OFFERED FREE

An Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic, right, sets off a bomb Monday as Rockie Yardley, left, an Edmond Police Department bomb expert, and two paramedic students watch. Paramedic students joined with the Edmond police bomb squad for a training exercise on responding to explosions. For the story, see Page 16A. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the parish hall at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots while they last and free health screenings. A Spanish translator will be available. For more information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Metro-area high schools show wide range on ACT scores BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

Advanced Placement U.S. history students Laenie Fletcher, left, and Hannah Wilson read along with their teacher, Christine Curtright, at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state.

Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman SEE EXAM, PAGE 16A

ONLINE SHARE YOUR NEWS Post your Oklahoma City-area news immediately on NewsOK.com by adding okc@news ok.com to your email list. For details: knowit.newsok.com/ oklahoma-city.

INDEX Deaths Records

21A 21A


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

EMSA, bomb technicians team up to teach safety

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

IN BRIEF ST. ELIJAH PLANS ANNUAL FOOD FEST St. Elijah Orthodox Christian Church will host its annual food festival and holiday bake sale from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the church, NW 150 and May Avenue. Guided tours of the church and specialty booths also will be available. For more information, go to www.stelijahokc.com.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic students this week got an explosive lesson in what law enforcement officers face at crime scenes. Nine paramedic students spent the day Monday with Edmond police officers and members of their bomb squad. It was the first time EMSA and a law enforcement agency have joined forces to help train paramedics about crime scene investigations, how to help an injured bomb technician and what to look for in explosives, said Maj. Heather Yazdanipour, an EMSA paramedic and instructor. “Today has been invaluable,” Yazdanipour said. “There is a lot of power packed into today. What better way to learn but to seek out the experts.”

CALENDAR THURSDAY A paramedic student looks at different types of explosives.

Edmond officer Michael King also is an EMSA paramedic. He was instrumental in getting the class together. “It is a great learning experience,” King said. “EMSA and the law enforcement community react to situations every day. Very seldom do they get together outside of the scene. This gives them the ability to work better together.” Some of the students dressed in 90-pound bomb technician suits, while others learned how to remove the $12,000 piece of protective gear.

Paramedic students Tori Spencer, right, and Jennifer Coker look at a stick of dynamite Monday during a demonstration on explosives. PHOTOS BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

They later learned about the different kinds of explosives and what to look for when they arrive at a crime scene involving an explosion. Three of them got to set off different kinds of explosives at the police firing range. “All explosives burn fast,” said Rockie Yardley, a police department bomb

expert. “There are different sizes. None of them are good.” Yardley warned the students to be aware of what is around them because homemade bombs are becoming more popular. “We are rescuers at heart,” Yardley said. “Just stop and think. Take it slow.”

Exam: College requirements vary FROM PAGE 15A

and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be college-ready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other four-year schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of students who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, accept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced Placement courses students take. “One of the main things we do here is really encourage a rigorous program and hold students to high expectations, whether in AP or pre-AP classes,” Keirns said. “We really want our students to be fully prepared when they leave us.” The Midwest City-Del City School District saw average ACT scores ranging from 22.4 at Carl Albert High School to 16.7 at the Mid-Del Alternative Academy. While school district spokeswoman Stacey Boyer said the district would not comment on the differences in scores, she did point out that Carl Albert’s 2010 score was a full point above 2009 ACT scores. Principal Silvya Kirk said that comes from emphasizing reading, nonfiction writing, critical thinking skills and focus in all classes all year, she said. “We’re in the business of learning,” she said. “Academics have to be the focus.” The school also has a number of programs to help students who are struggling in classes. The options range from Teacher on Call to Saturday School. “If a kid here fails a course, they chose to,” Kirk said.

Advanced Placement U.S. history teacher Christine Curtright goes over lessons with her class at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

AT A GLANCE ACT SCORES BELOW NATIONAL LEVELS Oklahoma’s 2009 graduating class is behind the national average ACT test score in English, mathematics and science, according to state schools Superintendent Sandy Garrett’s latest “Investing in Oklahoma” report. The state matches the average score in reading. In English, Oklahoma’s average score is 20.5; the national is 20.6. In math, the average score is 19.9 for the state and 21 for the nation. In science, scores are 20.5 for the state and 20.9 for the nation. Reading scores are 21.4. Composite scores for the state are 20.7, and nationally 21.1. Shelly Hickman, spokeswoman for the state Education Department, said it’s important to remember that Oklahoma has more test takers than the national average. “We’re very close to the national average in some subjects,” she said, “But math is an area where we need to improve.” TRICIA PEMBERTON, STAFF WRITER

School Board, 6 p.m., 8104 SW 44. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Piedmont School Board, Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 6 p.m., administration 691-0509. building, 713 Piedmont Road. FRIDAY Tecumseh School Board, Tree Sale, 8 a.m., Moore 7 p.m., Tecumseh High Community Center, 301 School library, 901 N 13. Union City Board of S Howard, 793-5090. Trustees, 7:30 p.m., 102 N Elm St. SATURDAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave.

TUESDAY

Mid-Del Toastmasters, 6:15 p.m., Midwest City Library, 8243 E Reno Ave., 341-1938. West Women’s MONDAY Connection, 11:15 a.m., McEvoy’s ToastSportsman’s Country masters, 6:30 p.m., Club, 4001 NW 39, 740Grace United Methodist 7374. Church, 6316 N Tulsa, Choctaw City Council, 787-1598. 7 p.m., city hall, 2500 N Deer Creek School Choctaw Road. Board, 6 p.m., Deer Midwest City Council, Creek High School, 6101 7:10 p.m., city council NW 206. chambers, 100 N MidChoctaw-Nicoma Park west Blvd. School Board, 7 p.m., Oklahoma City Council, 12800 NE 10. 8:30 a.m., city hall, 200 N El Reno School Board, Walker Ave. 5:30 p.m., administration building, 100 S ONLINE Bickford. Kingfisher City Council, 5:30 p.m., city hall, 301 N Main. Make sure all your school Midwest City-Del City or nonprofit events are School Board, 7 p.m., entered into wimgo.com, school board center, the Web site for all activ7217 SE 15, Midwest ities in Oklahoma. City. IT’S EASY TO DO Moore School Board, Go to wimgo.com and log 6 p.m., administration in using your building, 1500 SE 4. NewsOK.com log-in and Mustang School Board, 7 p.m., education password, or choose to create one. Click on “Add center, 400 N Clear Event.” Enter the inSprings Road. Okarche School Board, formation about your 7 p.m., superintendent’s event, and wimgo will help you with each step. office, 215 N Fourth. Western Heights WIMGO.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EVENT CELEBRATES CULTURES

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org. For more information, go to wimgo.com.

TODAY What: Book Blast When: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Choctaw Ages: 6 and older

SATURDAY

What: Local Author Series: Rodney Redus When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Del City Ages: Adults

SUNDAY

THURSDAY What: Pajama story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 2½ to 5 Aseem Nevrekar, a student at the University of Oklahoma, performs with OU’s Arashi Taiko, an Asian drum band, at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam at Moore Public Library. The festival was one of several activities Saturday, including the annual Red Ribbon Parade against drug abuse. PHOTOS BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Phil Clark, of Norman, browses through items for sale.

Above and left: Bagpiper Jessie Bills performs Saturday at the Red Ribbon Culture Jam in Moore. Drummers with Arashi Taiko perform.

UCO offers new athletic training program

METRO ACHIEVERS COMMUNITY SERVICE

BY SARAH HILL NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Graduate Athletic Training Education Program is accepting applications for early admission. UCO’s program is the only one of its kind in Oklahoma and only one of 23 offered in the United States. The program was accredited earlier this year by the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. UCO’s program offers a master of science degree in athletic training. Since its creation, two students have graduated from the program. Currently 15 students are enrolled in the program. The deadline for early admission is Dec. 15. The final deadline to apply for admission is March 1. Applicants will not be admitted to UCO’s Jackson College of Graduate Studies until they have been accepted into the Graduate Athletic Training Education Program. A maximum of 10 students will be admitted into the program each year. The program’s academic plan of study must last a minimum of six semesters — two summer terms and four regular semesters. The first semester begins each summer in July. SARAH HILL IS A UNIVERSITY RELATIONS STAFF WRITER AT UCO.

INFORMATION For information about the program or to download an application, go to http://ceps.uco.edu/ programs/at, call McKibbin at 9742959, or e-mail jmckibbin@uco.edu.

Dr. Sam Dahr

PROFESSIONAL An Integris ophthalmologist has received a certificate of appreciation from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Sam Dahr has been the principal retinal consultant for the Ophthalmic Device Division of the FDA for the past three and a half years. In this role, he reviews applications for FDA approval of retinal devices that have been submitted by companies worldwide. He plays a critical role in the design and monitoring of the clinical trials that ultimately lead to approval or disapproval of these retinal devices. He was recognized in particular for his work in the area of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that affects hundreds of thousands of people in the United States every year.

Four community activists and one nonprofit were honored by World Neighbors at the A Journey Around the World gala. Patty Johnston and Mark and Jerry Gautreaux were given the World Neighbors Namaste Award, recognizing them for their contributions to World Neighbors and for representing the qualities of World Neighbors mission throughout Oklahoma. The Dale Rogers Training Center is receiving the World Neighbors & KFOR Dignity Award for the nonprofit category. The center provides training and job placement to promote independence for people with disabilities. The other Dignity Award winner is Charlotte Lankard, a marriage and family therapist. Lankard founded the nonprofit group Calm Waters, which provides grief and divorce support groups for children. Based in Oklahoma City, World Neighbors is an international development organization striving to eliminate hunger, poverty and disease in the most deprived, rural villages in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

When: 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bethany Ages: Newborn to 5 years

FRIDAY What: Developmental screenings

What: Apple pie time When: 10 to 11:30 a.m. Where: The Village Ages: 5 to 12

What: Flute circle concert When: 2 to 3 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

MONDAY What: Family Thanksgiving story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Ralph Ellison Ages: All ages


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IV

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

OCU to honor alumni during Homecoming

Carl Alexandre

Frank Bruno

Edgar Cruz

John Fletcher

Stephen Kovash

Phil McSpadden

Angela Monson

Marla Peixotto-Smith

Ekaterina Marsakova Zoubkova

BY LESLIE BERGER

Bruno was previously inducted into the OCU Athletic Hall of Fame. He is retiring after 59 years as co-owner of Bruno’s Home Furnishings. Cruz played string bass for the OCU Orchestra, established his independent record label, E.C.I. Recordings in 1987, and began his official recording career in 1989. Fletcher starred in a number of OCU productions and spent a year in OCU’s touring children’s theater troupe, the Let’s Pretend Players. In 2005, he accepted his current position as assistant professor of theater history and women’s and gender studies at Louisiana State University. Kovash serves as the national acquisition manager for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development and is a certified federal mediator and facilitator. Monson was elected chair of the Oklahoma City School Board last year after previously serving as a

NewsOK.com Contributor

The Oklahoma City University Alumni Association will honor outstanding alumni during Homecoming weekend festivities Saturday. The annual Distinguished Alumni and Athletic Hall of Fame Awards Dinner begins with a 6 p.m. reception, followed by dinner and the awards ceremony at 7 p.m. at the Devon Boathouse, 616 SE 6. This year’s honorees are law alumnus Carl Alexandre; business alumnus Frank Bruno; music alumnus Edgar Cruz; honors alumnus John Fletcher; dance/arts management alumnus Stephen Kovash; arts and sciences alumna Angela Monson; nursing alumna Marla PeixottoSmith; religion alumna Ekaterina “Katya” Marsakova Zoubkova; and Athletic Hall of Fame inductee Phil McSpadden. Alexandre is the director of the Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training for the U.S. Department of Justice.

OCU film series to continue FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma City University Film Institute continues its annual series at 2 p.m. Sunday with Sergei Dvortsevoy’s “Tulpan.” The screening will be in the Meinders School of Business Kerr McGee Auditorium, McKinley Avenue and NW 27. Admission is free. “Tulpan” won the Un Certain Regard award at the Cannes Film Festival and was one of the two most requested works on evaluation forms from last year’s OCU series. The Kazakhstan film is about a young dreamer, Asa, who returns to his sister’s nomadic brood on the desolate steppes to begin a hardscrabble career as a shepherd. But before he can tend a flock of his own, Asa must win the hand of the only eligible bachelorette for miles — his alluringly mysterious neighbor, Tulpan.

INFORMATION For more information about the series, go to www. okcu.edu/film-lit.

state senator and in the state House of Representatives. Peixotto-Smith earned her master’s in nursing degree from OCU’s Kramer School of nursing. She is retired as director of emergency services, outpatient services and the transplant program at St. Anthony Hospital. Zoubkova, a native of Ulyanovsk, Russia, transferred to OCU in 1994. She serves as pastor of the Tyumen United Methodist Church of the Salvation. McSpadden is a softball coach who has captured eight national championships and was a 2007 National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics hall of famer. He has been recognized as national coach of the year by the National Fastpitch Coaches association three times. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by calling 208-7787 or e-mailing rsvp@okcu.edu.

LESLIE BERGER IS ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS AT OCU.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN

METRO | STATE

IV

19A

Superintendent stresses safety FROM STAFF REPORTS

ALSO IN THE NEWS ...

WARR ACRES — Putnam

City School District parents on Monday night were reminded to be vigilant about their children’s safety in light of recent news of three cases of middle school students being abducted and molested in Oklahoma City. Superintendent Paul Hurst said Oklahoma City police believe there could be a connection between the cases and have formed a task force to investigate the incidents. “It is important that parents and families remind their children of personal safety rules,” said Hurst during the school

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED Superintendent Paul Hurst said The Care Share Program, a volunteer effort that assists families in need in Putnam City schools, is asking for more people and organizations to help children have a merry Christmas and a warm winter. Those interested in donating may do so by sending checks, made payable to Care Share, to the Putnam City Foundation, 5401 NW 40, Oklahoma City, OK 73122.

board’s meeting. “Ask children to walk to and from school with others, to never approach or speak to a stranger, and to report any suspicious person or persons to a trusted adult. We must work together to

keep children safe.” The girls were abducted Sept. 16 and 29 and Oct. 29 near May and Brookline avenues, SW 59 and Blackwelder Avenue and near Klein Avenue and NW 16.

Advisers say high school students should plan now for college years BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

It’s never too soon for high school students to start preparing for college, advisers say. Dee Dee Stafford, a college adviser at Putnam City North High School, said students need to take the most rigorous courses they can successfully handle, mainly Advanced Placement courses. “This is essential to be prepared for college and to be prepared to do well on the SAT or ACT, the admission tests for college,” Stafford said. Stafford also stresses to students that they need to take four years of math — algebra I, geometry, algebra II and pre-calculus or trigonometry. And the newest ACT research indicates that students score best on the test when they have taken biology, chemistry and physics, she said. Students also should select a number of colleges to which they will apply, Stafford said. The exact number, however, depends on the teen. For scholarships, Stafford recommends students sign up early for one or two of the free scholarship search engines. By the beginning of the year, parents of se-

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Emily Lodes, a senior at Putnam City North High School, fills out her college application with the help of Chan Klingensmith. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

niors need to have their financial information in order to apply for federal and state money. Oklahoma scholarship deadlines are Feb 1, Stafford said. To help students decide an area of study, Stafford recommends the Career Interest area of the PLAN test given in 10th grade, or she advises students to explore websites like www.matchcollege. com or the College Board’s www.myroad. collegeboard.com.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Other Legal Notices

Notice of Intent to Bid Rehabilitation and Construction Contracts For The Comanche Nation Housing Authority h The Comanche Nation Housing Authority (CNHA), Lawton, Oklahoma will be soliciting bids in the near future on housing rehabilitation and new construction work. The intent of this announcement is to identify qualified Indianowned contractors that may be interested in bidding on future work. All interested Indian-owned contractors will be placed on a list for use in future solicitations. Interested contractors may provide CNHA with a Statement of Intent to respond to future Invitation for Bid (IFB) or Request for Proposals (RFP). Contractors must be bondable and must provide required insurance documentation as well as Contractor’s License. For a detailed list of requirements, interested firms may contact the Comanche Nation Housing Authority at 580357-4956. The closing date for accepting the letter of intent is November 5, 2010 at the close of business, 5:00 pm CST.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Union Bank, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to (1) merge with First Coleman National Bank, Coleman, Texas, Graham National Bank, Graham, Texas, Citizens National Bank of Breckenridge, Breckenridge, Texas, First State Bank of Canadian, National Association, Canadian, Texas, First National Bank of Olney, Olney, Texas, Friona State Bank, National Association, Friona, Texas, Farmers National Bank of Seymour, Seymour, Texas and InterBank, Elk City, Oklahoma; and (2) purchase the assets and assume the liabilities of the banking offices of First National Bank of Borger, Borger, Texas which are located at 531 N. Deahl Street, Borger, Texas and 525 Morse Street, Stinnett, Texas. Each of the banking offices of the banks to be acquired by merger and the banking offices located in Borger and Stinnett, Texas to be acquired by purchase and assumption will become branch offices of Union Bank. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of our banks in helping to

777

Other Legal Notices CITY OF MOORE BID NOTICE BID #101-008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Moore will receive sealed bids in the office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, Moore City Hall, 301 North Broadway, Suite 203, Moore, Oklahoma, 73160, for MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY. Bids will not be accepted after 1:45 P.M., CST, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2010. Bids will be made in accordance with the specifications, and these specifications are on file and available for examination, or may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, Moore City Hall. One (1) copy addressed to the Office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, will be submitted, and that copy must be sealed and clearly marked with the name of the bidding vendor and identified as follows: “SEALED BID #101-008” “MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY” The bidder must attend the mandatory pre-bid conference at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 22, 2010. The pre-bid conference will be held in the City Council Chambers, Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore, Oklahoma. Attendance is required in order to be qualified to submit a bid. Bids filed as provided herein will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 29, 2010, Moore City Hall, City Council Chambers, 301 North Broadway, Suite 126, Moore, Oklahoma 73160. All bids will remain at least forty-eight (48) hours thereafter, before a contract will be made and entered into thereon. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays], before the time set for the receipt of bids will not be considered. The City of Moore reserves the right to accept the bid which, in the judgment of the Staff, is the best for the application of needs, materials and services as covered in the specifications, and is deemed the best, overall, for the good of the City. The City of Moore reserves the right to reject any and all bids; waive irregularities and formalities in any bid submitted. In addition, the City of Moore reserves the right to contract with one or more parties to perform identical services as deemed appropriate. The City of Moore is an equal opportunity employer. Carol Folsom, Purchasing Agent 405/793-5022

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND PETITION FOR FORFEITURE PURSUANT TO PENAL CODE SECTION 186.4 COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, SUPERIOR COURT CASE NO: 1333867 TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, you are hereby notified that: On July 1, 2010, the District Attorney of Santa Barbara County initiated proceedings to forfeit property and assets pursuant to Penal Code section 186.4. The property and assets subject to the above-described proceedings includes cash, an automobile and other personal property. You are hereby notified that any interested person may file a verified claim with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara stating the nature and amount of their claimed interest. You must file this claim within thirty (30) days after receipt of this notice, or within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of the notice, if that person was not personally served or served by mail. You must serve a verified copy of your claim on the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office (Attention: Senior Deputy District Attorney Lee Carter) at 1112 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Failure to serve the District Attorney's Office within thirty (30) days from the date of filing the claimed interest with the Superior Court can result in a waiver of interest in the property or assets or delay of any legal proceedings. Failure to file a verified claim stating an interest in the property or assets with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara will result in a waiver of any interest in the property or assets without further hearing pursuant to Penal Code §186.5). The following property is subject to the above-described proceedings: $4,180.00 U.S. currency, a 2000 CADILLAC VIN 1G6KD54Y8YU202179 and all the contents of the 2000 CADILLAC, including clothing, cell phones and computers Dated: October 27, 2010 JOYCE DUDLEY District Attorney LEE CARTER Senior Deputy District Attorney

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meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application in writing to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198. The comment period will not end before December 6, 2010, and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Board’s procedures or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City at (816) 881-2633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are accepted by the Reserve Bank on or before the last date of the comment period.

Anyone having interest in the following vehicle should contact John @ 370-0845: 2002 Honda CRX VIN # JHMEC 1316HS026799 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT VIN# KMHCG35C22V196493 1992 MERCEDES 190E VIN# WDBDA29D1NF969454 Anyone having financial interest in 1964 Chev VIN# 41847R1218884 Contact Lloyd 405-388-2671 Anyone with legal/ financial interest in 2002 Saturn VIN 1G8ZN12862Z234296 call Sandra 350-2087 Anyone with interest in 1971 chev nova vin# 1142711138 to be sold for mechanics lien on 11-25-10 contact Gary 405-812-8209. Anyone with interest in 1974 Johnson boat motor Model # 50ESL74M, Serial #4040409, HP 50. Sale to be held on 11-25-10 contact Betty at 405-634-5897


20A

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

HINTON

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

Fire: Damage was about $125,000 FROM PAGE 15A

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

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Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

CHOCTAW

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LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

› ›

nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

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PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

BUCHANAN

FUNERAL SERVICE Family Owned & Operated 8712 N. Council Rd., OKC 722-5262 www.buchananfuneralservice.com

AFFORDABLE™ URNS 4334 NW Expressway, Suite 214 Open Monday through Friday, Noon to 5 pm 405-752-URNS (8767)

MERCER-ADAMS www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363

Vondel L. Smith & Son

Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 Resthaven Spaces 1 & 2, lot 128, section 3, Garden of Devotion. $3000/both plus transfer fee. 405-745-2257 Resthaven Cemetery, S. chapel, spaces 14, lot 370, section 12, market value $3495 ea. sacrife $2000 each. 405-943-5059 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com RESTHAVEN CEMETERY DOUBLE DIP LAWN CRYPTS (STACKED) $6000 794-0005 Resthaven Memorial Gardens 2 Plots $4300 for both, includes transfer fee. Call 405-823-8245 Resthaven Memory Gardens, OKC, spaces 1-4, lot 399, section 12, buy from owner, save 50%, $1400 ea, 918-492-1344. Resurrection Mausoleum, 2 crypts, row 11, tier 3, 1 north, $7600 value, sell for $6500, 405-340-1911, ask for Max. John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 2 plots in the Garden of Devotion $3000 for both. Call 405-948-3125 ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $1975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

METRO | STATE Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 15

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

EAST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO ESCAPED THROUGH A WINDOW, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 19A

PARAMEDIC STUDENTS BLAST THROUGH EXPLOSIVES LESSON

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

OKLAHOMA CITY

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone who has information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FREE FLU SHOTS OFFERED The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the parish hall at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots and free health screenings. For information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188.

An Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic, right, sets off a bomb Monday as Rockie Yardley, left, an Edmond Police Department bomb expert, and two paramedic students watch. Paramedic students joined with the Edmond police bomb squad for a training exercise on responding to explosions. For the story, see Page 16A. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

ONLINE

Metro-area high schools show wide range on ACT scores

SHARE YOUR NEWS

BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

Advanced Placement U.S. history students Laenie Fletcher, left, and Hannah Wilson read along with their teacher, Christine Curtright, at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state.

Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman SEE EXAM, PAGE 16A

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Post your Mid-Del or Oklahoma City news immediately on NewsOK.com by adding mid-del@ newsok.com or okc@newsok.com to your e-mail list. For details, go online to knowit.newsok.com/ oklahoma-city or knowit.newsok.com/ midwest-city.

INDEX Deaths Records

19A 19A


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

EMSA, bomb technicians team up to teach safety

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

IN BRIEF ST. ELIJAH PLANS ANNUAL FOOD FEST St. Elijah Orthodox Christian Church will host its annual food festival and holiday bake sale from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the church, NW 150 and May Avenue. Guided tours of the church and specialty booths also will be available. For more information, go to www.stelijahokc.com.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic students this week got an explosive lesson in what law enforcement officers face at crime scenes. Nine paramedic students spent the day Monday with Edmond police officers and members of their bomb squad. It was the first time EMSA and a law enforcement agency have joined forces to help train paramedics about crime scene investigations, how to help an injured bomb technician and what to look for in explosives, said Maj. Heather Yazdanipour, an EMSA paramedic and instructor. “Today has been invaluable,” Yazdanipour said. “There is a lot of power packed into today. What better way to learn but to seek out the experts.”

CALENDAR THURSDAY

A paramedic student looks at different types of explosives.

Edmond officer Michael King also is an EMSA paramedic. He was instrumental in getting the class together. “It is a great learning experience,” King said. “EMSA and the law enforcement community react to situations every day. Very seldom do they get together outside of the scene. This gives them the ability to work better together.” Some of the students dressed in 90-pound bomb technician suits, while others learned how to remove the $12,000 piece of protective gear.

Paramedic students Tori Spencer, right, and Jennifer Coker look at a stick of dynamite Monday during a demonstration on explosives. PHOTOS BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

They later learned about the different kinds of explosives and what to look for when they arrive at a crime scene involving an explosion. Three of them got to set off different kinds of explosives at the police firing range. “All explosives burn fast,” said Rockie Yardley, a police department bomb

expert. “There are different sizes. None of them are good.” Yardley warned the students to be aware of what is around them because homemade bombs are becoming more popular. “We are rescuers at heart,” Yardley said. “Just stop and think. Take it slow.”

Exam: College requirements vary FROM PAGE 15A

and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be college-ready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other four-year schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of students who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, ac-

cept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced Placement courses students take. “One of the main things we do here is really encourage a rigorous program and hold students to high expectations, whether in AP or pre-AP classes,” Keirns said. “We really want our students to be fully prepared when they leave us.” The Midwest City-Del City School District saw average ACT scores ranging from 22.4 at Carl Albert High School to 16.7 at the Mid-Del Alternative Academy. While school district spokeswoman Stacey Boyer said the district would not comment on the differences in scores, she did point out that Carl Albert’s 2010 score was a full point above 2009 ACT scores.

Principal Silvya Kirk said that comes from emphasizing reading, nonfiction writing, critical thinking skills and focus in all classes all year, she said. “We’re in the business of learning,” she said. “Academics have to be the focus.”

The school also has a number of programs to help students who are struggling in classes. The options range from Teacher on Call to Saturday School. “If a kid here fails a course, they chose to,” Kirk said.

Moore School Board, 6 p.m., administration Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., building, 1500 SE 4. Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, Mustang School Board, 691-0509. 7 p.m., education center, 400 N Clear Springs FRIDAY Road. Tree Sale, 8 a.m., Moore Okarche School Board, Community Center, 301 7 p.m., superintendent’s office, 215 N Fourth. S Howard, 793-5090. Western Heights School Board, 6 p.m., 8104 SW SATURDAY 44. Oklahoma State Piedmont School Board, University-Oklahoma 6 p.m., administration City Farmers Market, building, 713 Piedmont 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Road. Ave. Tecumseh School Board, 7 p.m., Tecumseh High School library, 901 N 13. MONDAY Union City Board of McEvoy’s ToastTrustees, 7:30 p.m., 102 masters, 6:30 p.m., N Elm St. Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa, TUESDAY 787-1598. Deer Creek School Mid-Del Toastmasters, Board, 6 p.m., Deer 6:15 p.m., Midwest City Creek High School, 6101 Library, 8243 E Reno NW 206. Ave., 341-1938. Choctaw-Nicoma Park West Women’s School Board, 7 p.m., Connection, 11:15 a.m., 12800 NE 10. Sportsman’s Country El Reno School Board, Club, 4001 NW 39, 7405:30 p.m., administra7374. tion building, 100 S Choctaw City Council, Bickford. 7 p.m., city hall, 2500 N Kingfisher City CounChoctaw Road. cil, 5:30 p.m., city hall, Midwest City Council, 301 N Main. 7:10 p.m., city council Midwest City-Del City chambers, 100 N MidSchool Board, 7 p.m., west Blvd. school board center, Oklahoma City Council, 7217 SE 15, Midwest 8:30 a.m., city hall, 200 N City. Walker Ave.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Pumpkin Chunkin’ catapults more than 100 squashes

V

17A

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org. For more information and additional events, and to post details about new events, go to wimgo.com.

BY JOHN A. WILLIAMS Staff Writer jwilliams@opubco.com

EDMOND — It was like a

fireworks show and a science project rolled into one. More than 100 pumpkins were launched Sunday by a catapult during the first Pumpkin Chunkin’ sponsored by Edmond Parks and Recreation Department. Program manager Diane Self said as many as 50 people came to Mitch Park to set the orange orbs into orbit. “Families brought two or three pumpkins a piece so we were out there two and a half hours launching pumpkins,” Self said. “Everyone had a good time.” There were no official measurements made, but most of the pumpkins wound up in a nearby field, while a couple went backward. “The little ones were the ones that just flew,” Self said. The Pumpkin Chunkin’ is scheduled to come back next year as part of a larger Pumpkin Fest that will encompass Fall Family Night activities and introduce pumpkin races. “There are so many things to do with pumpkins so we are going to change it up so it’s not all arts events,” Self said.

The forum today is free for OU students and faculty. For more information, go to arch.ou. edu/creatingmaking or e-mail creating making@ou.edu.

What: Apple pie time When: 10 to 11:30 a.m. Where: The Village Ages: 5 to 12

What: Local Author Series: Rodney Redus When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Del City Ages: Adults

SUNDAY

FRIDAY

A pumpkin is launched into the air from a catapult Sunday during the Pumpkin Chunkin’ at Mitch Park in Edmond. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

What: Developmental screenings When: 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bethany Ages: Newborn to 5 years

What: Flute circle concert When: 2 to 3 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

MONDAY What: Family Thanksgiving story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Ralph Ellison Ages: All ages What: Elaine and Susan Hoffman and the Fabulous Shpielkehs When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: All ages

Above: Garan Smith, 6, gets help from his father, Gary Smith, as he pulls the pin on a catapult.

Left: Pumpkins are lined up ready to be launched.

METRO ACHIEVERS COMMUNITY SERVICE

FROM STAFF REPORTS

FOR MORE INFORMATION

What: Book Blast When: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Choctaw Ages: 6 and older

What: Pajama story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 2½ to 5

For a list of upcoming Parks and Recreation Department events, go to http://edmond ok.com/parks/rec.

NORMAN — Architects from Massachusetts, Michigan and Arkansas are scheduled to speak as part of the University of Oklahoma College of Architecture’s Fall 2010 Bruce Goff Chair of Creative Architecture Lecture Series. Presentations are scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m. today in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. The series is in conjunction with the “Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind” multimedia exhibit at OU’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which will remain on display through Jan. 2. Goff was chairman of the OU School of Architecture from 1947 to 1955 and is considered a pioneer of the organic design movement, along with Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Sullivan. The speakers will be Sheila Kennedy, professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Craig Borum, associate professor at the University of Michigan, and Marlon Blackwell, head of the University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture. The event is part of the Creating_Making Forum scheduled today through Friday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which will feature more than 20 other lectures by noted architecture scholars from around the country.

SATURDAY

THURSDAY

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Architects to speak at OU

TODAY

Dr. Sam Dahr

PROFESSIONAL An Integris ophthalmologist has received a certificate of appreciation from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Sam Dahr has been the principal retinal consultant for the Ophthalmic Device Division of the FDA for the past three and a half years. In this role, he reviews applications for FDA approval of retinal devices that have been submitted by companies worldwide. He plays a critical role in the design and monitoring of the clinical trials that ultimately lead to approval or disapproval of these retinal devices. He was recognized in particular for his work in the area of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that affects hundreds of thousands of people in the United States every year.

Four community activists and one nonprofit were honored by World Neighbors at the A Journey Around the World gala. Patty Johnston and Mark and Jerry Gautreaux were given the World Neighbors Namaste award, recognizing them for their contributions to World Neighbors and for representing the qualities of World Neighbors mission throughout the Oklahoma community. The Dale Rogers Training Center is receiving the World Neighbors & KFOR Dignity award for the nonprofit category. The center provides training and job placement to promote independence for people with disabilities. The other Dignity Award winner is Charlotte Lankard, a marriage and family therapist. Lankard founded the nonprofit group Calm Waters, which provides grief and divorce support groups for children. Based in Oklahoma City, World Neighbors is an international development organization striving to eliminate hunger, poverty and disease in the most deprived, rural villages in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Other Legal Notices

Notice of Intent to Bid Rehabilitation and Construction Contracts For The Comanche Nation Housing Authority h The Comanche Nation Housing Authority (CNHA), Lawton, Oklahoma will be soliciting bids in the near future on housing rehabilitation and new construction work. The intent of this announcement is to identify qualified Indianowned contractors that may be interested in bidding on future work. All interested Indian-owned contractors will be placed on a list for use in future solicitations. Interested contractors may provide CNHA with a Statement of Intent to respond to future Invitation for Bid (IFB) or Request for Proposals (RFP). Contractors must be bondable and must provide required insurance documentation as well as Contractor’s License. For a detailed list of requirements, interested firms may contact the Comanche Nation Housing Authority at 580357-4956. The closing date for accepting the letter of intent is November 5, 2010 at the close of business, 5:00 pm CST.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Union Bank, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to (1) merge with First Coleman National Bank, Coleman, Texas, Graham National Bank, Graham, Texas, Citizens National Bank of Breckenridge, Breckenridge, Texas, First State Bank of Canadian, National Association, Canadian, Texas, First National Bank of Olney, Olney, Texas, Friona State Bank, National Association, Friona, Texas, Farmers National Bank of Seymour, Seymour, Texas and InterBank, Elk City, Oklahoma; and (2) purchase the assets and assume the liabilities of the banking offices of First National Bank of Borger, Borger, Texas which are located at 531 N. Deahl Street, Borger, Texas and 525 Morse Street, Stinnett, Texas. Each of the banking offices of the banks to be acquired by merger and the banking offices located in Borger and Stinnett, Texas to be acquired by purchase and assumption will become branch offices of Union Bank. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of our banks in helping to

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Other Legal Notices CITY OF MOORE BID NOTICE BID #101-008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Moore will receive sealed bids in the office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, Moore City Hall, 301 North Broadway, Suite 203, Moore, Oklahoma, 73160, for MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY. Bids will not be accepted after 1:45 P.M., CST, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2010. Bids will be made in accordance with the specifications, and these specifications are on file and available for examination, or may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, Moore City Hall. One (1) copy addressed to the Office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, will be submitted, and that copy must be sealed and clearly marked with the name of the bidding vendor and identified as follows: “SEALED BID #101-008” “MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY” The bidder must attend the mandatory pre-bid conference at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 22, 2010. The pre-bid conference will be held in the City Council Chambers, Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore, Oklahoma. Attendance is required in order to be qualified to submit a bid. Bids filed as provided herein will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 29, 2010, Moore City Hall, City Council Chambers, 301 North Broadway, Suite 126, Moore, Oklahoma 73160. All bids will remain at least forty-eight (48) hours thereafter, before a contract will be made and entered into thereon. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays], before the time set for the receipt of bids will not be considered. The City of Moore reserves the right to accept the bid which, in the judgment of the Staff, is the best for the application of needs, materials and services as covered in the specifications, and is deemed the best, overall, for the good of the City. The City of Moore reserves the right to reject any and all bids; waive irregularities and formalities in any bid submitted. In addition, the City of Moore reserves the right to contract with one or more parties to perform identical services as deemed appropriate. The City of Moore is an equal opportunity employer. Carol Folsom, Purchasing Agent 405/793-5022

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND PETITION FOR FORFEITURE PURSUANT TO PENAL CODE SECTION 186.4 COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, SUPERIOR COURT CASE NO: 1333867 TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, you are hereby notified that: On July 1, 2010, the District Attorney of Santa Barbara County initiated proceedings to forfeit property and assets pursuant to Penal Code section 186.4. The property and assets subject to the above-described proceedings includes cash, an automobile and other personal property. You are hereby notified that any interested person may file a verified claim with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara stating the nature and amount of their claimed interest. You must file this claim within thirty (30) days after receipt of this notice, or within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of the notice, if that person was not personally served or served by mail. You must serve a verified copy of your claim on the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office (Attention: Senior Deputy District Attorney Lee Carter) at 1112 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Failure to serve the District Attorney's Office within thirty (30) days from the date of filing the claimed interest with the Superior Court can result in a waiver of interest in the property or assets or delay of any legal proceedings. Failure to file a verified claim stating an interest in the property or assets with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara will result in a waiver of any interest in the property or assets without further hearing pursuant to Penal Code §186.5). The following property is subject to the above-described proceedings: $4,180.00 U.S. currency, a 2000 CADILLAC VIN 1G6KD54Y8YU202179 and all the contents of the 2000 CADILLAC, including clothing, cell phones and computers Dated: October 27, 2010 JOYCE DUDLEY District Attorney LEE CARTER Senior Deputy District Attorney

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meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application in writing to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198. The comment period will not end before December 6, 2010, and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Board’s procedures or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City at (816) 881-2633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are accepted by the Reserve Bank on or before the last date of the comment period.

Anyone having interest in the following vehicle should contact John @ 370-0845: 2002 Honda CRX VIN # JHMEC 1316HS026799 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT VIN# KMHCG35C22V196493 1992 MERCEDES 190E VIN# WDBDA29D1NF969454 Anyone having financial interest in 1964 Chev VIN# 41847R1218884 Contact Lloyd 405-388-2671 Anyone with legal/ financial interest in 2002 Saturn VIN 1G8ZN12862Z234296 call Sandra 350-2087 Anyone with interest in 1971 chev nova vin# 1142711138 to be sold for mechanics lien on 11-25-10 contact Gary 405-812-8209. Anyone with interest in 1974 Johnson boat motor Model # 50ESL74M, Serial #4040409, HP 50. Sale to be held on 11-25-10 contact Betty at 405-634-5897


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

HINTON

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

Fire: Damage was about $125,000 FROM PAGE 15A

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

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Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

CHOCTAW

V

LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

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nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


THE OKLAHOMAN

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HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

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PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

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Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 Resthaven Spaces 1 & 2, lot 128, section 3, Garden of Devotion. $3000/both plus transfer fee. 405-745-2257 Resthaven Cemetery, S. chapel, spaces 14, lot 370, section 12, market value $3495 ea. sacrife $2000 each. 405-943-5059 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com RESTHAVEN CEMETERY DOUBLE DIP LAWN CRYPTS (STACKED) $6000 794-0005 Resthaven Memorial Gardens 2 Plots $4300 for both, includes transfer fee. Call 405-823-8245 Resthaven Memory Gardens, OKC, spaces 1-4, lot 399, section 12, buy from owner, save 50%, $1400 ea, 918-492-1344. Resurrection Mausoleum, 2 crypts, row 11, tier 3, 1 north, $7600 value, sell for $6500, 405-340-1911, ask for Max. John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 2 plots in the Garden of Devotion $3000 for both. Call 405-948-3125 ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $1975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

METRO | STATE Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

EDMOND | STATE

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO ESCAPED THROUGH A WINDOW, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 28A

EMSA LEARNS AN EXPLOSIVE LESSON FROM EDMOND POLICE

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone who has information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FLU SHOTS OFFERED FREE

An Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic, right, sets off a bomb Monday as Rockie Yardley, left, an Edmond Police Department bomb expert, and two paramedic students watch. Paramedic students joined the Edmond police bomb squad for a training exercise on responding to explosions. Story, Page 16A. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the parish hall at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots while they last and free health screenings. A Spanish translator will be available. For more information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Edmond North makes the grade EDUCATION | ACT COLLEGE ENTRANCE SCORES VARY GREATLY IN METRO AREA BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT

score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state. Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman SEE SCORES, PAGE 16A

ONLINE SHARE YOUR NEWS Post your Edmond-area news immediately on NewsOK.com by adding edmond@ newsok.com to your e-mail list.For details: knowit.newsok.com/ edmond.

INDEX Advanced Placement U.S. history students Laenie Fletcher, left, and Hannah Wilson read along with their teacher, Christine Curtright, at Edmond Memorial High School. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Deaths Records

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond police teach explosive lesson BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Emergency Medical Services Authority paramedic students this week got an explosive lesson in what law enforcement officers face at crime scenes. Nine paramedic students spent the day Monday with Edmond police officers and members of their bomb squad. It was the first time EMSA and a law enforcement agency have joined forces to help train paramedics about crime scene investigations, how to help an injured bomb technician and what to look for in explosives, said Maj. Heather Yazdanipour, an EMSA paramedic and instructor. “Today has been invaluable,” Yazdanipour said. “There is a lot of power

Paramedic students Tori Spencer, right, and Jennifer Coker look at a stick of dynamite during a demonstration on explosives Monday. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

packed into today. What better way to learn but to seek out the experts.” Edmond officer Michael King also is an EMSA para-

medic. He was instrumental in getting the class together. “It is a great learning experience,” King said. “EMSA and the law en-

forcement community react to situations every day. Very seldom do they get together outside of the scene. This gives them the ability to

work better together.” Some of the students dressed in 90-pound bomb technician suits, while others learned how to remove the $12,000 piece of protective gear. They later learned about the different kinds of explosives and what to look for when they arrive at a crime scene involving an explosion. Three of them got to set off different kinds of explosives at the police firing range. “All explosives burn fast,” said Rockie Yardley, a police department bomb expert. “There are different sizes. None of them are good.” Yardley warned the students to be aware of what is around them because homemade bombs are becoming more popular. “We are rescuers at heart,” Yardley said. “Just stop and think. Take it slow.”

Scores: Edmond North places 2nd in state FROM PAGE 15A

North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be collegeready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other four-year schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of students who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, accept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced Placement courses students take. “One of the main things we do here is really en-

courage a rigorous program and hold students to high expectations, whether in AP or pre-AP classes,” Keirns said. “We really want our students to be fully prepared when they leave us.” Keirns said 65 percent of the school’s senior class has taken at least one AP course. Students took more than 1,300 AP exams last year, she said, maintaining a pass rate that is as high as it ever has been. “If you have a strong, rigorous curriculum, not only are students learning academically, they are learning how to learn, they’re learning timemanagement skills, analytical thinking, the ability to write,” she said. “The more we’ve increased that, we’ve consistently seen our ACT scores go up over the past seven years.”

Other districts The Midwest City-Del City School District saw average ACT scores ranging from 22.4 at Carl Albert High School to 16.7 at the Mid-Del Alternative Academy. While school district spokeswoman Stacey Boyer said the district would not comment on the differences in scores, she did point out that Carl Albert’s 2010 score was a full point above 2009 ACT scores. Principal Silvya Kirk

said that comes from emphasizing reading, nonfiction writing, critical thinking skills and focus in all classes all year, she said. “We’re in the business of learning,” she said. “Academics have to be the focus.” The school also has a number of programs to help students who are struggling in classes. The options range from Teacher on Call to Saturday School. “If a kid here fails a course, they chose to,” Kirk said. Putnam City high schools also showed a wide

range of average scores on the ACT test. Putnam City North tied for eighth in the state with five other schools with an average score of 22.9. Putnam City High School had a score of 20.5, while Putnam City West High School scored 19.3. Putnam City Academy, the district’s alternative school, scored 17.8. Melton said districts can learn from the scores. “We take the data and use it to design curriculum,” he said. “We see where we can do a better job in emphasizing certain areas to help

students be better able to succeed in college.” Melton said looking at schools with high vs. low scores is not really an accurate way to judge success, however. “You have to drill down into what percentage of those kids are taking the tests, what percentage are going onto college and what percentage are taking the rigorous course work,” he said. Students who take biology, chemistry and physics, for instance, typically perform at college-ready levels on the ACT, he said.

CALENDAR TODAY Breakfast on Boulevard, 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. Mondays through Fridays, First Christian Church, Boulevard entrance between First and Second streets, 341-3544. Edmond Area Chamber of Commerce Morning Mingle, 8 to 9:30 a.m., AT&T, 2003 W Danforth, 341-2808. 55+ Coffee Break, 9 to 11 a.m., Edmond Library, 10 S Boulevard, 341-9282. Early Risers Exercise, 9:15 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, Edmond Senior Center, 2733 Marilyn Williams Drive, 2167600. Golden Harmonizers Choir Concert, 10 a.m., Touchmark, 2801 Shortgrass Road, 216-7600. Momsomniac Support Group, 10 a.m. second and fourth Wednesdays, Edmond Transforming Life Counseling Center, 16301 Sonoma Park Drive, 623-8899. Tap for Fun, 10 a.m. Wednesdays, 1 p.m. Mondays, Edmond Senior Center, 2733 Marilyn Williams Drive, 216-7600. Kiwanis Club of Edmond, lunch and speaker, noon, Cherokee Room, Nigh University Center at University of Central Oklahoma, 100 N University Drive, 341-4205.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

Edmond committee writes blade sign law COUNCIL | GROUP CONTINUES WORK ON ELECTRONIC SIGN LAW BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — An ordinance to allow blade signs in Edmond was approved this week by members of the Edmond Sign Ordinance Committee. They are continuing to work on a law for electronic signs. City council members are expected to vote on the blade sign ordinance Nov. 23 or Dec. 13, City Attorney Stephen Murdock said. The three-page ordinance sets up the law for a blade sign, which is a sign that projects from a structure in a perpendicular fashion. Blade signs are not addressed in the present city code. Blade signs have been allowed with a variance to the city code at Hideaway Pizza, Fish City and Edmond Golf. Committee members have been fairly agreeable on the rules for blade signs. That has not been the case for allowing electronic signs in Edmond. Currently, electronic signs are allowed if the city council grants a variance from the city code.

I guess you can’t be for none at all? That is all I would be favorable of.” SAUNDRA NAIFEH

FORMER EDMOND MAYOR

Discussions to change the electronic sign ordinance began more than two years ago when Bob Williams, with R.L. Williams & Co., wanted to post electronic messages on a sign. Former Mayor Saundra Naifeh continues to speak out against electronic signs. She said she fears Edmond will lose its aesthetics and start to look like Las Vegas. “I guess you can’t be for none at all?” Naifeh asked during the discussions. “That is all I would be favorable of.” Most of the committee members said they are interested in allowing electronic signs on monumenttype ground signs, but not on the walls of businesses. Discussions have been to allow the signs in the commercial corridors, which

are Broadway from Second Street to the south city limits; E Second Street to Interstate 35; W Edmond Road from the railroad underpass west to the city limits; and 33rd Street from Broadway to Boulevard. Committee members will meet Nov. 15 to look at the level of the illumination during the day and night, if automatic dimmers should be required, the square footage allowed and other aspects of the electronic signs.

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IN BRIEF ST. ELIJAH CHURCH PLANS FOOD FESTIVAL, BAKE SALE St. Elijah Orthodox Christian Church will host its annual food festival and holiday bake sale 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the church, NW 150 and May Ave. Guided tours of the church and specialty booths also will be available. For more information, go to www.stelijahokc.com. FROM STAFF REPORTS


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Edmond board OKs lower school budget BY TRICIA PEMBERTON

DAVID FRASER CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, EDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

The decrease in the general fund comes largely because of a $5.6 million cut in state aid, Fraser said. The shortfall was partially offset by an increase of almost $1.8 million in federal stabilization funds and $852,542 in school land earnings.

Staff cuts No information has come from the state Education Department about how the budget will be approached in the future, he said. And with a state schools superintendent change to result from

Tuesday’s election, school districts are likely to remain in limbo for a while longer, he said. By February or March, however, Fraser said he believes there will be talk of additional budget cuts for all state agencies. As a result of a tighter budget, the district in June recommended reductions of $1.3 million for operations and more than $2 million in cuts to staff and administration. “There’s not much left to tap,” Fraser told board members. “We will have to look at labor.”

OCU hosts film series FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma City University Film Institute continues its annual series at 2 p.m. Sunday with Sergei Dvortsevoy’s “Tulpan.” The screening will be in the Meinders School of Business Kerr McGee Auditorium, McKinley Avenue and NW 27. Admission is free. “Tulpan” won the Un Certain Regard award at the Cannes Film Festival and was one of the two most requested works on evaluation forms from last year’s OCU series. For more information or future dates in the film series, go to www.okcu.edu/ film-lit.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

What: Book Blast When: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Choctaw Ages: 6 and older

This is the first time in my experience that our budget went down while our school district is still growing.”

EDMOND

— Edmond School Board members Monday night unanimously approved a $130.1 million general fund budget for the 2010-11 school year. The board also approved $11.7 million for the building fund and $10.8 million for child nutrition. The general fund — the primary operational budget for the district, paying employee wages and benefits as well as schools’ operating budgets — is down $3.8 million from last year, said David Fraser, chief financial officer for the Edmond School District. “This is the first time in my experience that our budget went down while our school district is still growing,” Fraser said. Edmond reported 21,342 students as of Oct. 1, an increase of 595 students from the same date last year.

LIBRARY EVENTS

TODAY

Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Other Legal Notices

Notice of Intent to Bid Rehabilitation and Construction Contracts For The Comanche Nation Housing Authority h The Comanche Nation Housing Authority (CNHA), Lawton, Oklahoma will be soliciting bids in the near future on housing rehabilitation and new construction work. The intent of this announcement is to identify qualified Indianowned contractors that may be interested in bidding on future work. All interested Indian-owned contractors will be placed on a list for use in future solicitations. Interested contractors may provide CNHA with a Statement of Intent to respond to future Invitation for Bid (IFB) or Request for Proposals (RFP). Contractors must be bondable and must provide required insurance documentation as well as Contractor’s License. For a detailed list of requirements, interested firms may contact the Comanche Nation Housing Authority at 580357-4956. The closing date for accepting the letter of intent is November 5, 2010 at the close of business, 5:00 pm CST.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Union Bank, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to (1) merge with First Coleman National Bank, Coleman, Texas, Graham National Bank, Graham, Texas, Citizens National Bank of Breckenridge, Breckenridge, Texas, First State Bank of Canadian, National Association, Canadian, Texas, First National Bank of Olney, Olney, Texas, Friona State Bank, National Association, Friona, Texas, Farmers National Bank of Seymour, Seymour, Texas and InterBank, Elk City, Oklahoma; and (2) purchase the assets and assume the liabilities of the banking offices of First National Bank of Borger, Borger, Texas which are located at 531 N. Deahl Street, Borger, Texas and 525 Morse Street, Stinnett, Texas. Each of the banking offices of the banks to be acquired by merger and the banking offices located in Borger and Stinnett, Texas to be acquired by purchase and assumption will become branch offices of Union Bank. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of our banks in helping to

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Other Legal Notices CITY OF MOORE BID NOTICE BID #101-008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Moore will receive sealed bids in the office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, Moore City Hall, 301 North Broadway, Suite 203, Moore, Oklahoma, 73160, for MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY. Bids will not be accepted after 1:45 P.M., CST, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2010. Bids will be made in accordance with the specifications, and these specifications are on file and available for examination, or may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, Moore City Hall. One (1) copy addressed to the Office of the City Clerk, Purchasing Division, will be submitted, and that copy must be sealed and clearly marked with the name of the bidding vendor and identified as follows: “SEALED BID #101-008” “MOWING OF SELECTED CITY PROPERTY” The bidder must attend the mandatory pre-bid conference at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 22, 2010. The pre-bid conference will be held in the City Council Chambers, Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore, Oklahoma. Attendance is required in order to be qualified to submit a bid. Bids filed as provided herein will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m., CST, Monday, November 29, 2010, Moore City Hall, City Council Chambers, 301 North Broadway, Suite 126, Moore, Oklahoma 73160. All bids will remain at least forty-eight (48) hours thereafter, before a contract will be made and entered into thereon. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays], before the time set for the receipt of bids will not be considered. The City of Moore reserves the right to accept the bid which, in the judgment of the Staff, is the best for the application of needs, materials and services as covered in the specifications, and is deemed the best, overall, for the good of the City. The City of Moore reserves the right to reject any and all bids; waive irregularities and formalities in any bid submitted. In addition, the City of Moore reserves the right to contract with one or more parties to perform identical services as deemed appropriate. The City of Moore is an equal opportunity employer. Carol Folsom, Purchasing Agent 405/793-5022

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND PETITION FOR FORFEITURE PURSUANT TO PENAL CODE SECTION 186.4 COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, SUPERIOR COURT CASE NO: 1333867 TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, you are hereby notified that: On July 1, 2010, the District Attorney of Santa Barbara County initiated proceedings to forfeit property and assets pursuant to Penal Code section 186.4. The property and assets subject to the above-described proceedings includes cash, an automobile and other personal property. You are hereby notified that any interested person may file a verified claim with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara stating the nature and amount of their claimed interest. You must file this claim within thirty (30) days after receipt of this notice, or within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of the notice, if that person was not personally served or served by mail. You must serve a verified copy of your claim on the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office (Attention: Senior Deputy District Attorney Lee Carter) at 1112 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Failure to serve the District Attorney's Office within thirty (30) days from the date of filing the claimed interest with the Superior Court can result in a waiver of interest in the property or assets or delay of any legal proceedings. Failure to file a verified claim stating an interest in the property or assets with the Superior Court of the County of Santa Barbara will result in a waiver of any interest in the property or assets without further hearing pursuant to Penal Code §186.5). The following property is subject to the above-described proceedings: $4,180.00 U.S. currency, a 2000 CADILLAC VIN 1G6KD54Y8YU202179 and all the contents of the 2000 CADILLAC, including clothing, cell phones and computers Dated: October 27, 2010 JOYCE DUDLEY District Attorney LEE CARTER Senior Deputy District Attorney

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meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments on this application in writing to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198. The comment period will not end before December 6, 2010, and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Board’s procedures or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City at (816) 881-2633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a hearing on the application if they are accepted by the Reserve Bank on or before the last date of the comment period.

Anyone having interest in the following vehicle should contact John @ 370-0845: 2002 Honda CRX VIN # JHMEC 1316HS026799 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT VIN# KMHCG35C22V196493 1992 MERCEDES 190E VIN# WDBDA29D1NF969454 Anyone having financial interest in 1964 Chev VIN# 41847R1218884 Contact Lloyd 405-388-2671 Anyone with legal/ financial interest in 2002 Saturn VIN 1G8ZN12862Z234296 call Sandra 350-2087 Anyone with interest in 1971 chev nova vin# 1142711138 to be sold for mechanics lien on 11-25-10 contact Gary 405-812-8209. Anyone with interest in 1974 Johnson boat motor Model # 50ESL74M, Serial #4040409, HP 50. Sale to be held on 11-25-10 contact Betty at 405-634-5897

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Where: Warr Acres Ages: 2½ to 5

FRIDAY What: Developmental screenings When: 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bethany Ages: Newborn to 5 years

SATURDAY

What: Local Author Series: Rodney Redus When: 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Del City Ages: Adults

What: Apple pie time When: 10 to 11:30 a.m. Where: The Village Ages: 5 to 12

THURSDAY

What: Flute circle concert When: 2 to 3 p.m. Where: Midwest City

What: Pajama story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY

Ages: All ages

MONDAY What: Family Thanksgiving story time When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Ralph Ellison Ages: All ages What: Elaine and Susan Hoffman and the Fabulous Shpielkehs When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: All ages

TUESDAY What: Nutrition education and weight loss program When: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: The Village Ages: Adults


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

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OC to present play during homecoming BY JOSH WATSON NewsOK.com Contributor

TICKETS

Oklahoma Christian University will present the musical “Thoroughly Modern Millie” at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday as a part of homecoming weekend. The show, with a cast of 25, will be performed in the school’s Hardeman Auditorium. The story focuses on Millie Dillmount, who has just moved to New York to start a new life during the 1920s. The show is directed by OC alumnus Chad Anderson. “We have a lot of dance talent in our cast this year,” Anderson said. “That’s great because there are some challenging tap numbers in this show.” He said choreographer and dance instructor Barbara Berard was instrumental in helping the cast

Tickets are $12 or $10 for seniors and groups of 20 or more. On Thursday, OC employees and students receive free admission with valid school identification. To reserve tickets, call 4255540. The show is appropriate for children age 10 and older.

UCO to host dance festival FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — The University of Central Oklahoma Department of Dance will host more than 180 high school students and their teachers for two days of classes, workshops and performances during its first Oklahoma High School Dance Festival on Friday and Saturday. Participating high schools are Bishop McGuinness High School, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Harding Fine Arts Academy, John Marshall High School, Luther High School, Norman High School, Norman North High School, Putnam City North High School, Southeast High School and U.S. Grant High School. In addition to taking classes in ballet, modern, jazz, hip-hop, flamenco and aerial dance from UCO faculty and alumni, six of the participating high schools will have the opportunity to join the UCO Kaleidoscope Dancers in performance. Dancers from Southeast, Norman North and Norman will perform with Kaleidoscope at 7:30 p.m. Friday, while students from Harding Fine Arts Academy, Bishop McGuinness and John Marshall high schools will perform with Kaleidoscope at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The festival also will include instructional workshops for high school dance teachers. UCO art students also will be involved in the festival, custom painting and adorning ballet pointe shoes that will be for sale before the evening performances. Tickets to the concert are $14 for adults, $10 for seniors and non-UCO students and $4 for UCO students. To reserve tickets, call the box office at 9743375. Reservations are recommended, as the performances are anticipated to sell out.

MORE INFORMATION For more information about the festival, call 974-5231 or e-mail jjacob son@uco.edu.

learn the tap numbers. “She had so much work to do, especially at the beginning of rehearsals,” Anderson said. “She is a wonderful person to work with and a great asset to OC.”

The leading cast members are mostly upperclassmen from across the country. “This is the first chance OC has had to produce this show,” theater professor Phil Reagan said. “It’s an award-winning musical set in the jazzy, flapper days that will be a lot of fun to watch. It’s really a wonderful, comic love story.” Audiences also will see an elaborate set and production, Anderson said. “There are more wigs in this show than any I’ve been a part of. We have an elaborate set, and we rented costumes from Music Theater of Wichita. It is a very professional production. Each year we try to raise the bar for the homecoming musical,” he said.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

Three architects to speak in lecture series at OU FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Architects from Massachusetts, Michigan and Arkansas are scheduled to speak as part of the University of Oklahoma College of Architecture’s Fall 2010 Bruce Goff Chair of Creative Architecture Lecture Series. Presentations are scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m. today in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. The series is in conjunction with the “Bruce Goff: A Creative Mind” multimedia exhibit at OU’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which will remain on display through Jan. 2. Goff was chairman of the OU School of Architecture from 1947 to 1955 and is considered a pioneer

of the organic design movement, along with Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Sullivan. The speakers will be Sheila Kennedy, professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and principal of Kennedy & Violich Architecture, Craig Borum, associate professor at the University of Michigan and principal of PLY Architecture, and Marlon Blackwell, head of the University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture and principal of Marlon Blackwell Architect. The event is part of the Creating_Making Forum scheduled today through Friday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which will feature more than 20 other lectures by noted architecture scholars from around

the country. To register or learn more about next week’s events, go to arch.ou.edu/creating making or e-mail creating making@ou.edu.

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IN BRIEF OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY LICENSE PLATES AVAILABLE SHAWNEE — State-issued Oklahoma Baptist University license plates are avail-

able for purchase through the Oklahoma Tax Commission. The license plates feature OBU’s Raley Chapel logo in green and a five-character combination that may be personalized. The cost for the plates is $38 for an original or replacement, including a $3 mailing fee. A portion of the cost is given to OBU for every tag ordered. To order an OBU specialty license plate, go to www.tax.ok.gov/ plates/sp140.html.

FROM STAFF REPORTS


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EDMOND | STATE

Edmond tree festival to support senior meals

IN BRIEF MORNING MINGLE IS TODAY

PANCAKE BREAKFAST SET

EDMOND — The Edmond Chamber of Com-

EDMOND — Matthews Funeral

merce’s Morning Mingle will be from 8 to 9:30 a.m. today at the AT&T Store at 2003 W Danforth Road. No reservations are required, and the event is free.

5K RACE TO SUPPORT ARTS EDMOND — The 5k to Monet Race to sup-

port the Edmond Fine Arts Institute programs will be Saturday at the institute, 27 E Edwards. A 1-mile fun run starts at 8 a.m. and the timed 5k race starts at 8:30 a.m. For more information, call 340-4481 or go to www.edmondfinearts.com.

STORE PLANS OPEN HOUSE EDMOND — The Gourmet Gallery, 1532 S

Boulevard, and 2820 NW 122 in Oklahoma City, will have a Holiday Open House from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Vendors and staff will offer samples of products and recipes. For more information, call 7153663.

The Festival of the Trees, an auction of decorated Christmas trees and wreaths to benefit senior meals, has been added to this year’s Dickens of a Christmas celebration in downtown Edmond. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE BY JOHN A. WILLIAMS Staff Writer jwilliams@opubco.com

EDMOND — In the spirit

of the giving season, Edmond’s Downtown Business Association merchants are organizing the first Festival of the Trees to help provide hot meals for seniors. The festival will be a part of the association’s annual Dickens of a Christmas celebration. “We wanted to do something that we felt represented the true spirit of Christmas,” festival Director Karen Morton said. Organizers are looking for individuals to decorate Christmas trees or wreathes that will be auctioned off to help the Edmond Senior Center Meal program. In 2009, state funds were cut for the program that provides a hot meal to about 60 seniors five days a week. Since then the city of Edmond and donations

INFORMATION For more information, go to www.downtown edmondok.com.

have made up the shortfall. “We’re hoping to get 20 trees for our first year,” Morton said.

Trees must be artificial and can be of any size. LED lights and large wreaths are preferred. The trees will be on display at 10 S Broadway. A silent auction will be held Dec. 3-4. To reserve a space, call 285-0927 or drop an application off at Sacred Heart Gifts, 23 S Broadway, or Cinnamon Bears, 102 S Broadway.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Home is hosting a pancake breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday to benefit the programs at Edmond Senior Center. They will be serving pancakes, sausage, bacon, orange juice and coffee. Tickets are $4. Tickets for children 10 and younger are $2. The breakfast will be at the senior center, 2733 Marilyn Williams Drive.

DEMOCRATS TO MEET GUTHRIE — The Logan County

Democratic Women’s Club will have a meeting and silent auction fundraiser at 7 p.m. Friday in the Hall of Trinity Episcopal Church, 310 E Noble. Members are asked to bring items for the auction. All Logan County Democrats, including men, are invited. FROM STAFF REPORTS


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

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Professor offers trips to Costa Rica, Hawaii BY JULIE MCGOWAN NewsOK.com Contributor

SHAWNEE — Associate biology professor Dale Utt is offering students the opportunity to explore natural science in Costa Rica and Hawaii next year. A course called Tropical Ecology and Biodiversity of Costa Rica will meet daily for one week in January for pre-field classroom instruction and then travel to Costa Rica for 13 days to explore the rain forest. Utt plans to focus on four areas: exploring Pacific coastal marine and

MORE INFORMATION For more information about the courses in Costa Rica or Hawaii, email Dale Utt at dale.utt@okbu.edu.

lowland tropical forests on the Osa Peninsula; observing cloud forests at the Quetzal Education Research Center in San Gerardode Dota; hiking in the Caribbean lowland rain forest at the La Selva Bio-

logical Research Station; and the geologically active region surrounding the volcano Volcan Arenal. The estimated trip expenses are $2,300. During the spring semester, OBU will offer a course titled Natural History of the Big Island: Hawaii, for four credits. Class members will meet with Utt once per week on campus during the spring semester, and then travel to Hawaii for field work in March. The estimated trip expenses are about $2,600.

'03 Ford Ranger Ext Cab, v6, auto, 94k, cust whls, exc cond $6800 740-0804 '97 Ford Ranger XLT, ext cab. 6 cyl, great cond., $3400 obo. 685-4949

'07 Chrysler T&C Limited nav, dvd, sunroof, 1 owner, $17,400 obo. 620-1882 '06 Ford E150 Cargo Van, V8 auto, shelving, like new $8200 obo 922-7236 '00 Ford 1Ton Handicap Hi-Top, lift & straps Very Nice $7200 obo 922-7236 2007 GMC cargo, low mi, like new, 1 owner, 2 seats, $13,500, 340-0424 1994 Olds Cutlassnice car with real clean body and interior. Needs engine (3100, v6) $500 obo 405-262-1336

$$$$ 946-4371 $$$$

'82 Chevy Short bed Stepside, 350 auto, runs good $2250 OBO 517-6899 '79 Firebird Formula, rebuilt 6.6, Runs Good $2495 Call 636-0597 1964 VW Dune Buggy red, tan int. 1974 VW eng runs good w/chrome acces on eng. $4995 obo 1948 Ford Super Deluxe Coupe needs to be restored no title $3500 obo 399-1528 » 625-9893 '64 Chevy Short bed Stepside, 350 auto, disc brks, tilt ps, rebldr $2000 517-6899 1959 Rambler, 4 door $500. 1962 Corvair, 2 door, $800. 1971 Chevy pickup, $250. » 405-262-4758 »

2002 LeSabre Custom. 6 cyl 3800 eng. tan. very gd cond $3500 601-6860

2004 Cavalier, 2 door, white, very clean, auto, air, stereo, 79K, $4895. 630-0290 or 3621 N May

2010 Escape UT, red. 2300 miles, $23,000, Call 216-272-3468 '04 Ford Taurus, blue w/gray interior, 24 valve v6, sunroof, 6 disc changer, 79k miles, $5000. Can been seen at 10220 W. Reno, OKC, M-F. 620-515-4001 '04 Taurus SE 3.0L, loaded, new ac, new tires, CD $2450 201-9342 '96 Crown Vic loaded a/c, 45K, CNG. Nice, 1 Owner $5000 OBO 922-7236 '90 Thunderbird, nice, low miles, good looking car, $1500 obo. 412-3746

1999 Civic EX, 4 door, black, 5 speed, $3500 obo, 454-3560/227-6607.

Administrative Assistant Financial planning co. in Edmond seeking an AA. Must be able to work in a demanding environment & be able to multi task. Email resume CharlotteS@ shawfinancialinc.com

Data Entry/ Customer Service. Hiring for 2011 tax season. Free training, flexible hours, premium pay. Many locations available. Jackson Hewitt Tax Service. 405-942-1980. Data Entry/ Customer Service Full time. Busy tag office. Apply at 7527 N. May Ave, M-F, 2-4. No phone calls. Entry Level Clerk Needed for OKC Law Firm. Spanish speaking a plus. $1600/month plus benefits. Fax resumes to 525-7855. Legal Secretary at least 5 years Estate Planning experience for large downtown law firm. Excellent benefits & salary. Send resume to: The Oklahoman, Box #1910, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0125

'05 Liberty 2WD Lmtd if you find nicer-buy it! 57K, $13.9Kobo 620-1882

Banquet Staff

1998 Town car exective series, clean, loaded, $2895. 630-0290 or 3621 N May

'00 Mystique, loaded 80k auto 4cyl, a/c, green VGC $3200 OBO 922-7236

'02 WS6, 30k miles, Sunset horns, 1 owner, $15k obo. 201-9863 '79 Firebird Formula, rebuilt 6.6, Runs Good $2495 Call 636-0597

'87 Toyota Supra, manual transmission $1000, 1 extra '87 manual transmission, $500. 625-6032/625-6048

needed for Country Club. Experience in fine dining helpful. Part time positions. Send resume to pgraham@okcgcc.com. You may also apply in person Tues-Fri. Enter thru the side entrance of the club. OKC Golf & Country Club, 7000 NW Grand Blvd., Nichols Hills, OK 73116. EOE Dietary Manager experience in food prep, cook & order. Managing staff, developing menus Apply in person Heritage Assisted Living Center 9025 NW Expwy, Okc Experienced Cook & Waitstaff needed. Good pay. Need all shifts. Apply in person 1427 SE 30th Mama Lou's Restaurant

Pancho's Mexican Buffet is now hiring for

HEAD CHEF '63 Baja Bug, needs engine work, $700. 405-812-5654 1971 VW Bug, runs & drives, needs work, $1000 firm 405-313-4635

I buy junk cars, trucks & SUVs, run or not, no title, no problem, 512-7278

$$ Fast Cash $$ $$$$ 946-4371 $$$$

'06 & '04 Chevy K Ton, v6 auto, both run/drive great $6000-$7500 922-7236 '06 Ford F-150 Ext Cab XLT, V8 auto, loaded $10,500 OBO 922-7236

DIRECTOR, TEACHERS, VAN DRIVERS. Apply 1755 N. Meridian Ave. Saint John's Child Development Center

FIREFIGHTER

No exp needed. Training, travel, great pay/benefits/ vacation & regular raises. HS Grads & seniors. age 1738. Call: 1-877-628-9562

Apply in person at 2166 SW 74th off I-240 & S. Penn.

DRIVER/COURIER Earn $500-$1000 weekly Requires your cargo van or pick up. Call Shane at 680-0113 or email to scooke@freedomexpress.com Local Fuel Hauler Salary $45-$60K. Nights and every other weekend off. Experience desired, but not req'd. Will train. Call 405-850-5040

New Year New CareerBethany Dental Assisting School. 12 week course. Next Class Jan 3, 11 Call Now 405-789-5266

Nichols Hills Cleaners is searching for CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES We are open from 7-7 M-F and 8-5 Sat. You must be able to work either shift and every other weekend. This is full time employment. Starting pay is $9ph. Apply at our Northpark Location, 2804 NW 122nd, Just East of May. Hate dirt, but love people? Must have car, ins & DL. No nights/no weekends. Health & dental insurance. Merry Maids South 670-1120

Hotel Breakfast Attendant Must be available Monday - Tuesday, Friday –Sunday. Hours 5am – 11:30am. Food handlings experience a plus. No phone calls please Hampton Inn Edmond, 300 Meline off I-35 and 2nd street.

OKLAHOMA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE Now accepting applications for •Detention Officers •Clerical Employees Good starting salaries + 401k & Deferred Comp Plan. Health , Dental & Vision Insurance + Paid Leave. P/U application @ 201 N Shartel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

ADON/LPN(QA), LPNs, RNs Experienced in Home Health Please call M-F, 605-1400 or fax resume to Janice 605-1451 Dental Assistant FT Dental Hygienist PT NEEDED FOR GROWING EDMOND PRACTICE. Experience required. APPLY IN PERSON 1400 W. COVELL RD. EDMOND damonrjohnsondds.com DON & RN Case Manager Loretta's Home Health Care has an immediate opening with experience. Apply at 500 N. Meridian Ave Suite 107, or call 405-948-2770 M-F, 10-3pm or fax resume to 948-2773 Lab Tech for family practice. Experienced only. Send resume MDFP 1212 S Douglas MWC 73130

LPN/RN

needed for busy NW OKC Pulmonary office. Great benefits. Fax resume to 946-6677 MEDICAL ASSISTANTS (Licensed) For busy specialty practice at Mercy. Experience required. Fax resume to 752-4242 RECEPTIONIST Will train qualified applicant. Optometric physician's office in Midwest City. Call 737-8935 SURGICAL COORDINATOR Schedule procedures & surgeries, greet patients & guests, interact with Dr's & staff, maintaining medical records. Experience preferred. Must have excellent computer & interpersonal skills. FAX RESUME TO: 405-280-5303

3 bdr, 1.5ba ch&a, 2 car, $800 month, $550 deposit. 405-755-0831

REAL ESTATE AUCTION Ardmore, OK Nov. 18, 10 AM. Building with over 19,000+ sf of space plus over 6,000 sf upper level which includes apartments and office. Building previously housed a sign company. Also selling personal property--lots of transformers and misc. United Country, Hendren & Associates 918-253-4133 and United Country, Wilson Realty 580-2233699. For info or brochure, call either office or LeRoy 918-6950808 or Kelly 580-2226248 or go to www.unitedcountry.com/jayok or www.ucwilsonreal ty.com. Also selling 90 acres near Healdton, OK surface and mineral rights. LeRoy Hendren

DELIVERY DRIVER Part Time, Apply at Penny & Irene's Flowers, 7556 SE 15th, MWC

TECH/DRILLER Lab & Field Tech/ Driller for geotechnical engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Excellent benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO, 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC, 73128.

Commercial RE Commercial Property For Sale

LUBE TECHS needed for Busy quick lube center seeking Lube Techs. We offer industry top starting pay & paid training. Apply at 2625 Broadway Court, Edmond, OK.

Classics Wanted

91 Seville, extra clean, well maintained, call for details, $1250, 514-4980.

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Data Entry/ Customer Service. Hiring for 2011 tax season. Free training, flexible hours, premium pay. Many locations available. Jackson Hewitt Tax Service. 405-942-1980.

Nationally owned Dental Lab looking for DELIVERY DRIVER Must have good driving record. Will need copy of record if hired. This is full time with large number of miles driven daily. Hours are-M-F 8AM-5PM. Good benefits–car provided Apply M-F 9AM-4PM 3824 N. MacArthur

PHOTO PROVIDED BY OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

JULIE MCGOWAN IS NEWS AND MEDIA RELATIONS DIRECTOR AT OBU.

Professional (Degree Required) '04 Ford F-350 4x4 Lariat SRW 6.0 dsl, Exc Cond 183K $14,900 820-5949

Dale Utt, associate professor of biology at Oklahoma Baptist University, searches for fossils in a quarry in Utah this past summer.

Queen Bdrm Set: dresser w/mirror, chest, 2 night stands & bed $750; Queen matt. & box $250 All Good Cond. 250-6591 Lighted curio/entertainment center, mirror back, locking wine drawer, pecan wood, burl inlays, $850. 685-8240 Kennedy Rocking Chair Vintage 1961 $50. 454-3816 Wood Entertainment Center with 4 cabinets, $275. 691-8646 7 pc Spanish oak din set, cane back chairs $250; loveseat $50; 721-1784. Queen size Memory Foam bed $150 OBO Call 924-5394

Industrial Property For Rent Manager sought to suppot child care resource and referral services to childcare providers in Oklahoma. Masters degree preferred. Must have knowledge of the ECE field and minimum 3 years experience in a childcare setting. Complete job disciption at www.oklahomachildcare.org, send resumes by Nov. 12 to pkoos@ oklahomachildcare.org

Advertising Account Executive Part/Full Time w/DollarsInside. Must be self motivated with a strong work ethic. Sales experience a plus but will teach, must have reliable transportation. Great pay for performance. Send Resume to: dollarsinsideok@gmail.com or call James at 405-210-5095.

FT Sales Rep

position avail. to cover OK. Degree in Bus/Marketing or related. 8 yrs sales exp in lieu of degree. 2 yrs sales exp in healthcare industry pref. Competitive sal, expenses and company pd family coverage medical/dental. Send resume to HPC, 63 S. Royal St., Suite 710, Mobile, AL 36602, fax 251.441.1986, email: stoulson@ hpcinternational.com

Building For Lease 3500 sqft, with approx 2 acres, 638 N. Meridian. 405-412-5441 or 405-947-0200

Panel Installer Aluminum siding, metal panel, aluminum cladding, & layout installers needed. Experience required. “Special training” opportunity. Great wages & benefits with year round work. Send resume to Shanna@ downtownglass.com

(1) 10'' radial arm saw w/steel base, (1) 6'' Craftsman wood lathe w/cabinet complete with motor, 1 8 gal. Craftsman wet dry vacuum, (1) air compressor Campbell Hausfeld needs service, (7) misc size wood cabinets with Formica tops. (2) battery chargers. $15-$300. 405-728-0327

Antiques, Art, Collectibles 501

TECH/DRILLER Lab & Field Tech/ Driller for geotechnical engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Excellent benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO, 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC, 73128.

Several Germ. wall & mantel clocks, restored, Beautiful! $80-$300 691-3121

Wine Refrigerator cedar wood, holds 25 cases. $6000 new, sell for $500 firm. 313-4635

Clean 1 bedroom apt. AC, you pay electric. 2328 SW 28th 685-8278 Furn 1BD most bills Paid + EMSA, no sec 8 and no pets, 524-2730

SALES CAREER

Looking to be part of a winning team? We offer: •Four-Day Work Week •Top Incentives •$3,000 Monthly Training Incentive Available •Management Opportunities •Many FIRST Year Representatives Earn $55K-$60K Overnight travel required (Mon. - Thurs.). Call now for interview times & locations. Brandon Headrick (866) 225-0727

Spacious, quiet, secure 2 bed duplex, $775 Call 826-2345. 3/2.5/2 9909 Mashburn Blvd. $875mo, No Sec. 8 412-8540 jjcrent.com

Houses for rent

2600 Nantucket - 3/2/2 + off. new carpet, granite & appliances, $1250 mo + dep. 627-1231 Commercial Roofers needed for Watonga, OK. Must have rubber roofing experience. Call 405-415-4107, ext. 1.

3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car gar, 1800 sf, $1100 month. Call 405-990-0488

3/1/2, brick, also 1 home in Harrah. 1 year lease, $675+deposit. 454-2314

Glazers Needed

Must have trans., driver's lic. & 5 years experience. 918-704-2688 or 918-244-7800

3 bed, 1 bath, 1 car gar, ch&a, $575+dep. 1120 Hazelwood Dr. 412-7013

Journeyman Plumber needed for commercial work in the metro area & out of town. Call 473-6639

Magnetic Particle Inspector for Cougar Tool Inc. A min of 1 yr experience inspecting down-hole drilling equipment. Wage is negotiable based on experience. Excellent benefits including 401K plan. Please fax resumes to 405-789-6765 or fill out an application at 9505 W Reno Ave

MECHANIC

The Village Public Works Department is accepting applications for an experienced Mechanic through November 5, 2010. Starting salary is $3,053.50/monthly with excellent benefits. Minimum Qualifications must be at least 18 years old, high school diploma/ GED & with Oklahoma Driver License, with good background and physical condition. Work hours may vary. Applications can be picked up at 1701 N.W. 115th Oklahoma City, Ok for further information call 751-4933. The City of The Village is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Kenmore refrigerator, 18 cubic feet, $110 cash, 354-2660. Apt. size Refrig, 15 cf, white; Elec Range, white $100 ea. 405-203-4034

WELL & SEPTIC ON 5 ACRES Close in Noble. Owner Carry 226-2015co

3 bd, 1.5 ba, 2c garage, ch&a, wet bar, $650+dep. 10022 Issac Dr. 412-7013

3 bd, 1.5 ba, 1 car gar, remodeled 1113 Berwyck $750mo + dep. 833-3540

Farms, Ranches For Sale, Okla. 308 Real Estate Auction McAlester, OK Nov. 13, 2010. 195 Acres selling in 3 parcels. Executive home, manager's home, tractors, farm equip., household, misc. Call United Country, Hendren & Associates 918-2534133 or LeRoy 918-6950808 for information or brochure, or see www. unitedcountry.com/jayok Preview: Nov. 7, 2-3 PM

Homes For Sale

309.9

3bd, 1.5ba, 1c, remodeled 1113 Berwyck approx 1k sqft $87,500, 833-3540

3808 S. Brookline 2bd, 1ba, single gar, lrg yard, $40,000. 632-7953

Nice lrg 3 bd, liv/din, appls, laundry rm w/d hkup no pets/no sec 8, $580. 1941 NW 15 557-1288 Nice 2 bd, liv, din, appl's w/d hkup, 2 car, 2808 NW 20th, $580, no pets, no sec 8, 301-5979. 1743 Churchill Way. The Village, 2bd ch&a, compl redone $750mo 942-3552 2/1/1 brick, ch&a, fenced, stove, Mayfair area, $595, 550-5128. 3 bd, $400 mo + $150 dep fncd yrd 1524 NW 10. 1 bed avail. 639-0556

Nice 3 bed 1O ba, ch&a, 2 car, 4913 Keith Dr. $795 month 733-3360

7x12, 76"x16', 76''x10', 5x8 util, 6x10 encl, 7x12 concession trlr, never used Nice $1200-$8500 922-7236 18ft tandem axle trailer, pipe desgn w/spare good tires $1200 685-7557

(9) Combo Snack & Beverage Machines: $1750-$2500, 1 or all. Call Bobby, 405-306-7750

Dell Pentium 4. 2.8 GHz, 1Gb DDR memory, WinXP, DVD/CDRW, internet ready, complete system w/17" LCD, $150. 819-8691 Dell Pentium 4. 2.8 GHz, 1Gb DDR memory, WinXP, DVD/CDRW, internet ready, complete system w/17" LCD, $150. 819-8691

2005, 750 C-II John Deere Dozer Hydraulic C frame long track with 6-way tilt blade, 3 shank Vail ripper, air suspension deluxe comfort control high back seat, cab heat and A/C, AM/FM weather band radio, 7600 hours on unit. $50,000 OBO. Contact: Ben Johnson at 405-242-6083 or bjohnson@ equalenergyus.ca

3-way flat screen tv console w/3 glass shelves, new, $200. 685-8240

Chinese Crested, Reg., 6 weeks old, POP, S/W $300 ea. 580-658-1467 or 405-428-0808 Cocker Spaniel Puppies Registered with several colors available. 300.00 580-548-6897 or amerflight@pldi.net Cocker Spaniel, ACA reg. 1 M $100, 3 F $150. 8 weeks, 405-215-1464 DACH, MINI, 2 red males X-special, 10 weeks old, $125 each »» 321-1209 Dachshund, Mini, 6 wks old, s/w, blk & tan, reds, $150 each. 405-623-7223 DACHSHUND PUPPIES SHOTS $150. 409-5132 Doberman, AKC, 9 weeks old, white, VERY LARGE 2 Males left! $475ea. 580-736-9519

Baby Sulcata Tortoises: Must be kept warm in winter. Grow very large. Make excellent pets. $80, Cash Only, (405) 596-6419, ask for Robert.

Oklahoma Breds 3 TB mares all in foal by First Smart Money QH. $1000 stud fee was paid. Sacrifice at $1000 each 405-371-0003 3yr AQHA bay filly, bred for performance & speed, broke $500 405-745-3502

English Bulldog Male, 9 weeks, red/white, hsebroke, s/w, papers, sleeping cage, harness & toys. Must sell due to owners' failing health. Must see to appreciate $1,250. 308-6542 English Bulldog AKC, 2 F, $1500 ea, 285-2825, englishbulldogsjarvis.com

German Shepherd AKC Puppy AKC register German Shepherd puppies for sale. She is 10 weeks old current on w/s, proven healthy, both parents are on site. We take great strides to make great companion for individuals. This dog has excellent ball and prey drive, and great obedience/social skill! For information or picture call (918) 399-2982. $500 (918) 399-2982

Olhausen Pool Table, 1'' slate top $600 Call Bobby, 405-306-7750

Hunting/Fishing Leases 607.0 German Shepherd Puppies Selling 4 import bred German shepherd pups excellent pedigree, health guarantee, both parents OFA certified.All shots. already started obedience 950.00 Call David@ 405-474-8200 German Shepherd AKC, born 10/01/10, black & tan, pop, country raised $350, 918-225-0032 Great Dane Puppies ACA, 3 males, shots, wormed, $300 black, $500 platinum merles, 580-541-5550 Maltese Puppies, ACA, Small, S/W $250-$300 918-426-5181

Olde English Bulldoggee Male, 1 year old, housebroke, plays rough. No papers, good watch dog $450. Enid, 580-541-3647

Deer hunting, duck, turkey & wild hog Call 580-994-5532 for prices & dates. Leave message. 300 acres 50 miles East of OKC. Deer & Turkey. 1 year lease $2000. 405-919-9687 TROPHY DEER LEASE 1st time offered. 1 hour N of OKC. 316-992-6935

2006 Honda Gold Wing Trike GL 1800, Red, 5600 Miles, Clear Title, One Owner, $7600. bayronjess68@gmail.com $7600 (405) 522-0576

Race car & trailer race ready! Pure/factory stock, $2500. 405-812-5654

Papillion Puppy AKC, male, 1st shots $300 (405) 464-1551 Pit Bulls-blue fawn 2 boys, 2 girls, $125. Call for info @ 837-5322

2 LITTLE KITTENS Must stay together. $10 Cash ’ 741-3420 Animals R Us Rescue Cats/Kittens, all ages & types, $10-$50 » 317-7593 Bengal kittens Full Blood brown spotted bengal kittens. Ready for Halloween 3Males 1 Female. $600.00 Nicole 405-816-2760

POM, ACA, 10 weeks, Small Male $150 shots/ wormed 405-626-6703 Pomeranian, AKC/CKC, Partis »» okcpoms.com $200-$550, 405-609-9241 Poms-8 weeks old, 1 female, $300; 2 males, $200 each; 1 male, 14 weeks, $150. Very fluffy, Very spoiled. All shots & records. Registered w/pedigree. 405-3977539 or 405-397-7536 Poms-Kennel CloseoutPure bred small dogs, minimum 6, $25 each. 405-872-7243

Fall Gathering 2010 Nov. 6th, 10 AM, Joplin Reg. Stockyards 3000 Cows & bred Heifers; 80 Bulls, 17 Ranch geldings; 43 weanlings. Mike Armitage, 918-625-5689

Poms ACA M & F, 8wks 4 months, $200-$250 ’ 405-872-7243 ’

2000 Winnebago Adventurer Motor Home 35ft , 2 slides, super clean, many extras. Free storage until Sept 2011. $41,000 Call 405-227-2455 '10 38FT 5TH WHEEL 3 SLIDE, FIREPLAC. W/D NOPETS & SMOKE NEW $32000 obo 8177296123 2007 Puma, 28 foot TT, 5 new tires, new mattress, heat & air, new batteries $10,500, 759-3633. '05 Salem 38 ft Super Slide 2 bdrm $11,500; '99 Springdale 29 ft, sleeps 7. $6500 ‘ 812-208-3997

Poodles ''Standard" AKC Pups, 3M, 1F, family raised, $250-$300 OBO 12wk OKC 405-919-7477

AKC German Shorthair, M/F, 5-7 mo, s/w, quails killed, whoas, points, backs, retrieves, natural, $400-$600 405-550-8324

(3) Reg. Angus bulls top bloodlines DOB 1/09 & 2/3/09. $1100-$2000. 273-2405 or 659-7825

PUG PUPPIES, REG, 1 blk male, 1 blk female , 12-13 weeks, 1st shots, wormed, $200, (405)756-4994/756-5074

Boykin Spaniels BSS/AKC great all-round retreivers, 2-F,1-M shots. $200 405.590.3846

(15) serviceable age Angus & (4) Maine bulls. F.T. 381-4307 lv msg.

Rat Terrier Puppies, 2M 8 weeks, black & white $45 each. 405- 314-7761

2 hyd mec shot shell reloaders, .410 & .28 gauge rebuilt May 2009, plus motor, $900, 250-2078.

Boston Terrier AKC, 6 weeks, blk/wht, 2 Female, good markings, $250 ea. cash. 580-6226716, 224-1542 Sulpher Boxer Pups AKC champ. sired, 1 flashy F 1 classic M, $500. 580-623-0517

Rottweiler, AKC Germ, 1M, pick of litter 12 wks, 40 lbs. $1000 619-0643 SCHNAUZER PUPS ACA 6 weeks, small minis, white, 4 female, 1 male, $250. 405-626-8812 Schnauzer Toy CKC, 2 M-10 wks & 7 months $350. 580-540-6354 Siberian Husky, AKC, 7 weeks, 3 Males, black & white, s/w, blue eyes $300 ea. »» 405-802-5367 »»

BOXERS ’ AKC CUTIES 2 male fawns, 1 female fawn, 1 male brindle, $300. 971-4900 or 971-4901

Weimaraner Pups AKC, 1M, 1F, 6 wks, weaned, s/w, $285. 918-306-2716

Chihuahua, female, spayed, shots, wormed, 7 years old, free to good home. 258-2720

YORKIE, 2F, 12 wks, 2lbs home raised w/ TLC. Exc quality, hlth guar. $350 Cash ’ 918-377-2940

Excellent split oak firewood. Del. Edm, Guthrie & N OKC 348-2531

Chihuahua, 2 Tiny Toys, 1 F, 1 M, S/W, 7 wks old $225 ea. ’ 650-3035

YorkieK /ChihuahuaK , 11 weeks, males, $75 each. 405-417-2956

Woods Unlimited Firewood: Del. $100, Pick up $75 Call 9-WOOD-52

Chihuahuas, 3F, 3M, Reg, s/w, POP, paper trained, $140 ’ ’ 370-8223 puppylovefarms.com

Seasoned, split oak/hickory mix, $110/rk DNS 974-1145 or 964-4370

Chihuahuas, 8 weeks, s/w, $75-$100 each, cash, » » 306-7083 »»

2 extra nice Gofer Machines, 1 Allison $1095, 1 HD Ekroat $1295. 405-794-8289

100 gal AQUARIUM With wood cabinet-62w 54h 24d, includes everything you need. Cabinet totally full of extras. $400.00 Jamie (405)388-7878

'06 Harley 1200 XL Custom Sportster, $7000, 918-348-0928

Blue Heeler Puppy M, 6 weeks, working parents $125 cash 224-6903 Akai M-10 tape recorder/ player exc cond, 20 tapes & access. $100 454-3816

Chihuahuas, 1 M, 1 F 18 mos $50 each 487-6708

Malti Tzu CKC. $300 »» 381-9238 dreamacrespuppies.com

Sheet Metal, 3'x10' $18, Mon.-Sat. 405-390-2077 or 405-659-3054

1137 NW 26th, 3 bed, 2 bath, 9 rooms, $750, 205-3379 or 396-8608. 7408 NW 6th Terrace. OKC 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car, $650 mo. Call 990-0488

1 pr OU vs Colorado section 33, row 45, seats 25 & 28. $80 cash 314-9511

•Solid Brazilian Cherry• • Hardwood Flooring • (2600sf) Beautiful, never used $2.50/sf 632-0499

1002 Bell Dr. Immac. brk, 2/1/1, no pets/smoking, ch&a $650+dep 787-8099 5 acres owner will carry , Charter Oak Road & Rockwell. 405-640-8206

1030 Trencher, 3 whlchair lifts, 76''x16' util. trailer $1250-$3000 ¡ 922-7236

• Laminate Flooring 2100 sq ft, 25 year warr, 95¢/sq ft • Prefinished oak, Hardwood, 2400 sq ft. 30 year warranty $2/sq ft. • 405-632-0499

1521 Concord Ln. 3-4/2/2 Edmond Schls, very nice, $1300 mo. 330-8978

Commercial Roofers needed for Watonga, OK. Must have rubber roofing experience call 405-415-4107 ext. 1.

Licensed Journeymen & Prime Power Electricians Fax resume to 405946-4443 or email to fedconjobapps@yahoo.com

END OF THE SEASON!!! JD 425, 3pt hitch, 54'' deck, nice. Very nice MF TO30. Very nice 8N Ford. $2500-$3000 Serious offers only For appt call 641-9932

Metal Building Erectors and Laborers needed. Must be able to pass drug test, have valid Oklahoma Drivers License and must be dependable. Call 405863-3195 leave message

Marketing Representative Needed for OKC Law Firm. $1600/month plus benefits. Fax resumes to 962-4250.

FURNITURE SALE! MUST SALE-$25 to $499 Inc: couches, frml dining, bed sets and more. 405-600-0504 for pics

Yorkie terriers 2 AKC registered for free, contact jmdouglas001@ gmail.com

English Pointer Puppies Reg. 2F $250ea. 6mos old S/W/DC. 580-564-4975 or 405-517-8329 GSP Males, startedfinish, $300-$900. Call Bruce 405-361-9498

Service Directory Carport, Patio, Awning Tuffsteel carports 20x20 $1595; Patio Covers, Free Est. 799-4026, 694-6109

Sunshine Cleaning Service ins/bond 793-1630, 625-3930

Retired Contractor Repairs, remodels, paints, 25 yr exp, free est 314-3621

D&D Roofing, OK owned, free estimates, 323-9300


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

› ›

nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CHOCTAW

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

FROM PAGE 15A

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

HINTON

Fire: Damage was about $125,000

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

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PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

BUCHANAN

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Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 Resthaven Spaces 1 & 2, lot 128, section 3, Garden of Devotion. $3000/both plus transfer fee. 405-745-2257 Resthaven Cemetery, S. chapel, spaces 14, lot 370, section 12, market value $3495 ea. sacrife $2000 each. 405-943-5059 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com RESTHAVEN CEMETERY DOUBLE DIP LAWN CRYPTS (STACKED) $6000 794-0005 Resthaven Memorial Gardens 2 Plots $4300 for both, includes transfer fee. Call 405-823-8245 Resthaven Memory Gardens, OKC, spaces 1-4, lot 399, section 12, buy from owner, save 50%, $1400 ea, 918-492-1344. Resurrection Mausoleum, 2 crypts, row 11, tier 3, 1 north, $7600 value, sell for $6500, 405-340-1911, ask for Max. John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 2 plots in the Garden of Devotion $3000 for both. Call 405-948-3125 ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $1975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


FORECAST

Warmer weather expected The bumper comes off a car Tuesday as it drives into a flooded area on Interstate 45 South in Dallas. Today in Oklahoma, it is expected to be warm and breezy. For the complete forecast, see Page 6C. AP PHOTO/DALLAS MORNING NEWS

IN BRIEF

NORMAN | STATE

OKLAHOMA CITY

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THREE ADULTS, INCLUDING A PREGNANT WOMAN WHO LEFT FROM THE HOUSE, WERE INJURED

Two children die in Norman fire BY JAMES TYREE AND JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writers

NORMAN — A young pregnant woman broke through a window to escape a burning house and banged on a neighbor’s door early Tuesday, but could only point to the raging fire she had just escaped. Suffering from smoke inhalation, Amber Larkins, 22, later underwent a successful cesarean

State sues Internet travel agencies

section delivery at Norman Regional Hospital, just hours after two children lost their lives in the blaze. The fire began about 4:20 a.m. in a wood-frame house at 905 N Cockrel Ave., Norman firefighters said. Savvy Larkins, 2, died in the fire and her father, Daniel Larkins, 19, was being treated for smoke inhalation in the intensive care unit at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Michael Larkins, 7, also died in

the fire. He was spending the night at the home of his aunt, Oley Mae Thornton, who was delivering newspapers at the time of the fire. Thornton lost a grandchild, Savry, but gained a grandchild with the birth of Amber Larkins’ baby. Also being treated for smoke inhalation at Integris was Amber Larkins, while Kelly Larkins, 46, was in the burn unit with seconddegree burns on 10 percent of his body, Integris spokeswoman

Brooke Cayot said. The neighbor, Jim Larkins, a relative, said Amber Larkins’ baby was doing fine. “Amber banged on my door and all she could manage to do was point, but I could see what was going on,” Jim Larkins said. “I tried to get to the back of the house, but the fire was too dangerous.” Jim Larkins said he heard the

Ricky Charles Howard Hoover Jr., 27, of Indiahoma, pleaded guilty to assault resulting in serious bodily injury in connection with a traffic accident that killed a man who was mowing his yard near Indiahoma in April, U.S. Attorney Sanford Coats reported Tuesday. Hoover was under the influence of alcohol and Lortab when he lost control of his vehicle, which struck and killed Kenneth Kowena, 61, of Indiahoma, records show. Hoover faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 at sentencing, Coats said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SEE FIRE, PAGE 21A

NORMAN STATION GETS A HEAD

BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

The state of Oklahoma is alleging in a lawsuit it has been cheated out of millions of dollars in hotel room taxes. The state is suing for back sales taxes from Priceline.com, Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity.com and other online reservation companies that offer discount hotel rooms. The lawsuit — filed Tuesday in Oklahoma County District Court — is the latest against the online travel industry. A year ago, Florida became the first state to sue the online travel companies. San Antonio and other Texas cities last year won $20 million in their 2006 lawsuit against Expedia and other companies. The lawsuit was initiated by Gov. Brad Henry. “We believe some outof-state firms have not paid their appropriate state sales tax bill and have essentially shorted Oklahoma taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars,” said a spokesman for the governor. The lawsuit alleges the companies act deceptively, collecting taxes from travelers “at or above” retail room rates but only paying the state taxes on wholesale rates. The state hired law firms from Georgia and Oklahoma to file the lawsuit. Most of the hotel tax cases against the industry have not been successful, said Andrew Weinstein, a spokesman for the Interactive Travel Services Association.

MAN PLEADS TO ASSAULT

POLICE NAME SLAIN WOMAN Ramona Lynn Anders, 25, was the woman found shot to death Saturday morning at 3151⁄2 SW 34, police said Tuesday. Anyone with information about the crime should call 297-1200. The death is the 48th homicide in Oklahoma City this year. FROM STAFF REPORTS

FLU SHOTS OFFERED FREE

Dino the Dinosaur sports a new paint job and a reattached head after being damaged by vandals in August. Owner Jerry Masters said the 700-pound, fiberglass apatosaurus is “as good as new or better” and has been repaired and repositioned in front of Master’s Sinclair service station at Main Street and Hal Muldrow Drive in Norman. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

GOV. BRAD HENRY AND RETIRED MAJ. GEN. TONEY STRICKLIN WILL SPEAK AT EVENT

Governor to help Norman honor vets BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

NORMAN — A Salute to

Vietnam Veterans, postponed from July 4 because of rain, will be Saturday at Reaves Park, 2501 S Jenkins Ave., city officials said. Gov. Brad Henry and retired Maj. Gen. Toney Stricklin will speak at 5:30 p.m. in a formal recognition ceremony, which also will feature an F-16 flyover and music by the 145th Army Band and a community choir, city officials said. A video tribute to Vietnam veterans will be included in the ceremony, along with a 21-gun salute.

Vietnam veterans Robert Poolaw, of Norman, left, and Paul Jones, of Guthrie, shake hands in front of the Dignity Memorial Vietnam Wall at Reaves Park on July 4. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

A fireworks display will cap off the evening, Norman Parks and Recreation Director Jud Foster said. The celebration will begin at noon with static dis-

plays of military equipment and memorabilia from the war. The recognition of Vietnam veterans originally was scheduled for July 4 to

coincide with a display of the Dignity Memorial Vietnam Wall, a traveling replica of the war memorial in Washington. The display was in Norman from June 30-July 5. A closing ceremony honoring veterans was rained out. Donations for Stuff the Truck, a community initiative to provide deployed soldiers with care packages, will be accepted from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday at the park. For a list of items needed for the care packages or for more information on the celebration, call 366-5472 or go to www.norman fun.com.

The Riverpark Neighborhood Association will conduct its annual health fair from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the parish hall at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 3901 SW 29. The event, held in conjunction with the University of Central Oklahoma School of Nursing and Mercy Community Outreach, will include free flu shots while they last and free health screenings. A Spanish translator will be available. For more information, call Jeanna Daniel at 519-2188. FROM STAFF REPORTS

ONLINE SHARE YOUR NEWS Post your Norman-area news immediately on NewsOK.com by adding norman@ newsok.com to your e-mail list. For details, go online to knowit.newsok.com/ norman.

INDEX Deaths Records

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

NORMAN | STATE

FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART TO DISPLAY PHOTOGRAPHS

Two photographic images of a 1979 work by Jack Welpott, left, and a 1983 work by Francis Merritt Thompson, right, are combined to create a three-dimensional stereograph, part of a student-curated show opening Friday. PHOTO PROVIDED BY FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART

Stereo images seen in students’ exhibit FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — A studentcurated photographic exhibit will open Friday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave. A free public reception will be at 7 p.m. A lecture at 6 p.m. by student curators Lauren Barnes, Sherwin Tibayan and Ken Sims will open the exhibit. Local experimental guitarist John Calvin will perform at the reception. “Stare Stare Stereo” is curated exclusively by students, museum Director Ghislain d’Humieres said. The exhibit positions pairs of photographic images from the museum’s per-

manent collection, d’Humieres said. “By placing two images together, an immediate dichotomy is created,” Barnes said. “A conversation of comparison and contrast is fostered, and an emphasis on looking and connoisseurship is elevated.” When students get involved in selecting the works, designing an exhibit and presenting artwork in a new way, “they connect in a much deeper way both with the art and with their visitors,” d’Humieres said. “Only in a university setting is this sort of connection possible.” Each pairing remains open to analysis and en-

courages a different interpretation, Tibayan said. The exhibit features stereographs, Tibayan said. A stereograph is composed of two slightly different images paired to create the illusion of three dimensions. The stereographs used in the exhibit parallel the standard art historical technique developed by Heinrich Wolfflin in the late 19th century, he said. The exhibit will remain on display through May 15 and is part of a semester of architecture exhibits at the museum this fall celebrating the art and achievements of famous architects.

Norman’s financial officers win award for budget plan FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada has awarded its Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the city’s financial department for its 2011 fiscal year budget, officials said.

The award is presented to financial departments for “significant achievement” in the budgeting process, according to a news release from the organization. To receive the award, the financial department is assessed and must receive high marks for its policy

document, a financial plan, an operations guide and a communications device, according to the release. Recognized individually for their work on the 2011 budget are city Finance Director Anthony Francisco and budget manager Suzanne Krohmer.

Blues guitarist Bugs Henderson’s concert date reset for February FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — A Sooner Theatre concert featuring noted blues guitarist Bugs Henderson has been rescheduled for 8 p.m. Feb. 25. The performance originally was scheduled in September. Henderson is a Texas native who has played with such guitar icons as B.B.

Calendar

King, Freddie King, Eric Clapton, Ted Nugent, Roy Buchanan and James Burton. “We are so happy that people will have the opportunity to see this phenomenal musician at our theater,” said Jennifer Baker, Sooner Theatre executive director. “There are many venues that host concerts, but there are very few like the

Sooner Theatre.” Tickets cost $25, $20 and $15. They are available by calling 321-9600, at www.soonertheatre.org, or at Sooner Theatre, 101 E Main St., from 10 a.m. to noon or 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays or one hour before the show. A $2 per ticket service charge will be added to phone and online orders.

ONLINE

TODAY Story Time, 9:30 a.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620. Bonus Years, 10:30 a.m., McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church, 419 S University, 3213484. Healthy Community Coalition, 4 p.m., Norman Regional Hospital Education Center, 901 N Porter, 307-6602. Zumba fitness class, 6 p.m., Whittier Recreation Center, 2000 W Brooks St., 292-9703.

How to submit your event Make sure all of your school or nonprofit events are entered into wimgo.com. Go to wimgo.com and log in using your NewsOK.com login and password, or choose to create one. Click on “Add Event.” Enter all the information about your event, and wimgo will help you with each step. On the next page, begin typing the venue name and a drop-down box will appear for you to select the venue. This opportunity is free to you, so check out wimgo today!

THURSDAY Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620. Preschool Story Time, 10:30 a.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620. U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman to visit University of Oklahoma, 2 p.m., Oklahoma Memorial Union, 900 Asp, 325-3784. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, Oklahoma City, 691-0509. Public forum on municipal finance, 6 p.m., Norman High School, 911 W Main, 366-5812. Women’s basketball exhibition, OU vs. Oklahoma Christian University, 7 p.m., Lloyd Noble Center, 2900 Jenkins, 325-4666. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, 7 p.m., Edsel Ford House, 107 State Drive, 2869370. Sooner Toastmasters, 7 p.m., McFarlin United Methodist Church, 419 S University, 2107831. Lauren Deger, 7 p.m., Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan, 360-2353. Contemporary Dance Okla-

homa, 8 p.m., Rupel J. Jones Theatre, 563 Elm, 325-4101. Breathe Owl Breathe, 8 p.m., Opolis Production LLC, 113 N Crawford Open Mic with Zach Walchuk,

9 p.m., Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan, 360-2353. John Calvin and The Cavalry CD Release with Shining Lights, 9 p.m., The Brewhouse, 110 W Main, 321-2739.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN

NORMAN | STATE

NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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Technology center sets career night FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — The Moore Norman Technology Center will hold a Career Awareness Night for public school students and their parents from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday at the campus at 12th Avenue NW and Franklin. Career Awareness Night for students in grades six through 12 and their parents is hosted each year by the center in partnership with Moore and Norman school districts, said Anna Trowbridge, spokeswoman for the technology center. The interactive event allows students to explore a variety of careers, learn about the center’s study

LEARN MORE For more information, call the career night coordinator at 364-5763, ext. 7379, or e-mail iadair@ mntechnology.com.

programs and get firsthand knowledge about work from local businesses and industry, Trowbridge said. Business and higher education professionals will share their expertise and related career experiences with students attending the event, Trowbridge said. Students may participate in a “reality check” exhibit, where they are

made aware of the realities of daily and monthly living expenses, she said. Parents can gather information on Oklahoma’s Promise and other state programs, as well as talk with high school counselors in the Student Transitions room, Trowbridge said. Representatives from local colleges and universities, Moore Norman Technology Center instructors and career advisers will be available, as well. High school students will be given information about summer employment opportunities, internships, college credit courses, higher education opportunities and entrance requirements, Trowbridge said.

Metro-area students struggle with ACTs BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

An analysis of metroarea schools’ average ACT college entrance exam scores shows that only four schools scored at or higher than 24, the score desired by most four-year colleges for entrance. The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics led the way by scoring an average composite ACT score of 31.4. The school is a two-year residential high school for academically gifted students across the state. Edmond North High School ranked next highest in the state, with an average composite score of 24.3. Also meeting or surpassing a score of 24 were Classen School of Advanced Studies, with a score of 24.2, and Norman North High School, with an average score of 24. Other metro-area schools came close to the benchmark score. Edmond Memorial High School had a score of 23.6, Deer Creek High School scored 23.2 and Norman and Putnam City North high schools each had scores of 22.9. ACT stipulates the composite score to be college-ready is 24, said Bob Melton, science curriculum facilitator for the Putnam City School District. Colleges such as the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and other four-year schools have picked that score as an entrance requirement. ACT arrived at that score based on data of stu-

AT A GLANCE OKLAHOMA SCORES BEHIND NATION Oklahoma’s 2009 graduating class is behind the national average ACT test score in English, mathematics and science, according to state schools Superintendent Sandy Garrett’s latest “Investing in Oklahoma” report. The state matches the average score in reading. In English, Oklahoma’s average score is 20.5, the national is 20.6. In math, the average score is 19.9 for the state and 21 for the nation. In science, scores are 20.5 for the state and 20.9 for the nation. Reading scores are 21.4. Composite scores for the state are 20.7, and nationally 21.1. Shelly Hickman, spokeswoman for the state Education Department, said it’s important to remember that Oklahoma has more test takers than the national average. “The more students who take an exam, the lower the overall score,” she said. Still, she acknowledges the state has work to do. “We’re very close to the national average in some subjects,” she said, “But math is an area where we need to improve.” TRICIA PEMBERTON, STAFF WRITER

dents who passed the test with that score and how they did in college, Melton said. Students who achieve that score have a 50 percent chance of making a B or better and a 75 percent chance of making a C or better in their freshman year in college, he said. Other colleges, such as community colleges, accept a lower entrance score. Edmond North Principal Jan Keirns attributed her school’s score to the number of Advanced Placement courses students take. Keirns said 65 percent of the school’s senior class has taken at least one AP course. Students took more than 1,300 AP exams last year, she said, maintaining a pass rate that is as high as it ever has been. “If you have a strong,

rigorous curriculum, not only are students learning academically, they are learning how to learn, they’re learning timemanagement skills, analytical thinking, the ability to write,” she said. The Midwest City-Del City School District saw average ACT scores ranging from 22.4 at Carl Albert High School to 16.7 at the Mid-Del Alternative Academy. Putnam City high schools also showed a wide range of average scores on the ACT test. Putnam City North tied for eighth in the state with five other schools with an average score of 22.9. Putnam City High School had a score of 20.5, while Putnam City West High School scored 19.3. Putnam City Academy, the district’s alternative school, scored 17.8.

Norman board to consider projects FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — The Norman School Board has scheduled a special meeting today to discuss and possibly give authorization to proceed with design plans for a new elementary school in southeast Norman and for classroom additions at three other schools. The meeting is at 5:30 p.m. at the Administrative Services Center, 131S Flood Ave. Representatives from The Stacy Group will show and explain plans for the new school, followed by representatives of Locke Wright Pruitt & Brown discussing the initial designs for classroom additions at Cleveland, Jackson and Wilson elementary schools. The capital improvements are part of the $109.7 million bond issue passed by Norman voters in December. After each design is ex-

plained and discussed, the school board will vote on whether to proceed with the construction document phase.

The board’s next regular meeting is scheduled to begin 7 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Administrative Services Center.


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A group of re-enactors dressed as a U.S. marshal’s posse watches over a celebration in February as Stockyards City Main Street celebrated the completion of its new archway at the entrance to Stockyards City in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Stockyards guard the Old West flair HISTORY | CENTURY OF TRADITION CELEBRATED EVERYDAY BY BRYAN PAINTER Staff Writer bpainter@opubco.com

A century into its existence, lots of activity can still be found at Historic Stockyards City. Each day Historic Stockyards City offers local, national and international visitors the opportunity to return to the Old West. The western district is home to more than 70 businesses specializing in catering to the everyday working cowboy and cowgirl. You can find western wear, farm and ranch needs, fine dining, entertainment and obviously, the Oklahoma National Stockyards Co. In addition to the present-day activity, it’s a great place to appreciate a rich history. The Oklahoma National Stockyards Co. began operating as a public livestock market in October 1910 — 100 years ago this fall. The stockyards and meat packing plants were Oklahoma City’s first major industrial installations

ONLINE This story originally appeared on NewsOK.com’s Oklahoma City community page, http://knowit .newsok.com/oklahoma-city. For more online resources and stories from Oklahoma City, Norman, Edmond, Midwest City or Yukon, go to http://knowit.newsok.com.

and represented the heaviest concentration of labor in the capital city, according to Stockyards City Main Street. In the first five years of operation, the volume of livestock handling increased by 130 percent. By 1966, the Oklahoma National Stockyards had become the sixth-largest market in the nation on the basis of livestock handling, representing $125 million in annual business. When the number of cattle for sale soared to 919,280 head in 1973, the stockyards took the nation’s lead. On one particular day in 1974, 21,000 head of cattle were sold by auction in a continuous trading span of 23½ hours, according to “Cattle Market for the World,” by Carol Holderby Welsh.

And certainly with all this activity was the need for a supporting community of goods and services. The streetcar was extended to this business district and what became known as “Packingtown.” A post office was opened, along with a bank, hotels, restaurants and a wide variety of businesses related to the cattle trade. Much of the original business district remains intact, maintaining the western atmosphere but broadening the marketing approach to serve the needs of the larger community. Historic Stockyards City and the Oklahoma National Stockyards officially celebrated their centennial in October. Large centennial celebration events were held in the summer.

Students honored by Kiwanis FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — The Norman Kiwanis Club has recognized one adult and one high school student as October students of the month. Selected students are enrolled at the Moore Norman Technology Center and represent full-time majors in health, business and information technology. Honored are Norman North High School senior Alison Lanphere and Tiffany McDonald, a secondyear accounting student at the Moore Norman Technology Center.

Alison Lanphere Besides fulfilling requirements at Norman North High School, Lanphere is a second-year student in the pre-nursing course at the center. She serves as president of her class chapter of Health Occupations Students of America. She placed first in the annual Health Occupations Students Association’s job-seeking skills event this year and is eligible for national competition in Orlando, Fla., in June. She has volunteered at the Full Circle Day Center, a day-care center for elderly adults in Norman, since 2008 and is a member of the Medical Explorer Post No. 901 sponsored by Norman Regional Hospital. She also is a Eucharist minister for the homebound and nursing home patients in her church.

Tiffany McDonald McDonald is a secondyear accounting student focusing on the fullcharge bookkeeper career

major. She began the course as a Moore High School senior. She will complete the course this semester at the center. She is a member of the Business Professionals of America student organization and is a member of the center’s Employment

Leadership Council. She plans to attend Oklahoma City Community College for general education courses and transfer to the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond to complete a bachelor’s degree in accounting.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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Oklahoma City Zoo maps out big projects BY CARRIE COPPERNOLL Staff Writer ccoppernoll@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Zoo plans to spend nearly $100 million in the coming years to build, repair and remodel major exhibits ranging from Asian habitats to underwater ecosystems. “It’s a very exciting map,” said Dwight Scott, executive director of the zoo. “We are going to add over the next 10 years some pretty exciting and engaging exhibits.” Scott will present the master plan to the Oklahoma City Council for approval in coming weeks. Two weeks ago, the Oklahoma City Zoo Trust approved the final draft of the zoo’s master plan, a comprehensive outlook at the next 10 years. Seven large-scale building projects are scheduled to be completed before 2020. The second phase of the Asia project will open in 2013 and cost $17 million. The first phase was the elephant exhibit, which alone cost $13 million and is nearly paid for and is ex-

pected to open this spring. A new veterinarian hospital also is scheduled to open in 2013. The $9 million building will include an area where the public can see veterinarians at work. The setup can be found at only a few zoos in the country, but it’s popular with guests at those locations, Scott said. The World Plaza will open in 2014 at a cost of $5 million. The World Plaza is the central location where visitors can access the major exhibits, such as Oklahoma Trails, Cat Forest and Great EscApe. The first phase of an Africa exhibit will open in 2015. It is expected to cost $20.5 million. The pachyderm building at the front of the zoo will be razed to make way for an Africanstyle restaurant and events center. The giraffes will be moved into the old rhino yards, so visitors will have an up-close look at the animals. The old pachyderm building, Scott said, is “one of our biggest eyesores.” The Canopy Restaurant

will be remodeled into a better herpetarium, which will cost $2.7 million and open in 2017. A $2.5 million demonstration amphitheater and entertainment zone will open in 2018. Aquaticus will be updated and expanded to make room for new and larger animals, possibly sharks and jellyfish. The upgrades will cost $19.4 million, and the new center is set to open in 2019. Smaller projects — like a ropes course, zip line and Safari Skyride — also are tucked in between the bigger developments. Scott said officials also have been careful to include enough guest amenities, such as restrooms and concession stands. Those miscellaneous costs are expected to total $21 million. The second phase of the Africa exhibit is expected to open in 2022. It will cost $42.4 million, bringing the total of the two phases of the Africa exhibit to $62.9 million. It will be twice as expensive as the Asia project. The Tropical Forest

Professional (Degree Required)

MECHANIC

The Village Public Works Department is accepting applications for an experienced Mechanic through November 5, 2010. Starting salary is $3,053.50/monthly with excellent benefits. Minimum Qualifications must be at least 18 years old, high school diploma/ GED & with Oklahoma Driver License, with good background and physical condition. Work hours may vary. Applications can be picked up at 1701 N.W. 115th Oklahoma City, Ok for further information call 751-4933. The City of The Village is an Equal Opportunity Employer

1997 Dodge Maxi van, w/security cage, parting out, $5-$500, 812-6253.

Classics Wanted $$$$ 946-4371 $$$$

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2002 LeSabre Custom. 6 cyl 3800 eng. tan. very gd cond $3500 601-6860 1998 Lesabre, all power, runs great, good tires, $1800 obo, 417-3544.

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'05 Liberty 2WD Lmtd if you find nicer-buy it! 57K, $13.9Kobo 620-1882

Administrative Assistant Financial planning co. in Edmond seeking an AA. Must be able to work in a demanding environment & be able to multi task. Email resume CharlotteS@ shawfinancialinc.com

Data Entry/ Customer Service. Hiring for 2011 tax season. Free training, flexible hours, premium pay. Many locations available. Jackson Hewitt Tax Service. 405-942-1980. Legal Secretary at least 5 years Estate Planning experience for large downtown law firm. Excellent benefits & salary. Send resume to: The Oklahoman, Box #1910, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0125

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TECH/DRILLER Lab & Field Tech/ Driller for geotechnical engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Excellent benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO, 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC, 73128. Hate dirt, but love people? Must have car, ins & DL. No nights/no weekends. Health & dental insurance. Merry Maids South 670-1120

Hotel Breakfast Attendant Must be available Monday - Tuesday, Friday –Sunday. Hours 5am – 11:30am. Food handlings experience a plus. No phone calls please Hampton Inn Edmond, 300 Meline off I-35 and 2nd street.

is now hiring for

HEAD CHEF Apply in person at 2166 SW 74th off I-240 & S. Penn.

DRIVER/COURIER Earn $500-$1000 weekly Requires your cargo van or pick up. Call Shane at 680-0113 or email to scooke@freedomexpress.com Local Fuel Hauler Salary $45-$60K. Nights and every other weekend off. Experience desired, but not req'd. Will train. Call 405-850-5040

'02 WS6, 30k miles, Sunset horns, 1 owner, $15k obo. 201-9863 '79 Firebird Formula, rebuilt 6.6, Runs Good $2495 Call 636-0597

Nationally owned Dental Lab looking for DELIVERY DRIVER Must have good driving record. Will need copy of record if hired. This is full time with large number of miles driven daily. Hours are-M-F 8AM-5PM. Good benefits–car provided Apply M-F 9AM-4PM 3824 N. MacArthur

New Year New CareerBethany Dental Assisting School. 12 week course. Next Class Jan 3, 11 Call Now 405-789-5266

Data Entry/ Customer Service. Hiring for 2011 tax season. Free training, flexible hours, premium pay. Many locations available. Jackson Hewitt Tax Service. 405-942-1980. DELIVERY DRIVER Part Time, Apply at Penny & Irene's Flowers, 7556 SE 15th, MWC

Norman Public Schools •M.S. Asst. Principal Whittier M.S. EOE For questions call 405-447-6599 Applications online at www.norman.k12.ok.us

Metal Building Erectors and Laborers needed. Must be able to pass drug test, have valid Oklahoma Drivers License and must be dependable. Call 405863-3195 leave message Sheetrockers Experienced /residential Must have hand tools & transportation. Call Guy, 740-4696

TECH/DRILLER Lab & Field Tech/ Driller for geotechnical engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Excellent benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO, 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC, 73128.

Advertising Account Executive Part/Full Time w/DollarsInside. Must be self motivated with a strong work ethic. Sales experience a plus but will teach, must have reliable transportation. Great pay for performance. Send Resume to: dollarsinsideok@gmail.com or call James at 405-210-5095.

FT Sales Rep

position avail. to cover OK. Degree in Bus/Marketing or related. 8 yrs sales exp in lieu of degree. 2 yrs sales exp in healthcare industry pref. Competitive sal, expenses and company pd family coverage medical/dental. Send resume to HPC, 63 S. Royal St., Suite 710, Mobile, AL 36602, fax 251.441.1986, email: stoulson@ hpcinternational.com

Real Estate Auction McAlester, OK Nov. 13, 2010. 195 Acres selling in 3 parcels. Executive home, manager's home, tractors, farm equip., household, misc. Call United Country, Hendren & Associates 918-2534133 or LeRoy 918-6950808 for information or brochure, or see www. unitedcountry.com/jayok Preview: Nov. 7, 2-3 PM

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OKLAHOMA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE Now accepting applications for •Detention Officers •Clerical Employees Good starting salaries + 401k & Deferred Comp Plan. Health , Dental & Vision Insurance + Paid Leave. P/U application @ 201 N Shartel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

DON & RN Case Manager Loretta's Home Health Care has an immediate opening with experience. Apply at 500 N. Meridian Ave Suite 107, or call 405-948-2770 M-F, 10-3pm or fax resume to 948-2773 Lab Tech for family practice. Experienced only. Send resume MDFP 1212 S Douglas MWC 73130

LPN/RN

needed for busy NW OKC Pulmonary office. Great benefits. Fax resume to 946-6677 MEDICAL ASSISTANTS (Licensed) For busy specialty practice at Mercy. Experience required. Fax resume to 752-4242

FIREFIGHTER

LUBE TECHS needed for Busy quick lube center seeking Lube Techs. We offer industry top starting pay & paid training. Apply at 2625 Broadway Court, Edmond, OK.

SURGICAL COORDINATOR Schedule procedures & surgeries, greet patients & guests, interact with Dr's & staff, maintaining medical records. Experience preferred. Must have excellent computer & interpersonal skills. FAX RESUME TO: 405-280-5303

Please fax resumes to 405-789-6765 or fill out an application at 9505 W Reno Ave

3 bdr, 1.5ba ch&a, 2 car, $800 month, $550 deposit. 405-755-0831

REAL ESTATE AUCTION Ardmore, OK Nov. 18, 10 AM. Building with over 19,000+ sf of space plus over 6,000 sf upper level which includes apartments and office. Building previously housed a sign company. Also selling personal property--lots of transformers and misc. United Country, Hendren & Associates 918-253-4133 and United Country, Wilson Realty 580-2233699. For info or brochure, call either office or LeRoy 918-6950808 or Kelly 580-2226248 or go to www.unitedcountry.com/jayok or www.ucwilsonreal ty.com. Also selling 90 acres near Healdton, OK surface and mineral rights. LeRoy Hendren

WELL & SEPTIC ON 5 ACRES Close in Noble. Owner Carry 226-2015co

Dachshunds fullblood puppies, 2M 1F, 4 wks, $150. For info 887-2114 Dachs Minis, 2M, 3F, colorful, cute, very small, $150-$225. 405-380-8469 Doberman, AKC, 9 weeks old, white, VERY LARGE 2 Males left! $475ea. 580-736-9519

(1) 10'' radial arm saw w/steel base, (1) 6'' Craftsman wood lathe w/cabinet complete with motor, 1 8 gal. Craftsman wet dry vacuum, (1) air compressor Campbell Hausfeld needs service, (7) misc size wood cabinets with Formica tops. (2) battery chargers. $15-$300. 405-728-0327

German Shepherd AKC Puppy AKC register German Shepherd puppies for sale. She is 10 weeks old current on w/s, proven healthy, both parents are on site. We take great strides to make great companion for individuals. This dog has excellent ball and prey drive, and great obedience/social skill! For information or picture call (918) 399-2982. $500 (918) 399-2982

1030 Trencher, 3 whlchair lifts, 76''x16' util. trailer $1250-$3000 ¡ 922-7236

German Shepherd Puppies Selling 4 import bred German shepherd pups excellent pedigree, health guarantee, both parents OFA certified.All shots. already started obedience 950.00 Call David@ 405-474-8200

1 pr OU vs Colorado section 33, row 45, seats 25 & 28. $80 cash 314-9511

Great Dane Puppies ACA, 3 males, shots, wormed, $300 black, $500 platinum merles, 580-541-5550 Lab Puppies AKC, male only, s/w, pop, yellow & wht, $250. 918-387-4216 Labs, full blood puppies, black, golden & chocolate, $125. 405-933-1014 Lhasa Apso, 1 F Pup, Shots/Wormed $200 Cash ’ 659-9256 Papillion Puppy AKC, male, 1st shots $300 (405) 464-1551 Pom pup, 8 weeks old, ready to go, 1 white M, s/w, reg, $125, 376-3130 Poms-Kennel CloseoutPure bred small dogs, minimum 6, $25 each. 405-872-7243

Industrial Property For Rent

Poodle Puppies, toy, ACA, M&F s/w, pop, very cute, $225, 918-387-4216

Building For Lease 3500 sqft, with approx 2 acres, 638 N. Meridian. 405-412-5441 or 405-947-0200

Poodle Pups, Toy 2F, 1 blk 1 brown $350; 1 M apricot $300 each; 794-5365

(9) Combo Snack & Beverage Machines: $1750-$2500, 1 or all. Call Bobby, 405-306-7750

3 bed, 1 bath, 2 car, on 5 acres, Union City/ElReno area, owner finance with 10% down, $140,000, $1200 month, 833-9707.

Nice 10 acres in Cleveland Co., big trees, might divide, owner finance 360-6586 or 590-4367.

END OF THE SEASON!!! JD 425, 3pt hitch, 54'' deck, nice. Very nice MF TO30. Very nice 8N Ford. $2500-$3000 Serious offers only For appt call 641-9932

18' car hauler, steel floor brakes, new tires, dovetail $2075 405-834-9094

Automatic form, fill & seal film packaging machine, stainless steel LCD monitor, $9400; Multi roasting machine, automatic, stainless steel, $4500; $11,000 for both; all negotiable; never used; 405-615-4958.

40 acre tract near Lexington, excellent location good grass, trees, creek & ponds, 405-517-8600.

Magnetic Particle Inspector for Cougar Tool Inc. A min of 1 yr experience inspecting down-hole drilling equipment. Wage is negotiable based on experience. Excellent benefits including 401K plan.

2 bed, corner lot, large carport. No pets. $600mo + dep. 232-9704

Several Germ. wall & mantel clocks, restored, Beautiful! $80-$300 691-3121

Journeyman Plumber needed for commercial work in the metro area & out of town. Call 473-6639 Licensed Journeymen & Prime Power Electricians Fax resume to 405946-4443 or email to fedconjobapps@yahoo.com

4bd-2ba-2317 SW 46th huge mstr bd & strg bldg $785 + no pets-sect 8 ok. 405-642-4116/794-0928.

10x13 High Quality Hand Made Wool Persian Rug like new $1400, 819-7778

80 beautiful wooded acres, SE of T-Bird Lake, by owner, 360-6586 or 590-4367

Queen size Memory Foam bed $150 OBO Call 924-5394

jects will come from taxes, donations and memberships, zoo officials said.

English Bulldogs, AKC, Cute and Cuddly, $1000 405-368-7211 www.lovemybulldogs.com

Commercial Property For Sale

Commercial Roofers needed for Watonga, OK. Must have rubber roofing experience call 405-415-4107 ext. 1.

Glazers Needed

Nice 3 bed 1O ba, ch&a, 2 car, 4913 Keith Dr. $795 month 733-3360

Antiques, Art, Collectibles 501

Must have trans., driver's lic. & 5 years experience. 918-704-2688 or 918-244-7800

10x13 High Quality Hand Made Wool Persian Rug like new $1400, 819-7778 Hide-a-bed, very clean; 2 recliners; $50-$250; 405-737-3850.

Commercial RE

Looking to be part of a winning team? We offer: •Four-Day Work Week •Top Incentives •$3,000 Monthly Training Incentive Available •Management Opportunities •Many FIRST Year Representatives Earn $55K-$60K Overnight travel required (Mon. - Thurs.). Call now for interview times & locations. Brandon Headrick (866) 225-0727

Commercial Roofers needed for Watonga, OK. Must have rubber roofing experience. Call 405-415-4107, ext. 1.

Nice 2 bd, liv, appls, ch/a 1941 NW 15, $435, no pets, no sec 8, 557-1288

DW on Acreage, 4 Bed/ 2 Bath, 2350 sq ft, 2 car garage ¡ 405-412-6236

SALES CAREER

RECEPTIONIST Will train qualified applicant. Optometric physician's office in Midwest City. Call 737-8935

No exp needed. Training, travel, great pay/benefits/ vacation & regular raises. HS Grads & seniors. age 1738. Call: 1-877-628-9562

Manager sought to suppot child care resource and referral services to childcare providers in Oklahoma. Masters degree preferred. Must have knowledge of the ECE field and minimum 3 years experience in a childcare setting. Complete job disciption at www.oklahomachildcare.org, send resumes by Nov. 12 to pkoos@ oklahomachildcare.org

complex indoor rain forest exhibit. The money for the pro-

Farms, Ranches For Sale, Okla. 308

217

1994 Olds Cutlassnice car with real clean body and interior. Needs engine (3100, v6) $500 obo 405-262-1336

Conservatory will cost $11.2 million and open in 2025. It is designed to be a

Furn 1BD most bills Paid + EMSA, no sec 8 and no pets, 524-2730

3/2.5/2 9909 Mashburn Blvd. $875mo, No Sec. 8 412-8540 jjcrent.com

Houses for rent

2005, 750 C-II John Deere Dozer Hydraulic C frame long track with 6-way tilt blade, 3 shank Vail ripper, air suspension deluxe comfort control high back seat, cab heat and A/C, AM/FM weather band radio, 7600 hours on unit. $50,000 OBO. Contact: Ben Johnson at 405-242-6083 or bjohnson@ equalenergyus.ca

2 extra nice Gofer Machines, 1 Allison $1095, 1 HD Ekroat $1295. 405-794-8289

1108 S Howard $750 disc 3/1.5/2- lrg lr-nice crpt avail 11/1-no pets-appt 405-642-4116/794-0928 3 bed, 1.5 bath, 1 car, CH&A $700mo + $500dep ‘‘‘ 631-8220 ‘‘‘

Woods Unlimited Firewood: Del. $100, Pick up $75 Call 9-WOOD-52

2 LITTLE KITTENS Must stay together. $10 Cash ’ 741-3420 Bengal kittens Full Blood brown spotted bengal kittens. Ready for Halloween 3Males 1 Female. $600.00 Nicole 405-816-2760

SCHNAUZER, AKC MINI, 10 weeks, S/W/T/DC, 1 Wheaton M, $150 Cash »» » 314-8274 » »»

Olhausen Pool Table, 1'' slate top $600 Call Bobby, 405-306-7750

Taylor Made irons, 3PW, and Burner driver, all regular flex graphite shafts, $250, 691-1080.

Hunting/Fishing Leases 607.0 Deer hunting, duck, turkey & wild hog Call 580-994-5532 for prices & dates. Leave message. 300 acres 50 miles East of OKC. Deer & Turkey. 1 year lease $2000. 405-919-9687 TROPHY DEER LEASE 1st time offered. 1 hour N of OKC. 316-992-6935

2006 Honda Gold Wing Trike GL 1800, Red, 5600 Miles, Clear Title, One Owner, $7600. bayronjess68@gmail.com $7600 (405) 522-0576 '06 Harley 1200 XL Custom Sportster, $7000, 918-348-0928

2000 Winnebago Adventurer Motor Home 35ft , 2 slides, super clean, many extras. Free storage until Sept 2011. $41,000 Call 405-227-2455 '10 38FT 5TH WHEEL 3 SLIDE, FIREPLAC. W/D NOPETS & SMOKE NEW $32000 obo 8177296123 '05 Salem 38 ft Super Slide 2 bdrm $11,500; '99 Springdale 29 ft, sleeps 7. $6500 ‘ 812-208-3997

Schnauzers, AKC/CKC, mini, okcpoms.com $250-$500, 405-609-9241 Schnauzers, Mini, 1M 1F, Extra Cute Puppies $150$225 Guar. 405-380-5859

Siamese applehead sealpoint kittens, 10 weeks , litter box trained, 1M, 2F $100 ea, 405-320-4587.

Yorkie, Reg., Absolutely Adorable M & F, 9 wks, S/W $200-$750 580-515-6680

Custom .270 Rem, never hunted with, Douglas bbl, jewel trigger, fiberglass stock, 3x9 Zeiss scope, cost $1850, sell $1250. CZ over/under 20 ga, used once, $750. » » 405-428-1880 » » Boykin Spaniels BSS/AKC great all-round retreivers, 2-F,1-M shots. $200 405.590.3846

Siamese Kittens- seal & blue point, 1st shots, $150; 8 month male blue point, $50; 642-4416.

Yorkies, 1F Teacup $550; 1M, Tiny $250 EXTRA NICE! Guar. 405-380-5859

English Pointer Puppies Reg. 2F $250ea. 6mos old S/W/DC. 580-564-4975 or 405-517-8329

FREE KITTENS 1 female, 2 male, (1) 6 mo old Kitten 324-2130

Yorkies, ACA, 1F $225, 2M home raised S of Norman 527-2606/760-4863

German Shorthair Pointer, female, FREE to good home. 405-392-3055 TRX3S Wildlife Tracking Unit, 3 collars $200 obo Call 405-659-3725

(3) Reg. Angus bulls top bloodlines DOB 1/09 & 2/3/09. $1100-$2000. 273-2405 or 659-7825

Yorkie terriers 2 AKC registered for free, contact jmdouglas001@ gmail.com

(15) serviceable age Angus & (4) Maine bulls. F.T. 381-4307 lv msg.

» Aussie's » all colors, mini & toy's, $200-$400, 405-650-4671 Basset pups, AKC, 8 weeks old , $250 580330-0304, 580-588-3853.

Drives, foundations, patios, lic, bond, ins, free estimates,769-3094 100 gal AQUARIUM With wood cabinet-62w 54h 24d, includes everything you need. Cabinet totally full of extras. $400.00 Jamie (405)388-7878

BOXER AKC PUPS, $250 CASH. Meeker, 405-279-2340 Chihuahua Pups, papers, $150-$400 381-3740 www.mychihuahuas.net Chinese Crested, Reg., 6 weeks old, POP, S/W $300 ea. 580-658-1467 or 405-428-0808 Cocker Spaniel Puppies Registered with several colors available. 300.00 580-548-6897 or amerflight@pldi.net

Service Directory

Oklahoma Breds 3 TB mares all in foal by First Smart Money QH. $1000 stud fee was paid. Sacrifice at $1000 each 405-371-0003 5 year old gray miniature stud, well mannered, $400 obo, 833-9707. 7 year old Smart Little Lena gelding, heel horse, $3000 obo, 833-9707.

Drywall Ceiling & Wall Doctor Roofing & Remodeling ‚ Acoustic popcorn removal ‚ Drywall repair ‚ Custom hand trowel finishes & spray finishes ‚ Interior/Exterior painting ‚ Powerwashing ‚ Flooring, carpet, tile, wood ‚ Granite counter tops Call Jeff for free estimate at 405-408-5453

‘ Fence Repair and ‘ Replacement Free Est. 15 years exp. ‘ 410-2671

Hauling & Clean Up, reasonable prices, 201-0955.


20A

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Cold case ends with sentencing BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

CHANDLER — A Missouri

prison inmate was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1992 death of a woman who was strangled and dumped in a creek bed in rural Lincoln County. Dennis Ray Wright, 50, pleaded no contest in Lincoln County District Court to a reduced charge of first-degree manslaughter in the death of Georgette Pless, 22, of Tulsa. Wright was initially charged in April with firstdegree murder, but the complaint was altered as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. District Attorney Richard Smothermon said the sentence almost ensures Wright will spend the rest of his life behind bars. Wright is a diabetic and in poor health, he said. “There is little risk of him ever getting out alive,” Smothermon said. Wright appeared Friday in court, but no one was in the courtroom representing Pless’ family. Smothermon said law enforcement has been unable to reach any of Pless’ family members to tell them about the conviction. He said investigators tracked her mother to a homeless shelter in Louisiana and left messages there, but received no response. Pless has a son who agents continue to search

for, he said. “We’d like to let someone in her family know that after all this time Georgette Pless got justice,” he said. Deputies stumbled upon Pless’ nude body in November 1992 while searching for two victims in an unrelated murder case. She was facedown under a bridge in rural Lincoln County, authorities said. It took months for law enforcement to identify her remains, and her murder remained unsolved for nearly two decades. Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents last year had DNA information from semen collected from Pless’ body compared to DNA information kept in a national computer database. The results garnered a match to Wright, who was serving time in a Missouri prison on a fraud conviction, said Gary Perkinson, agent in charge of the OSBI’s cold case unit. Perkinson said investigators later learned Wright once lived about a mile from where Pless’ body was found, and he lived in the neighborhood from which she disappeared. Perkinson said Wright never admitted to killing Pless, and denied ever knowing her. There were ligature marks across the front of Pless’ neck, and her spine was broken in several places, according to a report from the state medical examiner’s office.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS CLAIM 3 ON STATE ROADS Three people died from accidents on state roads, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported Tuesday. Jackie Morris, 43, Clayton Morris died at the scene of a crash Tuesday four miles west of Wilburton in Latimer County, the patrol reported. He was driving a car about 5:45 p.m. west on U.S. 270 when it veered left of center and struck an oncoming tractor-trailer rig, troopers said. The rig’s driver was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Leslie Fipps, 24, Paden Fipps died Monday after a wreck in Seminole County north of Seminole, troopers said. She was driving an eastbound car about 7 p.m. on the ramp from U.S. 377 to Interstate 40 when she ran a stop sign, the patrol reported. A southbound pickup slammed into her car. Fipps died at a Seminole hospital, troopers said. The driver of the pickup was not hurt. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, the patrol reported. Donald Richardson, 47, Custer City Richardson died Tuesday after a wreck west of Custer City in Custer County, troopers said. He was driving a westbound SUV about 3 a.m. on State Highway 33 when it left the road, the patrol reported. The SUV hit a concrete ditch and rolled 21⁄2 times. Richardson was ejected from the vehicle and died at an Oklahoma City hospital, troopers said. He was not wearing a seat belt. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Deaths BARTLESVILLE

Scott, Richard Lee, 82, died Saturday. Graveside services 1 p.m. today, Summit View Cemetery, Guthrie (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Wright, Naomi Joella, 63, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stumpff, Bartlesville).

BEAVER

Elfers, Fumiko, 74, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Church of Christ (Mason, Shattuck).

BLANCHARD

Brown, Mickey Hough, 57, died Oct. 31. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Eisenhour, Blanchard).

CARNEGIE

CLINTON

Hill, Robert Wesley “Hillboy,” 69, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday (Stanley-Lee, Clinton). Torres, Antonio, 74, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Kiesau-Lee, Clinton).

Henry, Alice “Marie,” 84, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Dustin Cemetery (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

FORT GIBSON

Burch, Florabelle C., 84, died Monday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Fort Gibson National Cemetery (Lescher-Millsap, Fort Gibson).

HINTON

Huey, Willie, 92, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Bridgeport United Methodist Church (Turner, Hinton).

JENNINGS

Reavis Marshall, Geneva Jacqueline, 71, died Oct. 28. Services 2 p.m. today, Oilton First Baptist Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma City).

KEMP

Fire: Damage was about $125,000 FROM PAGE 15A

fire started in the middle of the house but knew no other details. Norman fire marshals were still investigating Tuesday afternoon. A neighbor, Kristine Butler, said the fire awakened her. “I saw them pull the bodies out. Thank goodness my kids didn’t. It was awful,” Butler said. Another neighbor, Stephen Swim, said the tragedy “breaks my heart.” Swim said he woke up to the sound of a dog barking

ONLINE Video Watch video from the site of the fatal fire online at NewsOK.com.

and could see light through a window shade. When he looked out, he could see the house on fire, he said. The fire caused an estimated $125,000 worth of damage to the house and its contents.

RINGLING

Maussner, Patricia, 76, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Oak Hill Cemetery (Chaney-Harkins, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Bodenheimer, Clyde Edward “Ed,” 71, died Monday. Services 3 p.m. Sunday, Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

Dunn, Patricia Ann, 62, died Oct. 24. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Eakley First Assembly of God (John M. Ireland, Moore).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

MULDROW

NEWCASTLE

Brown, John W., 82, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glory Promise Center (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City).

NICOMA PARK

Ballard, Anna Mae, 64, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Hibbs, Choctaw).

NINNEKAH

McClendon, Hazel F., 83, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday (Ferguson, Chickasha).

Sears, Debbie Ann (Walker), 50 died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church, Durant (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant).

Records Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, or call us at 475-3539. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Michael Rory Shearer, 52, and Carol Sue Rhoads, 55. Jerry David Snider, 47, and Theresa Dolores Roche, 48. Joseph Lynn Suttle, 30, and Kasey Lynn Prowell, 29. Mark Anthony Morgan II, 28, and Tara Necole Johnson, 21. Dan Nubine Jr., 55, and Laura Diedra Howard, 40. Johnny Wayne Goodwin, 24, and Christine Elizabeth Crites, 18. Jereme Michael Cowan, 31, and Courtney Leigh Allen, 29. Michael Joe Rothrock, 28, and Natalie Kay Banks, 28. Rodney Lee Brehm, 26, and Chrystal Dawn Ableiter, 20. Eric Vincent Owen, 41, and Heather Dawn Estridge, 18. Michael Adam Mosteller, 27, and Kathryn Lynnell Tarr, 33. Loren Del Rosebrook, 21, and Audrey

NORMAN

Church (Parks Brothers, Prague).

PAULS VALLEY

Ayers, Steven Wayne, 38, died Oct. 30. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Erin Springs Baptist Church, Lindsay (B.G. Boydston, Lindsay). Holt, Tracy Denise, 49, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

PAWNEE

Cather-Brown, Ruth E., 99, died Sunday. Graveside services 12:30 p.m. Friday, Highland Cemetery (Poteet, Pawnee). Rolland, Edward Floyd, 55, died Oct. 29. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

PONCA CITY

Stanger, Norma Jean “Lindy,” 83, died Saturday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Odd Fellows Cemetery (Trout, Ponca City).

PRAGUE

Hoffman, Paula Elaine (Friend), 58, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Sharon Baptist Church, Shawnee (Parks Brothers, Prague).

RALSTON

Dilbeck, Margie, 79, died Sunday.

Sheriellen Danyel Wall, 21. Adrien Javan Stafford, 28, and Aleicia Lashelle Henry, 24. Christopher B. Stewart, 33, and Cherith J. Pennell, 26. Jonathan Wesley Jones, 39, and Heather Renee Rinehart, 32. Adam Daniel Deutsch, 24, and Amanda J. Montelongo, 20.

DIVORCES ASKED

Carney, Jana K. v. Damon R. Cody, Tamara Lynn v. Michael James Conner, Karla J. v. Jason W. Donohew, Kimberley D. v. Joseph N. Gonzales, Jerry S. v. Elliott-Gonzales, Heather L. Hall, Bobby W. v. Marcella G. Jackson, Lloyd Dale Sr. v. Arleatha Gale Jones, Rita A. v. William R. Lietch, Christy Dawn v. Lewis Christopher Milberg, Carla Elaine v. Thomas Ripley Nola-Turk, Christine P. v. Turk, Steven J. Olson, Marjorie v. Scott E. Petrus, Jessica v. Salter, Thomas Anthony Quinn, Jennifer Lee v. Andrew James Reither, Meredyth v. Johnny L. Simpson, Holly Catherine v. Devon Kyle Smith Hough, Katherine Ainslie v. Hough, Charles Vandoren Spybuck, Stephanie H. v. Jason E. Tennyson, David R. v. Jayne A. Tran, Daniel Le v. Le, Cuong Kim Thi Webb, Samuel A. v. Diane L. Yarbrough, Tellia R. v. William L.

STILLWATER

Vincent, Pattie Jean, 89, died Oct. 30. Memorial services 2 p.m. Dec. 18 Turner, Don Mike, 81, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, (Strode, Stillwater). Ringling Memorial Cemetery (AlexanUTICA der, Wilson). Carr, Muriel, 88, died Monday. RINGWOOD Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Durant). Farrington, Clara Belle, 77, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First WYNNEWOOD Baptist Church (Lanman, Helena). Hensley, Willis Dwight, 67, died SALLISAW Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday Lowrimore, Othel E., 95, died Monday. (DeArman, Wynnewood). Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Immanuel YALE Baptist Church (Agent, Sallisaw). Turner, Frank, 81, died Oct. 30. SHAWNEE Services 10 a.m. Saturday, First Assembly of God (Palmer Marler, King, Terry Lee, 46, died Saturday. Cushing). Services 2 p.m. Friday, Spring Baptist

BASS Bert Faircloth Bass, 81, was Harwell, Paul, 87, died Monday. born in Thomasville, GA on Dean, William Jessie, 73, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Hampton July 27, 1929, the son of John Private services (OK Cremation, Mortuary, Checotah). C. Bass and Oklahoma City). Houston, Luke, 76, died Sunday. Laura HanDEL CITY Graveside services 2 p.m. today, IOOF nah Griffin. Harris, Alta Mae, 87, died Tuesday. Cemetery (Havenbrook, Norman). He passed Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery, Tuttle (Caskets away NoOKLAHOMA CITY Inc. & Johnson, Del City). vember 2, Allen, Jean Marie, 79, died Saturday. Sherrill, Virginia L., 94, died Monday. 2010, in Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Advantage, Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Bethel Midwest City). Oklahoma Church, Choctaw (Smith-Parks, Barfelz, Alan Gale, 50, died Sunday. City. On Harrah). Services 3 p.m. Thursday (Bill EisenNov. 6, Williams, Letha F., 88, died Tuesday. hour NE, Oklahoma City). 1955, Bert Services 10 a.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour Booker, Darryl, 50, died Oct. 22. SE, Del City). Services 11 a.m. Friday, Greater Mount married Carolyn Sugg in Lonoke, AR. Bert served in Olive Baptist Church (Temple and DEWEY the U.S. Army during the KoSons, Oklahoma City). Ketchum, Billy George Jr., 40, died rean War, rising to rank of Farnsworth, Dean Leonard Sr., 50, Oct. 29. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Dewey died Saturday. Services 11:30 a.m. Captain at age 26. After beChurch of Christ (Stumpff, BartlesThursday, Mercer Adams, Bethany ing discharged from the U.S. ville). (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma Army, he worked for the FAA DURANT City). as an Air Traffic Controller Franklin, Billy Ray, 78, died Oct. 23. No Flanagan, W.W., 86, died Sunday. and meteorologist, retiring services (OK Cremation, Oklahoma Services 11 a.m. Thursday, United from government service in City). Methodist Church, Calera (Holmes1982. He then worked as a Harper, Alma R., 96, died Monday. Coffey-Murray, Durant). real estate agent and apServices 10 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill EDMOND Christian Church (Mercer-Adams, praiser until his retirement. McEver, Winfred “Mac,” 90, died Bethany). Bert moved to Yukon in 1978, Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Heitman-Smith, Frances Mae, 94, died and was a member of the Southern Hills Christian Church Tuesday. Services in Chrisman, Ill. United Methodist Church of (Baggerley, Edmond). (Corbett, Oklahoma City). the Good Shepherd in Yukon. Whitaker, Gerald D., 80, died SatHyeche, Rose M., 62, died Oct. 29. He was an avid genealogist, urday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater Christian Church (OK Cremation, military historian, and reShiloh Baptist Church (Temple and Oklahoma City). cently began collecting coins. Sons, Oklahoma City). Kemp, Kenneth G., 85, died Sunday. As a former pilot in the Army ELK CITY Services 2 p.m. Friday, Chapel Hill Air Corps., he enjoyed phoSmith, Bertha, 94, died Monday. United Methodist Church (Hahn-Cook/ tographing and researching Services 2 p.m. today (Martin, Elk Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). historic aircraft, and attendCity). Lerner, Charlotte Marie, 77, died ing air shows. Bert is surMonday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday ENID vived by his wife, Carolyn; (Vondel Smith South Lakes, OklaCantellay, Joe H., 59, died Monday. sons, Brad Bass and wife Dihoma City). Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brownanna of Carrollton, Texas and Rae, Bill, 81, died Sunday. Services 2 Cummings, Enid). p.m. Thursday (Hahn-Cook/Street & Brian Bass of Carrollton, Falls, Jolene, 76, died Saturday. Draper, Oklahoma City). Texas; daughter-in-law, Cathy Private services (Brown-Cummings, Schumacher, LaVonne B., 78, died Enid). Bass of Oklahoma City; and Tuesday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass grandchildren, James Bass, Grandon, LeeRoy, 84, died Monday. 10 a.m. Friday, St. Francis of Assisi (Bill Graveside services Friday at Burrton, Stephen Bass, Michael Bass, Merritt, Bethany). Kan. (Ladusau-Evans, Enid). Carolyn Bass, Kelsey Bass Sumption, Herbert George, 83, died Jackson, Louie A. Jr., 83, died Satand Kenny Bass. He was preMonday. Private services (Mercerurday. Services 10 a.m. today (BrownAdams, Bethany). ceded in death by his parents, Cummings, Enid). Townley, Melton “Ray,” 63, died Oct. John and Laura Bass; sibMcClanahan, Sunshine, 50, died Oct. lings, Mary Lou Hillman, John 28. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brown- 27. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Resurrection Free Methodist Church (CorCummings, Enid). C. (Bub) Bass, and Betty Lee bett, Oklahoma City). O’Dea, Betty Jo, 77, died Sunday. O'Reilly; and his son, Brett Waters, Richard I., 70, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (HenningerBass. Memorial services will Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Memorial Hinson, Enid). be held 2:00 p.m., Sunday, Park, Oklahoma City). Tefft, Twyla, 81, died Thursday. November 7, 2010, at the Zachritz, Mary Elizabeth, 89, died Services 10 a.m. today (LadusauTuesday. Services 1:30 p.m. Friday, United Methodist Church of Evans, Enid). Nichols Hills United Methodist Church the Good Shepherd in Yukon, Turner, Willie, 48, died Oct. 28. (Demuth, Oklahoma City). OK. Online condolences may Services 2 p.m. Saturday, Grayson Baptist Church (Ladusau-Evans, be signed at www.yandaand PADEN Enid). sonfuneralhome.com Fipps, Leslie Lynn, 24, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist EUFAULA COUNCIL HILL

Briggs, Leona, 97, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Carnegie Cemetery (Smith-Gallo, Guthrie).

PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

MCALESTER

Blauvelt, Roy Dale, 44, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Victory Temple, Roland (Mallory-Martin, Sallisaw).

GUTHRIE

A Norman fire vehicle is parked in front of 905 N Cockrel Ave., where an early-morning fire killed two children and injured three adults.

Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Ralston Church, Sasakwa (Stout-Phillips, Riverside Cemetery (Hunsaker-Wooten, Wewoka). Fairfax).

CHECOTAH

Chilcoat, Mary Louise, 83, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Midwest City (Ford, Midwest City).

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Hill, Marion E., 86, died Oct. 5. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

Pendleton, Vernon, 74, died Monday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. today, Mountain View Cemetery (Ray & Martha’s, Mountain View).

CHOCTAW

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LAWTON

Whitewolf, Jeffery “Boe,” 41, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First Apache Indian Baptist Church, Fort Cobb (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie). Callich, Lola Mae, 86, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, First United Methodist Church (Garrett Family, Checotah).

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

CULLERS William M. “Bill” Cullers passed peacefully into his heavenly home on 11-2-2010. He was born in Lincoln, Arkansas on 11-111927 to William A. and Hattie J. Cullers. In January 1951, he married the love of his life Wilma Lee Hamlin. Together they had 5 children. He is survived by his devoted wife, Wilma, his sons Mike and Vickey Cullers, Bob Cullers and Retha, James Cullers and Patsy, all of OKC and his daughters Mary Dresel and Janie Patrick of MWC, OK. He leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. During his career, Bill served in the U.S. Army, was a schoolteacher and worked 33 years for DHS. After retirement he enjoyed walking and visiting with his friends at the mall. Bill especially enjoyed Sunday dinners and time spent with his family. Contributions in memory of Bill may be made to Britton Baptist Church. Services pending with Demuth Funeral Home.

ALEXANDER Violet Hautez (Tez) Alexander, 86, a longtime resident of the Oklahoma City area, passed away on Friday, October 29, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Funeral services will be held at 2 PM on Friday, November 5, 2010, at Mercer Adams Chapel, 3925 North Asbury, Bethany, Oklahoma. Reverend Steven C. Wright will officiate. The family will receive visitors at Mercer Adams on Friday, November 5, from 10 AM through 12 noon. While flowers are acceptable, memorial contributions made to the Alzheimer's Association, New Mexico Chapter, 9500 Montgomery NE, Suite 121, Albuquerque, NM, 87111, would be appreciated. Mrs. Alexander was born in Atwood, Oklahoma, to the late J.B. and Lula Miller. She was preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Harvey R. Alexander; one brother, Hewit Miller; and one sister, Beatrice Wright. Mrs. Alexander was a graduate of Calvin High School and Hills School of Business. She was a homemaker, devoted wife, loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She was a longtime member of the Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Mrs. Alexander is survived by two sons: David R. Alexander of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and James H. Alexander of Enid, Oklahoma; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and friends. She will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by all who knew her. To share a memory or condolence, visit: www.mercer-adams.com

BALLARD Anna Mae Ballard passed away Nov. 1, 2010. Ann was born to Frank and Velma Williams in Richland Center, WI on Nov. 9, 1945. She married Raymond Ballard on Jan. 29, 1977. They spent many happy years square dancing and traveling together. Ann and Raymond served as Central District SD Assoc. presidents in 1989-90. They belonged to Happy Tracks and Rolling Squares Clubs, and many others over the years. Ann was preceded in death by sisters, Arzenith Peterson and Alberta “Peaches” Wickels. She is survived by husband, Raymond; sisters and brother, Alma Bee, Allen Williams, Arlene Winchell, and Ariel Banker and husband Delbert, all of WI; son, Jeff Nevel and wife Donna; daughters, Cynthia Griffin, Lorene Flores, Jean McCray and husband Ron, and Raymona VanCuren and husband Jamie. Survivors also include 10 grandchildren, Cherie, Felicia, Markus, Matthew, Ashlee, Amber, Melody, Jamie, Fernando, and Seth; 4 greatgrandchildren, Sabra, Lance, Matthew Jr., and Serenity; and many nieces and nephews. Ann retired from Tinker after 27 years of service, including 14 years as Building Manager for Bldg. 3001. Her hobbies included sewing, embroidery, and quilting, and she loved hosting family events, especially on Christmas Eve. Funeral services will be held at 10 AM, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, at Hibbs Funeral Home, Choctaw, with interment to follow at Arlington Memory Gardens, Midwest City. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Do-it-yourself workshop yields tasty gifts Each Christmas, I have delusions of gift grandeur. I imagine putting together a pile of personalized, handmade gifts for all my loved ones. I’d gracefully wrap holiday ribbon around baked goods in my pristine kitchen. Then a songbird would land on my shoulder and admire my thoughtfulness. For some reason, this hasn’t panned out yet. But this year, I’m hoping to create a realistic version of my dream. I attended the Gifts From Your Kitchen workshop at the Oklahoma County Extension Center. Dietitian Casey Campbell instructed about 75 people how to make their own holiday projects. Everyone could make three gifts: soup in a mug, soup in a jar and cookies in a jar. Campbell gave some good advice about making food as gifts. Run containers through the dishwasher first, and start the project with clean hands and a clean kitchen. Use fresh ingredients. Use

Homemade cookies-in-ajar and soupin-a-jar can be an inexpensive option for the holiday gifts.

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

COLUMNIST

labels with at least two things: Ingredients. The gift receiver may have allergies. Instructions. Receivers need to know how to prepare and store the food. You don’t want to give the recipient a foodborne illness or allergic reaction, Campbell said. Unless you don’t like that person and it’s a sabotage present. I think we’ve all given those at one point or another. As if creating your own personalized gifts weren’t crafty enough, you could gussy up your projects by painting the jars or tie on a cute cookie cutter, Campbell suggested. And then, if you haven’t had enough, you could toss it in a handwoven basket full of orga-

PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

› ›

nic cheeses you made. Package with fresh-cut flowers from your greenhouse. Deliver in a horsedrawn sleigh filled with a children’s choir singing carols. Or you could just make the jars. Your friends will be impressed enough. Besides, hiring a children’s choir probably is pricey. Casey turned us loose to make our projects with ingredients laid out on long tables. It was craft madness. Women dumped flour and spices and pasta into jars and Baggies. Campbell allowed at least an hour to put together the gifts.

City council votes to keep ban on out-of-state travel BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members declined Tuesday to lift a ban on their own out-of-state travel. The council voted a year ago to quit paying for its own members to travel outside Oklahoma for seminars, conventions and other activities. The ban also applies to the mayor. The moratorium came

after the city’s sales tax revenue took a turn for the worse, prompting budget cuts in every department and a hiring freeze. After six months of positive sales tax receipts, Ward 5 Councilman Brian Walters suggested lifting the ban. Walters was the chief advocate for passing the ban in the first place. Other council members said although they are encouraged by improving sales tax, they don’t think

the timing is right to lift the moratorium. The proposal to lift the ban failed 6-3. Voting to lift the ban were Walters, Mayor Mick Cornett and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly. Voting no were Ward 1 Councilman Gary Marrs, Ward 2 Councilman Sam Bowman, Ward 3 Councilman Larry McAtee, Ward 4 Councilman Pete White, Ward 6 Councilwoman Meg Salyer and Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan.

Sales tax growth prompts optimism BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

October’s sales tax report continued an encouraging trend, prompting some cautious optimism Tuesday from Oklahoma City officials. Sales tax revenue was up 16.7 percent over expectations and 19.2 percent over last year’s collections for the same period. The October report includes actual collections for the second half of August and estimated collections for the first half of September. It is the sixth straight month of sales tax growth over the previous year. “We’re out of the woods, but we could still be hit by a falling tree,”

Ward 8 Councilman Pat Ryan said. The growth over the past few months has been well over expectations, a development that surprised city officials who have attributed the numbers to busy body shops and roofing companies after a major summer hailstorm. City Manager Jim Couch said there are signs the city’s tax base is growing beyond the temporary bump from storm recovery. “For the first quarter, our revenue is up by just under $6 million,” Couch said. “The primary driver on that is sales tax. We believe about two-thirds of that growth is attributable to the storm. If you take that out of the equation,

sales tax still grew, but it’s about $1 million over target. “It was a very strong month for us. The growth is better than we anticipated. It’s good news. We are coming out of it.” Council members used temporary funds to plug some of the holes in this year’s budget. Without new revenue to fill that gap, further cuts would be needed next year.

Forget it. The flurry of holiday cheer and the possibility of discounted gift-giving were too much for the room to bear. I was briefly scared that I might get trampled, which would be the opposite of holiday cheer.

GET THE RECIPES HOW TO PURCHASE COOKBOOKS The Oklahoma County Extension Center has “Gifts From Your Kitchen” cookbooks available for sale at the office, 930 N Portland Ave. The books are $5. They can be mailed for $5 plus shipping. To order, call 713-1125. The cookbooks include recipes from extension services throughout Oklahoma. Get three of the recipes on Carrie Coppernoll’s blog online at blog.newsok.com/red-dirt-ruckus.

Aside from the impending doom, the projects were really easy to make. Just to be sure this class was legitimate, I made the soup when I got home. It was spectacular. I’ll admit it: I’m probably

going to make the cookies and the other soup myself. I just want to be sure this whole gift-in-a-jar idea is, you know, good. So, here’s a heads up to my friends and family: You’re all getting potato soup this year.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

HENRY Alice “Marie” Henry, 84, died November 1, 2010 following a hard fought battle with parotid carcinoma. Marie was born April 26, 1926 near Dustin, OK to Rufus and Lee Ella (Moore) Leffler. Following graduation from Hanna High School, she moved to OKC where she held numerous jobs including “Rosie the Riveter” for Douglas Aircraft. On March 16, 1946, she married Joe W. Henry, who preceded her in death on December 23, 2000. In 1957, she graduated from Capitol Hill Beauty College and eventually owned and operated Marie’s Beauty Shop in their home at S.W. 25 and Miller in OKC until Joe had to retire due to his health in 1979, and they moved to the Eagle Bluff area on Lake Eufaula. In 1996 when Joe’s health began to fail further, they moved to the Sandy Bass Bay No. 4 area to be near their daughter, Carol Jo McKay and husband Gary. Other survivors are her son James Raymond and wife, Coleen of Edmond, OK, granddaughters, Amy of Dallas, TX and Alyson and husband Scott and great granddaughter Paige Noel Crawford of Lubbock, TX. She is preceded in death by all her siblings, Irene Park of Hanna, OK, R.S. of Martinez, CA, Eugene of OKC and Charlie of Countyline, OK. Also left to grieve her loss are numerous nieces and nephews who adored their Aunt Reesee and step grandson Mark and wife Kimberley McKay of OKC. Graveside services will be held Thursday, November 4, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Dustin Cemetery. Viewing will be held November 3 from 9-8 at the Hunn, Black & Merritt Funeral Home & Crematory in Eufaula. HIATT-OUTLAW Mildred (Rowe) Hiatt-Outlaw, 87, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2010 at Tuscany Village Nursing Home in Oklahoma City. Mildred was born in Augusta, Georgia. She was the daughter of the late Lillie Belle and Samuel Rowe. In 1944 she married Lambert Hiatt in Augusta and moved to Oklahoma City following WWII to work and raise their family. Mildred worked as office manager to Drs. Wilk and Hiatt Optometrists for many years. She maintained her Georgia roots by an annual summer trip to Augusta to visit family and friends. She was socially active in Oklahoma City, a member of the Reveler’s Dance Club, Mayfair Dance Club, Lost Needles Sewing Club, and Designing Women Investment Club. She also played Mah Jongg weekly with a group of friends for many years. Following the death of her husband of 54 years, Dr. Lambert R. Hiatt, she remarried Dr. Robert Outlaw of Oklahoma City. She is predeceased by her late husband, Lambert R.; a daughter, Janis Sidwell; son, Jack Hiatt; sisters, Evelyn Greiner, Ernestine Hughes, Alice Shackelford; and niece, Carol Marsh. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Outlaw; two sons: David B. Hiatt and his wife, Gwen, of Portland, Maine; and Charles R. Hiatt of Oklahoma City; daughter-in-law, Patricia Hiatt of Jacksonville, Florida; sister, Elizabeth Fogle of Augusta, Georgia; five grandchildren and one great grandson. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, November 5, at 10:00 AM, at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Ext., Oklahoma City, OK 73116, telephone 405-848-3744. The family requests no flowers. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may do so to a charity of their choice. A private burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

FARNSWORTH Dean L. Farnsworth Sr. had a short 50 years; was a loving and caring son, brother and father, and was survived by Karle R. & Donna J. Farnsworth (parents); Walter L. Farnsworth and David L. Farnsworth (brothers); sons, Dean Jr, Kyle S.; daughter, Heather Farnsworth; and daughter, Lauren and husband Zackary West; niece, Tami, husband Charlie Bradley, and thier son, Kendal; uncle Henry C & aunt Doris Williams; uncle Gary V. & aunt Karen Williams; along with many other uncles, aunts and cousins, nephews, and nieces. Memorial to be held at Mercer-Adams funeral home, 3925 N. Asbury Ave., Bethany, OK 73008, cross street 39 Expressway, at 11:30 am on 11/04/10. GILBREATH Carla Sue, 56, passed away Oct. 31, 2010. She was born Sept. 10, 1954 in Okla. City, OK to Robert and Marjorie Tompkins. She is survived by her brother, Bobby Tompkins, sister, Joyce Brown, daughters, Tracie Jones and April Rodriguez, sons-in-law, Bruce Jones and Rafael Rodriguez, 5 grandchildren, Robbie and Brandon Jones, Junior, Arianna and Isabel Aguilar. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Amber Dawn Gilbreath. A private memorial service will be held Thursday at 1:00 p.m. KEMP Kenneth G. Kemp died peacefully at home on Sunday, October 31, 2010. Ken was born May 24, 1925 in Pawhuska, Oklahoma to John T. and Ruth G. Kemp. He graduated from Norman High School, where he played basketball and baseball. After high school he joined the military and served in the Army Air Corp during World War II. He attended Texas A&M and graduated from Oklahoma City University with a degree in petroleum geology. In 1950, he married the love of his life Nina Dickinson and they enjoyed nearly 60 years of a wonderful partnership. He was a great dad to his four children, Susan, Brad, Sarah and Taylor and a loving granddad to his thirteen grandchildren. Ken served as a Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 168 and was a longtime member of Chapel Hill United Methodist Church. He was an avid OU football and basketball fan. He was a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was proud of his Indian heritage. After college he began a distinguished career in the oil and gas industry. Ken was a well log analyst for Schlumberger for many years, living in Shawnee, Duncan, Ardmore and Oklahoma City. He was a member of AAPG, SIPES, SPWLA and the Oklahoma City Geological Society. After retiring from Schlumberger in 1986, he worked as a geologist for Holden Energy and then as an independent log consultant. During his career he became an industry expert on reading old electrical logs to find bypassed pay zones in oil and gas wells. He taught in the Geology Department at the University of Oklahoma and spoke at numerous industry seminars on Well Log Analysis. He was preceded in death by his wife Nina, his parents John and Ruth, his brothers John T. Kemp, Jr., and Robert C. Kemp and nephew Mack Kemp. He is survived by his children and their spouses Susan Sampson, Brad and Susie Kemp, Taylor and Joni Kemp of Oklahoma City and Sarah and Jim Askew of Kansas City; his grandchildren Carter and Stuart Sampson, Michelle, Ford and Tricia Kemp, Baird, Bennett and Claire Askew, Amy and Michael Wopsle, and Adam, Caroline, Katie and John Kemp. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Alzheimer's Association, 3555 NW 58 St., Oklahoma City, OK 73112, American Heart Association, 5700 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112 or Boy Scout Troop 168, c/o Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, 2717 W. Hefner Rd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, November 5, at Chapel Hill United Methodist Church.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010 KETCHUM Billy George Ketchum Jr., of Rush, Springs, OK, died Friday, October 29, 2010. He was born April 8, 1970 in Key West, Florida, the son of Billy (George) & Barbara Ketchum. Billy was a member of the Eastern Delaware Tribe. He graduated from Copan High School in 1988. Billy was active in football, hunting, fishing, gardening, and hanging out with his big sister. Billy married his high school sweetheart, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum, on January 1, 1988 and had two lovely children, Sarah and Kimberly. Billy was an active and loving father in the lives of his girls. His greatest pleasures in life were playing in the snow with his daughters and swimming in the family pool. He graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. He was a Senior Auditor for the Defense Contract Audit Agency in Oklahoma City. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (Kraft) Ketchum; daughters, Sarah and Kimberly; father and mother, Billy (George) and Barbara Ketchum of Dewey, OK; sister, Tricia Harrell, niece, Chelsea Hudson, and brother-in-law, Tim Harrell of Pittsburg, KS; brother-in-law, K.C. Kraft and nephew, Conrad Kraft of Stillwater, OK; mother-in-law, Sally Derr; father-in-law and wife, Charles and Barbara Kraft of Texas; grandfather and grandmother, Robert and Maggie Fitch of Bartlesville, OK; and numerous cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by grandfather, Willard Ketchum; grandmother, Iris (Ketchum) Friend; and aunt, Linda Eddy. We will miss him very much. A memorial service will be held at Dewey Church of Christ in Dewey, Oklahoma, on Friday, November 5th, at 1:00 pm. There will be a private interment on the family land. PARKER Rev. Rick C. Parker, 60, born April 29, 1950 in Oklahoma City, passed away at Ave Maria Convalescent Hospital, Monterey, California, on October 27, 2010. He attended St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, Central State University (now known as the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond and Immaculate Conception Seminary in Missouri before receiving his Masters in Divinity from St. Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology in Indiana. Fr. Rick served as Associate Pastor and teacher at St. Francis’ Church and St. Eugene’s Church in Oklahoma City, St. John the Baptist Church in Edmond, and St. Stephen’s Church in San Francisco, CA. He also taught at Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City, Notre Dame High School in Riverside, CA, San Domenico High School in San Anselmo, CA, and Business Ethics at Central State University. After moving to Carmel, CA, in 1993, Fr. Rick was a very active member and board member of John XXIII AIDS Ministry which is now the Central Coast HIV and AIDS Services or CCHAS. He was a volunteer Chaplain at Community Hospital for many years and celebrated Mass at Carmel Mission and many other parishes in the Monterey, CA, Diocese. Fr. Rick is survived by his brother, G. Brock Parker of Oklahoma City and his identical twin, R. Brent Parker of Warr Acres; his nephew and niece, Damon Z. Parker of Las Vegas and Annessa J. Parker of Oklahoma City; his longtime companion, Larry Kern of Carmel and his beloved Scottish Terriers, Maggie, Malcolm and Hannah. He was preceded in death by his parents, H. Bruce and Betty Parker, and his brother, Mark. Visitation will be noon to 7p.m. on Thursday November 4, 2010 at Smith and Kernke, 1401 NW 23, Oklahoma City. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Catholic Pastoral Center Chapel, 7501 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 5. Interment will follow at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to: CCHAS, PO Box 1931, Monterey, CA 93942.

SWINDELL E.W. “Woody” Swindell, 90, was born August 8, 1920, and passed away November 1, 2010. A graveside service will be 2pm, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Memorial Park Cemetery.

PEYTON Ruth E. Peyton, 100, of Oklahoma City, passed away November 1, 2010 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Ruth was born April 16, 1910 in Butler, Oklahoma to Elbert and Madie Barton. She was one of eight girls and 4 boys born to the couple. After graduating from Butler High School in 1926, she attended Draughon’s Practical Business College in Oklahoma City. Ruth pursued her career in business as she worked as a bank teller, secretary, and served as church secretary at May Avenue United Methodist Church retiring after more than 23 years of service under ten ministers. Ruth married Robert Peyton in February 1936. He preceded her in death in 1995. Ruth was a longtime member of May Avenue UMC holding many offices in the United Methodist Women’s group including president. She was a member of the Leah Chapter of Eastern Star. Ruth is survived by her daughter Diane Buchanan and husband Richard of Stillwater; grandson Adam and wife Nicole of Cary, North Carolina; granddaughter Bethany of Indianapolis, Indiana; great grandson Peyton D. Buchanan; 2 brothers, E.M. Barton of Moscow, Idaho, John Barton of Kansas City, Missouri; and many nieces and nephews. Family will greet friends on Wed. 6:30 to 8:00 PM. Services are 10:30 a.m., Thurs., November 4, at May Avenue United Methodist Church, Oklahoma City. Interment at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. The family would like to thank the staff at Westhaven Nursing Home and Judith Karman Hospice. Ruth will be remembered for her sweet smile, fabulous sense of humor, and winning at BINGO and love of playing bridge! Memorials may be made to: The May Avenue United Methodist Church, 2604 North May Avenue, OKC 73107. Condolences may be offered at www.guardianwestfuneral chapel.com

OVERBEY Darrel Dewayne Overbey, 76, passed away October 29, 2010 in Oklahoma City. He was born May 23, 1934 in Snyder, OK to Thomas and Dovie Overbey. Darrel joined the Army at 19, and was honorable discharged. He worked many years as a truck driver and retired from his profession several years ago. Darrel is survived by his wife Ida Overbey; sister Edna Arbuckle; brother-in-law George Lewis and his wife Ginger; 5 children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; and numerous great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. At this time no services are planned.

SHERRILL Virginia Lela Ross Sherrill Born to Lee and Lela Tuttle Ross on Sep. 6, 1916 in Shawnee, OK. Virginia was the baby of 6 children. She finished her race on earth on Nov. 1, 2010 and was warmly greeted by our Lord and Savior and the many loved ones that had gone before her. Throughout her life, she worked various jobs though her greatest joy was being a homemaker. She taught the adult Sunday School Class and Bible study in her retirement years. Grandma enjoyed fishing, sewing, writing poetry, cooking, gardening, and loved helping others. She loved life! She married our Grandpa, Leland “Omer” Sherrill on Sep. 30, 1939. He was the love of her life always doing the little things that would bring a smile to her face. Special treasures were the red roses he gave her for their anniversaries. Grandma was preceded in death by her husband, parents, 3 sisters, 2 brothers, great granddaughter, Rachel Zawisza and grandson, Jody French. She is survived by her son, Emmitt and Joy Looney, 5 grandchildren, Debbie and Charles Barton, Donna and David Zawisza, Mark French, Deanna and Bill LaPach and Robin and Barrett Crane; 22 great grandchildren, and 8K great great grandchildren. Services are 10:00AM, Thursday, November 4, 2010, at Bethel Church, Choctaw, OK, with Dr. Dick Temple and Rev. Robert Temple officiating. Interment will follow at Memory Lane Cemetery, Harrah, OK. Services are under the direction of Smith-Parks Funeral Service in Harrah, OK. A guest book is available to share your memories on-line. Please visit www.smithparks.com

RIGGS Charlotte Riggs 7 Nov. 1944 - 21 Sep. 2010 Graveside memorial service Resurrection Cemetery for friends and family at 2:00 PM 5th of Nov. 2010. She is preceded in death by her father, Edward Y. Riggs; her mother, Christine McGarity Riggs. She is survived by her daughter, Raylene R. Lee, Springfield, MO; her sister, Isabell R. Eadens, Kemp, TX; her brother, (Bill) William R. (Ray) Riggs, OKC, OK. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Real Rescue, Inc., PO Box 358, Arcadia, OK 73007. Condolences will be received at rigwll@aol.com

VAHLBERG Mary Elizabeth Vahlberg Nov. 3, 1920 - Oct. 28, 2010 What do you say about perhaps the sweetest person who ever lived? To say that she was a wonderful mother seems inadequate. That she was a mentor, voice of reason, accomplished golfer, practical joker, pilot, music lover, republican, bird watcher, avid reader, lifetime learner, eccentric cook, advisor, witty, loved God, loved her husband, loved her children and loved life - almost scratch the surface. What we can say for certain is that when Mary passed away after a brief illness, a special light left this world and now brightens the next. Mary was born in Eudora, Arkansas in 1920 where she grew up with her five siblings, Sandy, Hilliard, Lamar, Rebecca and Medford, all who survive her. Mary's father, Medford Cashion, was a successful banker and entrepreneur who, along with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Cashion, moved the family to Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City in 1934 after inheriting some land. Here, the family developed a thriving home building business. She graduated from old Classen High School and attended the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. In 1939, she married Jack Callaway and had two children, Mary Cashion (Silver City, Nevada) and John R. (Oklahoma City). After a divorce, she wed Oklahoma City architect Robert W. Vahlberg in 1953 and was married to him for 50 years, the anniversary of which the couple celebrated a few months before his death in 2003. For 49 of their 50 years, Mary and her beloved Robert lived in a unique, contemporary home designed and built by him in Forest Park in east Oklahoma City. (A special thanks to Will and Leonor Rogers for rescuing and reviving the Vahlberg residence and keeping the family heritage alive). Besides the very large family from which Mary arose, she also was responsible for quite an impressive genetic trail. In addition to Cashion Elston and John Callaway, she is survived by her other children, Courtney Dodd (Mustang), Bob Vahlberg (Norman), Mia Vahlberg (Tulsa), and step-children, Stephanie Moody (Alpharetta, Georgia) and Marcia Vahlberg (Florence, Italy), along with 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. A memorial service for Mary is set for 2 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 4400 N. Shartel in Oklahoma City. The service is open to all of Mary's friends and family. Donations in Mary's name can be made to Neighbor for Neighbor, where Mary served as a volunteer for a number years. ''I am a people person. Love to be around people.'' -Mary Vahlberg's Facebook entry, July 2010. Indeed she was. We love her and will miss her very much.

23A

PARKER Lesa Ann Parker, 54, born August 20, 1956, in Oklahoma City, was the daughter of Hoyt and Ann Bargman. Lesa graduated from St. Anthony Hospital School of Nursing in 1980 and worked as a nurse most of her life. On April 14, 1989 Lesa married William Darrell Parker, Jr. She passed away October 28, 2010 in Oklahoma City after a long and courageous battle with Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Lesa is survived by her husband of 21 years, Billy Parker; son, Daniel Adams; and daughters, Breanna Parker, Christina Parker, and Crystal Thornton and husband Marcus; parents, Hoyte and Ann Bargman; brother, Phil Bargman and wife Sharon; and many others. Services will be 1:00 p.m., Saturday, November 6, 2010, at Town & Country Christian Church, interment following at Yukon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lesa's memory to: The American Cancer Society, 6525 N. Meridian #110, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. Online condolences may be signed at www.yandaandsonfuneral home.com

In Loving Memory of Maxine Barbee-Bowles June 14, 1935 - Nov. 2, 2000 The Broken Chain We little knew that night that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. Love, Your Family Pam (Thompson) Bullington 11/3/1956 to 7/4/1992 It’s hard to believe you have been gone for eighteen years. So much has changed, however the one thing that will never change is how much I love and miss you. Happy Birthday!

BUCHANAN

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VI

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

NORMAN | STATE

County-by-county results Here’s a look at vote totals by county for U.S. Senate and Oklahoma governor from the Associated Press.

Tessa Mills, 10 months, plays with her mother Elizabeth’s keys while she votes at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond.

Voters line up at Deer Creek Middle School on Tuesday in Edmond. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Governor Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottawatomie Pushmataha Roger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 46 28 26 18 7 40 12 43 12 17 10 1 22 11 9 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 24 32 0 14 12 26 12 27 17 12 16 175 34 27 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 30 16 33 29 16 10 76 25 24 13 8 15 1,694

Askins 2,500 737 1,500 321 1,993 1,099 4,346 3,602 8,858 4,461 5,609 1,843 263 14,617 958 10,950 1,007 1,834 1,787 218 4,127 557 314 5,318 366 5,740 613 683 334 331 1,525 1,642 2,050 942 1,230 4,970 1,295 1,250 1,466 581 3,837 4,099 1,107 3,157 4,035 201 791 1,485 4,768 1,802 6,173 1,200 1,300 1,405 52,035 4,903 4,945 3,136 1,813 8,258 5,671 4,412 6,533 1,525 413 7,473 2,687 4,495 8,217 889 1,020 17,874 4,060 5,039 1,333 1,043 1,522 288,493

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Fallin 3,023 1,301 2,231 1,564 3,471 2,061 6,111 3,723 21,985 8,478 5,850 2,227 734 18,230 1,052 10,827 818 2,470 3,233 281 7,304 1,307 755 11,515 568 10,027 1,199 892 420 898 1,901 1,880 3,950 881 1,713 8,656 3,504 1,423 1,602 723 6,973 8,846 1,554 6,111 4,312 265 2,221 2,528 6,992 2,177 6,810 2,781 1,960 1,619 59,366 5,389 6,496 3,983 3,030 11,633 6,807 5,363 11,827 1,901 923 15,477 3,636 5,659 6,458 3,545 1,083 26,315 7,728 11,548 2,263 2,041 4,080 422,488

U.S. Senate Adair Alfalfa Atoka Beaver Beckham Blaine Bryan Caddo Canadian Carter Cherokee Choctaw Cimarron Cleveland Coal Comanche Cotton Craig Creek Custer Delaware Dewey Ellis Garfield Garvin Grady Grant Greer Harmon Harper Haskell Hughes Jackson Jefferson Johnston Kay Kingfisher Kiowa Latimer LeFlore Lincoln Logan Love McClain McCurtain McIntosh Major Marshall Mayes Murray Muskogee Noble Nowata Okfuskee Oklahoma Okmulgee Osage Ottawa Pawnee Payne Pittsburg Pontotoc Pottwatome Pushmataha Rger Mills Rogers Seminole Sequoyah Stephens Texas Tillman Tulsa Wagoner Washington Washita Woods Woodward Totals

TP 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 24 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 39 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 33 17 12 16 303 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 273 38 24 13 8 15 2,229

PR 18 11 15 9 13 11 29 25 53 28 26 18 7 91 12 43 12 17 43 13 22 11 10 33 2 42 10 16 8 9 17 16 19 11 13 34 17 14 13 2 23 23 13 26 32 17 14 12 26 12 32 17 12 16 293 34 32 20 12 38 49 26 31 17 10 34 16 33 29 16 10 159 25 24 13 8 15 2,032

Rogers 1,705 284 1,087 162 1,053 599 3,053 2,185 5,603 3,284 3,971 1,304 108 20,179 687 6,114 468 1,169 4,400 1,387 2,593 279 202 2,720 214 3,237 308 410 190 136 1,030 1,057 1,136 547 912 3,177 541 688 958 428 2,261 2,571 775 2,100 2,260 2,012 353 1,038 3,257 1,086 5,264 686 831 909 56,220 3,467 4,638 2,106 1,207 5,266 3,840 2,510 4,338 1,047 188 5,661 1,820 3,112 3,377 491 578 26,101 2,581 3,065 684 522 732 238,519

Coburn 3,601 1,654 2,449 1,620 4,205 2,404 6,881 4,810 27,654 9,027 7,020 2,514 839 48,970 1,232 14,459 1,238 2,924 15,154 6,072 8,243 1,514 1,258 13,096 677 11,742 1,389 1,064 505 1,038 2,269 2,264 4,598 1,136 1,868 9,782 4,019 1,832 1,941 829 8,022 9,839 1,719 8,480 5,573 3,912 2,556 2,763 7,924 2,679 10,988 3,124 2,306 1,973 124,778 6,438 9,140 4,515 3,395 13,623 8,059 6,705 13,062 2,101 1,083 21,234 4,213 6,549 10,576 3,666 1,391 64,861 8,768 12,806 2,756 2,439 4,613 644,420

Wallace 129 55 112 58 102 60 250 153 777 301 254 113 24 2,244 32 578 40 99 472 138 295 31 27 390 30 440 53 38 18 31 59 86 129 47 82 352 65 46 82 28 282 276 69 245 249 118 55 105 277 113 334 98 89 60 4,657 197 337 203 127 518 285 236 454 137 25 599 147 251 339 145 42 2,269 259 380 84 63 110 22,554

Dwyer 32 20 23 9 26 29 76 67 206 97 100 43 7 570 17 185 33 33 152 40 88 15 6 118 3 103 13 16 3 3 29 29 35 16 32 149 31 14 33 8 86 97 29 62 67 52 15 27 86 27 98 40 21 25 2,455 82 114 67 64 193 118 58 156 34 9 203 56 86 106 40 21 675 69 116 23 20 38 8,044


BARONS

OSU FOOTBALL

Oilers goalie OKC-bound

Star in making Freshman ‘star’ linebacker Shaun Lewis could be key against Baylor.

Edmonton Oilers goaltender Jeff Deslauriers cleared waivers Tuesday morning and is expected to fly to Oklahoma City and report to the Barons on Thursday.

PAGE 3C

PAGE 2B

SPORTS

INSIDE

B THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THUNDER AT CLIPPERS

OU coach Bob Stoops won’t say it, but the Sooners have problems playing away from home. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

Great at home, shaky on road CHECK NUMBERS | SOONERS FAR BEHIND COMPARABLE TEAMS IN AWAY GAMES

Berry Tramel btramel@ opubco.com

COMMENTARY

N

ORMAN — The road to recovery begins with admitting you have a problem. Uh-oh. OU football is back on the road this Saturday, and its ringmaster refuses to concede the big top has a hole in it.

For half a decade, the Sooners have been prairie piranhas at Owen Field but nice little guppies outside their home tank. Since the calendar turned to 2005, OU is 35-1 at Owen Field, with a 35-game win streak, but 22-18 away from home, including 14-9 in true road games. “I think we play better on the road than most teams,” Stoops said. “I guess I’d like to see what everybody else’s record is. SEE TRAMEL, PAGE 5B

IS BLAKE BACK?

SOONERS WIN FROM THE INSIDE OUT The Inside-out approach worked for the Sooners in Tuesday’s exhibition game. Relying less on 3-pointers, OU rallied in second half to beat Northern State. PAGE 5C

OU WOMEN’S HOOPS

ROBINSON NAMED PRESEASON ALL-AMERICAN

A STRESS FRACTURE CAUSED A ONE-YEAR DELAY FOR FORMER OU STAR BLAKE GRIFFIN IN BEGINNING HIS NBA CAREER. STILL LISTED AS A ROOKIE, HE HAS FINALLY MADE HIS NBA DEBUT, AND HIS IMPACT HAS BEEN FELT IMMEDIATELY.

OU’s Danielle Robinson was named a preseason All-American by The Associated Press on Tuesday. The Sooners play their first exhibition game on Thursday at 7 p.m. against Oklahoma Christian. Find out who else was selected to the team inside. PAGE 4C

Danielle Robinson PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

OU AT TEXAS A&M

6 p.m. Saturday › When: Kyle Field, College Station, Texas › Where: Fox Sports Oklahoma (Cox 37) › TV: › Radio: 107.7 KRXO-FM, KOKC-AM 1520

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

WASHINGTON STILL IN HUNT FOR DISTRICT TITLE

ON NEWSOK.COM No need to "Google it up" as OU coach Bob Stoops likes to say. We’ve got the video of Coach Stoops’ press conference at NewsOK.com/sports. AP PHOTO

OU’s Nelson takes on team he turned down Darnell Mayberry

Mike Baldwin

dmayberry@ opubco.com

mbaldwin@ opubco.com

THUNDER

OU FOOTBALL NORMAN — Oklahoma li-

nebacker Travis Lewis takes every chance he gets to remind teammate Corey Nelson about his original commitment to Texas A&M before switching to the Sooners. “When we’re watching them on film, I’ll tell him, ‘There are your boys,’ ” Lewis said. “We’ve teased

OU 75, NORTHERN ST. 64

Corey Nelson

him about it all season whenever we see them on film... We have fun with it.” SEE NELSON, PAGE 4B

Blake Griffin caught an entry pass on the left block Monday night, turned and faced up against San Antonio forward Antonio McDyess. First, Griffin surveyed the court. Then, he sized up his man. If you blinked, you might have missed Griffin leave McDyess in his dust,

using one dribble and some graceful footwork to blaze by McDyess on the baseline before throwing down a ferocious onehanded dunk. Right then, you knew Griffin was back — and better than ever. After a stress fracture of his left knee caused a oneyear delay, Griffin, the former Oklahoma star and 2009 No. 1 overall draft pick by the Los Angeles Clippers, has finally made his NBA debut. And his impact has been felt immediately. In his first four games, Griffin has averaged 16.8 points, 10.3 rebounds, two

THUNDER AT CLIPPERS

› › ›

When: 9:30 p.m. today Where: Staples Center, Los Angeles TV: Fox Sports Oklahoma (Cox 37, HD Ch. 722). Radio: WWLS 98.1-FM, WWLS 640-AM.

assists and one steal. Game No. 5 for Griffin comes tonight at Staples Center against the Thunder. “Blake is really, really SEE GRIFFIN, PAGE 8B

The Warriors lost quaterback Dakota Treat for a threegame stretch, but remain within striking distance in 2A-3. Washington plays Hobart on Friday. PAGE 6B

CONTACT US Have a question, comment or suggestion? Let us know. The Oklahoman Sports Department P.O. Box 25125 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 (405) 475-3313 (800) 375-6397 ext. 3313 Fax: (405) 475-3315 NewsOK.com sportsdesk@oklahoman.com


2B

...

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

TUNING IN

PAGE 2

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 7 p.m. 8 p.m.

Norman Football Totally Moore Football

KREF-AM 1400 KREF-AM 1400

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 6 p.m.

BARONS GETTING EDMONTON GOALIE

Deslauriers reporting Thursday

Rutgers at South Florida

ESPN2 (Cox 28)

NBA 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m.

Milwaukee at Boston Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers

9:30 p.m.

L.A Lakers at Sacramento

ESPN (Cox 29) FSOK (Cox 37) WWLS-AM 640; 98.1 FM ESPN (Cox 29)

NHL 6 p.m.

Toronto at Washington

NHLNET (Cox 263)

European PGA Tour

GOLF (Cox 60)

AC Milan vs. Real Madrid

FSC (Cox 262)

GOLF 11 p.m.

Edmonton Oilers goalie Jeff Deslauriers, left, cleared waivers Tuesday and is expected to fly to Oklahoma City and report to the Barons on Thursday. AP PHOTO

practice time is the obvious downfall (but) we knew something had to happen at some point. ... “I can stop thinking about it, stop talking about it, and move forward.” Now, though, the Barons have a decision to make as they wind up with the same situation. Oklahoma City already has goalies Martin Gerber and Bryan Pitton on the roster. “They’re both NHL goalies,” Barons general manager Bill Scott said. “Between the two of them, we’re going to see how they’re going. “Not a lot of teams have that ability or that luxury to keep guys like that. We’ll give both guys every opportunity to play as much as they can.” With Gerber and Deslauriers both expected to see significant playing time, Pitton could be

Ryan Aber raber@ opubco.com

BARONS

Goaltender Jeff Deslauriers cleared waivers Tuesday morning and is expected to fly to Oklahoma City today and report to the Barons on Thursday. “He’s going to play,” Barons coach Todd Nelson said. “That’s important for a goaltender to stay sharp.” Deslauriers hadn’t played for the Oilers since the preseason. Devan Dubnyk was in net the one game starter Nikolai Khabibulin sat out. “They had to make a decision at one point,” Deslauriers told the Edmonton Journal. “It’s not a good situation for anybody to have three goalies. The

headed to the Oilers’ ECHL affiliate in Stockton, Calif. “We’ve got to find the right combination there,” Nelson said. “We’re happy with both our goalies that we have here right now. Marty’s played well. Bryan’s played well. We’ve got to figure out what’s best for us and best for the Oilers organization.” Deslauriers’ contract was likely a reason he wasn’t claimed on waivers. The 26-year-old has a one-year, one-way contract for $1.05 million. Also, Oilers winger J.F. Jacques will report to OKC in time for this weekend’s games as he begins a conditioning assignment. Jacques is recovering from back surgery. Jacques played 49 games last season for the Oilers before being sidelined with a back injury that required surgery to re-

pair a herniated disc for the second time in a year and a half. Jacques is expected to play in two of the three games this weekend as he works his way back. “He’ll be a great addition,” Scott said. “We’re not going to overwork him. We’re going to ease him back into it so he can get back quickly. “As his cardio and fitness levels show us, he’ll play.” Jacques last saw significant time in the AHL in 2007-08 with Springfield. Last season, he played eight games for the Falcons. “He’s a big guy who goes to the net and he can whip the puck in the net,” Scott said. “I’m sure he’ll help our team be successful as well as push our prospects and show them what it takes to get to the next level.”

BARONS NOTEBOOK

Barons look to keep momentum going After two days away from the rink, the Barons returned to practice Tuesday morning to prepare for this weekend’s three-night stretch at home. The practice wasn’t as crisp as coach Todd Nelson would have liked, but it wasn’t unexpected. “Anytime after two days off, the team is going to be a bit sluggish,” Nelson said. “But the rest was wellneeded after the trip. “I didn’t even play in a hockey game and I came back from the trip totally mentally drained and fatigued.” The trip was a productive one, though, as the Barons went 4-1 in a trip that took them to Toronto, Hamilton, Chicago, Grand Rapids and Peoria. Nelson said he hoped his team could keep that momentum at home. “It was a great trip but we have to start focusing on this weekend,” Nelson said. “We’ve got to establish ourselves at home.” Part of that, he said, was not getting away from what’s been successful on the road. “If we start trying to be too fancy and getting away from what’s worked, we can get ourselves in trouble,” Nelson said. “On the road, we played smart, there was no panic in our game. We need to do that here as well.”

MCDONALD LEADING WAY FOR “MOVEMBER” Nelson is used to sporting facial

hair, but most of his players go the clean-shaven route. That changes this month as the Barons participate in “Movember,” a charity event designed to raise money and awareness for prostate cancer. The players, coaches and other staff are participating in the event by growing mustaches for the entire month of November. Leading the way for the Barons’ participation on the event is winger Colin McDonald. McDonald participated in the even last year with the Springfield Falcons, as did Liam Reddox and Taylor Chorney. “We had fun with it last year,” McDonald said. “This year, I mentioned it to a couple guys and they said they’d do it. “Hopefully we can raise some good money and get the fans to help out.”

VANDE VELDE, KYTNAR DRAW PRAISE As the Barons return home for Friday’s game against Texas, Nelson said several players particularly pleased him during the trip. Nelson said Chris Vande Velde and Milan Kytnar had improved of late. “Those two guys really picked it up on the road trip,” Nelson said. “They’re playing a lot better than they did early. “A lot of our guys are.” Matt Marquardt and Philippe Cornet rotated games as healthy scratches during the trip, but Nelson said the scratches aren’t being used as punishment for poor play. “We’re trying to keep the guys as

OU, OSU kick off Big 12 tourney

fresh as possible,” he said. “It’s a good competitive thing to have that situation where guys keep working and pushing themselves so they are playing. “It’s just a numbers game, we have to sit somebody.”

FROM STAFF REPORTS

2 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL 8 p.m. 10 p.m.

Oklahoma at Texas A&M St. Mary’s at San Diego

Barons defenseman Jake Taylor missed the recent road trip, staying behind for rehabilitation as he works his way back from an upper-body injury. Taylor has not played since Oct. 15 but returned to practice Tuesday and didn’t wear a “non-contact” jersey. Barons general manager Bill Scott said it was still unclear when Taylor would return, although having him back at practice was a good sign. “We’ll see how he progresses this week and make the decision Friday on whether he can play,” Scott said. “He’s certainly on the right road and he should be back real soon.”

PENALTY SHOTS Friday is adult practice jersey night. The first 2,000 adults will receive the practice jerseys. ... After Sunday’s game, fans will be permitted to skate on the Cox Center ice. Several Barons will participate in the skate. ... The Barons are 0-4-0-1 when scoring fewer than three goals but 7-0-0-0 when scoring three or more. ... Brad Moran is the Barons’ leader in plus/ minus at plus-4. Reddox is at plus-2. BY RYAN ABER

BIG 12 SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIP

Today through Sunday › When: Where: Blossom Soccer Complex, San Antonio, Tex› as 1: No. 4 Oklahoma vs. No. 5 Texas, 11:30 a.m. › Game 2: No. 3 Nebraska vs. No. 6 Missouri, 2 p.m. › Game Game 3: No. 1 Texas A&M vs. No. 8 Colorado, 5:30 › p.m. › Game 4: No. 2 Oklahoma State vs. No. 7 Texas Tech. 8 p.m. FRIDAY

› Game 5: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 3, 5:30 p.m. 2 vs. Winner Game 4, 8 p.m. › Game 6: Winner GameSUNDAY › Championship: Winner Game 5 vs. Winner Game 6, Noon

ESPNU (Cox 253) ESPNU (Cox 253)

RATINGS WATCH ESPN2’s Colorado-OU telecast topped the week in the Oklahoma City sports ratings. None of the KOKH-25’s World Series telecasts made the top five, averaging 8.2 for the five games (8.8, 7.9, 5.1, 10.4, 8.6). The Dallas Cowboys had their lowest rating here in several years, managing only a 7.5 for their 35-17 loss to Jacksonville on KWTV-9 and losing out to KOKH-25’s Carolina-St. Louis game (8.0). Sports events Oct. 26-Nov. 1 1. Colorado at Oklahoma, college football, Saturday, ESPN2, 21.0. 2. Minnesota at New England, NFL, Sunday, KOKH-25, 15.0. 3. Oklahoma State at Kansas State, college football, Saturday, FSOK, 12.1. 4. Missouri at Nebraska, college football, Saturday, KOCO-5, 15.0. 5. Pittsburgh at New Orleans, NFL, Sunday, KFOR-4, 11.2.

› › › › ›

BY MEL BRACHT

OKLAHOMA SCENE

OSU cross country selected No. 1 The OSU men’s cross country team was voted No. 1 for the first time in school history by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. The team claimed its third consecutive Big 12 Championship last weekend to move past previously top-ranked Stanford. Oklahoma State is the defending national champion, but never reached higher than the No. 2 spot last season. The Cowboys will defend their NCAA Midwest Regional title on Nov. 13. The OSU women also reached a milestone in Tuesday’s poll, receiving their highest ranking since 2006 at No. 23.

ORANGE AND BLACK MATCHUPS SET OSU wrestling coach John Smith announced the lineups for the Orange and Black Ranking Matches, which will be held Thursday at 7 p.m. in Gallagher-Iba Arena. The feature bout of the night will come at 149 pounds, where Albert White takes on Jamal Parks. Last year’s Big 12 champion at 141 pounds, Parks moves up this year to face White, who was 9-0 last season. Admission is free, and fans are encouraged to stay in the arena after the wrestling ends to get autographs and pictures with their favorite Cowboy wrestlers. The Cowboys open their season at the Oklahoma City Open on Sunday. Find a complete list of the Orange and Black matchups in Scoreboard on Page 5B.

TAYLOR CLOSE TO RETURN

TODAY

The Oklahoma State and Oklahoma soccer teams kick off the Big 12 Soccer Championship today in San Antonio. OSU, seeded second in the tournament, plays tonight at 9 against No. 7 seed Texas Tech. OU, which is seeded fourth, opens the championship against No. 5 Texas at 11:30 a.m. The championship is being played at the Blossom Soccer Complex in San Antonio. The final match, on Sunday at noon, will be broadcast on FSN.

SOCCER

FROM STAFF REPORTS

MORNING ROUNDUP

Report: Brewers hire Roenicke A person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press the Milwaukee Brewers have hired Los Angeles Angels bench coach Ron Roenicke to be their new manager. The person requested anonymity because the team has not yet announced the move. An announcement could come this week. The 54-year-old Roenicke has been a member of the Angels’ coaching staff for the past 11 seasons, including the past five as bench coach. He was seen as a dark horse candidate in the Brewers’ search to replace Ken Macha, who was fired after two disappointing seasons. The Chicago Sun-Times first reported the hiring Tuesday.

MARLINS KEEPING RODRIGUEZ A person familiar with the Florida Marlins’ managerial search said Edwin Rodriguez will keep the job next season. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Marlins weren’t planning an announcement until today. Rodriguez became the first Puerto Rican manager in the major leagues when he took over as interim manager June 23 after Fredi Gonzalez was fired. Rodriguez, who has been in baseball for 30 years, managed Florida’s Triple-A team in New Orleans before getting his first big-league job.

SERIES RATINGS TIE LOWEST EVER Television ratings for this year’s World Series equaled the lowest ever. The San Francisco Giants’ five-game victory over the Texas Rangers averaged an 8.4 rating and 14 share. That matches the record low of the 2008 Phillies-Rays World Series, which also went five games, with the decisive game suspended then completed two days later because of rain. The average rating was down 28 percent from the 11.7/19 for last year’s Yankees-Phillies series. The Giants’ 3-1 win Monday night on Fox earned an 8.8/14. San Francisco averaged a 35.3/61 for the series, while Dallas had a 30.9/48. Ratings represent the percentage of all homes with TVs tuned into a program. Shares represent the percentage of all homes with TVs in use at the time. FROM WIRE REPORTS


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

.

3B

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Lewis is one special freshman OSU FOOTBALL | LINEBACKER COMBINES AGGRESSIVE TACKLING WITH INSTINCTS

Brandon Chatmon bchatmon@ opubco.com

OSU FOOTBALL STILLWATER — A sequence early in the third quarter of Oklahoma State’s 24-14 win over Kansas State last Saturday reveals the potential of Cowboy linebacker Shaun Lewis. On first down, Lewis sidestepped a KSU blocker then knifed through the line of scrimmage to bring down Wildcat running back Daniel Thomas in the open field. On third down, the freshman dropped into coverage and arrived moments after the football to drive a Wildcat receiver to the ground 5 yards short of the first down. “Shaun Lewis is awesome,” cornerback Brodrick Brown said. “He’s fast, he’s relentless and he’s strong. He’s a guy you don’t hear a lot about, but he’s a solid playmaker.” That combination of aggressiveness, one-onone tackling and instincts earned Lewis his first career start against the Wildcats. The Missouri City, Texas, native answered the call with eight tackles, including two for loss, in the win. “He’s a special freshman, no question about it,” defensive coordinator Bill Young said. “He’s aggressive and he’s real smart. And that’s a good combination.” Lewis is the “Star” linebacker in OSU’s base defense with junior James Thomas manning the “Star” spot in OSU’s speed package. The freshman brings aggressiveness in the run game with the versatility to hold up in coverage, which has given the Cowboy coaching staff the confidence to place him alongside Orie Lemon and Justin Gent in OSU’s base package. “He’s done well the past couple of weeks,” coach Mike Gundy said. “He’s starting to understand what’s going on. He has success because he’s an aggressive tackler when he comes up to hit you. He’s different than other people.” Ask Taylor Martinez. Lewis forced Nebraska’s lone turnover with a jawrattling hit on the Cornhuskers’ freshman quarterback, forcing a fumble in the Cowboys’ only loss two weeks ago. Lewis’ playmaking ability first came to light against Texas A&M when his fourth-quarter interception set up Dan Bailey’s game-winning field goal. “His instincts are pretty

As attention finally focuses on Baylor and all the Bears have done this season to reshape perceptions of what’s going on in Waco, inside the program the focus remains dead ahead. And for now, that means on OSU on Saturday in Stillwater. Even at 7-2 and achieving bowl eligibility and a Top 25 presence — status seemingly unattainable as members of the Big 12 — the Bears don’t want to soak it all in just yet. “We have done a lot in this season for Baylor and Baylor Nation,” said Bears quarterback Robert Griffin III. “At the end of the year we will be able to look back on it and really take it in. Right now we are just focused on winning another game. “This is the only game that matters right now, and

OSU finalizes 2011 schedule Oklahoma State finalized its 2011 college football schedule on Tuesday. The highlights of the schedule include a non-conference visit from Mike Stoops and Arizona, a road trip to Tulsa and a second straight Bedlam game in Stillwater. OSU will not play any non-Saturday games in 2011. Here’s a look at the Cowboys 2011 schedule: Date: Opponent Sept. 3: Louisiana Lafayette Sept. 10: Arizona Sept. 17: at Tulsa Sept. 24: at Texas A&M* Oct.1: Open Oct. 8: Kansas* Oct. 15: at Texas* Oct. 22: at Missouri* Oct. 29: Baylor*# Nov. 5: Kansas State* Nov. 12: at Texas Tech* Nov. 19: at Iowa State* Nov. 26: Oklahoma* *Big 12 Conference game #Homecoming

COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Thorpe semifinalists announced The semifinalists for the Jim Thorpe Award, given annually to the top defensive back in college football, were announced Tuesday. Nebraska’s Prince Amukamara is the Big 12’s only player among the semifinalists. The other semifinalists are Mark Barron, Alabama; Chimdi Chekwa, Ohio State; Brandon Harris, Miami (Fla.); Cliff Harris, Oregon; Tejay Johnson, TCU; Joe Lefeged, Rutgers; Rahim Moore, UCLA; Patrick Peterson, LSU; and Tyler Sash, Iowa. The announcement of the Jim Thorpe Award winner will be featured on The Home Depot ESPNU College Football Awards live on Dec. 9, at 6 p.m. on ESPN. The Thorpe Award official presentation will be at a formal banquet in Oklahoma City on Feb. 7.

GATORS SEEK SOONERS’ HELP Desperate to find some offensive rhythm, Florida took a close look at two of college football’s most recent juggernauts. The Gators copied everything they could. Florida re-examined 2008 Oklahoma, which became the highest-scoring team in NCAA history (716 points) and the first to score 60 or more points in five consecutive games, and broke down 2010 Oregon. The top-ranked Ducks are averaging 573 yards and 55 points a game. Florida spent two weeks installing no-huddle formations and incorporating a dual-quarterback twist for deception. The result was a season-high 77 plays, 450 total yards and a 34-31 victory in overtime Saturday against rival Georgia. The Gators plan to stick with it the rest of the year.

OSU’s Shaun Lewis returns an interception against Texas A&M. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Shaun Lewis’ game-by-game stats Opponent

Washington State Troy Tulsa Texas A&M At Louisiana-Lafayette At Texas Tech Nebraska At Kansas State

OSU VS. BAYLOR

Solo Assisted Total For Forced Int. tackles tackles loss fumbles

5 0 5 1 1 2 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

5 0 5 1 1 2 5 8

1 0 1 0 0 0 2 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

› ›

When: 11:30 a.m. Saturday Where: Boone Pickens Stadium, Stillwater TV: Fox Sports OK (Cox 37) Radio: KXXYFM 96.1

› ›

COMPILED BY BRANDON CHATMON

good; he likes to play the game and he’s not scared,” Gundy said. “It will be good to have him for three years.” It will be particularly good to have him on Saturday. With Baylor and explosive run-pass threat Robert Griffin III visiting Boone Pickens Stadium, Lewis could provide an athletic option and solid one-on-one tackler to help contain Griffin if the Bears’ quarterback begins

stretching OSU’s defense with his feet. “He’s going to do pretty well here,” Gundy said. “He’s going to give you what Andre Sexton did with maybe a little more athleticism.” Lewis is a perfect example of the rise of Gundy’s program. The UnderArmour All-American had offers from Alabama, Florida, LSU, Oklahoma, Oregon and Nebraska, among others. He’s the

type of player the Cowboys struggled to consistently attract in previous years. And he’s living up to the hype. “He’s nowhere near close to the player he’s going to be,” linebackers coach Glenn Spencer said. “But he can do some things you just can’t coach. He makes things happen. “There are times when you gotta say sic ’em, and he does that.”

OSU FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Attention falling on Baylor

OSU FOOTBALL

it will be a big game for us. We will look at it and focus on the little things and let the big things fall into place.”

WEEDEN NOT EXACTLY A RUNNING MAN Cowboys quarterback Brandon Weeden saw open field and ran to daylight Saturday, gaining 8 yards and nearly picking up a first down. Weeden’s not opposed to running, although he has been discouraged. “I’m not sure coach (Dana) Holgorsen likes when I do,” Weeden said with a laugh. “I did in the spring and he wasn’t very happy about it. If I need to get a quick 5 yards, I can do that. But you’ll never see me break a 30-yarder. That will never happen. “I’m not the slowest guy in the world, but I’m also not the fleetest of foot. I’ll do

Big 12 Standings

NORTH Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Missouri .......... 3 1 108 67 7 1 260 123 Nebraska ......... 3 1 143 91 7 1 303 142 Iowa St............ 3 2 128 154 5 4 216 267 Kansas St........ 2 3 155 146 5 3 251 205 Colorado .......... 0 4 59 127 3 5 150 222 Kansas............. 0 4 40 177 2 6 129 265 SOUTH Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Baylor .............. 4 1 201 141 7 2 309 208 Oklahoma ....... 3 1 150 66 7 1 286 160 Oklahoma St. . 3 1 137 117 7 1 362 228 Texas A&M...... 2 2 134 105 5 3 274 172 Texas ............... 2 3 107 113 4 4 187 171 Texas Tech....... 2 4 168 217 4 4 255 261 Saturday’s Games Baylor at Oklahoma State, 11:30 a.m. Colorado at Kansas, 1 p.m. Nebraska at Iowa State, 2:30 p.m. Oklahoma at Texas A&M, 6 p.m. Texas at Kansas State, 7 p.m. Missouri at Texas Tech, 7 p.m.

what I need to, but I’m not going to make a habit out of it.” The former baseball player should have the slide concept down, although he went head-first against Kansas State, trying to stretch for the first-down marker. “I’ll get down. I’m not

going to take anybody on, that’s for sure.”

BAYLOR BREAKING BARRIERS Baylor has lost eight straight games at OSU and hasn’t won in Stillwater since 1939. Still, this has been a breakthrough season in many ways for the Bears. And a win at Boone Pickens Stadium would add to a list of accomplishments that includes: Most Big 12 wins in a season (4). Longest Big 12 winning streak (3). 7-2 for the first time since 1991. First Top 25 ranking since 1993. First win over Texas since 1997. Bowl eligible for the first time since 1995.

› › › › › ›

BY JOHN HELSLEY

AUBURN QB DODGES NFL QUESTION Auburn quarterback Cam Newton said he won’t think about the NFL until after this season. Newton said he couldn’t give “a definite decision on how I’m feeling right now” about the possibility of skipping his senior season to enter the draft. The Heisman Trophy contender said the third-ranked Tigers can’t be thinking about awards or the NFL because those kinds of “selfish thoughts” can be contagious on a team. Newton has led the team to a 9-0 start and into Southeastern Conference and national title contention. His 1,122 rushing yards lead the SEC by 400 yards over South Carolina’s Marcus Lattimore.

BIG EAST WILL EXPAND The Big East conference unanimously agreed to expand the number of football-playing schools to 10. The Big East made the announcement after Tuesday’s board of directors meeting in Philadelphia. Commissioner John Marinatto said potential expansion candidates will start to be evaluated. The 16-member Big East has eight teams playing football. The conference informed Villanova in September that it wants to add them to the conference. The Wildcats currently play in the Colonial Athletic Association. Villanova won the FCS national championship last year and would move up to the Football Bowl Subdivision.

BRIEFLY

Georgia: Coach Mark Richt said assistant Todd Grantham was caught up in the emotions of an overtime game when he gave a choke sign to Florida kicker Chas Henry. A television snapshot from Sun Sports in Florida shows Grantham, Georgia’s defensive coordinator, with one hand on his throat as Henry lined up for his winning field goal in the Gators’ 34-31 win Saturday. Richt said he doesn’t think Grantham is “necessarily proud of it (the gesture).” Richt said Grantham will “learn from it and move on,” but did not say he faces disciplinary action. Mississippi State: Officials said football player Nick Bell died after battling cancer since late September. The 20-year-old from Bessemer, Ala., was diagnosed after experiencing headaches during football practice and had surgery on Oct. 1 to remove a mass from his brain. Bell, a 6-foot-3, 265-pound sophomore, played in four games this season.

FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS


4B

...

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

SPORTS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Inside-outside plan lifts OU

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

OU 75, NORTHERN STATE 64 | SOONERS ATTACK BASKET IN SECOND-HALF RALLY OU 75, NORTHERN STATE 64

Mike Baldwin

Northern State Min

Parks f...... Pryor f ...... Filipovic c . Lane g....... Hoellein g. Hannigan.. Becker ...... Strrstn ..... Thomas .... Gregor ...... Leeper ...... Tetzlaff..... Team.........

mbaldwin@ opubco.com

OU BASKETBALL NORMAN — The newlook Oklahoma men’s basketball team doesn’t have a lot of size. But coach Jeff Capel reminded players at halftime of the Sooners’ exhibition game that to reach their potential, they can’t rely on perimeter shots. After being outscored in the paint in the first half by undersized Division II Northern State, the Sooners attacked the basket in the second half to rally to a 75-64 win Tuesday night at Lloyd Noble Center. “We were so out of character from how we’ve been in practice,” Capel said. “We’ve been very unselfish in practice. The ball was moving, being reversed. In the first half we took so many 3s, some off one pass or no pass. That’s not the way we want to play. “Certainly we’re a team that’s going to have to make perimeter shots. But when we got penetration, kicked it out and the ball got reversed, those are the 3s we made. ... We will make shots. I’m not worried about that. We’re a good shooting team. But we have to be able to drive the ball, too.” A good example was sophomore guard Steven Pledger. Last season, Pledger’s game was 3pointers. Tuesday, Pledger

20 30 11 22 24 16 10 19 17 15 3 13

FG 3PT M-A M-A

4-8 3-7 0-1 3-7 2-7 1-5 0-1 4-6 4-9 0-1 0-0 0-1

3-5 0-0 0-0 0-1 1-6 1-4 0-0 1-2 0-2 0-0 0-0 0-0

FT M-A Reb A PF PTS

2-2 4-7 0-0 5-6 0-1 0-0 0-0 2-4 2-2 0-0 0-0 1-2

1 6 1 3 4 1 3 3 6 1 0 2 1

0 2 1 4 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0

2 4 1 3 0 3 1 3 2 4 0 2

13 10 0 11 5 3 0 11 10 0 0 1

Totals ........200 21-53 6-20 16-24 32 11 25 64

Oklahoma Min

Ftzgrld f ... Thmpsn f.. Blair g....... Clark g ...... Davis g ..... Pledger ..... Newell ...... Ahmed...... Neal .......... Honore...... Team.........

FG 3PT M-A M-A

FT M-A Reb A PF PTS

26 6-9 0-0 1-4 10 1 4 13 23 1-5 0-2 2-2 8 1 2 4 21 1-1 0-0 1-2 1 8 3 3 19 3-7 1-3 2-3 4 0 3 9 38 4-13 2-7 4-6 2 4 3 14 28 7-12 1-3 8-10 3 0 0 23 16 2-7 0-1 2-2 3 4 3 6 7 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 1 0 8 0-1 0-1 0-0 1 0 2 0 14 1-2 0-0 1-2 2 0 1 3 5

Totals ........200 25-57 4-17 21-31 40 18 22 75

Northern State.............................. 33 31 — 64 Oklahoma........................................29 46 — 75 Steals — NS 7 (Storrusten 3), OU 10 (Newell 4). Turnovers — NS 22 (Storrusten, Lane 5), OU 17 (Pledger 5). Blocks — NS 1 (Storrusten), OU 2 (Fitzgerald 2). A — 3,192.

OU’s Steven Pledger scored a game-high 23 points in the Sooners’ 75-64 win over Northern State on Tuesday in Norman. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

scored a game-high 23 points and made only one 3-pointer. “I’ve been working on that all spring, summer and fall,” Pledger said. “When I’m at home, I work out with my father. We did a lot of going-tothe-rack moves, one dribble, two dribbles, get to the basket or pull up for jumpers.” In the first half, the Sooners were outscored 11-9 in the paint and shot 33.3 percent. Half their shots were 3-pointers. In the second half, OU

shot 55.5 percent and attempted only two shots beyond the arc. “That’s one thing Coach said to us, that we were settling for too many 3s, that we needed to work inside and play inside-out,” said senior guard Cade Davis. “That made a huge difference for us.” Northern State, from Aberdeen, S.D., returns four of its top five scorers from a team that finished 13-14 last season. The Sooners trailed much of the second half. Pledger scored 14 points in

the final seven minutes to help turn a 55-51 deficit into a double-digit win. “We did a great job battling adversity for a team with so many new guys that haven’t been through anything, yet,” Capel said. “Our guys kept fighting. And we had some guys on the bench step up and give us some good minutes.” Capel said it will take time for eight eligible newcomers to mesh with three returning players, but he was encouraged. “This was a really good game for this young group to be in this type of game situation,” Capel said. “I was actually pleased with a lot of things we did. We have a lot we need to work on, but some guys stepped up and made some big plays for us.”

OU guard Danielle Robinson was named a preseason All-American by the Associated Press on Tuesday. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

OU’s Robinson named preseason All-American Oklahoma women’s basketball player Danielle Robinson was named a preseason All-American by The Associated Press on Tuesday. Robinson a senior guard for the Sooners, averaged 16.8 points per game last year along with 3.3 rebounds and 5.3 assists. Connecticut’s Maya Moore was the second player to be a two-time unanimous choice on The Associated Press’ women’s basketball preseason All-America team. Moore received all 40 votes from the national media panel and joined Alana Beard as the only women to accomplish the feat. Brittney Griner of Baylor, Nnemkadi Ogwumike of Stanford and Jantel Lavender of Ohio State joined Robinson and Moore on the team. The Sooners open the exhibition portion of their schedule Thursday at 7 p.m. against Oklahoma Christian.

SOONERS NINTH IN PRESEASON POLL Oklahoma is No. 9 in the USA Today/ESPN Preseason Women’s Basketball Coaches’ poll announced Tuesday. OU has started each of the past five seasons in the top 10 of the coaches’ poll. Connecticut, ranked No. 1, received 27 of 31 possible first-places votes. Baylor and Stanford were tied for second. OU will play UConn on Feb. 14 in Hartford, Conn. Other ranked Big 12 teams include No. 17 Iowa State, No. 20 Texas and No. 23 Nebraska. Oklahoma State received 19 points. FROM STAFF REPORTS

OU BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK

Rebounding issues One of the biggest questions for the Oklahoma men’s basketball team is rebounding. The Sooners out-rebounded undersized Division II Northern State 40-32, but the Wolves owned a 30-28 edge the first half of Tuesday’s exhibition game, which OU won 75-64. “We’re not getting ready for Northern State,” said senior guard Cade Davis. “We’re getting ready for OSU, Kansas and Kansas State. Those guys have monsters down low. We need to make sure we’re on

the boards, boxing out, no matter who we’re playing.” Forward Andrew Fitzgerald, one of three returning players who logged significant minutes last year, led the Sooners with 10 rebounds. Nick Thompson, a junior-college transfer, grabbed eight. No one else grabbed more than four. “That’s something that’s going to be a work in progress for us all year long,” said coach Jeff Capel. “We have to do a better job blocking out. We have to pursue rebounds.” C.J. Washington, who sat out Tuesday’s game, will help. Other options could be Barry Honore, a 6-7, 260-

pound walk-on transfer from Southern, and Abudl Ahmed, a skinny 6-10 raw talent from London, who both played key minutes down the stretch.

WASHINGTON, TAYLOR DON’T PLAY T.J. Taylor, a top-100 national incoming freshman from Denison, Texas, didn’t dress out for Tuesday’s game. Taylor suffered a concussion last month and has only practiced a few times. Washington, a 6-foot-7 transfer from Connors State, did not play after injuring his groin in Saturday’s practice following a

hard fall. Washington is day-to-day. Freshman Tyler Neal suffered a foot injury in Tuesday’s game and did not play the second half.

FIRST GAME JITTERS Capel said with so many new players, first-game jitters were to be expected, but he saw several positives. “Defensively there is a lot to be desired,” Capel said. “We still have a long way to go, but I knew that coming in. This hopefully opened our guys’ eyes to when we get back into the gym on Thursday and we’ll work hard.” BY MIKE BALDWIN

Nelson: Sooner versatile on defense FROM PAGE 1B

Saturday night at Kyle Field, Nelson could affect the outcome between the school he chose (OU) over the school (A&M) he was committed to for seven months. The first six games, Nelson primarily played on special teams as Lewis’ understudy at weakside linebacker. But in last week’s win over Colorado, Nelson played strongside linebacker in OU’s 4-3 base defense. He also played the hybrid linebacker/defensive end position on passing downs. “Everyone is talking about all these different freshmen, but he takes a backseat to no one when it comes to his ability to play his position,” said OU coach Bob Stoops. “We love him. He has excellent speed, quickness. He’s physical. He’s smart. We’re moving him around, giving him more opportunities to play.” Against Missouri, Nelson played 11 snaps and recorded five tackles. He wasn’t as productive against Colorado but played 28 snaps in an expanded role. “Coach (Brent Venables) has a lot of confidence in him,” Lewis said. “He’s a smart guy. People don’t realize how tough it

OU freshman linebacker Corey Nelson, center, was committed to Texas A&M before switching to the Sooners. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

is for a true freshman to pick up this defense. He’s way above where I was. If he stays on track he’s going to be another great OU linebacker.” Nelson said it’s been a challenge to learn all three positions but is grateful for the opportunity to play more. Defensive end Jeremy Beal said Nelson is one of OU’s fastest linebackers during his five seasons in the program. “He’s an amazing talent,” Beal said. “He’s good right now but will really be good down the road. He’s still learning the defense, playing three different positions. Once he gets the grasp of it he’s going to be an outstanding player.” Ranked the No. 1 player

in A&M’s class, Nelson probably will be a target for taunts Saturday night. He experienced some Aggie fans’ wrath in February when he signed with the Sooners. What most Aggie fans don’t know is Nelson was considering OU for several weeks. The problem was he continued to tell recruiting services he was committed to Texas A&M and wore an A&M hat to his high school the day before national signing day. Nelson’s last-minute flip-flop didn’t go over well in College Station. The school newspaper blasted him, writing Nelson stabbed coach Mike Sherman in the back, that he was an example of what’s wrong with college football. Fans attacked him

on Facebook. “They were criticizing me about my decision,” Nelson said. “From the newspaper to fans to scouts, the list could go on and on.” The reason Nelson switched was he took advice from those closest to him. “After talking to my family and peers I look up to, OU was better for me,” Nelson said. “(A&M) wasn’t sure what type of defense they were going to run. They didn’t have a linebackers coach. I don’t regret it at all. I love Oklahoma. I love my teammates. And the school... “I’ve tried to put that behind me. It’s in the past. A&M is a good school. I just want to move on and continue to work. I’m at Oklahoma now. We’re just going to go out and play Oklahoma football.” As for teammates’ ribbing, Nelson takes it in stride. “Travis will be like, ‘Ain’t this your school here, man? They don’t look too good right now,’ ” Nelson said. “But it’s not the worst thing I’ve heard. Some of the things (teammates say) I can’t really tell you. But it’s quite funny.” Pardon A&M fans if they’re not laughing Saturday night at Kyle Field.

USA Today/ESPN Women’s Top 25 Poll 1. Connecticut (27) ..... 2. Baylor (2) ................ 2. Stanford (1) ............ 4. Tennessee (1) ......... 5. Duke ........................ 6. Xavier ...................... 7. Ohio State............... 8. Texas A&M .............. 9. Oklahoma ............... 10. Kentucky ................. 11. West Virginia.......... 12. Notre Dame............. 13. Georgetown ............ 14. Florida State ........... 15. UCLA........................

Record

39-0 27-10 36-2 32-3 30-6 30-4 31-5 26-8 27-11 28-8 29-6 29-6 26-7 29-6 25-9

Pts

765 724 724 674 619 602 522 512 506 497 454 419 380 298 283

Pvs

1 4 2 8 6 5 15 14 3 9 16 11 17 9 23

16. St. John’s ................ 17. Iowa State............... 18. North Carolina......... 19. Georgia.................... 20. Texas ....................... 21. Vanderbilt ............... 22. Gonzaga .................. 23. Nebraska ................. 24. Michigan State ....... 25. Iowa.........................

25-7 25-8 19-12 25-9 22-11 23-11 29-5 32-2 23-10 20-14

262 226 206 196 182 151 106 95 91 86

18 13 — 19 25 24 12 7 — —

Others receiving votes: TCU 70, Maryland 62, Wisconsin-Green Bay 48, LSU 46, Dayton 38, DePaul 33, Georgia Tech 30, Virginia 23, San Diego State 22, Oklahoma State 19, Hartford 17, California 16, James Madison 10, Arkansas-Little Rock 9, Auburn 9, Mississippi State 7, N.C. State 6, Temple 5, Marist 4, Rutgers 4, Gardner-Webb 3, Purdue 3, Southern Cal 3, Bowling Green 2, Fresno State 1, Liberty 1, Louisville 1, Michigan 1, Princeton 1, Western Kentucky 1.

OU FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Sooners dealing with D-line injuries Going into the season, the Sooners knew they wouldn’t be deep at defensive tackle. And that was before injuries to starter Casey Walker and freshman Daniel Noble. To cope, Oklahoma has been shifting players the last two weeks. Defensive end Pryce Macon has been working at defensive tackle, and forgotten offensive guard Tavaris Jeffries is practicing at defensive tackle, as well. “We’re looking at Tavaris at defensive line a little bit, just to see if here down the stretch he can’t jump in and help some,” coach Bob Stoops said. “Another big, physical, strong, guy; you know, it may work.” Lane Johnson has also changed sides, from tight end to defensive end. “Austin Haywood is really doing well, at tight end, along with these other guys,” Stoops said. “So it’s really just trying to, we think it may fit (Johnson) better. And you know what? In just a week’s time, we kind of think it does. He’s a big, strong guy, athletic, plays hard. So this may be a good fit for him.” Stoops revealed Tuesday that Walker will miss his fifth consecutive game with sprained knee. Noble was able to practice some Monday, but is doubtful, as is linebacker/ defensive end Ronnell Lewis, who his injured his right knee two weeks ago.

MADU’S FUMBLING GETS HIM BENCHED Senior running back Mossis Madu had been a positive force backing up starter DeMarco Murray, until the last three weeks. In back-to-back games against Iowa State and Missouri, Madu lost fumbles. Then against Colorado, he was benched. “He’s had a couple glitches, and one of our values as an offense is you earn your job, you earn the right to have the ball,” said offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson. “Even on the kickoff return at Missouri, he kind of blotched the catch. Our thing was if you’re not good with the ball, and it’s anyone, your role gets minimized. We value squeezing the ball.” With freshman running back Roy Finch also coming on, what does all that mean for Madu’s role the rest of the season? “He’s a good kid, he’ll keep battling,” Wilson said. “Sometimes the door swings back. Hopefully he’ll be ready to roll again.”

PASSING ON DEFENSE Saturday, quarterback Landry Jones torched Colorado’s No. 112-ranked pass defense for a career-high 453 passing yards. Jones will have more opportunities against poor pass defenses to close the season, beginning this weekend at Texas A&M. The Aggies rank 101st nationally in pass defense. After that, the Sooners get Texas Tech (No. 119 pass defense), Baylor (No. 87 pass defense) and Oklahoma State (No. 113 pass defense). BY JAKE TROTTER


SPORTS/SCOREBOARD

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM FOOTBALL

Champions

Nov 4-7 — Charles Schwab Cup Championship, San Francisco, Ca Nov 16-19 — Champions Tour Q-School, Coral Springs, Fla

NFL Standings NFC

LPGA

East Division W

L T

Pct

PF PA

N.Y. Giants.................... 5 2 0 Philadelphia.................. 4 3 0 Washington.................. 4 4 0 Dallas............................ 1 6 0 South Division

.714 .571 .500 .143

Atlanta ......................... 5 2 0 Tampa Bay.................... 5 2 0 New Orleans................. 5 3 0 Carolina ........................ 1 6 0 North Division

.714 169 133 .714 136 163 .625 167 148 .143 85 150

Green Bay..................... 5 3 0 Chicago ......................... 4 3 0 Minnesota .................... 2 5 0 Detroit .......................... 2 5 0 West Division

.625 .571 .286 .286

Seattle.......................... St. Louis ....................... Arizona ......................... San Francisco ...............

.571 .500 .429 .250

W

W

W

4 4 3 2

L T

L T

L T

3 4 4 6

0 0 0 0

175 172 155 154

Pct

Pct

Pct

153 157 170 187

PF PA

PF PA

176 126 129 183

136 114 144 165

PF PA

123 140 133 137

140 141 198 178

AFC

East Division W

L T

Pct

New England ................ 6 1 0 N.Y. Jets........................ 5 2 0 Miami ........................... 4 3 0 Buffalo.......................... 0 7 0 South Division

.857 .714 .571 .000

Indianapolis.................. 5 2 0 Tennessee..................... 5 3 0 Houston........................ 4 3 0 Jacksonville.................. 4 4 0 North Division

.714 .625 .571 .500

Baltimore ..................... 5 2 0 Pittsburgh .................... 5 2 0 Cleveland ...................... 2 5 0 Cincinnati ..................... 2 5 0 West Division

.714 .714 .286 .286

Kansas City .................. Oakland ........................ San Diego ..................... Denver ..........................

.714 .500 .375 .250

W

L T

W

L T

W

L T

5 4 3 2

2 4 5 6

0 0 0 0

Pct

Pct

Pct

PF PA

205 159 133 131

154 110 149 211

PF PA

193 224 170 165

142 150 197 226

PF PA

149 147 118 146

129 102 142 163

PF PA

163 212 210 154

122 168 174 223

Sunday, Nov. 7 Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, noon N.Y. Jets at Detroit, noon Miami at Baltimore, noon San Diego at Houston, noon Tampa Bay at Atlanta, noon New Orleans at Carolina, noon New England at Cleveland, noon Arizona at Minnesota, noon N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 3:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 3:15 p.m. Dallas at Green Bay, 7:20 p.m. Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis, Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee Monday, Nov. 8 Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Results Indianapolis 30, Houston 17 Sunday’s Results San Francisco 24, Denver 16 Detroit 37, Washington 25 Kansas City 13, Buffalo 10, OT St. Louis 20, Carolina 10 Miami 22, Cincinnati 14 Jacksonville 35, Dallas 17 Green Bay 9, N.Y. Jets 0 San Diego 33, Tennessee 25 New England 28, Minnesota 18 Oakland 33, Seattle 3 Tampa Bay 38, Arizona 35 New Orleans 20, Pittsburgh 10 Open: N.Y. Giants, Philadelphia, Chicago, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland

College

Lone Star Conference Standings

North Division Division W L Pct. W NSU.................. 4 1 .800 5 East Central..... 4 1 .800 4 Eastern N.M. ... 3 2 .600 4 Southeastern .. 2 4 .333 3 TAMU-C ........... 2 3 .400 3 Southwestern . 2 3 .400 2 UCO.................. 1 4 .200 2

Overall L Pct. Stk. 4 .556 L1 5 .444 W3 5 .444 W1 6 .333 L2 6 .333 W1 7 .222 L1 7 .222 L4

South Division Division W L Pct. W Abilene Chr. .. 5 0 1.000 9 TAMU-K ........ 4 1 .800 8 West TAMU .. 4 1 .800 7 Midwest. St.. 3 2 .600 7 Angelo St...... 1 5 .167 3 Tarleton St.... 1 4 .200 2 In. Word ........ 0 5 .000 2

Overall L Pct. Stk. 0 1.000 W9 1 .889 W4 2 .778 W2 2 .778 W1 5 .375 L1 7 .222 L2 7 .222 L3

Saturday’s Games Central Oklahoma at Southwestern, 2 p.m. Eastern New Mexico at Northeastern State, 2 p.m. Angelo State at Southeastern, 2 p.m. Abilene Christian at West Texas A&M, 6 p.m. East Central at Texas A&M-Commerce, 6 p.m. Incarnate Word at Tarleton State, 7 p.m. Midwestern State at Texas A&M-Kingsville, 7 p.m.

Central States Football League Standings

Division Overall W L Pct. W L Pct. Northwestern ........ 5 0 1.000 6 2 .750 Langston ................ 2 1 .667 5 3 .625 SNU ........................ 2 1 .667 5 4 .556 Bacone ................... 2 2 .500 3 6 .333 SW Asse. of God.... 0 4 .000 1 7 .125 Texas College ......... 0 3 .000 0 8 .000 *OPSU.................... - 5 3 .625 *-Not eligible for conference Championship Saturday’s Games Southern Nazarene at Bacone College, 2 p.m. Langston at Texas College, 2 p.m. Oklahoma Panhandle State at Northwestern, 2 p.m. Haskell Indian Nations at SW Assemblies of God, 2 p.m.

BASKETBALL

College Men Tuesday’s Game SWOSU 90, USAO 66

USAO............................................... 30 36 — 66 Southwestern..................................37 53 — 90 USAO — Thomas Peters 18, Sahlih Butts 15, Phillip Harris 7, Trell Porter 6, Graham Faulkner 6, Damian Jones 6, Johnny Uhegwn 4, Drew Godwin 2, Bradley Uhles 2. SW — Curtis Nickson 14, Leon Nelson 14, Jeremy Lay 9, C. Flemmings 9, Greg Richardson 9, Ross Moore 8, Jamere King 7, Ty Pace 7, Chancellor Jones 6, Nick Thurman 4, Zac Howe 3.

NOC-ENID 89, OK. CHR. JV 61

Oklahoma Chr. JV............................ 32 29 — 61 Northern-Enid..................................43 46 — 89 OCJV — Shropshire 13, Essman 12, Horne 8, Haynes 5, Johnson 5, Turley 5, Holden 4, Fletcher 4, Wulfert 3, Newsom 2. NE — Hearn 16, Smith 16, Patterson 12, McClish 9, Cook 8, Mason 6, Burns 6, Thomas 6, Cungious 5, Morgan 2, Candyfire 2, Guillore 1.

ORU 79, DRURY 76

Drury................................................ 41 35 — 76 Oral Roberts.................................... 39 40 — 79 Drury — Dennon Mitchell 12, Brandon Lockhart 12, Alex Hall 12, Ian Carter 10, Chris Parks 8, JaJuan Maxwell 8, Cable Hogue 6, Andrew Taylor 4, Julius Verdun 2, DaQuan Brown 2. ORU — Warren Niles 22, Steven Roundtree 13, Dominique Morrison 13, Ken Holdman 13, jake Lliteras 5, Damen Bell-Holter 4, Michael Craion 4, Roderick Pearson 3, Chris Angsomwine 2.

High School

Tuesday’s Results Boys City Area

Lomega 49, Dover 37

State

Blair 51, Granite 45 Hammon 66, Ft. Supply 37 Hydro-Eakly 82, Binger-Oney 40 Lawton Christian 69, Navajo 52 Stuart 77, Moss 52 Tushka 68, Pittsburg 35 Union City 42, Gracemont 40 Vanoss 37, Roff 29 Varnum 105, Shutler 35

Girls City Area

Lomega 64, Dover 39 OKC Knights 59, Tulsa CHEF 23

State

Binger-Oney 51, Hydro-Eakly 25 Granite 35, Blair 29 Hammon 82, Ft. Supply 50 Moss 55, Stuart 52 Navajo 57, Lawton Christian 20 Pittsburg 67, Tushka 53 Rock Creek 59, Eagletown 42 Shutler 60, Varnum 58, OT Union City 36, Gracemont 26 Vanoss 37, Roff 29

Nov 5-7 — Mizuno Classic, Shima-shi, Mie, Japan Nov. 11-14 — Lorena Ochoa Invitational, Guadalajara, Mexico Nov. 18-21 — LPGA Tour Championship, TBD

Tour Schedule PGA

Nov. 11-14 — Children’s Miracle Network Classic, Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

0 $4,846,480 2 $4,570,762 2 $4,393,804

Schedule

Nov. 7 — Lone Star 500, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 14 — Arizona 500, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 21 — Ford 400, Homestead, Fla.

VOLLEYBALL Tuesday’s Results

Midwestern St. def, Cameron (25-19, 20-25, 25-15, 25-18)

NHL Standings Eastern Conference

WRESTLING

Atlantic Division GP

W L OT Pts GF GA

Philadelphia............ 12 7 4 1 N.Y. Rangers ........... 11 6 4 1 Pittsburgh .............. 12 6 5 1 N.Y. Islanders.......... 11 4 5 2 New Jersey............. 13 3 9 1 Northeast Division

15 13 13 10 7

37 34 35 31 20

29 32 28 37 42

GP

W L OT Pts GF GA

GP

W L OT Pts GF GA

Montreal................. 11 7 3 1 15 29 25 Boston .................... 8 6 2 0 12 24 11 Toronto ................... 10 5 4 1 11 23 23 Ottawa.................... 11 4 6 1 9 26 35 Buffalo.................... 12 3 7 2 8 30 38 Southeast Division Tampa Bay.............. Washington ............ Atlanta ................... Carolina................... Florida.....................

10 11 11 11 9

7 7 5 5 4

2 4 4 6 5

1 0 2 0 0

15 14 12 10 8

35 34 36 27 24

30 25 40 33 21

Western Conference Central Division GP

W L OT Pts GF GA

GP

W L OT Pts GF GA

Chicago ................... 14 7 6 1 St. Louis ................. 9 6 1 2 Detroit .................... 9 6 2 1 Nashville................. 10 5 2 3 Columbus................ 10 6 4 0 Northwest Division

15 14 13 13 12

Colorado.................. 11 6 4 Vancouver............... 10 5 3 Calgary.................... 11 6 5 Minnesota .............. 10 4 4 Edmonton ............... 9 3 4 Pacific Division

1 2 0 2 2

13 12 12 10 8

Los Angeles ............ Dallas...................... San Jose ................. Phoenix................... Anaheim .................

0 16 34 25 0 12 32 27 1 11 29 25 3 9 23 29 1 9 29 42

GP

11 10 9 10 12

41 26 30 23 24

39 27 33 26 28

40 17 24 25 29 39 24 34 27 33

W L OT Pts GF GA

8 6 5 3 4

3 4 3 4 7

Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Ottawa at Toronto Montreal at Columbus San Jose at Minnesota Vancouver at Edmonton Wednesday’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Florida, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Nashville at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Columbus at Atlanta, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Monday’s Results N.Y. Rangers 3, Chicago 2 Philadelphia 3, Carolina 2 Vancouver 3, New Jersey 0

AHL Standings Eastern Conference Atlantic Division GP

W L OL SL Pts GF GA

10 8 2 0 10 6 4 0 10 5 3 1 9 4 3 1 11 3 5 2 8 3 5 0 9 2 5 1 East Division

GP

Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton........... 8 Hershey ............ 10 Norfolk ............. 9 Albany .............. 8 Binghamton ..... 9 Syracuse........... 9 Charlotte .......... 10 Adirondack ....... 11

0 0 1 1 1 0 1

16 12 12 10 9 6 6

39 30 31 28 20 19 18

33 25 30 32 26 22 34

W L OL SL Pts GF GA

8 6 5 5 4 4 3 2

0 3 2 3 3 3 6 8

0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1

0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0

16 13 12 10 10 10 7 5

29 40 41 22 22 22 25 23

15 29 29 20 26 22 29 44

Western Conference North Division GP

W L OL SL Pts GF GA

GP

W L OL SL Pts GF GA

Rochester ......... 11 6 4 1 Abbotsford ....... 12 6 5 0 Grand Rapids.... 9 5 2 0 Hamilton .......... 8 4 1 1 Lake Erie .......... 11 5 5 0 Manitoba .......... 9 5 4 0 Toronto ............. 8 2 6 0 West Division

0 1 2 2 1 0 0

San Antonio ..... Oklahoma City . Peoria ............... Texas ................ Chicago ............. Milwaukee........ Rockford ........... Houston............

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

10 12 11 10 10 9 9 10

7 7 7 6 5 4 4 4

2 4 4 4 4 3 4 5

1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1

13 13 12 11 11 10 4

15 15 14 12 11 10 9 9

34 30 30 28 26 27 20

34 36 31 27 25 26 28 23

35 33 24 25 29 24 27 25 32 24 26 31 24 32 27

Note: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Tuesday’s Games Portland at Charlotte Manitoba at Hamilton Wednesday’s Games Springfield at Bridgeport, 11 a.m. Manchester at Hartford, 7 p.m. Portland at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Manitoba at Hamilton, 7 p.m. Toronto at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Rockford at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Hartford at Manchester, 7 p.m. Manitoba at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m. Norfolk at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Bridgeport at Providence, 7:05 p.m. Syracuse at Springfield, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Lake Erie, 7:30 p.m. Albany at Worcester, 7:30 p.m. Adirondack at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Binghamton at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Rochester, 7:35 p.m. Peoria at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Texas at Oklahoma City, 8:05 p.m. Toronto at Houston, 8:35 p.m. San Antonio at Abbotsford, 10 p.m. Monday’s Results No games scheduled

SOCCER

MLS Playoffs Eastern Conference

Semifinals New York vs. San Jose Saturday, Oct. 30: New York 1-0, New York leads series 1-0 Thursday, Nov. 4: San Jose at New York, 7 p.m. Columbus vs. Colorado Thursday, Oct. 28: Colorado, 1-0, Colorado leads series 1-0 Saturday, Nov. 6: Colorado at Columbus, 3 p.m.

Western Conference

Semifinals Real Salt Lake vs. FC Dallas Saturday, Oct. 30: FC Dallas, 2-1, FC Dallas leads series 1-0 Saturday, Nov. 6: Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. Los Angeles vs. Seattle Sunday, Oct. 31: Los Angeles, 1-0, Los Angeles leads series 1-0 Sunday, Nov. 7: Seattle at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

College

Tuesday’s Games Men MACU 2, ROGERS STATE 0

Rogers State......................................... 0 0 — 0 Mid-America Chr................................... 0 2 — 2 Goals — MAC: Javier Hernandez, Brett Brown (Benny Olvera). SOG — RS 16, MAC 19. Saves — RS: Sean Surridge 6; MAC: Austin Custar 6.

Women MACU 1, ROGERS STATE 0

Rogers State......................................... 0 0 — 0 Mid-America Chr................................... 0 1 — 1 Goal — MAC: Kelsey Whalen (Julia Nimal). SOG — RS 15, MAC 16. Saves — RS: Chelsea McMullin 8; MAC: Melissa Dobie 4.

AUTO RACING

NASCAR-Sprint Cup Leaders

Through Oct. 31

GOLF

5797 5788 5782

College

HOCKEY

Portland............ Springfield........ Manchester ...... Worcester......... Hartford ........... Bridgeport ........ Providence........

10. Jeff Burton ......... 11. Greg Biffle .......... 12. Clint Bowyer.......

1. Jimmie Johnson . 2. Denny Hamlin..... 3. Kevin Harvick ..... 4. Jeff Gordon ........ 5. Kyle Busch.......... 6. Carl Edwards ...... 7. Tony Stewart...... 8. Matt Kenseth ..... 9. Kurt Busch..........

Points

6149 6135 6111 5942 5919 5902 5832 5825 5799

Wins

6 7 3 0 3 0 2 0 2

Money

$6,652,947 $5,211,128 $6,250,656 $5,333,253 $5,919,143 $4,977,313 $5,280,734 $4,998,328 $6,351,919

College 2010 Orange and Black

Matchups take place on November 7th 125: Jon Morrison (Orange) vs. Tyler Dorrell (Black) 133: Josh Kindig (Orange) vs. Jordan Oliver (Black) 141: Luke Silver (Orange) vs. Julian Feikert (Black) 149: Albert White (Orange) vs. Jamal Parks (Black) 157: Stephen Swan (Orange) vs. Matt White (Black) 165: Joe Ali (Orange) vs. Dallas Bailey (Black) 174: Mike Benefiel (Orange) vs. Chris McNeil (Black) 184: Zach White (Orange) vs. Darnell Bortz (Black) 184: Elliott Hellwege (Orange) vs. Chris Perry (Black) 197: Colton Hill (Orange) vs. Clayton Foster (Black) 285: Alan Gelogaev (Orange) vs. Tyson Yoder (Black)

TRANSACTIONS Tuesday’s Deals

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Declined their 2011 option on LHP Mark Hendrickson. BOSTON RED SOX—Named Curt Young pitching coach. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with SS Omar Vizquel on a one-year contract. DETROIT TIGERS—Declined their 2011 option on SS Jhonny Peralta. NEW YORK YANKEES—Assigned RHP Chad Gaudin and LHP Royce Ring outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Gaudin refused assignment and elected free agency. Selected the contract of OF Melky Mesa from Tampa (FSL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Sent OF Matt Carson outright to Sacramento (PCL) and signed him to a one-year minor league contract. Announced RHP Boof Bonser declined an outright assignment to Sacramento and elected free agency. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Declined their 2011 option on 1B Adam LaRoche. ATLANTA BRAVES—Exercised their 2011 options on INF Alex Gonzalez and INF Omar Infante. Agreed to terms with RHP Scott Proctor on a one-year contract. Reinstated RHP Jairo Asencio to the 40-man roster. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Claimed RHP Justin James off waivers from Oakland. Selected the contract of C Martin Maldonado from Nashville (PCL). Declined 2011 mutual options on LHP Doug Davis and RHP Trevor Hoffman and their 2011 option on C Gregg Zaun. NEW YORK METS—Named J.P. Ricciardi special assistant to the general manager. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Named Derek Lilliquist bullpen coach. Named Greg Hauck trainer and Barry Weinberg assistant trainer. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Exercised their 2011 option on 1B Adrian Gonzalez. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Named Bo Porter third-base coach. BASKETBALL NBA MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES—Signed G Mike Conley to a multiyear contract extension. NBA Development League RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS—Traded G-F Robert Vaden to Tulsa for G Mustafa Shakur. TULSA 66ERS — Have acquired guard Robert Vaden, the seventh overall pick in 2010 D-League Draft. FOOTBALL NFL CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed DE James Ruffin to the practice squad. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released LB Jason Williams. HOUSTON TEXANS—Waived DE Adewale Ogunleye. Signed DE Tim Jamison. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Signed LB Chris Ellis to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Waived LB Shawne Merriman. Placed WR Craig Davis. Re-signed OT Adam Terry. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Placed C Eric Heitmann on injured reserve. Signed LB Thaddeus Gibson. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed DT Red Bryant and G Ben Hamilton on injured reserve. Released RB Quinton Ganther and CB Nate Ness. Signed DT Frank Okam. HOCKEY NHL ANAHEIM DUCKS—Placed C Kyle Chipchura on injured reserve. ATLANTA THRASHERS—Placed D Freddy Meyer on injured reserve, retroactive to Oct. 23. Recalled D Noah Welch from Chicago (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Ben Smith and F Ryan Potulny to Rockford (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS—Assigned C Andrei Loktionov to Manchester (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Loaned F Jon Sim to Bridgeport (AHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Promoted communications coordinaor Erik Heasley to hockey operations assistant. Named Jason Seidling communications coordinator. SAN JOSE SHARKS—Assigned D Mike Moore to Worcester (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Assigned F Jeff Tambellini to Manitoba (AHL). COLLEGE MINNESOTA —Suspended DB Michael Carter and DL Ra’Shede Hageman indefinitely for academic issues. Suspended DT Brandon Kirksey one game.

ODDS NFL

Week 9 Sunday’s Games a-Chicago 21⁄2 Buffalo HOUSTON 1 San Diego New Orleans 7 CAROLINA MINNESOTA 9 Arizona ATLANTA 9 Tampa Bay NY Jets 4 DETROIT BALTIMORE 51⁄2 Miami CLEVELAND New England 51⁄2 NY Giants 5 SEATTLE Kansas City OAKLAND 21⁄2 Indianapolis 1 PHILADELPHIA GREEN BAY 8 Dallas Monday, Nov 8 Pittsburgh 41⁄2 CINCINNATI a-at Toronto, Canada Bye Week: Denver, Jacksonville, San Francisco, St. Louis, Tennessee, Washington.

College Football

Wednesday’s Game SOUTH FLORIDA 10 Rutgers Thursday’s Games OHIO 15 Buffalo Georgia Tech VIRGINIA TECH 131⁄2 Friday’s Games CENT MICHIGAN 4 Western Michigan HOUSTON Central Florida 21⁄2 Saturday’s Games 31⁄2 TEXAS A&M Oklahoma 7 Baylor OKLAHOMA ST 18 Rice TULSA Air Force 7 ARMY MIAMI-FLORIDA 9 Maryland CLEMSON 3 N.C. State DUKE Pick’em Virginia SYRACUSE 6 Louisville Iowa 17 INDIANA MICHIGAN 3 Illinois Boston College 3 WAKE FOREST Northwestern PENN ST 61⁄2 Wisconsin 20 PURDUE MICHIGAN ST 24 Minnesota FLORIDA ST 10 North Carolina SOUTH CAROLINA 3 Arkansas Florida 14 VANDERBILT Colorado 9 KANSAS Akron BALL ST 131⁄2 BYU 18 Unlv Hawaii BOISE ST 221⁄2 KENT ST Temple 31⁄2 UTAH ST 17 New Mexico St EAST CAROLINA 3 Navy OREGON 28 Washington Southern Miss 10 TULANE Nebraska 19 IOWA ST Texas 4 KANSAS ST STANFORD 8 Arizona Tcu 5 UTAH Fresno St 2 LOUISIANA TECH ALA-BIRMINGHAM 10 Marshall Idaho Nevada 121⁄2 California 141⁄2 WASHINGTON ST Wyoming 11 NEW MEXICO Oregon St 6 UCLA TEXAS TECH Missouri 51⁄2 Alabama 6 LSU MEMPHIS Tennessee 181⁄2 Smu 8 UTEP SAN DIEGO ST 17 Colorado St USC 6 Arizona St MISSISSIPPI 27 UL-Lafayette WEST KENTUCKY Florida Atlantic 21⁄2 FLA INTER 91⁄2 UL-Monroe NORTH TEXAS Troy 121⁄2 Home team in CAPS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

...

5B

Tramel: Time for Sooners to man up on the road FROM PAGE 1B

Go ahead and Google it up and I bet it’s not a lot different.” OK, here you go. Compared to the programs that OU should compare itself to, the programs that have competed for national championships in the last five years, the Sooners lag far behind in road success. Among the seven schools that have competed in the last five BCS title games, OU has the worst road record and the worst away record, starting with the Sooners’ 55-19 loss to Southern Cal in January 2005. Only Alabama is close to the Sooners. ’Bama is 16-8 on the road and 22-12 in away games; OU is 14-9 and 22-18. Texas is 22-3 in road games. USC is 27-7. Ohio State 23-4. Likewise, no one is close to the Sooners in home prowess. The nextbest home record after OU’s 35-1 is Ohio State’s 38-4. The Sooners would have to pull a Texas and lose three straight at Owen Field to lose that status. But that status won’t help this stretch drive of 2010. Only Texas Tech comes to Norman the rest of this season. The Sooners play at Texas A&M, at Baylor and at Oklahoma State. If the Sooners want a Big 12 championship, they’ve got to win on the road. Good news, though. While Stoops might not admit to a problem, Stoops’ troops do. “Honestly, we stress road games more,” center Ben Habern said. “We almost have more energy.

Jan. 4, 2005, how OU compares in true road games, neutral›siteSince games, all away games and home games, with the other schools that over that time have played in a BCS title game: School Road USC ................27-7 Texas .............22-3 Ohio State ....23-4 Florida............16-6 LSU ................18-8 Alabama........16-8 Oklahoma ....14-9

Neutral 5-1 10-3 2-3 11-3 6-2 6-4 8-9

To me, we approach road games stronger than we do at home.” Then stop it. Whatever you’re doing, do something different. This year, the Sooners in road games survived Cincinnati 31-29 and lost 36-27 at Missouri. The Cincy win looks worse and worse; the Bearcats have lost home games the last two weeks to South Florida (38-30) and Syracuse (31-7). The Missouri loss looks worse after the Tigers were avalanched at Nebraska. It’s time for the Sooners to man up. They are better than A&M. They are better than Baylor. Go win in College Station, go win in Waco, then go play OSU for South Division supremacy. A&M’s not a bad team, but the Aggies lost 30-9 at home to Mizzou. I don’t care if the Aggies have switched quarterbacks. This is a game the Sooners should win. Of course, that hasn’t stopped them from losing before. OU’s road malaise has included bad luck (Sam Bradford’s injury at Texas Tech in 2007), bad officiating (Texas Tech 2005, Oregon 2006) and bad quarterbacking (Bradford at Colorado ’07, Landry Jones at Nebraska ’09). Offensive coordinator

Away 34-6 32-6 25-7 27-9 24-10 22-12 22-18

Home 29-5 30-6 38-4 35-4 34-6 35-5 35-1

Kevin Wilson at least offered a viable theory on the road slump. The Sooners are so dominant at home, they “start thinking we’re good. We lose our edge.” Tight end Trent Ratterree tends to agree. “We play a hell of a game here at home,” he said. “Whoop somebody up, hear people tell us how good we are. Maybe a loss of focus. “People say in football you have to have a short memory. You gotta have amnesia. Almost forget what you did last week.” OK. That information is available on Google, too. In OU’s most recent six road losses, five immediately followed a home rout. Only the loss at Nebraska a year ago followed a moderate victory (42-30 over Kansas State). That has to fortify Aggie hopes. OU beat Colorado 43-10 last week. But maybe this week the Sooners aren’t hearing how good they are. Maybe they are hearing how mediocre they’ve been on the road. Even if they’re not hearing it from their coach. Berry Tramel: Berry can be reached at (405) 760-8080 or at btramel@opubco.com. He can be heard Monday through Friday from 4:40-5:20 p.m. on The Sports Animal radio network, including AM-640 and FM-98.1. You can also view his personality page at newsok.com/berrytramel.


6B

.

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL DISTRICT SCENARIOS Classes 2A-3A DISTRICT 3A-1

Key Games: Bridge Creek at Blanchard, Marlow at Tuttle. Anadarko: First. Bridge Creek: Second with win. Second with loss of 8 points or less and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 21 or less district points on Bridge Creek. Third with loss and Marlow win. Third with loss and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 22 or more district points on Bridge Creek or Bridge Creek loses by 9 points or more. Fourth with loss of 9 points or more and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 22 or more district points on Bridge Creek. Blanchard: Second with win and Marlow win. Second with win of 9 points or more and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 2 or less district points on Blanchard. Third with win and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard or Blanchard wins by 8 or less points. Third with loss and Marlow win where Marlow gains 29 or less district points and Tuttle gains 2 or less district points on Blanchard. Fourth with loss and Marlow win where Marlow gains 29 or less district points or Tuttle gains 2 or less district points on Blanchard. Fourth with loss and Tuttle win. Fourth with win of 8 points or less and Tuttle win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard. Tuttle: Second with win and Blanchard win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard and 22 or more district points on Bridge Creek. Third with win and Bridge Creek win. Third with loss of 12 or less points and Bridge Creek win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard. Third with win and Blanchard win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard or 22 or more district points on Bridge Creek. Fourth with win and Blanchard win where Tuttle gains 2 or less district points on Blanchard and 21 or less district points on Bridge Creek. Fourth with loss and Bridge Creek win where Tuttle gains 3 or more district points on Blanchard or loses by 12 or less. Marlow: Third with win of 15 points or more and Bridge Creek win by 15 or more. Fourth with win and Bridge Creek win where Marlow wins by 13 points or more or Bridge Creek wins by 15 points or more. Fourth with win and Blanchard win.

DISTRICT 3A-2

Key Games: Purcell at Lone Grove, Sulphur at Dickson. Plainview: First. Madill: Second. Purcell: Third with win or Sulphur win. Fourth with loss and Sulphur loss. Lone Grove: Third with win and Sulphur loss. Fourth with win and Sulphur win where Lone Grove picks up 2 or more district points on Sulphur. Sulphur: Fourth with Purcell win. Fourth with win and Lone Grove win where Sulphur loses 1 or less district points to Lone Grove.

DISTRICT 3A-3

Key Games: Bethany at Newcastle. Heritage Hall: First. Bethany: Second with win. Third with loss. Newcastle: Second with win. Third with loss. Kingfisher: Fourth.

DISTRICT 3A-4

Key Games: Bristow at Bethel, Chandler at Little Axe, Star Spencer at Prague. Perkins-Tryon: First. Bristow: Second with win. Third with loss, Little Axe loss and Prague loss. Fourth with loss, Little Axe loss and Prague win. Bethel: Second with win. Third with loss, Little Axe loss and Prague loss. Third with loss, Little Axe win and Prague loss where Bethel loses 3 or less district points to Prague and 16 or less district points to Little Axe. Fourth with loss, Little Axe win and Prague loss where Bethel loses 3 or less district points to Prague or 16 or less district points to Little Axe. Fourth with loss, Little Axe loss and Prague win. Prague: Third with win. Third with loss, Bristow win and Little Axe win where Prague gains 4 or more district points on Bethel and loses 14 or less district points to Little Axe. Fourth with loss, Bristow win and Little Axe win where Prague gains 4 or more district points on Bethel or loses 14 or less district points to Little Axe. Fourth with loss and Bethel win. Fourth with loss, Bristow win and Little Axe loss. Little Axe: Third with win, Bristow win and Prague loss where Little Axe gains 17 or more district points on Bethel and 15 or more district points on Prague. Fourth with win, Bristow win and Prague loss where Little Axe gains 17 or more district points on Bethel or 15 or more district points on Prague. Fourth with win and Prague win.

DISTRICT 3A-5

Key Game: Kellyville at Berryhill. Cascia Hall: First. Sperry: Second. Nowata: Third. Berryhill: Fourth with win. Kellyville: Fourth with win.

DISTRICT 3A-6

Key Games: Inola at Locust Grove, Seq. Claremore at Metro Christian, Verdigris at Westville. Seq. Tahlequah: First with Verdigris loss. Second with Verdigris win and Seq. Claremore win. First with Verdigris win and Metro Christian win by 1 point. Second with Verdigris win and Metro Christian win of 2 or more points.

Verdigris: First with win and Seq. Claremore win. Third with win and Metro Christian win. Third with loss. Metro Christian: First with win of 2 or more points and Verdigris win. Second with win of 1 point and Verdigris win. Second with Verdigris loss. Third with loss and Verdigris win. Inola: Fourth with win or Seq. Claremore loss. Seq. Claremore: Fourth with win and Inola loss.

DISTRICT 3A-7

Key Games: Checotah at Keys (Park Hill), Henryetta at Okmulgee, Victory Christian at Poteau. Beggs: First. Keys (Park Hill): Second with win. Second with loss of 9 points or less and Henryetta win where Henryetta gains 19 or less district points on Keys (Park Hill). Third with loss and Henryetta win where Keys (Park Hill) loses by 10 or more or Henryetta gains 20 or more district points on Keys (Park Hill). Third with loss and Henryetta loss. Fourth with loss of 10 points or more and Henryetta win where Henryetta gains 20 or more district points on Keys (Park Hill). Checotah: Second with win and Henryetta loss. Second with win of 10 or more points and Henryetta win where Checotah gains 1 or more district points on Henryetta. Third with win and Henryetta win where Checotah wins by 10 or more points or Checotah gains 1 or more district points on Henryetta. Fourth with win of 9 points or less and Henryetta win where Checotah gains no district points on Henryetta. Fourth with loss and Victory Christian loss. Henryetta: Second with win and Checotah win where Henryetta picks up 20 or more district points on Keys (Park Hill) and loses no district points to Checotah. Third with win and Checotah win where Henryetta picks up 20 or more district points on Keys (Park Hill) or loses no district points to Checotah. Third with Keys (Park Hill) win. Fourth with loss and Checotah win. Fourth with win and Checotah win where Henryetta picks up 19 or less district points on Keys (Park Hill) and Henryetta loses district points to Checotah. Victory Christian: Fourth with win and Keys (Park Hill) win.

DISTRICT 3A-8

Key Games: Atoka at Valliant, Eufaula at Seminole, Stigler at Spiro Spiro: First with win or Valliant loss. Third with loss, Valliant win and Eufaula win. Fourth with loss, Valliant win and Seminole win. Valliant: First with win and Stigler win. Second with Spiro win. Third with loss, Stigler win and Eufaula win. Fourth with loss, Stigler win and Seminole win. Stigler: Second with win and Valliant win. Second with win, Valliant loss and Eufaula win. Second with win, Valliant loss and Seminole win where Stigler picks up 6 or more district points on Seminole. Third with win, Valliant loss and Seminole win where Stigler picks up 5 or less district points on Seminole. Fourth with loss. Eufaula: Third with win and Spiro win. Fourth with win and Spiro loss. Seminole: Second with win, Stigler win and Valliant loss where Seminole loses 5 or less district points to Stigler. Third with win, Stigler win and Valliant loss where Seminole loses 6 or more district points to Stigler. Third with win and Valliant win. Third with win, Valliant loss and Spiro win.

DISTRICT 2A-1

Key Game: OCS at Tonkawa. Watonga: First. Hennessey: Second. Tonkawa: Third with win. Fourth with loss. OCS: Third with win. Fourth with loss.

DISTRICT 2A-2

Key Game: Crooked Oak at Christian Heritage. Millwood: First. Jones: Second. Christian Heritage: Third with win. Fourth with loss. Crooked Oak: Third with win. Fourth with loss.

DISTRICT 2A-3

Key Games: Cordell at Frederick, Hobart at Washington, Lindsay at Comanche. Hobart: First with win. Second with loss, Lindsay loss and Frederick loss. Third with loss, Lindsay win and Frederick loss. Fourth with loss and Frederick win. Washington: First with win and Lindsay loss. Second with win and Lindsay win. Third with loss. Lindsay: First with win and Washington win. Second with Hobart win. Second with loss, Washington win and Frederick win where Frederick picks up 8 or less district points on Lindsay. Third with loss, Washington win and Frederick win where Frederick picks up 9 or more district points on Lindsay. Third with loss, Washington win and Frederick loss. Frederick: Second with win, Washington win and Lindsay loss where Frederick picks up 9 or more district points on Lindsay. Third with win, Washington win and Lindsay loss where Frederick picks up 8 or less district points on Lindsay. Third with win, Washington win and Lindsay win. Fourth with loss or Hobart win.

DISTRICT 2A-4

Key Game: Marietta at Tishomingo. Davis: First. Coalgate: Second. Tishomingo: Third with win. Fourth with loss of 9 points or less.

Kingston: Third with Marietta win. Fourth with Tishomingo win. Marietta: Fourth with win of 10 points or more.

DISTRICT 2A-5

Key Games: Holdenville at Meeker, Okemah at Morris. Morris: First with win. Second with loss of 13 points or less and Holdenville win where Holdenville gains 19 or less district points on Morris. Third with loss and Meeker win. Third with loss and Holdenville win where Morris loses by 14 or more or Holdenville gains 20 or more district points on Morris. Fourth with loss of 14 points or more and Holdenville win where Holdenville gains 20 or more district points on Morris. Stroud: First with Morris loss. Second with Morris win. Okemah: Second with win and Meeker win. Second with win of 14 points or more and Holdenville win where Okemah picks up 10 or more district points on Holdenville. Third with win and Holdenville win where Okemah wins by 14 points or more or Okemah picks up 10 or more district points on Holdenville. Fourth with win of 13 points or less and Holdenville win where Okemah picks up 9 or less district points on Holdenville. Holdenville: Second with win and Okemah win where Holdenville gains 20 or more district points on Morris and loses 9 or less district points to Okemah. Third with win and Okemah win where Holdenville gains 20 or more district points on Morris or loses 9 or less district points to Okemah. Third with win and Morris win. Fourth with loss and Morris win. Fourth with win and Okemah win where Holdenville gains 19 or less district points on Morris and loses 10 or more district points to Okemah. Meeker: Third with win. Fourth with loss and Morris win.

DISTRICT 2A-6

Key Games: Hartshorne at Wilburton, Vian at Talihina. Talihina: First with win. Second with loss. Vian: First with win. Second with loss. Hartshorne: Third with win. Fourth with loss. Wilburton: Third with win. Fourth with loss.

DISTRICT 2A-7

Key Games: Chouteau at Pawhuska, Lincoln Christian at Caney Valley, Newkirk at Pawnee. Lincoln Christian: First with win. First with loss and Newkirk loss. Second with loss, Pawhuska win and Newkirk win. Third with loss, Pawhuska loss and Newkirk win. Newkirk: First with win and Lincoln Christian loss. Second with Lincoln Christian win. Second with loss, Lincoln Christian loss and Pawhuska loss. Second with loss, Lincoln Christian loss and Pawhuska win where Newkirk loses 20 or less district points to Pawhuska. Third with loss, Lincoln Christian loss and Pawhuska win where Newkirk loses 21 or more district points to Pawhuska. Chelsea: Second with Lincoln Christian loss, Pawhuska loss and Newkirk win. Third with Lincoln Christian win and Pawhuska loss. Third with Lincoln Christian win, Pawhuska win and Newkirk win. Fourth with Lincoln Christian win, Pawhuska win and Newkirk loss. Third with Lincoln Christian loss, Pawhuska loss and Newkirk loss. Third with Lincoln Christian loss and Pawhuska win of 2 points or less. Fourth with Lincoln Christian loss and Pawhuska win of 3 points or more. Pawhuska: Second with win, Lincoln Christian loss and Newkirk loss where Pawhuska gains 21 or more district points on Newkirk. Third with win of 3 points or more, Lincoln Christian loss and Newkirk win. Fourth with win of 2 points or less, Lincoln Christian loss and Newkirk win. Third with win, Lincoln Christian loss and Newkirk loss where Pawhuska gains 20 or less district points on Newkirk or wins by 3 or less. Third with win, Lincoln Christian win and Newkirk loss. Fourth with win, Lincoln Christian win and Newkirk win. Fourth with win, Lincoln Christian loss and Newkirk loss where Pawhuska gains 20 or less district points on Newkirk and wins by 3 or less. Fourth with loss.

DISTRICT 2A-8

Key Games: Adair at Kansas, Commerce at Quapaw, Ketchum at Colcord, Wyandotte at Salina. Commerce: First with win. First with loss, Ketchum win and Kansas win. First with loss, Colcord loss and Adair win. Second with loss, Colcord win and Kansas win. Third with loss, Colcord win and Adair win. Colcord: First with win and Commerce loss. Second with Commerce win. Second with loss, Commerce loss and Kansas win. Second with loss, Commerce loss and Adair win where Adair picks up 29 or less district points on Colcord. Third with loss, Commerce loss and Adair win where Adair picks up 30 district points on Colcord. Adair: Second with win, Commerce loss and Colcord win. Second with win, Commerce loss and Colcord loss where Adair picks up 30 district points on Colcord. Third with win, Commerce loss and Colcord loss where Adair picks up 29 or less district points on Colcord. Third with win and Commerce win. Fourth with loss and Salina loss. Kansas: Third with win. Fourth with loss. Salina: Fourth with win and Kansas win.

BY ROBERT PRZYBYLO, RYAN ABER AND SCOTT WRIGHT

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Washington still in the hunt TERRIFIC TURNAROUND | WARRIORS EYE HOME PLAYOFF GAME

Scott Wright swright@ opubco.com

HIGH SCHOOLS WASHINGTON — A big part of success in high school football is responding positively to negative situations. That’s why the Washington Warriors are still in the hunt for the District 2A-3 championship heading into the final Friday of the season. Two tough nondistrict defeats and an injury to quarterback Dakota Treat have done as much for the Warriors (6-3, 5-1) as anything else they’ve been through this year. The Warriors are in a three-way tie for first place with Lindsay and Hobart, which comes to Washington on Friday. With a win and a Comanche victory over Lindsay, the Warriors would jump to the top seed. A win over Hobart guar-

Brad Beller Washington coach

Dakota Treat Washington quarterback

antees Washington a home playoff game, and a loss will knock them to third, sending them on the road for the first round. Still, it’s quite a turnaround from where this team was after Week 3, when it was 1-2 coming off a 35-13 loss to Purcell and 37-0 defeat to Bethany — both Class 3A teams. “We knew we had a young team with a new coaching staff, and expected that to affect us early in the season,” firstyear coach Brad Beller said. “But the kids really responded. We feel we’re playing at a high level right now.” The Warriors lost Treat

for a three-game stretch but managed to go unbeaten, including a couple of close victories over Comanche and Frederick. Treat came back two weeks ago and has thrown for 420 yards combined in those games. “Playing without him really brought this team together,” Beller said. “Teams were keying on Dakota, and our kids were looking to him to make plays. But now, they’re playing more as a team. “You’re going to have bad situations over the course of the season, but we’ve been able to pull positives out of the negatives.”

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL RUSHING STATISTICS LARGE SCHOOLS

Player, School

No

Donavan Roberts, Norman ............223 Andrew Long, Southmoore ...........206 James Flanders, Midwest City......215 Casey Curtis, Putnam City ............188 Alex Christensen, Deer Creek .......162 Deaquan Wojciechowski, Lawton .182 Cody Feuerborn, Westmoore.........164 Louis Durant, Lawton Ike..............147 Terry Jones, Yukon ........................157 Davion Carter, Stillwater ..............187 Adrian McDonald, Lawton Ike.......120 Raymond Demby, Norman North ..173 Kenton Whittington, Carl Albert ..120 Tony Keifer, McAlester..................130 Jarion Tudman, Edmond North .....130 Johnny Smith, Putnam West........101 Corey Bennett, Choctaw................133 Chandler Bennett, Bartlesville ..... 83 Scottie Prelow, Owasso ................112 Karltrell Henderson, Southmoore. 80 Jay Gogue, Southeast ................... 52 Darvonta Knight, Carl Albert ........ 73 Darius Young, Western Hts. .........128 Jordan Laskey, Duncan..................138 Greg Johnson, Del City ..................104 Williams, Muskogee......................104

SMALL SCHOOLS

Player, School

Sheldon Wilson, Anadarko.......... Derrick Moore, Wetumka ............ Dakota Biswell, Stroud ............... Mike Miller, Davenport................ Blake Riojas, Newcastle.............. LaRone Richardson, McGuinness

No

179 149 197 130 202 183

Yds TD

1571 1499 1490 1440 1223 1024 1007 987 974 973 902 900 862 860 855 808 776 762 673 670 659 644 626 624 618 602

27 18 19 18 17 13 12 15 10 7 8 11 10 11 6 12 9 10 4 8 9 10 8 10 7 1

Yds TD

1718 1666 1582 1543 1496 1436

31 18 23 22 16 8

Aliston Cobb, Douglass ............... Holden Davis, Marlow ................. Matt Mendoza, Turpin................. Robby Dryden, Little Axe ............ Devin Campbell, Bethany ............ Magnus Scott, Coyle ................... Shane Bailey, Maud..................... Damien Shea, Purcell .................. Saul Pina, Clinton ........................ VanSingel, Oologah ..................... Keith Justus, OKC Patriots ......... Josh Way, Wayne ........................ Barry Sanders, Heritage Hall ...... Ryan Frater, Hobart ..................... Garrett Sikes, OKC Patriots ........ Eric Dockins, Broken Bow ........... Levi Hill, Hennessey .................... Steven Howard, Washington ...... John McCracken, Blanchard ........ Taylor Ashcraft, Piedmont .......... Taaron Burcum, Carnegie ............ Cody Cottom, Sharon-Mutual ..... Tanner Jenkins, Velma-Alma ...... Travelle Pelkey, Lexington .......... Caleb Muncrief, Madill ................ Jacob Ellis, Alva........................... Dawson Myers, Cushing.............. Spencer Bond, Madill................... Chris Hunter, Watonga................ Jacob Welt, Harrah...................... Je. Davenport, Sallisaw............... Levi Killman, Stroud.................... Corey Mooney, Sayre................... Zack Woolman, Vinita ................. Blake Henderson, Bridge Creek... Tyler Arney, Thomas ................... Tyler Henry, Corn Bible................ Austin Culwell, Community Chr..

123 167 258 196 160 99 98 146 168 169 158 137 81 210 111 171 134 127 134 206 140 92 84 145 102 159 145 109 101 160 149 102 159 114 137 73 109 119

1399 1330 1258 1253 1242 1231 1211 1207 1195 1171 1152 1141 1136 1120 1119 1114 1089 1049 1036 1033 1015 1001 997 991 984 978 970 960 913 911 881 839 838 838 825 823 811 778

19 19 21 15 17 23 26 9 15 14 14 14 16 10 14 15 15 12 21 6 15 12 16 12 17 5 8 11 12 8 7 12 14 8 13 16 11 14

Cody Coats, PC-Hunter................ 103 Chas Stallard, Cleveland .............1241 Jon Vanover, SW Christian.......... 107 Kris Vaughn, Jones...................... 97 Brady Krittenbrink, PC-Hunter ... 113 Cassius Calhoun, Casady............. 190 Ivan Moreno, Hennessey............. 86 Ashton Wright, Central Marlow . 93 Colton Maynard, Antlers............. 101 Zeke Zimmer, Washington.......... 92 Tyler Sills, Quinton...................... 102 Dion’tay Washington, Douglass . 71 Landon Nault, Kingfisher ............ 119 Mac Katigan, Casady ................... 92 Cole Swayze, Purcell ................... 55 David Adams, Minco.................... 91 Derek Patterson, Kingfisher ....... 101 Clay Rindal, Stratford.................. 117 Dakota Thomas, Newkirk............ 65 Devonta Carter, Vinita ................ 92 Garrett Roach, Woodward........... 85 Andy Habib, Chr. Heritage........... 82 Dakota Pearson, Elgin ................. 96 Trevor Lopez, Coyle ..................... 53

778 774 760 750 743 742 735 726 719 716 709 688 673 670 669 665 663 661 653 653 650 648 646 616

13 15 12 6 11 7 7 11 9 8 8 9 10 7 11 7 9 12 12 8 4 8 7 7

Editor’s note: Want to know who’s leading tackles in Class 4A? It’s available, as are numerous other individual and team categories on NewsOK.com. And by clicking on a player’s name, that player’s entire statistics will be displayed. Coaches or team stat-keepers who want to enter statistics online can call The Oklahoman at (800) 375-6397 or (405) 475-3313 for instructions. Coaches and stat-keepers are encouraged to update their statistics once a week. The stats are immediately updated online and will be published Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays during the season.


SPORTS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Cowboys ponder changes LOST SEASON | YOUTH MOVEMENT COULD BE IN ORDER WITH PLAYOFF HOPES DIM BY TOM ORSBORN San Antonio Express-News

IRVING, Texas — With their playoff hopes shattered, should the Dallas Cowboys turn to their younger players? That’s a burning question the demoralized team has faced ever since a Giants linebacker broke Tony Romo’s collarbone nine days ago. Without Romo, the Cowboys seem all but assured of having a losing season for the first time since 2004. With that said, why not give younger guys like inside linebacker Sean Lee, outside linebacker Victor Butler and safety Barry Church an opportunity? Other youngsters in line for extended looks include quarterback Stephen McGee, safety Danny McCray, defensive lineman Sean Lissemore and offensive linemen Sam Young and Phil Costa, who started Sunday’s 35-17 loss to Jacksonville at left guard. “We can evaluate those things,” Dallas coach Wade Phillips said. “We’ve let players play some to see

against the next two opponents (road trips to Green Bay and the New York Giants), but how about giving him a look against the Lions on Nov. 21 at Cowboys Stadium? Spell Colombo with Young: A sixth-round pick, Sam Young hasn’t played this season. Like Kosier, Marc Colombo is an aging player with injury issues. Young’s not ready to start at right tackle, but playing him a series or two seems warranted. Bench Ball: Alan Ball, a converted cornerback, has been a disappointment at free safety. Barry Church and Danny McCray are bigger and more physical and deserve a chance to start. Give Lee more snaps: Keith Brooking has looked his age (34) and has no future with the club. Why not give Sean Lee, a second-round pick, more time in the base defense at linebacker? Rotate Butler and Spencer: Anthony Spencer was great last year at linebacker, but it hasn’t carried over. Victor Butler had a sack against Jacksonville.

Coach Wade Phillips and the Dallas Cowboys are 1-6 this season and 0-4 at home. AP PHOTO

how they do. In some cases, it’s hurt us.” Owner Jerry Jones suggested he would like the team to achieve a modicum of success before initiating a youth movement. “We have a lot of games left, and it is important to me, these individuals and the fans that we play better and get a good taste in our mouth,” Jones said. But at 1-6, including 0-4 at home, and a brutal schedule looming, it would seem Dallas is doomed to an embarrassingly bad finish no matter

whether it has veterans or youngsters in the lineup. Here’s a look at some changes the Cowboys could make: Keep playing Costa: Starting left guard Kyle Kosier seems injury prone and backup Montrae Holland is a journeyman. The undrafted Costa is a scrappy, hard-nosed kid who played decent against the Jaguars. He also plays center, so he could spell Andre Gurode as well. Start McGee against Detroit: It wouldn’t be fair to McGee to start him

COMMENTARY

No easy fix for Dallas Cowboys, UT BY CEDRIC GOLDEN Austin American-Statesman

Automobiles run on gasoline, and the state of Texas runs on football. Funny thing about this fuel: The ride is always smoother when the premium stuff is flowing through the engine. With all due respect to the Houston Texans and TCU Horned Frogs — teams with healthy postseason aspirations — the Dallas Cowboys and Texas Longhorns are the superunleaded of football teams in Texas, and when these teams are struggling, it’s bigger news than when the others are winning. The numbers are hideous, the most distressing being the combined 5-10 won-lost record. The 1-6 Cowboys have had their bye week already, so their seven games add up to one less than the 4-4 Longhorns have played. Bad records aside, the dreamers

in both fan bases still cling to the fading belief that these titans of Texas football will figure this out sooner rather than later. Welcome to later. Much later. After watching the Baylor Bears become the first really good team to beat Texas at home this season — Iowa State and UCLA are a combined 8-9; those aren’t good teams — I stumbled through 30 minutes of Longhorn players and coaches saying they were going to watch film and find out what the heck was going on. As for me, about eight hours after another UT home disappointment, I stumbled out of bed at 6 a.m. Sunday to make the 200-mile trek to Cowboys Stadium. The ’Boys were hungry for a win, and the unimpressive Jacksonville Jaguars figured to be an unwilling tasty morsel for a team this desperate. By

now you know Jacksonville humbled Dallas 35-17. It adds up to two months of bad road trips — and bad football — if you will. Having attended 12 of the teams’ 15 combined games, I don’t see many differences between the Cowboys and Longhorns. Programs/franchises that were built on the exploits of great runners are not able to put together a sustained ground attack. Dallas’ 3.7 yards per carry ranks next to last in the pros while the Longhorns are averaging 3.8 in Big 12 play. Cody Johnson leads the ’Horns in rushing with a measly 282 yards. Receivers are dropping passes at an alarming rate, and defenses aren’t playing up to their talent. As for the coaches, Brown isn’t in any trouble as far as job security goes.Wade Phillips appears clueless and would already be gone if not for the NFL’s uneasy labor situation. As

for the respective offensive coordinators, Greg Davis’ blood pressure would be 30 points lower if he had Jason Garrett’s gig. Wade handles the defensive coordinator duties and that makes sense, given that the defense is as equally adept at quitting as the offense. Texas’ Will Muschamp has a defense ranked fifth in the nation, but he would be the first to admit that wire-to-wire complete performances have been rare. Lone Star football fandom has been spoiled rotten for the most part. The two biggest draws in Texas football rarely stink up the joint in the same season. My best suggestion is to get through these next two months any way you can. And if you’re hanging in there for duration, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to carpool to the games. Gas just seems more expensive these days.

COMMENTARY: TEXAS RANGERS

BY JEAN-JACQUES TAYLOR Dallas Morning News

Winning the American League championship this season will only increase expectations for the Texas Rangers next year. AP PHOTO

that remains stocked with premium players. It has a manager who knows how to maximize the roster’s talent, and a GM who does a wonderful job of finding role players that complement the team’s core. These Rangers aren’t going anywhere. They should be among the AL’s best teams for the next few seasons. That’s why just competing with the Angels and Athletics — Seattle stinks — for the division title won’t be good enough anymore. Fans have seen the Rangers vanquish the Evil Empire in stunning fashion, so the standard has been raised. After 39 years in Arlington, that’s a good thing.

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NFL NOTEBOOK

Report: Moss hits waiver wire Two people with knowledge of Randy Moss’ status told The Associated Press that the Minnesota Vikings have waived the receiver. The people spoke Tuesday on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release the information publicly. Vikings coach Brad Childress told his players on Monday that he intended to waive Moss. He released a statement saying he felt the move was in the best interests of the team “both in the short and long term.” Teams will have until 3 p.m. Central time today to place a claim on Moss. The team with the worst record will win the claim. Winless Buffalo has the first shot at him. If Moss is not claimed, he will be free to sign a new contract with any team and the Vikings would be on the hook for rest of his salary.

MCNABB SITUATION CLOUDIER On Day 3 of the Redskins’ attempt to explain the benching of Donovan McNabb, the head coach’s son gave it a try. He was doing a decent job — until he threw in a new wrinkle that only added to the confusion. Offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan said McNabb was told in advance of the possibility of getting pulled if coaches felt the veteran quarterback was struggling. McNabb went on the radio and immediately claimed otherwise, saying: “I didn’t hear that part.” And, by the way, this just happened to be the day the Redskins brought in JaMarcus Russell for a workout. McNabb was pulled in the final 2 minutes of Sunday’s 37-25 loss to Detroit.

CHARGERS WAIVE MERRIMAN The San Diego Chargers waived outside linebacker Shawne Merriman three weeks after he was placed on injured reserve with a “minor injury” designation. The Chargers said then that they would release Merriman once his calf injury healed. General manager A.J. Smith, who hasn’t been a fan of Merriman’s celebrity-leaning lifestyle, didn’t return a call seeking comment. Merriman didn’t return an e-mail seeking comment.

REPLAY FOUL-UP BLOCKED CHALLENGE The Steelers apparently didn’t challenge a possible touchdown run by Rashard Mendenhall in a loss to the Saints because their assistant coaches stationed in the press box couldn’t see the same replays that were viewed by the millions of fans watching on TV on Sunday. On second down from the 2 early in the second quarter, the officials ruled Mendenhall didn’t get the ball across the goal line before being brought down. NBC replays appeared to show the ball touching the goal line before Mendenhall was tackled, but coach Mike Tomlin didn’t challenge. FROM WIRE REPORTS

HIGH SCHOOL NOTEBOOK

Blanchard’s McCracken ignites spark Blanchard coach Jeff Craig said running back John McCracken isn’t 100 percent yet, but he’s still a big factor in the offense. “It’s a welcome relief to have him back out there,” Craig said. “He just gives us another dimension to our offense.” In a game the Lions had to have, McCracken scored three touchdowns in a road win at Marlow to clinch a playoff spot. The Lions face Bridge Creek on Friday. With a win and some help, Blanchard could earn the second seed.

BUSY WEEK FOR DEER CREEK’S CHRISTENSEN Deer Creek senior Alex Christensen has a lot on his plate right now. He’s the starting quarterback for the Antlers and is preparing for senior night against Ada. But he might have to take a back seat to the pressure felt by his stepmom, Mary Fallin. Yes, the same Fallin that was elected governor Tuesday. She will become the first female governor in the state’s history. “It’s really exciting. I’m a little biased, but I think she’s a great candidate,” Christensen said before Tuesday’s vote. “I’m going to a hotel watch party. so I’m pretty pumped.” From there, his attention will turn back to football. If Deer Creek beats Ada, the Antlers will finish third and play at Ardmore in the first round. If the Antlers lose, Deer Creek will be at Lawton MacArthur.

PIRATES’ FUTURE OUT OF THEIR HANDS

Expectations will be high next year DALLAS — For the last eight months, the Texas Rangers have taken us on a memorable, exhilarating ride that culminated in their first appearance in the World Series. Hope you enjoyed every moment of the Rangers’ ride because it’ll never be like this again. The cute little Rangers, who provide an annual diversion between the end of football season and the start of training camp, are no more. Not after playing in the Fall Classic and making claws and antlers part of our everyday vocabulary. But the flip side of Texas’ first playoff series win and their first American League pennant is that higher expectations will now accompany the Rangers into Surprise, Ariz., when pitchers and catchers report in a few months. The club has new ownership, which means it will have a budget commensurate with its market size. So we can scrap the excuses about the Rangers not having the cash to compete with the big boys. Now, they are one of the big boys. This team has talent and youth and a farm system

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

Next year, though, Ron Washington will have even more decisions questioned, if that’s possible. Every player Jon Daniels acquires who doesn’t work out, such as Jorge Cantu or Cristian Guzman, will be scrutinized more closely. Fans will expect a blockbuster trade similar to the Cliff Lee deal every season at the trade deadline — and that’s just not possible. They’ll just want a move made to get the team back to the World Series. Josh Hamilton won’t escape significant criticism during the next trip to the playoffs if he bombs in the ALDS or the World Series. We’ll expect C.J. Wilson and Colby Lewis to dominate on a regular basis, and the questions will

come fast and furious if they don’t. And if the Rangers are fortunate enough to sign Lee — somewhere around six years and $120 million might get it done — then fans won’t just be happy to see him delivering filthy pitches every fifth day. They’ll want him to lead them to a title. Anything else will be considered a failure. That’s not fair, but that’s life for a franchise with expectations, which is what the Rangers are really about to experience. As part of that, the Rangers must also deal with being the hunted instead of the hunter. It requires a different mindset. All you have to do is look at how the Dallas Cowboys crumble every time they enter a season with high expectations. The Rangers will get every other team’s best game because they are the AL champs and opponents will have a different respect for them. You think the Yankees won’t turn up the intensity next season against Texas? The Rangers surpassed all of our expectations this season. To do that again, they’ll have to win their first world championship. McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Putnam City knows any possible playoff future is a long shot, needing U.S. Grant to upset Edmond North on Thursday night for the Pirates to have a chance at the postseason. Having lost four of the last five games, the Pirates are hoping to close on a good note Friday night at Edmond Santa Fe. “We want to go out with a win,” said Caleb McFarland, who has been a key player on the Pirates’ offensive and defensive lines all season. “It’s definitely keeping us focused this week. “We know that barring some wonderful happening for us, this will be our last game. So we’ll just go out and play it to the best of our abilities and see where the cards fall.”

BETHEL CHASING HISTORY The Bethel football program only recently broke into the postseason. Now the Wildcats are looking for another playoff milestone. Bethel, in its first season under veteran coach Eddie Paul, has earned three playoff bids but has always been sent on the road. If Bethel can defeat Bristow Friday night, it would earn its first home playoff berth since the program began in 1987. A loss eliminates the possibility of a No. 2 seed, but opens up a wide variety of scenarios in which the Wildcats could finish third, fourth or out of the playoffs all together.

GUTHRIE’S ROBINSON AMONG FINALISTS Guthrie track star Emmanuel Robinson is one of the 20 Oklahoma finalists for the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award. Winners, one male and one female, will be announced Friday. As a junior, Robinson won the 100-meter dash and the 110 hurdles at the Class 5A state championships and made The Oklahoman’s Big All-City first team. Here are the 20 finalists: Deryk Ronk, Latta; Matthew Abbott, Anadarko; Danielle Koster, Bartlesville; Archie Bradley, Broken Arrow; Trey Lee, Broken Bow; Brandon Wrobbel, Cleveland; Taylor Stevenson, Commerce; Natalie Price, Edmond North; Elizabeth Schofield, Fort Gibson; Emmanuel Robinson, Guthrie; Taylor Woodall, Meeker; Ashley Bredy, Mountain View-Gotebo; Taylor Booth, Red Oak, Jerrad Richards, Ripley; Clinton Duncan, Bethel; Chase Chamberlain, Stratford; Brittany Beattie, Texhoma; Clayton Wilson, Lincoln Christian; Whitney Reece, Westville. BY ROBERT PRZYBYLO AND SCOTT WRIGHT


8B

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Q&A: FORMER OU GUARD AND CLIPPERS ROOKIE WILLIE WARREN

TONIGHT’S GAME

Warren calls NBA ‘great experience’ BY DARNELL MAYBERRY

Former Oklahoma guard Willie Warren made his NBA debut with the Los Angeles Clippers on Monday night, finishing with two steals and one assist against San Antonio. In a Q&A with The Oklahoman, Warren talked about the start of his professional career. Q: How did it feel to make your NBA debut Monday? A: “It felt good. It’s something I’ve been anticipating for a long time. I’ve just been waiting for my number to be called and it

say it’s been great. The (rookie transition program) was fun to me. A lot of players don’t like the RTP. They were telling us it’s going to be so long. But as somebody who’s coming in and been anticipating playing on this level for so long, I was really taking in as much information as I could.” Now that you’ve made it to this level, does it feel surreal? “Nah. The first preseason game, which I was hurt for, was in Portland. It was kind of crazy. But as the games keep coming, I’m adjusting more and more and more.”

Griffin faced a tough road to recovery. His days were filled with rehab: two hours of physical therapy before practice and weightlifting, ballhandling drills or free throws while his teammates practiced — anything to stay sharp and in shape. “I was constantly in the gym and I was constantly working out,” Griffin said. Griffin says he’s now 100 percent healthy. Almost defiantly, he calls his left knee his “good knee.” On it, Griffin carries 250 pounds of pent-up frustration. When asked the source of his motivation, Griffin, without hesitation, took aim at anyone who wants to label his team the same old Clippers. “Just help the team and try to prove everybody wrong,” Griffin said. “Everybody talks about the

Clippers as a franchise in a negative light, and I want to change that to a positive one.” Griffin noted how nine Clippers players are new. “We’re not a part of all that,” Griffin said. “We stepped into it, but to put on us what has happened the past however many years, I don’t think it’s fair to some of the newer guys. But I think we’re willing as a team to accept that challenge.” No one has ever questioned Griffin’s intensity or desire to win. But as an NBA rookie, it’s next to impossible for Griffin to take on a leadership role. “Just leading by example right now is all I try to do,” Griffin said. “As a guy that has four career games under his belt, I can’t really go out there and say much. But I can do a lot with my actions, how I work and how I prepare for games.”

Former OU teammate Willie Warren, who joined Griffin with the Clippers this season when L.A. selected him with the 54th pick, has seen firsthand how Griffin’s hardworking mentality has not wavered. “His middle name should be that four-letter word: H-A-R-D,” Warren said. “He only knows that way.” Warren was asked if Griffin is indeed back. “Oh, yeah,” he said. “I don’t know about fully, but he’s back enough to win Rookie of the Year.” Think about that. A not-yet-fully healed Griffin has expectations to run away with the Rookie of the Year award. That’s about how high the bar has been set for Griffin. “I don’t really think that’s too high for him,” Warren said. “I think high would be MVP.”

Griffin FROM PAGE 1B

impressive,” said Thunder coach Scott Brooks. “Every game he is getting better … He’s as strong and explosive as any big man in the league.” Because he missed the 2009-10 season, Griffin is classified as a rookie this year. But one of the few benefits to last year’s lost season, Griffin said, was getting a chance to learn the NBA game. “I feel a little bit more experienced just because I’m kind of used to it,” Griffin said. “Not necessarily playing, but seeing how the game is played up close and personal. That year that I sat out, I think, helped me be a little bit more prepared for this year.”

Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 100, Cleveland 88 Washington 116, Philadelphia 115, OT Boston 109, Detroit 86 Miami 129, Minnesota 97 Orlando at New York, ppd. Portland 90, Milwaukee 76 Memphis at L.A. Lakers Wednesday’s Games Detroit at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Charlotte at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Orlando, 6 p.m. Indiana at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.

Milwaukee at Boston, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 8 p.m. Toronto at Utah, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Results Chicago 110, Portland 98 Sacramento 111, Toronto 108 San Antonio 97, L.A. Clippers 88

Thornton, N.Young). Steals: 15 (Wall 9, Thornton 3, Blatche, Yi, N.Young). Technical Fouls: None.

Minnesota ...................... 27 26 17 27 — 97 Miami ............................. 33 36 29 31 — 129

NBA SCOREBOARD W

d-Atlanta ............. Miami .................. d-Boston.............. d-Chicago............. d-Indiana ............. New Jersey.......... Orlando................ New York ............. Toronto ................ Washington......... Cleveland............. Milwaukee........... Charlotte ............. Detroit ................. Philadelphia.........

4 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

W

d-L.A. Lakers ....... d-New Orleans .... d-Portland ........... Sacramento ......... Dallas................... Denver ................. Golden State ....... Memphis.............. Oklahoma City..... San Antonio ........ Phoenix................ Utah..................... Minnesota ........... Houston............... L.A. Clippers ........

3 3 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 0

L

0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 L

0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 4

Eastern Conference Pct

GB

1.000 .800 .750 .667 .667 .667 .500 .333 .333 .333 .250 .250 .000 .000 .000

— 1 ⁄2 1 1 1 ⁄2 1 1 ⁄2 11⁄2 2 21⁄2 1 2 ⁄2 21⁄2 3 3 31⁄2 4 4

Pct

GB

1.000 1.000 .800 .750 .667 .667 .667 .667 .667 .667 .333 .333 .250 .000 .000

— — — 1 ⁄2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 21⁄2 3 31⁄2

Game was postponed be›cause of safety concerns after

debris fell into the arena during overnight cleaning of asbestos-related materials. No makeup date has been announced.

HAWKS 100, CAVALIERS 88 MaWlms Smith ..... Horford... Bibby ...... Johnsn.... JCrwfrd .. Pachlia.... Powell .... Teague.... Collins ....

FG FT Min M-A M-A

35:47 35:18 30:49 27:53 42:11 21:36 15:34 12:42 16:36 1:34

8-12 3-11 7-13 6-10 6-21 4-7 1-1 2-4 0-5 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

5-6 1-4 2 0-2 3-11 4 2-2 6-12 4 2-5 0-0 1 2-2 2-6 9 6-6 1-2 2 1-3 0-2 0 1-2 0-4 2 2-2 1-2 2 0-0 0-0 0

2 3 3 2 0 1 3 1 2 0

22 6 16 15 15 16 3 5 2 0

Totals ..... 240:00 37-84 21-30 14-43 26 17 100

Percentages: FG .440, FT .700. 3-Point Goals: 5-17, .294 (Ja.Crawford 2-2, Ma.Williams 1-3, Bibby 1-4, Johnson 1-6, Smith 0-1, Teague 0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 7 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Smith 5, Johnson, Teague). Turnovers: 7 (Johnson 2, Ma.Williams 2, Ja.Crawford, Pachulia, Teague). Steals: 7 (Smith 2, Teague 2, Horford, Johnson, Ma.Williams). Technical Fouls: Bench, 5:19 fourth. CLEVELAND Moon..... Hickson . Varejao.. Sessins . Parker ... Gibson... JWillims MWiims Hollins... Powe .....

Min

FG FT M-A M-A

Reb O-T A PF PTS

33:50 3-5 0-0 1-7 2 32:28 11-17 9-11 2-5 0 34:09 1-6 0-0 2-12 3 21:44 2-9 3-4 2-3 3 32:14 4-10 0-0 1-3 2 24:08 3-10 0-1 0-7 2 15:20 2-2 0-0 0-1 0 24:27 4-12 2-2 1-2 2 13:51 2-2 4-4 1-1 1 7:49 0-1 1-4 0-3 0

3 0 3 1 2 5 1 3 4 0

Totals.... 240:00 32-74 19-26 10-44 15 22

6 31 2 7 10 6 5 12 8 1 88

Percentages: FG .432, FT .731. 3-Point Goals: 5-17, .294 (Parker 2-3, M. Williams 2-6, J.Williams 1-1, Moon 0-2, Gibson 0-5). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 14 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Moon 2, Powe, M. Williams). Turnovers: 14 (Hickson 5, Gibson 2, Sessions 2, Varejao 2, Hollins, J.Williams, M. Williams). Steals: 2 (Gibson, Hickson). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 0:05 first; Varejao, 4:58 second. Atlanta ........................... 40 19 15 26 — 100 Cleveland ........................ 27 20 26 15 — 88 A—20,562 (20,562). T—2:16. Officials—Marc Davis, David Guthrie, Josh Tiven.

CELTICS 109, PISTONS 86

BOSTON

Pierce..... Garnett .. JO’Neal .. Rondo .... Allen ...... Davis...... Robinsn.. Erden ..... Daniels... Wafer..... Harngdy .

FG FT Min M-A M-A

32:15 8-13 32:35 9-12 21:12 5-8 35:32 3-7 33:43 6-14 23:43 3-7 16:00 1-6 15:25 1-1 15:45 3-7 10:45 1-4 3:05 2-2

2-2 4-4 2-2 2-2 2-2 4-4 0-0 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-5 3 0-6 2 1-2 0 0-3 17 3-4 3 2-5 1 1-1 3 1-3 1 2-5 0 0-2 3 0-0 0

1 1 3 1 2 1 3 3 2 1 1

21 22 12 9 16 10 2 2 9 2 4

Totals..... 240:00 42-81 18-18 10-36 33 19 109

L10

3-0 3-0 4-1 3-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 1-2 1-2 1-3 0-3 0-4

Str

W-4 W-4 W-2 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-2 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 L-3 L-4 L-4

Western Conference

Tuesday’s Games ORLANDO AT NEW YORK, PPD.

ATLANTA

L10

4-0 4-1 3-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 1-1 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-3 1-3 0-3 0-4 0-4

Str

W-3 W-3 W-1 W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-2 L-3 L-4

Home

1-0 2-0 2-0 2-0 1-0 2-1 1-0 0-1 1-1 1-0 1-2 1-1 0-1 0-2 0-2

Home

2-0 2-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 1-0 2-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 0-1 0-1 1-1 0-1 0-3

Away

Conf

3-0 2-1 1-1 0-1 1-1 0-0 0-1 1-1 0-1 0-2 0-1 0-2 0-2 0-2 0-2

3-0 3-1 3-1 1-0 2-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 1-1 1-2 1-2 1-0 0-2 0-3 0-4

Away

Conf

1-0 1-0 3-1 2-1 1-0 1-1 0-1 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1 1-1 0-2 0-2 0-1

3-0 2-0 2-0 1-0 1-1 2-1 2-1 2-0 0-1 1-1 1-2 1-2 0-2 0-3 0-4

Percentages: FG .519, FT 1.000. 3-Point Goals: 7-21, .333 (Pierce 3-7, Allen 2-7, Daniels 1-1, Rondo 1-1, Wafer 0-2, Robinson 0-3). Team Rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 8 (7 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Erden 2, Garnett 2, J.O’Neal 2, Pierce). Turnovers: 8 (J.O’Neal 3, Davis 2, Allen, Erden, Pierce). Steals: 10 (Rondo 4, Daniels 3, Allen, Garnett, Wafer). Technical Fouls: Davis, 2:32 first; Garnett, 1:39 fourth. DETROIT Prince ..... Daye ....... Wallace .. Stuckey .. Gordon ... Villaneva McGrdy... Maxiell ... Summrs . Monroe...

FG FT Min M-A M-A

32:22 26:33 21:16 39:21 32:49 33:27 7:55 14:16 13:45 18:16

4-8 7-14 2-3 6-15 6-10 7-13 0-1 0-2 3-6 0-6

Reb O-T A PF PTS

2-2 0-1 1-2 1-5 2-2 4-8 3-3 0-1 2-3 0-2 2-2 2-7 0-0 0-0 1-4 1-2 1-2 0-2 0-0 3-10

1 0 1 3 4 0 1 1 0 2

0 5 2 1 6 1 0 1 1 2

Totals ..... 240:00 35-78 14-20 11-38 13 19

10 16 6 15 14 17 0 1 7 0 86

Percentages: FG .449, FT .700. 3-Point Goals: 2-9, .222 (Villanueva 1-3, Daye 1-4, Gordon 0-2). Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 17 (23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Villanueva 2). Turnovers: 17 (Stuckey 3, Daye 2, Gordon 2, Maxiell 2, Prince 2, Summers 2, Villanueva 2, Monroe, Wallace). Steals: 2 (Maxiell, Stuckey). Technical Fouls: Villanueva, 1:39 fourth. Boston ............................ 31 26 31 21 — 109 Detroit ............................ 26 18 24 18 — 86 A—15,313 (22,076). T—2:13. Officials—Bob Delaney, Violet Palmer, Derrick Collins.

WIZARDS 116, 76ERS 115, OT

PHILADELPHIA Nocioni ... Brand...... Hawes .... Holiday ... Iguodla ... TYoung ... Willims... Turner..... Battie ..... Speights. Kapono ...

FG Min M-A

16:18 42:26 16:01 40:57 38:18 17:52 31:59 27:51 8:39 17:14 7:23

FT Reb M-A O-T A PF PTS

1-5 0-0 1-3 2 9-11 3-4 4-9 3 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 6-11 2-2 1-3 13 5-13 1-3 0-3 9 4-4 0-0 0-1 1 6-16 15-17 0-1 3 4-7 1-2 0-6 1 2-2 0-0 1-3 0 3-5 0-0 0-4 0 2-3 1-1 0-1 0

1 6 3 4 2 4 2 3 0 5 0

Totals ..... 264:58 44-80 23-29 7-35 34 30

2 21 4 14 12 8 30 9 4 6 5

115

Percentages: FG .550, FT .793. 3-Point Goals: 4-15, .267 (Williams 3-7, Iguodala 1-3, Nocioni 0-2, Holiday 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 23 (34 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Brand, Hawes, T.Young). Turnovers: 22 (Holiday 6, Iguodala 4, Brand 3, Turner 3, Hawes 2, Nocioni, Speights, Williams, T.Young). Steals: 10 (Brand 4, Iguodala 2, Battie, Holiday, Turner, T.Young). Technical Fouls: Nocioni, 4:13 third. WASHINGTON Thorntn .. Blatche... McGee .... Wall........ Hinrich.... Armstrg . NYoung... Martin .... Yi ............ Booker....

FG Min M-A

40:03 43:12 21:49 44:48 42:14 20:35 23:17 8:58 19:59 0:06

FT Reb M-A O-T A PF PTS

5-12 2-2 2-6 1 5-17 13-14 3-8 1 1-3 1-3 1-6 0 9-16 11-14 0-2 13 3-5 1-1 0-4 9 2-3 2-2 1-3 0 7-11 3-3 0-2 0 2-3 0-0 0-1 0 3-8 3-4 2-4 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0

3 2 2 5 4 4 2 0 1 1

Totals ..... 265:01 37-78 36-43 9-36 24 24

12 23 3 29 8 6 20 6 9 0

116

Percentages: FG .474, FT .837. 3-Point Goals: 6-12, .500 (N.Young 3-5, Martin 2-2, Hinrich 1-2, Yi 0-1, Thornton 0-1, Wall 0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 23 (24 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Armstrong, McGee). Turnovers: 21 (Wall 8, Blatche 6, Yi 2, Armstrong, Hinrich, McGee,

Philadelphia ............. 28 20 18 40 9 — 115 Washington ............. 27 23 22 34 10 — 116 A—17,803 (20,173). T—2:51. Officials—Bill Kennedy, Bennie Adams, Nick Buchert.

HEAT 129, TIMBERWOLVES 97

MINNESOTA Beasley .. Love........ Milicic..... Ridnour .. Ellingtn .. Telfair..... Brewer ... Tolliver ... Johnsn.... Koufos.... Pekovic... Hayward.

FG FT Min M-A M-A

10:35 4-9 25:39 7-11 16:17 0-5 17:39 1-7 32:09 2-8 24:25 5-7 25:35 1-8 16:29 1-3 24:29 4-12 10:40 1-1 27:12 4-10 8:51 1-3

2-2 5-5 0-0 0-0 2-6 3-4 3-4 2-2 4-6 0-1 4-4 4-4

Reb O-T A PF PTS

1-2 3-6 1-4 0-1 0-3 0-1 0-3 0-5 2-3 1-3 4-8 1-1

0 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 5 0 0 0

1 1 2 3 2 4 1 4 0 2 2 1

Totals ..... 240:00 31-84 29-38 13-40 14 23

11 20 0 3 7 13 5 4 13 2 12 7 97

Percentages: FG .369, FT .763. 3-Point Goals: 6-18, .333 (Beasley 1-1, Love 1-2, Ellington 1-3, Hayward 1-3, Johnson 1-3, Ridnour 1-3, Telfair 0-1, Brewer 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 18 (24 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Koufos, Love). Turnovers: 18 (Ellington 4, Johnson 4, Pekovic 3, Beasley 2, Brewer, Love, Milicic, Telfair, Tolliver). Steals: 10 (Brewer 2, Johnson 2, Ridnour 2, Milicic, Pekovic, Telfair, Tolliver). Technical Fouls: None. MIAMI James.... Bosh ...... Antony .. Arroyo ... Wade ..... Haslem .. House .... Ilgasks... Jones ..... Calmrs ... Stckhse . Howard..

Min

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

32:26 7-12 26:20 4-12 20:25 1-1 23:54 2-3 24:27 12-17 23:59 5-6 17:08 4-5 19:20 3-6 22:26 6-10 17:43 2-4 5:56 0-2 5:56 0-1

6-8 0-0 12 5-6 1-6 2 2-2 0-5 0 3-3 1-6 3 2-2 1-2 1 1-2 1-10 1 3-4 0-2 1 0-0 2-6 2 0-0 1-6 1 2-2 0-2 8 1-2 1-1 0 0-0 0-1 0

0 2 2 1 5 4 3 4 4 1 0 1

20 13 4 8 26 11 15 6 17 8 1 0

Totals .... 240:00 46-79 25-31 8-47 31 27 129

Percentages: FG .582, FT .806. 3-Point Goals: 12-21, .571 (Jones 5-9, House 4-4, Chalmers 2-4, Arroyo 1-2, James 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 16 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Ilgauskas 2, Anthony, Bosh, Haslem, James, Stackhouse). Turnovers: 14 (Wade 3, Bosh 2, Chalmers 2, House 2, Arroyo, Haslem, Ilgauskas, James, Stackhouse). Steals: 9 (Bosh 2, House 2, James 2, Anthony, Chalmers, Howard). Technical Fouls: None.

Staples Center over the past two seasons. The Clippers rank last in scoring at 87.5 points per game and have been outscored by an average of 13.3 points in their first four games.

› 9:30 p.m. › What are the coach- ›› When: Where: Staples Center, es asking of you? Los Angeles “Just play my role, and TV: Fox Sports Oklahoma that’s being able to guard › (Cox 37, HD Ch. 722). (point guards) and (shoot- › Radio: WWLS 98.1-FM, Projected starters ing guards). Be a passer. A WWLS 640-AM.

finally came.” What’s it like to be on a team with so many talented guards in the backcourt? “It’s frustrating at times, but it’s also good because you can learn from ... guys like Baron (Davis) and Eric (Gordon). I think that’s what made me feel so comfortable (Monday) on the court. In the first three games, I was able to watch them and watch how they handled certain situations.” What’s been the best part of the NBA so far? “Everything about the NBA has been a great experience. So you can’t really just take one thing and

Staff Writer dmayberry@opubco.com

THUNDER AT CLIPPERS

consistent shooter. A great teammate.” Do you feel that you’re adjusting well at the next level? “Yeah. I’ve physically adjusted to that. My first preseason game, I got in and I wasn’t used to the pace. I got in the game and I looked like a deer with the headlights on. The (debut), I was a lot calmer and settled down. I wasn’t just running all over the place. I was trying to run the team.”

A—19,600 (19,600). T—2:23. Officials—Mike Callahan, Karl Lane, Sean Wright.

BLAZERS 90, BUCKS 76

PORTLAND Batum ..... Aldridge .. Camby ..... Miller....... Roy .......... Matthws . Johnsn..... Oberto..... Cninghm.. Fernndz ...

FG FT Min M-A M-A

13:45 43:48 20:05 27:34 37:35 27:53 21:56 3:55 28:12 15:18

1-5 6-14 1-3 5-10 7-17 7-15 4-4 0-0 6-8 1-4

Totals ...... 240:01 38-80

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-0 0-3 0 1-3 3-8 2 0-0 3-13 0 2-2 0-0 5 2-2 0-0 2 2-2 1-5 4 0-0 1-2 5 0-0 0-1 0 0-0 2-6 1 0-0 0-1 2

3 4 3 3 3 4 0 0 3 1

2 14 2 12 17 18 10 0 12 3

7-9 10-39 21 24

90

Percentages: FG .475, FT .778. 3-Point Goals: 7-24, .292 (Johnson 2-2, Matthews 2-8, Aldridge 1-1, Fernandez 1-4, Roy 1-5, Miller 0-1, Batum 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 13 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Aldridge 5, Camby, Cunningham, Roy). Turnovers: 12 (Matthews 3, Roy 3, Aldridge 2, Miller 2, Batum, Johnson). Steals: 10 (Roy 5, Aldridge 4, Fernandez). Technical Fouls: Miller, 7:03 third. MILWAUKEE Delfino ... Gooden ... Bogut ..... Jennings. Salmons . Ma Mute Mggtte ... Brckmn... Ilyasva.... Dooling... Sanders.. Boykins ..

FG FT Min M-A M-A

36:03 5-8 25:41 1-5 29:48 5-10 35:54 2-7 27:54 2-14 15:59 3-4 17:06 4-12 11:34 2-4 13:13 1-2 13:33 1-2 6:38 1-3 6:38 0-1

1-2 3-4 2-4 4-5 1-2 0-0 8-8 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-5 1-6 4-9 1-4 1-4 0-1 1-3 2-3 0-4 0-0 1-1 0-0

2 2 1 7 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1

0 2 3 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 0

Totals ..... 240:01 27-72 19-25 11-40 16 11

14 5 12 8 5 6 16 4 2 2 2 0 76

Percentages: FG .375, FT .760. 3-Point Goals: 3-15, .200 (Delfino 3-5, Ilyasova 0-1, Maggette 0-1, Jennings 0-4, Salmons 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 17 (21 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Bogut 2, Ilyasova, Mbah a Moute). Turnovers: 17 (Jennings 6, Mbah a Moute 3, Maggette 2, Bogut, Delfino, Dooling, Gooden, Salmons, Sanders). Steals: 4 (Delfino 2, Bogut, Mbah a Moute). Technical Fouls: None. Portland ............................ 21 26 26 17 — 90 Milwaukee........................ 27 18 17 14 — 76 A—13,087 (18,717). T—2:07. Officials—Steve Javie, Leroy Richardson, Brent Barnaky.

Three things to know Clippers point guard Baron Davis did not play Monday against San Antonio because of a swollen left knee but could return to the starting lineup tonight. Oklahoma City is 3-1 against the Clippers inside

› ›

Thunder (2-1)

Pos. Player G Russell Westbrook G Thabo Sefolosha F Kevin Durant F Jeff Green C Nenad Krstic

Ht. 6-3 6-7 6-9 6-9 7-0

Pts. Reb. 22.3 6.7 3.7 5.3 29.3 6.3 19.7 6.0 5.3 4.0

Ast 7.3 2.0 1.7 0.3 0.3

Clippers (0-4) G G F F C

Eric Bledsoe Eric Gordon Ryan Gomes Blake Griffin Chris Kaman

6-1 4.0 6-3 18.3 6-7 7.5 6-10 16.8 7-0 13.0

2.0 2.8 3.5 10.3 9.8

1.5 4.8 1.8 2.0 1.5

THUNDER NOTEBOOK

A simple solution Thunder coach Scott Brooks said there’s nothing complex in his team correcting its defensive problems. “It’s about as simple as it gets. You have to stop the ball,” Brooks said Tuesday before the team left for Los Angeles for tonight’s 9:30 game against the Clippers. All-Star small forward Kevin Durant agreed. “Just help,” Durant said. “It’s all about helping each other out, man, and giving a second effort.” The Thunder is without defensive standout Nick Collison, a power forward who is still on the mend from a lower left leg stress reaction. “Nick is one of our better defensive players but, nah, that’s not the reason,” Brooks said. “We’ve had too many breakdowns where we’re not real focused stopping our man. That’s unacceptable. The good thing about it is we’re getting some steals out of it (second in the league at 11.3 per game), but we might be getting too courageous on our steal attempts.” Collison, second in the league last year in charges taken, remains out indefinitely.

ALL ABOUT US The Thunder has played nothing but winless teams so far this season in Chicago (0-0), Detroit (0-1), Utah (0-2) and tonight in the Clippers (0-4). Durant said he is more concerned about what the Thunder is doing rather than the opponent. “We’ve got to worry about ourselves,” Durant said. “That Utah game, our energy wasn’t there at all. I know if we bring our energy, we can play with a lot of teams in this league. If we’re not making shots, our energy is going to pick us up and give us that defensive push.”

OFF THE MARK The Thunder and Clippers are tied for last in the NBA in field-goal percentage at .399, while the Thunder ranks last in 3-point percentage at .208. “As you’re coaching throughout the game, you feel either good or bad with the offense. I felt good, but I wasn’t sure until I watched the film (against Utah),” Brooks said. “We had a lot of open looks where we just missed shots. Guys were making the right plays, we were just missing shots. “Every player, every team will go through sections of the season where you’re not playing well or not shooting the ball well. I tell our guys to keep looking for each other. We’re not turning the ball over (first in the league at 12.7 turnovers), which is good. We just have to step up and shoot it with confidence.” Durant said it’s important to not allow poor shooting to have a negative effect elsewhere. “One thing we can’t do is let it affect our defense, and it’s done that a little bit,” Durant said. “We’ve got to go back to helping each other out a little bit more and playing harder. I’m the captain of the team, so it starts with me.”

MORE WESTBROOK Guard Russell Westbrook is shooting 46.3 percent from the field and is the only starter shooting better than 38.8 percent from the floor. Durant agreed Westbrook has to get more involved on the offensive end. “It’s tough to know as a point guard when to go score and when to pass. He’s figuring that out,” Durant said. “With me, I’ve got to pull him to the side and say, ‘Russ, you’ve got to be aggressive. You’ve got to go score.’”

ALL RIGHT, ALDRICH Cole Aldrich’s first NBA basket came on a one-handed, follow-up dunk off a missed James Harden jumper. Asked if he knew Aldrich could get up that high, Durant smiled and said, “No, I didn’t. He’s got skinny legs. He jumped pretty high for that one. I was very excited for him. Hopefully he gets more time on the floor with us. “I think his defense is great and crashing the boards, he’s unbelievable.”

BLAKE GRIFFIN FAN Durant said he had a chance to sneak a peek this season at Clippers rookie and former Oklahoma standout Blake Griffin, who missed last season with a fractured kneecap. “I’m a big Blake Griffin fan,” Durant said. “He’s doing an unbelievable job in the league so far. As a fan of the game, it’s good to see him out there on the floor. Any player sitting out of any game is tough. I can’t imagine sitting out a whole year for a guy who loves the game of basketball. I’m happy to see him back on the floor. He just gives that team a whole new look, a spark. He brings a lot of energy once he’s on the floor.” BY JOHN ROHDE


DOWNTOWN

NATION

MidTown looking up

Ready to Kinect

The revival of MidTown is continuing with fringe areas once dotted with flophouses now turning into offices and upscale apartments.

Microsoft Corp. is facing hurdles as it begins selling the long-awaited Kinect game-control system.

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STATE

BUSINESS

FRENCH FLAVOR

C THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

MAJOR INVESTMENT INDEXES REFLECT INCREASES THAT PUT DOW AVERAGE NEAR HIGH FOR THIS YEAR

Stocks rise on Election Day BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Major stock indexes rose Tuesday as investors awaited the results of congressional elections, putting the Dow Jones industrial average near its highest point of the year. The Dow Jones industrial average rose more

than 60 points. The Dow has now traded above its 2010 closing high of 11,205 four times over the past two weeks but failed to close above that level each time. Small companies performed especially well. The Russell 2000, the index that tracks the performance of smaller cor-

porations, jumped 2 percent to 712.89. The index is up nearly 14 percent for the year, roughly double the return of the Dow and the broad Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Uncertainty over the effects of the midterm elections and the size of the Federal Reserve’s expected stimulus program due to-

day have kept the market from ending with either big gains or losses in recent days. Analysts say companies have avoided hiring new workers because of questions surrounding taxes and costs associated with health care and financial regulatory overhauls. Election results could pro-

vide some more clarity about those issues. High unemployment remains one of the biggest obstacles to a strong recovery. The government said last week that the gross domestic product, the broadest measure of the nation’s economy, SEE VOTE, BACK PAGE

Housing units get boost in efficiency

Help for tenants OG&E launched its weatherization program for low-income customers last year. It added fixedincome customers to the program this year. The partnership with the Oklahoma City Housing Authority marks the first time the company has weatherized multifamily residences. “Many of our residents don’t have the means to make their apartments more energy efficient, and we have limited resources as well,” said Mark Gillette, the authority’s assistant executive director of planning and development. “The services OG&E provides will help our tenants stay more comfortable and also help them save on their energy bills.” The housing authority recently installed geotherSEE HOUSING, BACK PAGE

TO LEARN MORE OG&E offers lowincome and fixedincome weatherization to qualified customers in its service territory. For more information, go to www.oge.com or call (800) 2729741.

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TECHNOLOGY

ORACLE VS. SAP A battle between two of the world’s biggest makers of business software hinges on the value of a trove of millions of stolen customersupport documents. BACK PAGE

IN BRIEF

MARKETS Coverage, 5C X DOW JONES 64.10, 11,188.72 X NASDAQ 28.68, 2,533.52 X OIL $0.95, $83.90 X NATURAL GAS $0.038, $3.870 X CATTLE $0.75, $98.25 X WHEAT $0.01, $8.021⁄2

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Two Oklahoma City apartment complexes for low- and fixed-income families are becoming more energy efficient. Oklahoma City Housing Authority developments Ambassador Courts and Reding Senior Center are receiving free weatherization services as part of an Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. program. Services include caulking and weather stripping, attic insulation and installation of more energy-efficient refrigerators. OG&E contractor Skyline Energy Solutions will begin weatherization today at Reding Senior Center, 1000 SW 38. Crews are expected to complete about 20 apartments a day. The company recently completed weatherization of 196 apartments at Ambassador Courts, 800 SE 15.

Chef Robert Black with A Good Egg Dining Group and Paul Schatte with Head Country Barbecue attended a trade show in Paris.

A file photo shows a portion of Bricktown along the canal in Oklahoma City. Forbes magazine has named the city the most affordable in the country. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

FORBES SAYS OKLAHOMA CITY IS NATION’S MOST AFFORDABLE BY SUSAN SIMPSON Business Writer ssimpson@opubco.com

At the height of the Great Recession, Forbes.com said Oklahoma City was the most recession-proof city in the country. Two and a half years later, the magazine has given the city another top ranking. Noting low costs of living and good jobs, Forbes named Oklahoma City as America’s Most Affordable City. The magazine also noted Oklahoma City’s friendly residents and an unemployment rate well below the national average, 6.3 percent compared to 9.5 percent. “We searched for cities that had a balance of cheap living and economic prosperity — places with solid job markets, but where costs aren’t prohibitive,” magazine editors said. “In these cities, costs have stayed down, but residents have held onto steady incomes and decent jobs, making them a true bargain.” Forbes looked at all metropolitan statistical areas with populations of at least 100,000. They were ranked on the cost of a basket of goods and services, including groceries, health care and transportation, as of the second quarter of 2010. The magazine also mea-

Runners are a blur with the downtown Oklahoma City skyline in the background during the 2010 Susan G. Komen Central Oklahoma Race for the Cure on Oct. 19. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

sured the monthly cost of housing as a percentage of household income. The average sale price of an Oklahoma City-area home in September was $158,755, up 6.7 percent from September 2009, and the median price was $135,000, up 4.8 percent, according to the Oklahoma City Metro Association of Realtors. The next four spots on the Forbes list went to Pittsburgh; Buffalo, N.Y.; Rochester, N.Y.; and Nashville, Tenn. The top 10 also includes three Texas cities: San Antonio, Houston and Austin, along with Louisville, Ky., and Birmingham, Ala. “State capitals and university towns have vibran-

cy because of their job base, the stability of jobs and cultural diversification,” said James Gaines, a research economist at the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University.

Continuing praise The ranking was the latest in a string of kudos for Oklahoma City. In October, Oklahoma City was named a Top 25 Performing City by the Milken Institute, No. 7 Best City for Income Growth by Portfolio.com, a Top 5 Fastest Growing City by Forbes and a Top 10 State for Doing Business by Area Development Magazine. “In times like these, value is key to everything we do as a chamber,” said Roy

Williams, president and CEO of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber. “From attracting new business, retaining and fostering growth with our current companies to attracting conventions and visitors, the number one factor on everyone’s mind is value. Affordability isn’t always about being the cheapest, it is also about the quality you get for your dollar.” The Boeing Co. recently announced plans to move 550 high-paying engineering jobs here. The company cited low costs of living and doing business and economic development incentives in the decision to move the jobs from Long Beach, Calif.

Google TV is demonstrated May 20 at the Google conference in San Francisco. AP PHOTO

GOOGLE TV DISPUTES FEES Google TV’s lead product manager says any attempt by broadcasters to seek payment for allowing their websites’ content to be viewed through its Web-connected TVs represents a “misunderstanding” of what Google TV is. Rishi Chandra said that asking Google Inc. to pay to access shows on websites is like asking Microsoft Corp. to pay every time Internet Explorer is used to access NBC.com. Broadcasters ABC, NBC and CBS have blocked full episodes of their shows from being accessed through Google TV’s Web browser since the product became available last month. Analysts said the move was intended to prevent people from canceling their TV subscriptions in order to watch the online versions for free. Chandra spoke on the sidelines of the Streaming Media West conference on Tuesday. FROM WIRE REPORTS

GAS PRICES AAA’s average for regular unleaded: Nation $2.800 Week ago $2.810 Month ago $2.711 Year ago $2.691 Record $4.114 (set) 7-17-08 Tuesday

State $2.640 $2.666 $2.622 $2.533 $3.955 7-18-08


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

YOUR BUSINESS DISTRICT REPORTS STRONG LEASING ACTIVITY, IMPROVEMENTS BY NEIGHBORS

DOWNTOWN UPDATE DEVON’S HOLIDAY RIVER PARADE TO FEATURE SANTA, FIREWORKS Fireworks displays and decorated boats will return to the Oklahoma River as the sixth annual Devon Energy Holiday River Parade kicks off at 6 p.m. Dec. 4. About 25 boats will be featured, including the three Devon Energy River Cruisers, followed by a special visit from Santa Claus and his reindeer. The parade has typically drawn 30,000 to the river. “It is hard to believe it has been over seven years since we officially opened the Oklahoma River with the first holiday parade,” said Ron Norick, Oklahoma City Riverfront Redevelopment Authority chairman and former Oklahoma City mayor. “It is amazing to see the development that has taken place on the river since then, not to mention the special events that have attracted thousands of people to our river.” Net proceeds from the parade will benefit the Oklahoma River Foundation, which was established in 2004 and has generated $450,000 for future improvements to the river parks. In addition to the title sponsor, Devon Energy Corp., presenting sponsors to date include BancFirst, Chesapeake Energy Corp., Chickasaw Nation, city of Oklahoma City and the Oklahoma City Riverfront Redevelopment Authority. Anyone can enter and compete in the boat parade. Boat entry forms are available online at www.okcparade.com or the River Parade office at 100 Park Avenue, Suite 700. For sponsorship or event information, contact event chairman Mike McAuliffe at 231-0912 or visit www.okcparade. com. STEVE LACKMEYER, BUSINESS WRITER

A group meets at 725 NW 11 in Oklahoma City. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

IN BRIEF

PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Revival of MidTown continues to spread BY STEVE LACKMEYER Business Writer slackmeyer@opubco.com

The revival of MidTown is going beyond its core at NW 10 and Walker and now is stretching out to its boundaries that once were dotted with flophouses and old abandoned duplexes. Chris Fleming, partner in MidTown Renaissance, reports “leasing is very strong” for 16 apartments the development group opened in three renovated buildings along Frances Avenue between NW 9 and NW 12. He sees improvements by neighbors where a law firm has cleaned up its block and a dialysis center is being built near St. Anthony Hospital. “This involves the commitment of the other area stakeholders, not just us,” Fleming said. “It’s getting very nice here — one person does one thing, and then the neighbor doesn’t want to be the ugly duckling on the block.” It’s this revival that drew Darcie Harris, president of EWF International, a group that provides peer counseling to female business owners. After leasing various locations in northwest Oklahoma City and meeting at Quail Creek Country Club, Harris bought a historic Craftsman home at 725 NW 11 to be the new home of EWF International. Harris said she bought the 1927 home, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, because of its history and age, and the growth and energy in MidTown.

A view of 725 NW 11 in Oklahoma City.

“I like older homes,” Harris said. “I’ve lived in three or four homes built between 1911 and 1939, and I like their charm and character. And this was configured exactly like I needed for my business.” So far, Harris said, her clients seem happy. “We facilitate peer advisory groups for female business owners,” Harris said. “Our mission is to help them grow their business. We have 10 to 12 women in each group, and they must be in noncompeting businesses. Confidentiality is the cornerstone. The women learn by bringing their specific business issues and getting feedback.”

With the former home spanning 3,000 square feet, Harris has extra space that she leases to a few tenants, including Metro Family Magazine, Directing Design Web development and attorney Stephanie Younge. Harris said she hopes that by holding meetings in MidTown, she’ll expose the neighborhood to more business owners who might otherwise have not been familiar with the area. “I love the sense of being part of a community,” said Harris, who hopes to get active with the MidTown Association. “I look forward to learning more and getting to know the other business owners in the neighborhood.”

BY STEVE LACKMEYER

SUAN’S INC.

› › › ›

Owner: Suan Grant. Employees: 1. Website: www. suansfoods.com. Address: P.O. Box 211, Oklahoma City, OK 73101.

“They flavor almost everything they eat with Scotch bonnet peppers, which is unique. It’s a very hot pepper — one of the hottest peppers there are. I tame the heat and yet keep the wonderful flavors of the Scotch bonnet pepper. It has a kick to it, but it doesn’t burn.” Family and friends repeatedly urged Grant to bottle and sell the jelly, but she was reluctant at first. “Giving it away is one thing; selling it is another,” Grant said. “And that’s where a lot of people fall short. They may have it loved by families and friends, but they have to find people to buy it.” Grant enrolled in a one-

The American Institute of Architects’ Central Oklahoma Chapter recently honored eight firms at the 2010 AIA Central Oklahoma Design Excellence Awards Program. Winners were chosen from 44 entries submitted by members of the chapter for projects around the world. Elliott + Associates Architects received an Honor Award for Pops in Arcadia. Merit Awards were given to Fitzsimmons Architects in the unbuilt category for the Kerr Family Homestead and Chickasaw Nation Pavilion; and Elliott + Associates Architects in historic preservation for the Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. Six Citation Awards were given to Selser Schaefer Architects in the unbuilt category for Visual Arts Center; Hornbeek Blatt Architects for 1007 N Broadway in the historic preservation/adaptive reuse category; Frankfurt-Short-Bruza won the urban design category for the Chickasha Downtown Master Plan; Chesapeake Car Park One by Elliott + Associates Architects was honored in the architecture category; Randy Floyd Architects was also honored in the architecture category for the state Capitol west entry addition; and TAPARCHITECTURE won in the interiors category for its Visual Image Advertising project in Oklahoma City. The Chair’s Commendation Award in the unbuilt category was issued to Studio Architecture for the Flatiron project. FROM STAFF REPORTS

IN STOCK

Jamaican-inspired pepper jelly is selling well At the recently opened Bricktown Red Dirt Marketplace, Suan Grant stands out as an entrepreneurial success story. In one year, Grant has taken a jelly recipe enjoyed by just friends and family and turned it into a business that has sold “several thousand” jars to date. “It’s one of the bestselling items we have in the marketplace,” said market co-owner Chad Huntington. “She has a real talent and grasp for marketing, and the product is outstanding if you try it. We see a tremendous amount of sales from her booth — especially when she comes down and does samples. Then her sales shoot through the roof.” Grant’s secret is a recipe she developed while living in Jamaica between 1974 and 1978. “It’s a Scotch Bonnet Pepper Jelly — it’s a Jamaican pepper in the family of the habanera,” Grant said.

Innovative infill will be discussed by a Real Estate Roulette panel from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. today, hosted by the Central Oklahoma Chapter of the Urban Land Institute. Panelists will be Marva Ellard, owner of the Sieber Hotel Apartments in MidTown; Richard McKown, lead partner for City Center Properties LLC who has cited a similar panel discussion last year as his inspiration for upcoming development of apartments in the Maywood neighborhood in Deep Deuce; and David Wanzer, a partner in the 308 Design Collaborative who helped conceive the redevelopment of the Film Row district along Sheridan Avenue west of the Myriad Gardens. The panel will meet at the MidTown Deli, 1215 N Walker Ave. Cost is $20 at the door, which includes beverages and appetizers. For more information, contact the Urban Land Institute at 607-6801.

EIGHT ARCHITECTURE FIRMS CITED IN DESIGN EXCELLENCE AWARDS

MADE IN OKLAHOMA: SUAN’S INC.

Business Writer slackmeyer@opubco.com

REAL ESTATE ROULETTE PANEL WILL DISCUSS INNOVATIVE INFILL

Suan Grant stands next to some of her Scotch Bonnet Pepper Jelly, a top seller at the Bricktown Red Dirt Marketplace. PHOTO BY STEVE LACKMEYER, THE OKLAHOMAN

day food entrepreneurial seminar at Oklahoma State University, where she was advised the product might have a market and learned how to get her business started. “They are very honest and frank with you,” Grant said. “They encourage you; they take you by the hand and lead you through the process.” Grant tested the market at the Reining Horse Futurity at State Fair Park a year ago and enjoyed a great re-

sponse. She then persuaded Crescent Market in Nichols Hills and Sterling Produce (south of downtown) to carry the jelly. Her next step was to open her own booth last spring at the Bricktown Red Dirt Marketplace, where she sells her jellies and pottery by her daughter, Robin. “Sales are going very well,” Grant said. “We have customers who come in and buy multiple jars or even cases of it.”

ARCHER DANIELS Archer Daniels Midland’s firstquarter net income dropped 31 percent, pressured by rising commodity prices and a shifting supply of crops. Profit slid despite very strong volume and revenue and company shares tumbled 7 percent in early trading. The corn and soybean processor, which also makes ethanol, posted net income of $345 million, or 54 cents per share. A year ago, net income was $496 million, or 77 cents per share. This quarter’s performance fell below the 75 cents per share

FINANCIAL COMPANY AFLAC AIG Allstate Citigroup First Cash Fin. Lincoln National Manulife Fin. Morgan Stanley PSEG Funding RiskMetrics Group Wells Fargo

CLOSING PRICE $56.40 $42.12 $30.31 $4.17 $29.25 $24.97 $12.51 $24.61 $32.87 $17.40 $25.97

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

+2.19% +21.29% +0.21% +37.96% -7.22% -0.16% -0.24% +24.11% +3.36% +30.87% -1.58% -1.38% -1.96% -33.32% +1.74% -19.84% -1.56% -0.81% 0.00% +8.75% +0.23% -3.89%

MANUFACTURING COMPANY Altria Colgate Palmolive Dow Chemical DuPont Ecolab General Electric Kimberly Clark PPG Ind. Whirlpool Corp.

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

$25.57 $78.05 $31.39 $47.42 $49.42 $15.94 $62.95 $77.64 $77.22

+1.47% +2.09% -0.35% +0.42% +0.26% -1.36% +0.54% +0.44% -8.64%

+29.34% -5.38% +11.31% +39.55% +9.75% +4.73% -2.08% +30.93% -5.11%

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

CLOSING PRICE $47.66 $17.44 $69.78

WEEK CHG. +9.74% +8.32% -2.13%

YTD CHG. +1.02% +52.85% +25.23%

Allegiant Air Arvin Meritor Boeing Burlington 0.00% +1.52% Northern Santa Fe $100.21 $87.03 -2.91% +3.35% FedEx $14.43 +0.49% +41.89% Ford Motor Co. $0.02 0.00% -90.00% Frontier Airlines $31.40 -0.22% +23.19% Harley Davidson $47.24 -0.08% +19.26% Honeywell $36.40 -1.01% +11.79% JB Hunt L-3 Vertex $73.12 +2.51% -16.81% Aerospace $71.64 -0.22% -5.58% Lockheed Martin Northstar $1.90 -2.56% +65.22% Aerospace -4.40% Spirit Aerosystems $19.13 -11.68% $70.23 -0.90% -17.13% Toyota US Airways $11.92 +1.62% +146.28% Group $0.59 0.00% +1866.67% Visteon $0.00 -100.00% -100.00% YRC Worldwide


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BUSINESS: NATION | WORLD

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

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STUDY REPORTS POST-RECESSION RETURN RATE FOR U.S.-BORN WORKERS IS SLOWER

BUSINESS BRIEFS NATION

HOMEOWNERSHIP IS AT DECADE LOW WASHINGTON — U.S. homeownership is at the lowest level in more than a decade, hampered by a rise in foreclosures and weak demand for housing. The Census Bureau says the percentage of households that owned their homes was unchanged at 66.9 percent in the July-September quarter. That’s the same as the April-June quarter. The last time the rate was lower was in 1999, when the rate was 66.7 percent. The nation’s homeownership rate was about 64 percent from 1985 through 1995. It then rose dramatically during the Clinton and Bush administrations, hitting a peak of more than 69 percent in 2004 at the height of the housing boom.

CLOROX REPORTS INCOME UP NEW YORK — Clorox Corp., maker of cleaning products, Hidden Valley Ranch salad dressing, and Kingsford charcoal, said Tuesday its first-quarter net income jumped 37.6 percent on a gain from the sale of its auto-care business. But revenue slipped because shoppers are still shying away from purchases. The company cut its outlook below estimates on the uncertain economy and the impact of its auto care sale. Shares fell sharply. Categories the company competes in, including cleaning products, homewares and personal care products, are weak throughout the industry. People are skimping on or delaying purchases and trading down to lower-priced products. CEO Don Knauss told investors softness has continued into the first weeks of the second quarter.

OBAMA NOTE FETCHES $7,000 MONROE, Mich. — A 28-year-old mother of two

from southern Michigan whose bleak prospects and resilient attitude prompted a handwritten note from President Barack Obama promising “things will keep getting better” has sold the memento for $7,000. Jennifer Cline of Monroe received Obama’s twosentence note in January after writing him a letter detailing her family’s situation. The former pharmacy technician has been unemployed since losing her job in 2007 and she suffers from skin cancer. An autograph collector bought the note.

ORACLE TO BUY ART TECHNOLOGY NEW YORK — Business software maker Oracle Corp. said Tuesday it has agreed to acquire Art Technology Group Inc., which helps businesses interact with online shoppers to boost sales, for $1 billion in cash. ATG, based in Cambridge, Mass., works with customers like AT&T, Best Buy and CVS to improve their websites and streamline online purchasing. The purchase price of $6 per share is a 46 percent premium over Art Technology’s closing price on Monday. The deal needs shareholder and regulatory approval. Oracle expects to complete the deal by early next year.

FORECLOSURE DOCUMENTS REVOKED WASHINGTON — Mortgage buyers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are revoking thousands of foreclosure cases from a Florida law firm under investigation for falsifying documents used to complete foreclosures. Both companies say they have started transferring those documents from the Law Offices of David Stern to other firms. The Stern firm has been under investigation by the Florida attorney general’s office. A former employee has said in testimony that an office manager would sign as many as 1,000 documents a day without reading them and without witnesses present. Jeffrey Tew, an attorney for Stern’s firm, declined to comment.

WORLD

BP REPORTS THIRD-QUARTER PROFIT LONDON — BP PLC returned to profit in the third quarter but said it doesn’t plan to rush back into the Gulf of Mexico as it raised the likely cost of the devastating oil spill there by $7.7 billion to $40 billion. The London-based company said increased costs from the disaster dragged down third-quarter net income by more than 60 percent compared to a year ago, to $1.79 billion from $5.3 billion. All the other major oil companies, except Chevron, have reported stronger third quarter profits thanks to higher oil and gas prices. Still, BP saw an increase of 18 percent in underlying replacement cost profit — a key industry benchmark which strips out changes in the value of fuel inventories — to $5.5 billion, above the $4.6 billion forecast by analysts.

BOEING FORECASTS CHINESE GROWTH BEIJING — Boeing Co. raised its 20-year forecast of China’s demand for commercial aircraft due to strong economic growth and more competitive Chinese carriers. Chinese airlines are expected to add 4,330 aircraft worth $480 billion by 2029, up from a forecast last year of 3,770 planes worth $400 billion, Chicago-based Boeing said Tuesday. Boeing, Europe’s Airbus Industrie and rivals from Russia, Brazil, Japan and Canada are looking to China to drive sales as U.S. and European growth slows. Beijing also is trying to create its own civilian jetliner industry.

MINE YIELDS 185-CARAT DIAMOND JOHANNESBURG — Miners in Lesotho say they have found a 185-carat white diamond. In a statement Tuesday, Gem Diamonds Ltd. and the Lesotho government say the diamond was found in late October in the Letseng mine. They say a 196-carat white diamond was found in the same mine in August. Gem Chief Executive Clifford Elphick says Letseng, which is co-owned by Gem and the Lesotho kingdom, has frequently yielded “remarkable diamonds.” Gem also has operations in Angola, Australia, Botswana, the Central African Republic, Dubai, Mauritius and Indonesia. Lesotho is surrounded by South Africa. FROM WIRE SERVICES

Immigrants finding jobs quicker BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Immigrants are returning to work quicker than their U.S.-born counterparts but are earning significantly less than before the economic downturn, a Pew Hispanic Center study has reported. Immigrants in the United States have gained 656,000 jobs since the Great Recession ended in June 2009. By comparison, U.S.-born workers lost 1.2 million jobs. The unemployment rate for immigrants fell over the same period to 8.7 percent from 9.3 percent. For

American-born workers, the jobless rate rose to 9.7 percent from 9.2 percent. Foreign-born workers “did better in the first year of the recovery, but not so much better that they have recovered the losses they suffered beforehand,” said Rakesh Kochhar, Pew Hispanic’s associate director for research. Immigrants — who make up 15.7 percent of the labor force — began losing their jobs about a year before U.S.-born workers, he said. The study said immigrant wages fell sharply in the past year and that Latinos experienced the larg-

est wage drop of any group. From 2009 to 2010, the median weekly earnings of foreign-born workers fell 4.5 percent compared to a loss of less than 1 percent for U.S.-born workers. In the second quarter of 2010, the median weekly earnings for U.S. workers was $653, compared to $525 for foreign-born workers, Pew said. Hispanic workers, U.S.born and immigrants, fared worst of all. They are the only group whose wages fell two years in a row, Kochhar said. Median weekly wages for all Hispanic workers fell to $480

in the second quarter from $504 two years earlier. The Pew Hispanic Center included all immigrants who arrived legally and illegally in the U.S., naturalized U.S. citizens and people born in Puerto Rico, who are U.S. citizens at birth. The center said the reasons immigrant unemployment is decreasing are unclear. But foreign-born workers are more mobile, they exit and enter the labor market more frequently and are less likely to get unemployment benefits — so they may have to find jobs sooner, even if the jobs they take are worse.

KINECT CONTROL AIMS TO PLEASE, BUT PRICE TAG COULD BE HURDLE BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Caryn Bailey, a 32year-old blogger and mother of two, is impressed with Microsoft’s new Kinect game-control system. But she already owns the Wii from rival Nintendo, and she’s not ready to shell out hundreds of dollars to switch. That’s the challenge Microsoft Corp. faces as it begins selling the long-awaited system on Thursday ahead of the lucrative holiday season. To succeed, Kinect will need to exude the kind of iPad-like magic that defies frugality and gets people spending to experience something new, even as they cut back elsewhere in the uncertain economy. By all accounts, Kinect is loads of fun. The black, rectangular device, used in conjunction with Microsoft’s Xbox 360 console, goes just below your TV screen and senses all the activity in the living room. Using a 3-D camera, depth sensors and voicerecognition software, it recognizes your face, voice and gestures as you move around and talk, without requiring you to hold a controller or wear a headset. Kinect removes the last barrier between you and the screen: the remote. With Kinect, your on-screen character faithfully mimics your movements. Kinect also determines where you are in the room and with whom, and it can register objects so you can scan in your skateboard and “ride” a digital version on screen. It’ll have you flailing your arms to steer on-screen cars using an invisible steering wheel. It’ll have you shaking your bum as you practice on-screen dance moves. It will even take a photo of you doing these things so you can post it on Facebook for everyone’s amusement. Both Kinect and Sony Corp.’s new Move controller build on the active, motion-guided gaming experience pioneered by Wii four years ago. Both are betting that Wii owners are ready to graduate to high-definition consoles and more precise controls.

Michael McKoy, 11, right, and Cameron White, 10, race while playing the Kinect for Xbox 360 as Brett Scherrman and his son, Steven, watch at a Charlotte, N.C., GameStop store. AP PHOTO

“The best thing is that you don’t have to sit on a couch. You get up and move,” said Bailey, who lives in Aliso Viejo, Calif., and tried the Kinect at several Microsoft-sponsored events. “There is a lot of interaction between you and the person you are playing with.” That said, you don’t really need one. And at $150 — that’s without an Xbox — it’s a pricey proposition in the current economic climate. Buy it with the console and throw in a few $50 games, and the price tag for fun can quickly rise to $400. Move, meanwhile, costs $100 for a camera, one controller and a game, or $400 for a PlayStation 3 bundled with a Move controller and camera. Extra controllers are $50 each. “If I didn’t have any gaming system, I’d choose the Xbox, without a doubt,” Bailey said. “But I’ve already invested so much in the Wii.” Bailey, who has a 10-month-old daughter and a 3½-year-old son, is precisely the type of customer Microsoft is going after with Kinect as it works to expand its reach beyond the “Halo” crowd by removing complex controllers from the experience.

High court hears case on violent video games BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday expressed sympathy for a California law that aims to keep children from buying ultraviolent video games in which players maim, kill or sexually assault virtual people in the games. But several justices said the law faces a high constitutional hurdle before going into effect. California officials argue they should be allowed to limit minors’ ability to pick up violent video games on their own at retailers because of the purported damage they cause. Violent video games are “especially harmful to minors,” said Zackery P. Morazzini, a California supervisory deputy attorney general who argued the case for the state. California’s 2005 law would prohibit anyone younger than 18 from buying or renting games that give players the option of “killing, maiming, dismembering, or sexually assaulting an image of a human being.” Parents would be able to buy the games for their

children. Retailers selling directly to minors would face fines. That means children would need an adult to get games such as “Postal 2,” the first-person shooter that features the ability to light unarmed bystanders on fire. It would also apply to the popular “Grand Theft Auto IV,” a thirdperson shoot-’em-up that allows gamers to portray gun-toting carjackers. Some Supreme Court justices wondered where the regulation would stop if they allowed California’s law to go forward. “What about films?” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg asked. “What about comic books?” Justice Antonin Scalia wondered if movies showing drinking and smoking might be next. “I am concerned with the First Amendment, which says Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech,” he said. The California law never took effect. Lower courts have said the law violates minors’ constitutional rights. The Supreme Court will make a decision sometime next year.

But unlike hard-core gamers, who can be counted on to open their wallets in good times and bad, people who play games more casually can be fickle. Microsoft, which launched the original Xbox in 2001, won’t disclose how much it is spending on convincing people that Kinect is a musthave item for the holidays. “It’s pretty unprecedented to see the type of retail support and marketing support and consumer enthusiasm we are seeing,” said Dennis Durkin, who runs day-to-day operations for Microsoft’s video game business. For Microsoft, however, games are an increasingly lucrative business. In its latest fiscal quarter, the division that makes the Xbox 360 grew revenue 27 percent to $1.9 billion. This was about 12 percent of Microsoft’s overall revenue, up from 10 percent in the same period a year earlier. In the holiday quarter, the hottest period for video games, Microsoft said it expects the division to increase revenue by 30 percent compared with a year ago, largely because of Kinect’s launch.


A GOOD EGG DINING GROUP,HEAD COUNTRY BARBECUE REPS ATTEND TRADE SHOW

tate com anies off Oklahoma flavor in Paris ¦

er

¦

¦

_4 l

FROM STAFF REPORTS

C

`{s ;

attracted buyers from around the world. Black and Schatte represented the only two Oklahoma companies

can they save on costs?

importer purchasing its products, but

Schatte attended hoping to drum u

p

customers. People

A: Before you re-enroll in the same medical plan ,

s

?s

there are excited to taste American barbecue , he said.

1 1 t Nu a l

Tr

"The outdoor cooking and barbecue

concept is still in its infancy stage in Europe , especially the Western taste of barbecue sauce;' Schatte said.

read the fine print to check for increases in Co payments, deductibles and maximum out-ofpocket costs. Take the time to understand your options. Recent studies show employees spend

, n ib

just under 1.5 hours reviewing their benefit plan

options , or about the same amount of time you might spend shopping for new jeans. Health plan benefits are worth investing your time to review. ' 1

At the show, importers from Greece , Finland, Saudi Arabia, Spain and Italy all showed an interest in Head Country products, he said.

Q: Do you have any advice for employees when

Paul Schatte, co-owner and general manager of Head Country Food Products Inc., left, with Robert Lundin , co-owner of BBQ Chili Co., a Swedish importing company, at the SIAL Trade Show in Paris.

reviewing medical plan options? A. Don 't just pick the medical plan option with the lowest premium cost. Look at how your family utilizes medical plan services and compare that to the premiums you will pay. Check to see if your current doctor any e ed hospital is in the plan's lan 's n etwork. ork If you u ta ke e prescription medicap

Tulsa-based Dollar Thrif ty reports its best quarterly erformance ever

tions,check to see if they are covered on your plan 's prescription formulary and at what reim bursement level.

p

TULSA -Dollar Thrifty Automotive Group Inc., the little engine that could in the U.S. rental car industry, continued to post industry-pacing earnings Tuesday, reporting third-

income of $30.09 million , or $129 per share, and the best quarterly financial performance in company history, company executives said. Dollar Thrifty 's third-quarter revenue was $443.5 million , up ipercent from the same quarter last year. Despite a less-than-robust travel market and distractions surrounding

discipline, company executives said. "One of the main things we have done is benchmark our operations against each other;" Dollar Thrift y President and CEO Scott Thompson said in a conference call with industry analysts. "We expect employees to implement cost savings ... as opposed to having outside people tell us

or $162 per share. The Tulsa company 's net income

posal of Hertz Global Holdings Inc. - which cost the company $11.9 mil-

As a result , third-quarter costs and expenses dropped 6 percent , to

quarter net income of $49.16 million , was a 63.4 percent increase com-

pared with 2009's third-quarter net

the failed $L46 billion merger pro-

lion in the third quarter - Dollar

Thrifty maintained its focus and cost

how to run our business?' $372.3

million,

compared

with

2009's third quarter.

seeks Southeast pipeline expansion FROM STAFF REPORTS

TULSA - Williams Partners LP has filed an application with federal regulators to expand its Transco natural gas pipeline serving the southeastern United States, the partnership announced Tuesday, Williams Partners said it wants to add capacity to

move an additional 225,000 dekatherms per day in two phases , subject to approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. "This filing is an important milestone in our efforts to meet our customers' growing needs for natural gas in the Southeast," said Phil Wright, president

of Williams' natural gas pipeline business. The $219 million expansion project will require construction of about 23 miles of new pipeline and a new 32,000 horsepower compressor facility in Alabama. It also will require upgrades to existing compressor facilities in Alabama , Georgia , South Car-

olina and North Carolina. Also Tuesday, Williams Partners announced it has priced a public offering of $600 million in senior notes. Proceeds are expected to be used to fund the acquisition of Williams' gathering and processing assets in the Piceance Basin of Colorado.

Arby's catering division expands to city area FROM STAFF REPORTS

the typical Arby's menu,

Arby 's can now cater to business meetings and other events after expanding its Market Fresh Catering to the Oklahoma City area. The catering division of Arby 's restaurants features food choices not on

Cher A. Bumps CABA Inc. employee benefit consultants

whose companies offer health care plans. How

Head Country already has a Swedish

don.stewart@tulsaworld.com

,

medical cost sharing through changes in plan designs in 201L Open enrollment is under way for many employees

that participated.

Tulsa World

Hewitt Associates reported that the combined p average premium and out-of-pocket costs for 2011 health care r coverage for an employee is projected to climb to $4,386 - a 12A percent increase,or $486, over 2010.The 2010 PriceMedical Cost Trends Report shows that 42 percent of employers plan to increase employee health insurance contributions and 41percent said they would increase

b'` J

21,

BY D.R.STEWART

T MEDICAL PLAN OPTIONS S TIME WELL-SPENT FOR EMPLOYEES

waterhouseCoopers annual

Chef Robert Black with A Good Egg Dining Group and Paul Schatte with Head Country Barbecue represented Oklahoma during a recent trade show in Paris. The SIAL Trade Show, held Oct. 17-

more European

Q & 4 WITH CHER BUMPS

such as pasta salad, sliced meat trays and freshbaked cookies. Other items include boxed lunches , sandwich platters and fruit turnovers. Arby's largest franchisee, United States Beef Corp. in Tulsa, announced Tuesday it will expand

Market Fresh Catering to

the metro area. "Oklahoma City is in for a real treat . Market Fresh Catering naturally puts an emphasis on convenience and value, but you'll also discover a level of personal service that is difficult to find with our competitors," said Kathy

Bondy, manager of the

Market Fresh Catering division. A ribbon cutting to mark the expansion is planned for 4 p.m. Monday at the Arby 's restaurant at 4041 Northwest Expressway. To order, call (866) 8472729 or go to www.arbys catering.com.

Q.What Health Care Reform (HCR) changes will affect my open enrollment? A: For open enrollments after Sept. 23, 2010,

health plans will remove lifetime limits, annual dollar limits on essential benefits, pre-existing condition clauses for children under age 19, and cost-sharing on preventive care, as well as allowing adult children to be covered up to age 26. Be sure to ask if your health plan is going to be a Grandfathered Plan , as this can limit the preventive care benefits and access by adult children to your health plan .

Q. If companies offer flexible spending accounts, should employees enroll? Absol u tely. contri bu ting pret ax money , y ou can save t he accounts th ts v iaa your p ay cheeck ss,,

approximately one-third on your out-of-pocket

medical costs, including co-pays, deductibles, eyeJan. Iyou irl r' and ore. need a dctor's presripti n for o er -the-co nt medications to be eligible for reimbursement, so keep this in mind x e ieg health related costs ffor or ne extt yyearr. Some So employees ees s are a reluctant to take advantage of this benefit because any funds left over at the end of year are lost. You can avoid that by conservatively projecting your expenses.

v

glass

PAULA BURKES, BUSINESS WRITER

OKLAHOMA CHEROKEES BUY MOBILITY COMPANY Cherokee Nation Businesses, the business arm of the Cherokee Nation, recently acquired Muskogeebased A supp lier of health care equip mentt and supplies,Mobility Plus has offices in Muskogee, Tahlequah,Claremore, Tulsa and McAlester. David Stewart , chief executive officer

of Cherokee Nation Business, said purchasing Mobility Plus allows the Cherokee Nation to enter the commercial side of the health care industry. -

ONEOK INC. TULSA - ONEOK Inc. announced Tuesday its earnings increased to $55.3 million , or 51cents a share. The company earned $48 million , or 45 cents a share, in the third quarter of last year. "All of our businesses are performing well,with our ONEOK

COMPLETION Coal: Centerpoint Energy Gas Trans Co . ; Double 5 Ranch No. 1-8 Well ; C NEI/4 SW1// SW1/,of 08-03N-1OE; 464,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 6,750. Nowata: Rc Oil Co. Inc.; Garrett RC No. 27 Well; SW44 SE'/4 NW'/4 SE'/4 of 01-26N-14E; 11 barrels oil per day, TD 1,250. RC Oil Company Inc.; Garrett RC No. 30 Well; SE'/4 SW1/4 NW1/4 SE'/. of 01-26N-14E; 12 barrels oil per day, TD 1,250. Pawnee : Special Energy Corp.; Flatbush No.1Well; E1/2 SW'/4 SE'/. NE'/4 of 14-21N-04E; 5 barrels oil per day, TD 3,150. Pottawatomie :C & F Oil & Gas Investments LLC; CF SWD No. 1 We ll;

E/z NE'/4 NW'/4 SW'/4 of

05-06N-05E; TD 7,255. Seminole:New Dominion LLC; Dearborn No. 1-27H We ll; NW1/4 NE'/4 NE1/4 SW'/4 (BHL) of

State

CASH WHEAT 5to6centslower. 5.98-6.58 Alva . . . . . . . . . 6.54 Banner.......6.48

Buffalo....... 6.54 Cherokee . . . . 6.56 Clinton....... 6.44 Davis ........5.98 El Dorado.. .. 6.53 El Reno ......6.48 Frederick..... 6.29 Geary . . . . . . . . 6.58 Hobart....... 6.49 Hooker....... 6.38 K e y e s . . . . . . . . 6.23 Lawton . . . . . . 6.28 Manchester . . .. 6.50 Medford . . . . . 6.58 Miami . . . . . . . . 6.50 Okarche .....6.58 Okeene...... 6.58 Perry ........6.58 Ponca C i t y. . . . 6.58 Shattuck- ....6.47 Stillwa t er . . .. 6.58 T e m p l e _ _ . . 6.31 Watonga . . ..6 .58 Weatherford ...6.44 Gulf . . . . . . . . . . 7,381/2 FEED GRAINS

MILD Alva . . . . . . . . 9.26 Buffalo...... 9.26 Hooker . . . . . . 9.05

K e y e s . .. .. .. 8.94

Manchester. 9-30 Medford .. .. 9.44 Mlam l........9.17 Ponca City... 9.44 Shattuck.... 9.30 Weatherford .. 9.03

GUIf. . . . . . .11.213/4

27-10N-06E; 80,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 9,560. INTENT TO DRILL Carter: Pruitt Operating Co. LLC; Bostick No.1 Well; NE'/4 SW'/4 NW'/. NE'/., of 14-05S-01E; TD 2,250. Spring Operating Co.; Cheryl No. 1-7 We ll; E1/2 W'/2 NE'/4 SE'/, of 07-03S-02W; TD 9,500. Comanche: Penn Virginia MC Operating Co. LLC; Jacobi No. 1-12H Well; SE'/4 SEl/4 NEi/4 NEI/4 (SL) of 12-03N-09W; TD 15,257. Grant : Legacy - M & K Corp.; Amend No.1 Well; C NE14SW'/4 NE'/,.of 19-29N-03W; TD 4,838. Pittsburg: Newfield Exploration MidContinent Inc.; Adams No. 7H-18 Well; SE'/. SW'/4 SE'/4 SE'/. (SL) of 18-05N-12E; TD 13,793. Newfield Exp loration MidContinent Inc.; Adams No. 8H-18 We ll; SE'/. SW'/4 SE'/4 SEV. (SL) of 18-05N-12E ;TD 13,783. Newfield Exploration MidContinent Inc . ; Adams No .8H-18

Weil; SE'/4 SW'/4 SE'/4 SEV. (SL) of 18-05N-12E; TD 13,783.

Roger Mills : Samson Resourcs

Co.; Bold Ruler No. 1-29 Well; C NE/, of 29-14N-23W; TD 11 ,390. Washita:Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Rainbolt No. 1-9H Well; NE'/4

SWl/4 SEV< SE'/< (SL) of 09-11N-17W;TD 17,500. SOURCE OIL-LAW RECORDS

LIVESTOCK Tuesday 's livestock report from the Oklahoma City Stockyards : Receipts: 12,079. Feeder Steers : Medium and Large No. 1: (weighted average): Calves: 331 lbs. $135.93; 372 lbs . $136.57;430 lbs. $132.72; 493 lbs. $126.92; 526 lbs. $123.30; 561 lbs. $117.64; 627 lbs .$107.76; 658 lbs. $105.00; Yearlings: 615 lbs. $110.84;683 lbs. $113.82; 727 lbs. $112,33;773 lbs. $113.07; 832 lbs. $m.89; 866 lbs. $112.00;928 lbs. $110.04. Feeder Heifers :Medium and Large No. I (weighted average): Calves: 384 lbs. $117.45; 419 lbs.

OW

CORN (CBOT)

SOYBEANS

Alva ........11.39 Buffalo......11.39

Hooker......11.09 Medford ....11.54

Miami. . . . . . . 11.58 Ponca C i t y . . .11.56 Shattuck... .11.19 Stillwater . ..11.54 Gulf........ 12.85

CORN $5.21-$5.56 per bushel. COTTON Grade 41, Leaf 4, Staple 34 cotton in southwestern O K N/A cents per pound, FOB rail car or truck

KANSAS CITY GRAIN

Wheat, No.2 Hard,bu_...........$6.13.$6.73'/2 Corn, No. 2ycllow._ __........._$522 t /4-$5.53 Milo ..... ................ .................... .................... $8.79-$9.96 Soybeans, No. 1........-.$11.601/2-$11821/2

SOURCE: USDA-OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MARKET

NEWS SERVICE

-150 -lE . 50

-cents per bushel 39950 362 379 372 37450

-1

-1

37950 378 )ulll 38550 38550 38450 Est sales 3.874 Mons. sales 2194 Mon 'soxnint13 ,915off10400 SOYBEANMEAL (CBOT)

379.50 38450

0.,1C 33650 33960 33570 Jan ll 33800 34130 33750 h,a,11 339 .50 342 .50 33&90 May 11 338.70 34190 33810 Est sales 74,909 Mons sales 44,672 Mons open In[ 207,627 up 2122OO

33710 339.40 34100 34020

'20

4963

-12

100 tcis- dc tars per ton

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 60 .000 lbs- cents per lb Dec10

4973 4992 49.40 Jam s 50 08 5226 4976 May 11 5045 5060 50 May 11 50.66 40 x75 Est sales 124,686 Mons sales 74, 4,319 Mon'soxn Int355760up298a0o

50.62

ccnts per bushel 5000.5 mnim irn do, 10 122350 123250 1220.75 1223.75 Jan11 :23375 124250 123050 1234

1h,11

1739

1247

Mayn

Op•i

75625

ICI L_ 774

753

1U 11 767 782 76U5 Estsales 208,963 Mons sales 101,328 nt 528 .684 off 263600 Mms oo WIRERWFEAT(KCBT)

1237

h,ay11 1248 1248 1238 Est sales 213,618 Mon's sales 136730

124050

114125

'1 -1

-30 -30

-12

, 09 .06

-150 -1

',50

•125

Mon'sopenlnt619 ,806off415.o0

WHEAT (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dz 1C 656 71215 692.50 64425 Mall 735 75225 73225 734

S.t

ci

76575

6,75

75550

-825 -8.50

-6.25

pen

779

779 763.50 764.25

Ma 11 JU 11 791 791 778 h4on's.sales22 175 Man's open +n 239,867 w 3832.00 CATTLE (CME)

40,000les.- cents per lb.

49.99 5038

last year," CEO John W. Gibson said.

TULSA - Buoyed by the sale of a 49 percent interest in Overland Pass Pipeline Co., ONEOK PartHers LP on Tuesday reported net income of $141.5 million,or $1.09 per unit,for the third quarter, That is up from $121.5 million,or $1per unit, for the same period of last year.The quarter included a $16.3 million gain from the partnership 's sale of its interest in the pipeline company to Williams Partners LP. CEO John W. Gibson said ONEOK Part-

ners is well positioned for future growth. "Our

recently announced plans to invest up to $1.5 billiquids and natural gas gathering and processing segments to meet the needs of producers in the

5,000 ?1 m? um ntspe ?I s he'4850 Dec p ?

Mcdsoxnint.619.741up 8619.00

OATS(cBOT) 5,000buminmd m 0.1 1C 361 36675

capital investment program that was completed

lion over the next three years in the natural gas

s" c .

0

Partners segment benefiting from continued volume growth as the result of the $2 billion-plus

ONEOK PARTNERS LP

HOGS Receipts: 100. Compared to: Monday Barro w s and Gilts: Steady. U.S . No. 1-3 220-270 lbs., $40. Sows: Steady. U.S. No. 1-3 300-500 lbs., $38-$42 U.S. No.1-3 500-700 lbs., $44-$46 Boars:200-250 lbs., $20 over 250 lbs., $10

Agri Markets

5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel De( 1 576 383 57225 575.75 h,a r 11 588 .50 596 58550 58925 h,ay11 59460 60150 592 595.75 5 4 ,3 59875 Est sales 62 ,628 Mons,sales 30 317

11 " 11 37275 h,ay 11 378

Grains

wpb Low

$116.63;466 lbs.$113.84; 518 lbs. $110.69; 574 lbs.$103.98;632 lbs. $102.17; 671 lbs. $98.50; Yearlings: 643 lbs. $103.90; 681 lbs. $105.69; 713 lbs. $104.93; 762 lbs. $103.38.

Dec 10 98 47 9867 9&02 Feb tl 10190 10222 10147 Apr 1 10512 10525 10457 Jln11 102.25 10300 10225 Est sales 40.569Monksales 44,804 Man's open t 317,755 up 1533.00 .

OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Tuesday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. - $80.25 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. - $68.25 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted Oct. 15:

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 50,000lbs: cents per lb. Nm10

110.90

110.90 11095 n 11 M 11160 11283 112.50 Ma ll April 11150 11415 112.50 Est sales 280Mon's.s es 3,729 Monsopenet 25,997 off 1274 .00 HOGS -Lean (CME)

11120

11155

11207

40,000 1bs- cents per lb. Dec10 66.47 6655 6517 Feltl l 7215 72.65 7135 Apr 11 7605 7725 7610 may U 8155 8285 8155 Est sales 27,820 Mons. sales 31477 Mons open M201.748 uo 2143.00

77825

prolific Bakken Shale in the Williston Basin establish a strong foundation for the next phase of earnings growth," Gibson said.

MAGELLAN MIDSTREAM PARTNERS 575

-575

-4.25

TULSA - Magellan Midstream Partners on Tues day reported third-quarter earnings of $56.6 million, or 51cents a unit,up from $54.2 million,or 43 cents a unit ,from the same period last year. Ma -

9825 lOtRS 10512 10297

11155

11 11282 W

11415

•10

oe

-40 •75

•120 d42 0.42 x168

gellan also saw a 10 percent rise in operating profits , rising from $74.8 million to $82.3 million. " Recent acquisitions and strengthening of refined petroleum products demand in the markets we

serve produced record throughput on our petroleu m pipeline system during the quarter," CEO

Customer interest in the

Don Wellendorf said. "

Texas pipeline system and crude oil storage assets we

acquired from BP in September 2 0 1 0 is strong. Cash flow growth we expect as a result of acquisi-

tions,organic

growth projects and solid base busi-

Hess fundamentals should support attractive

6620 7237 77.25 82.55

-100 •102

,1.45

•135

distribution growth for Magellan in 2011and beyon

'

FROM STAFF REPORTS


BUSINESS

p

DOW 11,188.72

NASDAQ 2,533.52

+64.10

p

p p q p Money&Markets

S&P 500 1,193.57

+28.68

Today

$32.41 TWX $35 The big media company’s $28.08 third-quarter report is ’10 30 expected to give investors some clues about consumers’ changing viewing 25 habits. Analysts are conOperating est. cerned that Time Warner, $0.61 $0.53 EPS whose businesses include 3Q ’09 3Q ’10 HBO, is going to lose viewers to services like Netflix, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . 15 which allow people to watch Price-to-earnings ratio: based on past 12 months’ results movies over their PCs. But Dividend: $0.85. .Div. Yield: 2.6% they’re also upbeat on the .............. . . . . . . . ..... .. .. company’s stock. Source: Thomson Reuters

1,200 ................................ .

Close: 1,193.57 Change: 9.19 (0.8%)

1,180 1,160 ........ 10 DAYS

..

.....

A reading on housing PulteGroup, one of the nation’s biggest homebuilders, issues its reading on the housing market when it releases its third-quarter earnings. Other homebuilders have reported small improvements in their earnings in recent months. But orders plunged after the April 30 expiration of the tax credit for homebuyers. So investors will want to see if Pulte is also seeing some improvement.

2,560 ............. ...................

S&P 500

1,200 ................................................................

2,480 2,400 ....

............

...

10 DAYS

30-YR T-BONDS 3.93%

6-MO T-BILLS .15%

+9.19

Time Warner earnings

........

Nasdaq composite Close: 2,533.52 Change: 28.68 (1.1%)

2,600 ............ ...........................

1,150 2,400 2,300 2,200 1,050 1,000

2,100 ............ M

J

J

A

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NYSE

NASD

3,846 3,963 2232 798 244 15

1,838 1,860 1949 702 168 40

S

M

....... . . .

J

.?.......... ... j . . . . . . . . . . .. ?.............i

J

A

S

O

HIGH

LOW

CLOSE

CHG.

%CHG.

YTD

11219.52 4822.08 407.27 7594.23 2534.88 1195.88 839.18 12622.72 712.89

11125.22 4759.99 401.88 7509.51 2518.29 1187.86 828.64 12527.13 698.56

11188.72 4818.62 406.65 7582.14 2533.52 1193.57 837.82 12606.54 712.89

+64.10 +61.70 +4.90 +72.93 +28.68 +9.19 +9.18 +113.69 +14.33

+0.58% +1.30% +1.22% +0.97% +1.14% +0.78% +1.11% +0.91% +2.05%

+7.29% +17.54% +2.17% +5.53% +11.65% +7.04% +15.30% +9.16% +13.99%

BEST MUTUAL FUND:

Investors are getting comfortable with riskier stocks. The Highland Nasdaq led the stock market’s major indexes in October with mid-cap a 6 percent gain. The index is dominated by technology and value small-cap stocks seen as most vulnerable during a bad BEST (HEVIX) INDUSTRY: economy. The Dow rose about 3 percent and the S&P 500 Raw rose almost 4 percent. materials WORST +15% producers NASDAQ MUTUAL S&P 500 WORST FUND: Dow WORST INDUSTRY: Z Seven STOCK:

+7%

+15%

+8%

-2%

Telecom

+6%

+4%

+11%

+3% +7%

+6%

flat +6%

world stock fund (ZSEVX)

Apollo Group (APOL)

-54%

-38%

CHANGE THIS YEAR

Investors also seemed less interested in stocks that are considered safe and pay a big dividend. So telecommunications and utilities, two of the S&P 500’s 10 industries, lagged in October. Telecom stocks dropped 0.1 percent and utilities rose less than 1 percent. Apollo Group was the biggest loser. The for-profit education company said new government regulations would hurt its earnings. October’s big winner was King Pharmaceuticals, which is being bought by Pfizer. October’s gains extended the market’s big September advance. The S&P 500 has had an average gain of 0.62 percent in November, just above its average of 0.58 percent for all months. Today’s election may determine whether stocks can beat that performance.

-17%

-27%

/07<;;,9B

SOURCES: Morningstar; MSCI; Standard & Poor’s; Thomson Reuters

MASTERCARD GETS CREDIT – OVERSEAS Like Caterpillar, Colgate Palmolive and other big U.S. companies, MasterCard is making more of its money overseas. The company, which process payments made with credit and debit cards bearing its name, said global credit and charge card purchases rose 9 percent during the

third quarter and debit card purchases rose 29 percent. In the U.S., credit and charge card purchases fell nearly 1 percent and debit card purchases dropped 5 percent. MasterCard’s U.S. numbers aren’t surprising, considering that the Federal Reserve reported that

consumers cut back on their credit card use in August for the 24th straight month. The question going forward is whether consumers will feel like spending a little more freely during the holidays, and whether they’ll be charging more of their purchases.

CompanySpotlight MASTER CARD (MA)

52-WEEK RANGE

$191.00 Tuesday’s close: $245.98 Price-earnings ratio (Based on past 12 months’ results): 19 YTD: -6.4%

3-YR*: 8.3%

AP

DIV.: 60 cents

Total returns through Nov. 1

269.88

DIV. YIELD: 0.2% *annualized

SOURCES: Morningstar; Thomson Reuters

Stocks Stocks climbed Tuesday as investors awaited the rose 9.19, or 0.8 percent, to 1,193.57. Small comresults of congressional elections. The Dow Jones panies performed especially well. The Russell industrial average rose more than 60 points, or 0.6 2000, the index that tracks the performance of percent, to 1,188.72. That’s near its 2010 closing smaller corporations, jumped 2 percent to 712.89. high of 11,205.03. The broader S&P 500 index Bond prices also rose. MEMC Electronic WFR Archer Daniels Midland ADM Skilled Healthcare SKH Close: $12.30 -0.37 or -2.9% The chip maker increased revenue, but third-quarter earnings fell short of Wall Street estimates and it withdrew its forecast for the year. $14

Close: $31.19 v -2.20 or -6.6% The drought in Russia and Eastern Europe that slammed the local wheat crop and led to bans on exports hurt the company’s profit. $34

Close: $4.78 A 0.85 or 21.6% The company’s long-term care business gave it a boost during the third quarter, and it raised its earnings forecast for the year. $5

12

32

4

10

30

3

8

28

A S 52-week range

$9.19

O $16.99

Vol.: 24.0m (3.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.8 b

PE: ... Yield: ...

Energizer Holdings

ENR

Close: $66.37 -6.96 or -9.5% The maker of Energizer batteries doubled its quarterly profit, but warned that high zinc and steel costs could drain 2011 results. $80 70 60

A S 52-week range

$49.25 Vol.: 6.0m (8.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.66 b SOURCE: Sungard

O $77.09 PE: 13.5 Yield: ...

A S 52-week range

$24.22

2

O $34.03

A S 52-week range

$1.43

Vol.: 19.6m (3.4x avg.) PE: 10.4 Mkt. Cap: $19.92 b Yield: 1.9%

Vol.: 3.4m (6.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $99.37 m

Buckle

Art Technology

BKE

Close: $31.15 1.90 or 6.5% A KeyBanc analyst raised his rating on the retailer. He noted it had a large number of stores in states with lower unemployment. $35

5

25

4

20 $23.00

A S 52-week range

O $40.35

Vol.: 818.2k (1.5x avg.) PE: 11.6 Mkt. Cap: $1.46 b Yield: 2.6%

O

3

est.

.. . . . . .

-$1.15 -$0.05 3Q ’09

.............

3Q ’10

..... . . . . ..

Price-to-earnings ratio:

N/A

..

based on past 12 months’ results

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Source: Thomson Reuters

Interestrates

TREASURIES

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.59 percent Tuesday. Changing yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

A S 52-week range

$2.98 Vol.: 89.7m (35.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $940.77 m

YEST

-0.01 ... ... ... -0.01

.04 .15 .37 .90 2.32

10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.59 3.93

2.62 4.01

-0.03 -0.08

3.42 4.26

YEST

PVS

Barclays LongT-BdIdx 3.50 Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.94 Barclays USAggregate 2.48 PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 7.27 RATE FUNDS Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.76 .13 YEST 3.25 Barclays US Corp 3.59 .13 6 MO AGO 3.25 KBW Bank 45.12 .13 1 YR AGO 3.25

3.56 4.94 2.45 7.28 4.75 3.58 45.22

-0.06 ... +0.03 -0.01 +0.01 +0.01 -0.10

PVS

.6241 1.0090 6.6823

.6237 1.0177 6.6943

CLOSE Euro Japanese yen Mexican peso

.7124 80.68 12.3040

NAME

LAST

26.13 3.48 46.16 62.91 38.50 56.12 47.15 6.63 29.22 52.53 76.79 53.00 7.00 15.00 2.70 17.36 49.13 22.65 54.56 12.54 45.00 50.85 79.76

AAON ADDvntgT AlliHold AllnceRes ApcoO&Gs BOK BncFstOK BroncoDrl ChesEng ContlRes DevonE DollarTh EduDv GMX Rs GrayMrkH GulfportE HelmPayne LSB Inds MagelMPtr MatrixSv OGE Engy ONEOK ONEOK Pt

24.89 +.34 3.12 -.09 42.38 +.74 59.61 +.16 37.03 +.25 46.85 +.82 41.65 +.80 4.50 +.04 22.05 +.22 49.24 +1.08 65.93 +.59 47.11 +1.33 6.70 +.65 4.46 +.08 1.47 +.01 17.08 +.11 42.78 +.08 22.96 +.33 55.32 +.76 9.41 +.53 45.34 +.80 50.34 +.47 79.24 +.55

18.16 1.91 21.30 37.05 18.00 41.06 34.87 3.25 19.62 36.25 58.58 17.72 4.85 3.98 1.00 7.35 32.34 10.62 37.81 8.25 32.33 29.56 53.70

CH.

YTD %CH. DIV

YLD

+27.7 +58.2 +54.6 +37.4 +67.6 -1.4 +12.4 -11.2 -14.8 +14.8 -10.3 +84.0 +11.7 -67.5 -16.1 +49.2 +7.3 +62.8 +27.7 -11.6 +22.9 +12.9 +27.2

1.4 ... 4.7 5.6 .2 2.1 2.4 ... 1.4 ... 1.0 ... 7.2 ... ... ... .6 ... 5.4 ... 3.2 3.8 5.7

0.36 ... 2.00 3.32 0.08 1.00 1.00 ... 0.30 ... 0.64 ... 0.48 ... ... ... 0.24 ... 2.98 ... 1.45 1.92 4.52

TKR VXX TZA FAZ FAS FZB FCV FOC FKL FMV EWJ SLV EEM EFA IWM QQQQ SDS SPY XLB XLF UNG

LAST 12.86 21.67 12.44 22.44 27.79 28.40 28.34 27.17 28.39 9.99 24.31 47.21 57.74 71.27 52.78 26.88 119.48 35.14 14.60 5.59

CH. -.36 -1.40 -.15 +.24 ... +.21 ... ... ... +.07 +.24 +.58 +.94 +1.45 +.56 -.44 +.95 +.36 +.04 +.07

$0.50

3Q ’09

3Q ’10

............................... .

Price-to-earnings ratio:

N/A

based on past 12 months’ results

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .

Source: Thomson Reuters

4.08 5.36 3.58 10.02 5.16 4.85 42.61

OPEN

CLOSE

CH.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Dec 10 84.08 83.90 Jan 11 84.75 84.56

+.95 +.89

Est. sales 494,041 Mon’s. sales 596,923 Mon’s open int 1,424,326 up 7438.00

NATURAL GAS (NYMX) 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Dec 10 3.841 3.870 Jan 11 4.090 4.122

+.038 +.036

Est. sales 254,119 Mon’s. sales 265,859 Mon’s open int 804,438 up 9696.00

GOLD (COMX) 100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. Nov 10 1356.80 1356.40 +6.20 Dec 10 1356.60 1356.90 +6.30 Est. sales 134,078 Mon’s. sales 142,325 Mon’s open int 615,686 up 7603.00

SILVER (COMX) 5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz. Nov 10 2461.5 2483.2 +28.4 Dec 10 2488.0 2483.6 +28.4 Est. sales 49,657 Mon’s. sales 62,090 Mon’s open int 156,509 up 1643.00

NY HARBOR GAS BLEND (NYMX) 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Dec 10 2.1102 2.1096 +.0167 Jan 11 2.1211 2.1203 +.0165

PVS .7200 80.57 12.3460

Est. sales 100,948 Mon’s. sales 110,486 Mon’s open int 278,489 up 7809.00

The Oklahoman’s Top 30 Mutual Funds FUND NAV American Funds BalA m 17.50 BondA m 12.51 CapIncBuA m 50.44 CpWldGrIA m 35.73 EurPacGrA m 41.44 FnInvA m 35.09 GrthAmA m 29.31 IncAmerA m 16.55 InvCoAmA m 27.23 NewPerspA m 27.94 WAMutInvA m 26.23 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 35.42 Stock 101.90 Fidelity Contra 65.44 DivrIntl d 29.82 GrowCo 78.20 Magellan 67.61 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m 2.14 Harbor IntlInstl d 60.11 PIMCO TotRetA m 11.71 TotRetAdm b 11.71 TotRetIs 11.71 Vanguard 500Adml 110.01 500Inv 109.99 InstIdxI 109.29 InstPlus 109.29 TotIntl d 15.67 TotStIAdm 29.82 TotStIdx 29.81 Welltn 30.41

CH.

PERCENT RETURN 4WK. 12MO. 3YR. 5YR.

+.11 +.02 +.30 +.33 +.37 +.30 +.26 +.10 +.22 +.25 +.20

+3.2 +0.6 +2.9 +4.1 +3.7 +4.2 +4.8 +3.0 +4.2 +4.7 +3.3

+15.1 +9.8 +12.6 +13.0 +13.4 +17.0 +15.6 +16.4 +14.3 +16.7 +16.5

-1.0 +3.1 -3.6 -5.1 -4.5 -5.1 -5.3 -1.6 -4.9 -3.4 -5.7

+3.7 +4.1 +4.9 +5.8 +7.0 +4.4 +2.6 +4.6 +2.4 +6.4 +1.7

+.36 +.82

+5.1 +16.6 +4.4 +14.3

-5.1 -8.3

+5.8 -0.4

+.61 +.33 +.83 +.77

+5.0 +4.4 +5.2 +4.2

+21.4 +11.6 +25.7 +15.2

-3.4 -9.7 -3.1 -9.6

+4.8 +3.2 +5.6 0.0

+.01

+2.0 +17.1

+0.7

+5.6

+.80

+5.2 +16.5

-5.4

+8.5

+.02 +.02 +.02

+1.1 +11.2 +10.1 +1.1 +11.4 +10.4 +1.1 +11.7 +10.6

+8.4 +8.6 +8.9

+.85 +.85 +.84 +.84 +.18 +.27 +.26 +.16

+4.2 +4.2 +4.2 +4.2 +3.9 +4.5 +4.4 +2.3

+1.8 +1.7 +1.8 +1.8 +5.3 +2.4 +2.3 +5.5

+16.8 +16.6 +16.8 +16.8 +13.9 +19.0 +18.9 +12.5

-5.4 -5.5 -5.4 -5.3 -7.5 -4.5 -4.6 +0.6

MutualFundCategories PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR 12.42 13.88 15.93 16.65 42.94 27.67

1.54 -1.42 -1.05 -5.85 -3.57 -1.97

4.00 3.34 3.16 7.60 2.81 5.64

9.26 9.82 9.95

13.12 14.76 14.92

-0.43 -2.22 -2.52

3.98 3.29 3.26

16.97 8.57 14.37 8.02 11.33 17.27 5.91 9.05 9.70

26.76 13.35 18.28 13.02 17.95 23.63 9.94 13.30 17.03

-4.31 -9.47 -6.80 -8.84 -7.83 -7.26 -8.91 -1.52 -6.36

12.84 4.21 5.31 3.53 4.77 6.52 2.74 5.06 3.63

5YR

BALANCED

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

LAST

CH.

YTD %CH. DIV -34.6

YLD

22.10

11.85 OrchidsPP

13.10

+.08

30.31

19.46 PanhO&G

24.91

+.48

22.98

2.75

3.86

-.03

-76.4

...

...

68.66

30.68 PrepaidLg

61.47 +1.43

2.50

1.31

RAM Engy

1.52

11.08

3.87

SandRdge

13.11

7.28

SonicCorp

16.20

5.96

SwstBc

3.00

1.48

Syntroleum

51.00

33.36 Unit

24.66

17.53 WmsCos

21.57

48.95

25.08 WmsPtrs

3.99

2.27

PostRock n

XetaTech

...

...

-3.8 0.28

1.1

+49.6

...

...

-.02

-25.9

...

...

5.70

+.11

-39.6

...

...

9.06

+.09

-10.0

...

...

9.40

+.21

+35.4

...

...

1.81

+.07

-32.0

...

...

38.47

+.48

-9.5

...

...

+.39

+2.3 0.50

2.3

45.44 +1.38

+48.2 2.75

6.1

3.63

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 26.08 14.91 10.50 5.11 29.43 23.78 25.18 15.25 4.00 2.25 58.65 42.24 37.77 28.17 3.70 2.28 75.07 34.54 111.00 81.94 11.00 5.03 19.86 11.03 76.00 47.33 11.34 7.43 81.50 37.62 61.95 49.47 62.63 46.63 17.52 11.34 51.95 40.06 25.40 11.00 76.54 55.94 34.55 14.04 73.23 45.39 16.39 9.10 38.24 22.22 35.89 21.10 37.03 24.47 25.14 15.04 48.20 35.16 66.20 56.86 83.00 68.97 87.19 67.87 28.54 19.15 47.75 32.16 45.60 26.23 82.47 56.23 58.82 36.83 90.99 72.13 5.85 3.43 27.36 13.89 64.85 44.12 22.98 2.75 32.95 25.15 27.02 17.40 21.58 9.84 125.42 59.21 14.16 8.10 5.31 2.78 28.99 18.85 28.71 16.79 28.18 18.00 91.49 67.98 44.68 31.77 70.89 53.17 34.13 25.79 56.27 47.77 11.90 7.32

NAME AAR AMR AT&T Inc AdmRsc AlcatelLuc AMovilL AEP AmShrd Anadarko Apache Arbinet rs BkofAm Boeing Celestic g Cimarex CocaCl ConocPhil Dell Inc EngyTsfr EthanAl ExxonMbl GaylrdEnt Genzyme Goodyear Group1 Hallibrtn HomeDp IntlBcsh JPMorgCh JohnJn LabCp LockhdM Lowes MetLife NobleCorp NobleEn OReillyA h OcciPet ParkDrl Petrohawk PlainsAA PostRock n RepubSvc Rollins SeagateT SearsHldgs SwstAirl SprintNex Starbucks Terex TetraTc 3M Co UMB Fn UPS B VerizonCm WalMart Xerox VALUE

8.85 8.71 5.03 6.90 25.75 13.92

Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

NAME

...

+20.6

...

...

Stocks of Local Interest %YTD -62.3 -56.0 -36.0 -9.2 +10.1 +8.3 +8.2 +5.9 +8.9 +2.6 +47.0 +13.7 +4.5 +14.1 +15.4 -23.3 +7.2 +6.5 +1.4 -44.5

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

$6.00

1YR AGO

52-WEEK HI LO

ExchangeTradedFunds NAME Barc iPathS&P VIX ST Direxion SCapBear 3x Direxion FinBear 3x Direxion FinBull 3x FaithSh Baptist Val FaithSh Catholic Val FaithSh ChristianVal FaithSh Lutheran Val FaithSh MethodistVal iShare Japan iShares Silver Trust iShs Emerg Mkts iShares EAFE iShares Rus 2000 PowerShs QQQ Trust ProSh UltraSht S&P SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr SPDR Materials SPDR Financial US Nat Gas Fund

PE: ... Yield: ...

PE: 54.1 Yield: ... AP

est.

N/A

Oklahoma Inc. Stocks 52-WEEK HI LO

YTD

O

Operating EPS

ForeignExchange CLOSE

$25.07

20

FuturesTrading

.12 .15 .22 .33 1.16

BONDS

$25.29 ’10

EXP.

.11 .15 .22 .33 1.15

NET CHG

AOL

+6.20

25

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 1-year T-note 2-year T-note 5-year T-note

SPECIALTY FUNDS

ARTG

NET CHG

PVS

$8.23

Close: $5.95 1.85 or 45.1% Oracle agreed to buy the e-commerce software maker for $1 billion, or $6 per share — substantially higher than ATG’s price. $6

30

’10

Operating EPS

$30

5C

.

n

GOLD $1,356.40

+.0148

AOL’s earnings report will show investors whether it has been able to benefit from the improving market for online advertising. Google, Yahoo and IAC/ InterActiveCorp have all said they were able to place more online ads during the third quarter. AOL must follow that trend in order to succeed. The company is focusing on advertising to make up for the decline in the dial-up Internet service that made it famous in the 1990s.

10 7

p

EURO 1.4036

+.02

Is AOL getting ads?

$8.07

$9.01

;Winners &Loser

Winners and Losers

Oct. change

PHM

British pound Canadian dollar Chinese yuan

O C T O B E R

King Pharma. (KG)

+42%

O

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

OCTOBER’S BEST STOCK:

2,000

..........

$13

GASOLINE $2.11

-.08

............. ............ _ . ..........

2,500

1,100

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

LAST 22.44 7.85 28.94 19.77 3.52 58.08 37.63 2.90 63.82 103.12 6.50 11.40 69.78 8.73 78.96 61.86 59.34 14.37 51.54 15.37 67.84 33.26 72.18 10.03 35.08 31.40 31.51 17.63 36.96 63.88 82.66 71.64 21.92 40.21 34.46 82.39 57.17 81.51 4.46 17.20 63.17 3.86 29.89 26.44 14.79 72.27 14.08 4.10 28.88 23.30 21.13 84.80 36.67 68.30 32.80 54.79 11.72 BLEND

CH. +.64 +.12 +.22 +.06 +.09 +.51 +.35 +.04 +.66 +2.12 +.11 -.10 -.70 +.17 +1.44 +.15 +.39 -.05 +.43 +.21 +.89 -.94 -.02 -.18 +.33 -.02 +.80 +.83 -.46 +.19 +.74 +.17 +.73 +.25 +.28 +1.59 -.48 +1.68 +.33 -.34 -.05 -.03 +.44 +.30 +.24 +1.38 +.21 -.04 +.07 +.47 +.23 +.82 +.74 +.96 +.40 +.48 +.11

YTD %Ch. -2.3 +1.6 +3.2 -10.3 +6.0 +23.6 +8.2 -1.7 +2.2 ... -34.7 -24.3 +28.9 -7.5 +49.1 +8.5 +16.2 ... +14.6 +14.5 -0.5 +68.4 +47.3 -28.9 +23.7 +4.4 +8.9 -6.8 -11.2 -0.8 +10.4 -4.9 -6.3 +13.7 -15.3 +15.7 +50.0 +0.2 -9.9 -28.3 +19.5 -76.4 +5.6 +37.1 -18.7 -13.4 +23.2 +12.0 +25.2 +17.6 -22.2 +2.6 -6.8 +19.1 +6.0 +2.5 +38.5

GROWTH

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

7.3 12.9 -9.2 -0.3

LV

5.8 13.7 -4.4 2.9

LB

7.5 18.5 -4.5 2.1

LG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

12.3 24.4 -2.1 2.9

MV

15.9 29.0 -2.1 4.4

MB

16.1 29.3 -4.3 4.3

MG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

13.8 29.4 2.3 4.7

SV

13.9 26.0 -1.4 4.1

SB

17.0 30.2 -3.0 3.9

SG

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

1SVI1YXYEP*YRHWPMWXIHEX2I[W3/GSQ

9.50 7.52 9.98 13.35 5.36 6.69 2.62

10.00 7.09 11.19 18.14 6.65 7.83 3.46

6.33 6.30 1.48 6.17 4.87 4.07 3.35

5.76 5.71 2.45 6.75 4.30 3.90 3.27


_R Vff4 ATH F ? . ?. L ''• ' \ Cl' '.` /

unny Woodward 70/35 Altus

68/29

.

721 3740

... 6995 $

6 p.m. today

Enid 70/34 Lawton

70/42

Ardmore 72/43

Clear, 57

Clear,59 Clear, 61

Clear, 62

-

i

f

c

Clear, 39 y

Forecasts and graphics provided by Accu Weatheretlm 02010

Clear, 40

Thursday 63/35

Friday 60/35

Winds: NNW 8-16 mph

Wi nds: NE 7-14 mph

Regional forecast

-105

I-Os I OS

105

Saturday 66/40

Winds: S 12-25 mph

As of 7 a.m. yesterday Cake Normal Altus 1,559.0 Arbuckle 872.0 Arcadia 1,006.0 Brok Bow 599.5 Canton 1,615.4 Copan 710.0 Eufaula 585.0 Ft. Cobb 1,342.0 Ft. Gibson 2 F Supply 0040 o Foss 1, 1 642. ,642.0 Grand 745.0 Hudson 619.0 Hulah 733.0 Kaw 1,009.1 Kerr 460.0 Keystone 723.0 Oologah 638.0 Salt Plains 1,125.0 Skiatook 714.0 Tenklller 632.0 Texoma 615.0 Thunderbird 1,039.0 490.0 4 Webb. Falls .0 Wister 478.0

Kansas; Bright sunshine today. Clear tonight; windy. Bright sunshine tomorrow,except some

clouds in the west and southwest Mlssourk Bright and sunny today. Windy tonight with a star-studded sky Cooler tomorrow with times of sun and douds. Colorado:Sunny today. Clear tonight. Partly sunny tomorrow; pleasant. Friday: mostly sunny and delightful. Saturday: mostly sunny

Yesterday's pollen yayligh NGk Moderate

iiliilii?

?6seid trees weeds Grasses whit Mold and pdien cows courtesy of the

S S , ?? o

Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic

Tow Prodpitation Jan. 1- This date in 2007 Jan. 1- This date in 2008

305

505

Charleston,WV

0 AN-

Winds: SSW 10-20 mph

Winds: S 12-25 mph

S 15-25 mph

Yesterday in Oklahoma City.

Current 1,540 871.51 1,005 59229 L614 709.31 583.56 1,341 2 8 2,003 .0 3 640 741.47 619.23 732.66 1,009 459.80 721.46 637.67 1,125 710.76 630.14 620.69 L03 7 4 489..59 476.97

Yesterday in the state:

H L Midnight 51 Enid 63 43 1am. 50 Gage 68 37 2 am. 49 Guymon 72 34 3 a.m. 48 Hobart 65 45 4 am. 47 McAlester 60 55 5 am. 46 Ponca City 68 43 6 am. 45 Tulsa 64 50 7 a.m. 46 8 am. 46 Chickasha 63 45 9 am. 47 Durant 58 54 10 ant. 49 EIReno 62 43 11a.m. 55 Guthrie 66 46 Noon 57 Idabel 61 57 1p.m. 60 Miami 64 44 2 P-m. 63 Norman 68 48 3 pm. 63 OKC 63 45 4 p.m. 63 Shawnee 66 48 62 5 p.m. 61 Stillwater 67 46 6 p.m. 6p m 60 Woodward 67 38 One year ago In Oldahoma City:74/45 Normal hlgh/1°w in Oklahoma City:66/43 Record high/low.83 in 2008/19 in 1991 Natbnalextrerttesyttsterday : Camarillo, CA, 94; Alamosa CO, 12

Winds:

54.41

-... 34.60

Yesterday in the world:

Prc. .00 .00 .00 Trace .01 .00 .00 .00 .94 .00 .00 .30 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00

H Amsterdam 57 Baghdad 79 Calgary 56 Dublin 57

L Sky 43 Shwr 61 Sun 41 PtCI 48 Shwr Frankfurt 57 45 Udy Geneva 59 41 PtCI Hong Kong 81 65 Sun Kabul

London Madrid Manila Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris

Oklahoma City annual precip. is _... 35.85

iTTED FRAUD

OAKLAND, Calif. - A battle

78 37 47

60 67 83 81 43 47 89

ORACLE TO PAY $1BILLION

ue of a trove of millions of

Also Tuesday, Oracle announced that it is buying

documents. In its first pitch to a federal jury Tuesday, Oracle Corp. said archrival SAP AG's plundering of password-protected Oracle websites dealt a $2 billion blow to Oracle 's business. The attacks on Oracle's resources at times seemed ham-handed. Oracle said an SAP subsidiary, TomorrowNow, created bogus accounts to get access to walled-off Oracle websites. Once inside, Oracle said, TomorrowNow deployed computer programs that powered through page after page of support documents, "scraping" and saving the contents of those pages as they went. Oracle spotted the fraud when it noticed an extraordinary amount of downloads coming from

panies such as AT&T, Best Buy and CVS to improve their websites and streamline online purchasing. The purchase price is $1 billion in cash.

It says it owes Oracle just tens of millions of dollars, a fraction of the $2 billion Oracle is seeking. The jury trial is expected to last six weeks. The allegations of corporate espionage show how dirty the fight between Oracle and SAP has become as they square off for more of the business of managing corporations' day-to-day computing chores. It also highlights Oracle's changing role in the business software industry. In the process, Oracle has made some bitter enemies, particularly SAP. Oracle has been on a $4o billion shopping spree

sition of PeopleSoft in 2005. Shortly after Oracle announced its intention to buy PeopleSoft , SAP bought TomorrowNow, a company that supported PeopleSoft software. It was a bid to take support business from Oracle and eventually upgrade Peo pleSoft customers to SAP products. In some cases, SAP, through TomorrowNow, had legitimate access to Oracle 's walled-off sites, as TomorrowNow supported Oracle customers and was allowed to use their accounts to look for answers for support questions. But TomorrowNow

tered with clearly bad information , such as bad phone numbers ("7777777 ") and made-up names ("Tom Now") seemingly connected with the SAP subsidiary. Oracle technicians were also easfl y able to tell that the downloads went to TomorrowNow servers. SAP, which is based in Walldorf , Germany, has admitted that the nowshuttered subsidiary secretly siphoned off instruction manuals and technical specifications for Oracle 's software. But SAP argues that Oracle 's claims of injury are exaggerated.

snapping up companies that have put Oracle into selling business applications, an SAP stronghold. Oracle 's main business has historically been selling database software , and it is the industry leader. Databases help companies manage mountains of data. Applications help them do things with data they've amassed, such as cutting payroll checks. Oracle alleges that SAP has resorted to thievery to poach customers and inflict pain on Oracle following its encroachment on SAP's turf , particularly with its $10.3 billion acqui-

data it found there to support other customers, or to download the information to its own computers. Oracle, which is based in Redwood Shores, Calif., says SAP re-branded some of its documents and passed them off to customers as SAP's own. Oracle also accuses SAP of making illegal copies of Oracle's software and using them as models for SAP's own offerings. Oracle CEO Larry Ellison is expected to testify this week. Oracle also wants to call Leo Apothek er, SAP's former CEO and the new CEO of HewlettPackard Co., to testify.

FOR ART TECHNOLOGY GROUP INC.

Art Technology Group Inc., which works with com-

over the past six years ,

wasn't allowed to use the

PtCI 46 Sun 74 Rain 49 Sun 32 PtCI 33 Udy 60 Sun

57 41 Shwr

Kansas City

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grew at a 2 percent annual rate during the third quay ter. That's well short of what is needed to create a significant amount of jobs. Traders are also waiting for the Federal Reserve to wrap up a meeting where it is expected to announce plans to

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tempered movements in stocks in recent days. The Dow rose 64.10, or o.6 percent , to close at 11,188.72. It reached its closing high of 11,205.03 on April 26. The broader Standard & Poor 's 500 index rose 9.19,

Thomas Bishop, left, talks with a fellow specialist

Monday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. AP PHOTO or o.8 percent , to 1,193.57. The S&P 500, which is more closely watched than the Dow by professional investors, is also still below

its 2010 high of 1,217.28, reached on April 23. The Nasdaq composite index rose 28.68 , or 1.1 percent , to 2 ,533.52.

Housing: More effi ciency ¦

FROM PAGE 1C

mal systems at Ambassador Courts and Reding Senior Center. With the help of OG&E 's rebates for ge othermal systems, the agency will be able to install geothermal systems at tw o additional apartment complexes, Sooner Haven

and Oak Grove, this year. OG&E's Gary Marchbanks said apartment dwellers have special energy-efficiency challenges. "Because those living in apartments rely on their landlords for many energy-efficiency improvements, they often are himited in what they can do to

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J J J J J J Commercial RE Commercial Property For Sale REAL ESTATE AUCTION Ardmore, OK Nov. 18, 10 AM. Building with over 19,000+ sf of space plus over 6,000 sf upper level which includes apartments and office. Building previously housed a sign company. Also selling personal property--lots of transformers and misc. United Country, Hendren & Associates 918-253-4133 and United Country, Wilson Realty 580-2233699. For info or brochure, call either office or LeRoy 918-6950808 or Kelly 580-2226248 or go to www.unitedcountry.com/jayok or www.ucwilsonreal ty.com. Also selling 90 acres near Healdton, OK surface and mineral rights. LeRoy Hendren

Established Business For Sale FINE JEWELRY AUCTION See AUCTIONS, Sec. 5030 COOK AUCTION COMPANY

Office Space For Sale Portable Dr's. Office approx. 4000 sf. $50,000 405-368-8010

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NewsOK.com/CityFeet

To advertise call 475.3668

Office Space For Rent

GREAT Space OFFICE Convenient NW Locations: I-40 & Meridian NW Expressway & May Britton/Lake Hefner Parkway 200-6000sf 946-2516

GUTHRIE RETAIL Industrial Property FOR LEASE 1,100SF. Prime location For Rent Warehouse/Office I-40 & Meridian, 2200-4819sf, 946-2516

improve the efficiency of their homes;' said March banks, the utility 's manger of demand management. He said weather stripping and caulking around windows and doors are two low-cost ways customers can make their apartments more energy efficient.

620 Division Street! Available Immediately Call 405-641-1222 or 405-206-2567

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Oklahoma's website


ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD

Making ‘Due’

Worlds collide

Zach Galifianakis talks about his post-“Hangover” success and filming the road trip movie “Due Date” with Robert Downey Jr.

Flavors of India and Mexico come together in a spicy burrito recipe.

PAGE 6D

PAGE 3D

GOT A MINUTE?

LIFE

D THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

ILLUSTRATION BY TODD PENDLETON, THE OKLAHOMAN

ROLLING AROUND Take a Segway tour of the state Capitol grounds, Bricktown or the Oklahoma River. Cost is $50 per person. For more information, call (800) 755-3305 or go online to www.sure beatswalking.com. Find more activities at wimgo.com.

FUNDRAISER SUB SANDWICH SALE SOON Junior Hospitality’s annual Sub Sandwich Blitz will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Mayfair Baptist Church, NW 50 and May. Orders of 10 or more can be preordered for delivery. Sandwiches are $6; chips and drinks also will be available. Proceeds help Junior Hospitality fund grants and help provide vital services. Junior Hospitality has been making and selling subs since 1954, starting at the Oklahoma State Fair. For more information, go to www.jhok.org or e-mail jh@jhok.org.

BOOKS

DID YOU KNOW?

Turkey thawing times The time required for a frozen turkey to thaw in a refrigerator depends on the bird’s weight. Turkey size Hours to thaw 5 to 10 pounds 24 to 48 10 to 15 pounds 48 to 72 15 to 20 pounds 72 to 96 20 to 25 pounds 96 to 120

TALKING TURKEY Becky Varner has the information on fresh versus frozen birds. PAGE 3D

ners later. Planning on a big Sherrel If you love leftovers then plan bird this year? The Jones on the max: 1½ pounds of turearly birds get the big sjones@ key per person. Sounds garganbirds. Early birds are opubco.com tuan, but you have to figure all the ones who plan those bones and parts of the what size turkey they turkey that don’t make it to the need and place an order now. If it is impor- A PASSION FOR FOOD plate for Thanksgiving tant to you to have the dinner. Of course, biggest, freshest, perfect bird, you are you can use much of that in going to need to do some scouting and SEE TURKEY, PAGE 3D advance work.

Size matters What size turkey or how much turkey you are going to need depends on how many folks are showing up for Thanksgiving dinner. If you are the host this year, it is good to get the count as soon as possible. The size turkey to get also depends on how fond you are of leftovers. We happen to love turkey sandwiches, and I like to have a great dish of turkey tetrazzini tucked in the freezer to thaw and bake for one of those busy-day din-

Church festival offers tastes of Mediterranean

Baklawa and Mamoul cookies prepared for the St. Elijah Antiochian Eastern Orthodox Christian Church annual Food Festival and Bake Sale in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

What started as a bake sale to raise funds for a small church populated by local Lebanese immigrants has become the signature weekend to raise funds for local charity by a church that’s grown to 800 members and includes multiple cultures. St. Elijah Antiochian Eastern Orthodox Christian Church, 15000 N May Ave., begins its annual Food Festival and Bake Sale on Friday morning, spotlighting foods of the eastern Mediterranean.

Dave Cathey dcathey@ opubco.com

FOOD DUDE The fun and food will be from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The event is a celebration of the culinary ancestry of the St. SEE FESTIVAL, PAGE 3D

ONLINE Watch a video of the Food Dude’s visit to St. Elijah for a preview of the foods at this weekend’s Food Festival and Bake Sale. NEWSOK.COM

‘MAD MEN’ ADVICE DUE NEW YORK — “Mad Men” character Roger Sterling has a book coming out — for real. Grove Press said Thursday that “Sterling’s Gold: Wit & Wisdom of an Ad Man” will be released Nov. 16. The writing and publication of the book is a subplot on AMC’s “Mad Men.” It’s a collection of observations from ad firm executive Roger Sterling Jr. Sterling is played on the show by John Slattery, but the book’s real author is not being revealed. Among the book’s nuggets: “When a man gets to a point in his life when his name’s on the building, he can get an unnatural sense of entitlement.” FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

INDEX Food TV | Puzzles Dear Abby Horoscope

2D 4D 5D 5D


2D

.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

COOKING CLASSES

FOOD

DEEP FORK GRILL BIG ON FLAVOR FOR GROUP’S LUNCH OUTING

TODAY Thanksgiving With a Spanish Twist — International Pantry, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., $45. Thanksgiving Filipino Style — Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (continues Thursday), $29. TUESDAY Middle Eastern Holiday Dinner — International Pantry, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., $45. THURSDAY Raw Food Beginners — 105degrees Academy, 6 to 8 p.m., $40. SATURDAY Harvest Soups With Seasonal Squashes — chef Jermiah Duddleston, Gourmet Grille (Oklahoma City); chef Rick Bourgeois, Gourmet Grille (Midwest City), 1 to 1:45 p.m., free. MONDAY Tofu 101 — Sunita Sitara, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $39. Thanksgiving 101 — Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (continues Tuesday), $49. TUESDAY Learn With Lunch: Thanksgiving Foods — The Oklahoman columnist Becky Varner, Gourmet Grille (Oklahoma City), noon to 1 p.m., free. NOV. 10 Big Truck: Big Flavor — Chefs Cally Johnson and Kathryn Mathis, Artspace at Untitled, 6 p.m., $75. NOV. 11 New Ideas for Thanksgiving Sides — Chef Kurt Fleischfresser, The Tasting Room, 6 to 8:30 p.m., $50. Brownies and Bars — 105degrees Academy, 6 to 8 p.m. $40. Smokin’ and Brinin’ Turkey 101 — Francis Tuttle, 6 to 9 p.m., $39. NOV. 13 Pies and Tarts — 105degrees Academy, 1 to 3 p.m., $40. Holiday Cookie Cutouts for Kids — Sara Candelaria, Rose State, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., $25. Apple and Cranberry Pie and Pumpkin Pie — chef Jermiah Duddleston, Gourmet Grille (Oklahoma City); chef Rick Bourgeois, Gourmet Grille (Midwest City), 1 to 1:45 p.m., free.

BY GREG ELWELL

CONTACTS

› › › › › › › › › › › ›

Luna Tomato and Mozzarella Salad from Deep Fork Grill.

PHOTO BY GREG ELWELL, WIMGO.COM

ONLINE

Wimgo Food Blogger greg@wimgo.com

A couple of friends joined me on my recent visit to Deep Fork Grill, 5418 N Western, a spot most of us previously enjoyed but hadn’t returned to for whatever reason. I hadn’t gone back since my 30th birthday, when my friends and I had the Chef’s Choice meal and had to be rolled out the door. This time we went for something a little less extravagant and shared the fruit and cheese appetizer. Strawberry, pineapple and apple were paired with smoked Gouda, dill havarti and creamy Brie with a few toast points on the side. There was nothing on the plate that I didn’t enjoy, though I thought merely slicing up one strawberry was a little weak. Everybody really loved the havarti and dill, which was extremely flavorful, but my favorite was — as always — the Brie. Our waiter was very careful with the dish, especially after one of my dining companions shattered her water glass, and took it back to examine it for shards. He was also nice enough to bring out a few more toast points when we plowed through our original allotment. As my friend Jennifer put it: “The cheese plate was good, though fairly standard. At least they buy locally at Forward Foods.” We were also given a little chicken brochette amuse bouche to start off the meal. Chicken, wrapped in bacon, grilled to perfection and served on a spicy sauce? I could have forgone the rest of my meal and just eaten those all day. And I’m not saying for my meal — I’m saying I would

Read all the reviews from The Corner Booth: Read more reviews at the Food Dude blog:

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WWW.NEWSOK.COM/ DAVE-CATHEY

Poblano-Corn Chowder from Deep Fork Grill. PHOTO BY GREG ELWELL,

DEAR MELBA: I want to make some of the ice cream from the county and state fair winners recipes but am having trouble finding chocolate ice cream mix and double vanilla ice cream mix. June Wilson, City DEAR MELBA: Years ago, you awarded tasting spoons for exceptional recipes. One was for Cinnamon Rolls. Hopefully, someone still has that recipe. Carol Clark, City DEAR MELBA: Arapaho-Butler Elementary

Melba Lovelace mlovelace@ opubco.com

SWAP SHOP School needs UPC codes from Best Choice and Campbell’s food products. We also save Box Tops for Education to buy playground equipment. They can be mailed to the school in care of me, Box 160, Arapaho, OK 73620. Vayda Brown DEAR MELBA: I wanted to let you know that the famous Junior Hospitality sandwiches will be available to the public from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Mayfair Baptist Church, NW 50 and May. Money raised from the sales annually goes to support local community programs. Natalie Fix, City DEAR MELBA: The Statesman Club Retirement Community would like to request used greeting and Christmas cards. Only fronts are needed. Residents use them to create new cards. This is a great use for all

WIMGO.COM

Big enough that I worried about it spilling off the plate and trying to invade other dishes. Thankfully, rather than opt for appeasement, Julie decided to fight it straight on with a fork. With so many great options, I had trouble choosing but ended up with the Angry Peppers pasta dish. It’s fettuccine in a light cream sauce, topped with roasted, stuffed peppers and cheese, spinach and mushrooms. The peppers might have been angry about being roasted, but they weren’t spicy. That said, I wasn’t angry, either, because the whole thing was pretty tasty. Here’s Jen again: “Seems like more of a dinner place as far as the ambience goes. A little dark and stuffy for lunch, in my opinion. I suspect some of their specialty dishes would have been really good, but $15 to $18 for a lunch entree seems a little steep. But that is just me being cheap.” It’s not a budget meal, for sure, but if you’re in the mood for good food, I think you’ll enjoy hanging out at Deep Fork Grill.

Baby shampoo is easy on the eyes DEAR READERS: After cataract surgery, I asked ophthalmologist Gemini Jill Bogie how to clean the “goop” out of my eyelashes when I get up in the mornings. She suggested washing them every morning and every evening with warm water and baby shampoo. Rinse thoroughly, but it still doesn’t cause your eyes to burn if a little shampoo gets in them. I thought it was such a good idea, I now use baby shampoo instead of soap for bathing. If it’s gentle enough for a baby, it’s gentle enough for me. Thank you, Dr. Bogie. Melba

Francis Tuttle Technology Center, 12777 N Rockwell Ave., 717-4900, www.francistuttle.com or jmansell@francistuttle.com. International Pantry, 1618 W Lindsey, Norman, 360-0765, www.intlpantry.com. Gourmet Grille, in two Buy For Less locations, 3501 Northwest Expressway, 946-6342, and 10011 SE 15, 733-4385. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3, 815-9995, info@art spaceatuntitled.org, www.artspaceatuntitled.org. Rose State College, 6420 SE 15, Midwest City, 733-7392, Social Science Building, Room S137, www. rose.edu. 105degrees Academy, 5820 N Classen Blvd., Suite 1, 842-1050.

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WIMGO.COM/RESTAURANTS

have stayed there for the next 12 hours, happily eating plate after plate of those wonderful little bites. Ridiculously good. We then moved on to soup: The ladies all opted for the soup special — a cup of corn and poblano soup — while I went with the always-available corn chowder. They all raved about the spicy, creamy soup. My chowder was good, though it seemed very similar to a tortilla soup, seasoningwise. Regardless, I slurped it down. Everybody went every which way for entrees. Jennifer got the chicken sandwich, which I’ll let her explain: “The chicken sandwich was tasty, nothing special. But, I guess you can’t expect much when you order a grilled chicken sandwich. The sauce, bacon, cheese and bun were all great. The chicken itself was bland and dry. Again, fine, just nothing special.” Dawn got the Luna Tomato and Mozzarella Salad, which is exactly like it sounds. Fresh mozzarella, ripe tomatoes, with a balsamic vinaigrette on top. I sneaked a bite and thought it was very tasty. Julie got a salad special with plenty of vegetables on top. It was a big salad.

› › ›

those cards stacked away in a box. Please ask that the cards be mailed to me at Statesman Club Retirement Community, 10401 Vineyard Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73120. Patty Ridenour DEAR MELBA: Last spring, first, the big hail came, then the downpour of rain. And now, we’re only weeks from Christmas. During the hailstorm, the unfortunate roof had some damage, and a leak opened over my vast collection of cookbooks and recipes, some dating from the 1920s. While rescuing them from a watery demise, I came across a magazine article from a November 1954 copy of Woman’s Home Companion and thought it would be fun to share parts of an article about a visit to Oklahoma by Nell Nichols. She described the weather in Tulsa as “one of those beautiful Oklahoma mornings immortalized in song.” Nichols gathered some young mothers for lunch and conversation. Since Christmas is upon us, I thought readers might be interested in one of the tips she shared. Regarding baking cookies for Christ-

mas, she said, “Properly packaged, many kinds (of cookies) keep several weeks in a cold room or freezer.” She also suggested trays of cookies as gifts for friends at the office. Christine, The Village DEAR MELBA: A reader asked where to find ladyfingers. We have them at our Gourmet Gallery stores. Janet McDonald, City DEAR MELBA: The International Pantry, 1618 W Lindsey, Norman, carries packaged ladyfingers. They are the crisp variety, which works best when making tiramisu. Jocelyn, The International Pantry DEAR MELBA: Please invite readers to come to our annual fall bazaar anytime between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday at New Hope United Methodist Church, 11600 N Council Road. There’ll be about 30 booths displaying jewelry, candles, holiday items, etc. And there will be a nice lunch served by the young people of the church. Nancy Hanneld If you have a problem other readers might help solve or an idea you’d like to share, write to Melba’s Swap Shop, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. Please include your name and address.

EVENTS GOURMET GALLERY OPEN HOUSE SET The Gourmet Gallery, 1532 S Boulevard in Edmond and 2820 NW 122 in Oklahoma City, will have a holiday open house from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Free samples and recipes for your holiday entertaining and gift-giving plans will be offered. Products at both stores will be marked down 20 percent. For more information, call 715-3663.

HEALTHY GROCERY TOURS SET Buy For Less will hold Healthy Grocery Shopping Tours with The Oklahoman columnist Becky Varner. Varner, a licensed dietitian, will guide the free tours, which will include label explanations for diabetes, celiac and heart health. The tour includes sample products, recipes, a newsletter and health brochure as well as healthy tips. Varner will give her first tour Tuesday at Buy For Less at Portland Avenue and Northwest Expressway. She also will give a tour Nov. 16 at the Midwest City store at Post Road and SE 15. Both tours will begin at 2 p.m.

COACH HOUSE GALA NEARS The Coach House, 6437 Avondale Drive, will celebrate its 25th anniversary Nov. 12. The crown jewel of the Western Concepts restaurants will hold three gala dinners Nov. 12, 13 and 14 prepared by owner-chef Kurt Fleischfresser. Cost is $150, which includes gratuity and wine. For reservations, call 842-1000.

FOR BASKETBALL FANS ROCOCO TO SHUTTLE THUNDER FANS Rococo Restaurant and Fine Wine, 2824 N Pennsylvania Ave., is offering limousine and coach service to and from all Thunder home games this season. Complimentary cookies will be available to all going to the game. For more information, call 528-2824 or go to www.rococorestaurant.com.

TACOS FOR THUNDER FANS The Whole Enchilada Cafe, 4 Santa Fe Plaza, will be open before Thunder home games this season. The fast, casual gourmet taqueria owned and operated by the Paseo Grill team typically closes after lunch service but will open two hours before all home games this season. The restaurant is beneath the Santa Fe parking garage. For more information, call 239-3624 or go to www.thewholeenchiladacafe.com.

THANKSGIVING VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT The Culinary Kitchen, 7302 N Western Ave., will deliver turkeys for City Rescue Mission and Food and Shelter for Friends in Norman on Thanksgiving again this year and could use a helping hand themselves. Owner Claude Rappaport, with help from friends, family and the technology of TurboChef ovens, will see to it that those who show up at either shelter for Thanksgiving will not only have a Thanksgiving feast to enjoy but a fresh one. To deliver from 80 to 100 turkeys to the missions, Rappaport needs all the help he can get in preparing the turkeys the day before and during the wee hours of Thanksgiving morning. For more information, call 418-4884. FROM STAFF REPORTS


LIFE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

.

3D

Price cycles big factor influencing purchases Q: I am a mother of four, and there are chickens can sell from 89 cents per pound six people in my household. I try to save to more than $1.89 per pound. A 1-pound money every way I can. bag of shrimp can sell for Do you have any ad$9.99 or as low as $3.99. vice on whether it is If you want to enjoy a Jill better to budget dinshrimp dinner and this hapCataldo ners around sale items pens to be a week in which for the week or by usthat bag of shrimp is priced ing coupons? near $10, you’ll pay twice as A: It’s an often-remuch as you would if you peated piece of advice: waited to buy that shrimp a COUPON QUEEN “Plan your meals few weeks from now. And, in around what’s on sale turn, if I buy a few extra packthis week.” But in my experience, this ages of ground beef when its price is low isn’t the best way to save money. If you then keep them in the freezer, I won’t pay limit meal planning to weekly sale items, a higher price for it when I need more for there’s a strong possibility you will still meals during the next few weeks. overspend on what you buy. These price cycles are a huge factor inThere is a wide range of per-pound fluencing what I buy. Once you start payprices for meat, poultry and seafood. One ing attention to the highs and lows, you’ll week, a pound of ground beef may sell for start intuitively noting what the “good” $2.49. A few weeks later, the same beef per-pound prices are for meat, poultry may be on sale for $1.59 per pound. Whole and seafood. As you recognize these, keep

them in mind as mental benchmarks for what to pay in the future. In my area, my personal benchmark for most meat is $1.99 per pound or less; bone-in chicken, 89 cents per pound or less; pork chops, 99 cents per pound or less; fish fillets or shrimp, $3.99 per pound or less. If I want to serve chicken breasts and they’re not selling for a good price at the moment, I won’t pay whatever price they happen to be. I simply won’t buy them that week. But when they do go on sale, I’ll stock up, buying enough for the current week’s meals and then some. This is also where having a second freezer is extremely helpful. Meat can be stored for many months at a time. I’m never afraid to buy big when a great sale comes around. If I have enough freezer space, I’ll buy just about as much as I can store and know that I’ll use it in the next few months. When one of my stores priced

ground turkey at 99 cents a pound, I bought 20 pounds of it, froze it and ate it for many months after the sale. Now, my freezer contains five whole chickens. They were a steal at 69 cents per pound; near the end of the sale, my store marked them down an additional 50 percent. I took those 5-pound chickens home for less than $2 each. If you don’t have a lot of freezer space, you can still adopt a per-pound pricing benchmark strategy by learning the best prices for what you buy and then sticking to your benchmarks. Be open to planning weekly meals around sales, but only buy when the per-pound price is at a low point in the cycle. The cycles repeat frequently. If there are no good sales on chicken this week, rest assured more will come around. Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three, never passes up a good deal. Learn more about couponing at her website, www.jillcataldo.com. E-mail your couponing victories and questions to jill@ctwfeatures.com. CTW FEATURES

Using fresh turkey ends Festival: Sale this weekend chore of thawing bird FROM PAGE 1D

Let’s talk turkey, specifically fresh turkey. The term “fresh” can only be placed on raw poultry that never has been below 26 degrees. When turkey drops below 26 degrees, it becomes firm to the touch because the free water within it changes to ice. At 26 degrees, the surface is still pliable and will yield if pressed with the thumb. This labeling rule regards a Becky “truth in laVarner beling” issue and not one about food safety, since most pathoRECIPE FOR HEALTH genic bacteria do not multiply or multiply very slowly at normal refrigerator temperatures. There is no specific labeling required on poultry that is kept between 0 and 26 degrees. The term “fresh” should not be used on the label of poultry that is chilled to the point of being hard to the touch. Additives are not allowed in fresh turkeys. The Food Safety and Inspection Service requires that safe-handling instructions be on all raw turkey products (fresh and frozen) packaged and labeled in federally and state inspected plants or in retail stores and sold to consumers. Fresh poultry should always carry the term “keep refrigerated” on the label. If the poultry has been held at 0 degrees or below, it’s label should carry the term “frozen” or “previously frozen” and say “keep frozen.” Select a fresh turkey just before checking out at the grocery store so that it is out of the refrigerator for minimal time. It is a good idea to put the turkey in a disposable plastic bag, if available, to prevent leaking onto other foods in the cart. Avoid making stops on the way home and immediately refrigerate the turkey. The refrigerator should be 40 degrees or colder. The turkey should be used within two days. Otherwise it should be frozen at 0 degrees or colder. If the turkey is frozen to be used within two months, it can be kept in the original packaging. Turkey that will be frozen longer than two months should be wrapped airtight in freezer bags, freezer plastic wrap, freezer paper or aluminum foil. Properly wrapping the turkey prevents “freezer burn,” which is the drying of the surface of the turkey. Fresh turkeys are inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, and the quality of the turkeys is the same. It is a matter of personal preference that determines whether to buy a fresh or frozen turkey. Some people prefer a turkey free of any additives and select a fresh turkey. Others want to avoid the process of defrosting a frozen turkey. Safe handling when preparing the turkey is important. All equipment and materials used for storage and preparation of the turkey must be clean. Wash hands thoroughly with hot, soapy water before and after all stages of handling raw poultry. The oven temperature should be no lower than 325 degrees when cooking a turkey. The turkey must reach a minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the

Cranberry Orange and Pecan Topped Sweet Potatoes PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

ONLINE Watch a video of Becky Varner making her Cranberry Orange and Pecan Topped Sweet Potatoes. NEWSOK.COM

thickest part of the breast. Always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of the cooked turkey. For personal preference reasons, some people prefer to cook to a higher temperature. Check the label on the turkey for cooking times. Approximate cooking times for various weights are: 8 to 12 pounds: unstuffed, 2¾ to 3 hours; stuffed, 3 to 3½ hours. 12 to 14 pounds: unstuffed, 3 to 3¾ hours; stuffed, 3½ to 4 hours. 14 to 18 pounds: unstuffed, 3¾ to 4¼ hours; stuffed, 4 to 4¼ hours. 18 to 20 pounds: unstuffed, 4¼ to 4½ hours; stuffed, 4¼ to 4¾ hours. 20 to 24 pounds: unstuffed, 4½ to 5 hours; stuffed, 4¾ to 5¼ hours. It may be a good idea to call your butcher to reserve a fresh turkey. Buy For Less, Crescent Market, Crest and Homeland have reported they will have fresh turkeys. But order now as supplies will be limited. Here is a recipe for a simple, healthful side dish to go with your fresh turkey.

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CRANBERRY ORANGE AND PECAN TOPPED SWEET POTATOES Makes 4 generous servings 4 small sweet potatoes 1 cup orange juice 2 ⁄3 cup Craisins ¼ cup chopped pecans Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Scrub sweet potatoes and wash thoroughly. Pierce several times with a sharp knife and wrap each in aluminum foil. Place in oven to bake for 1 hour. Place orange juice, Craisins and pecans in a small saucepan and bring to boil. Turn burner down and simmer 10 to 12 minutes until thickened. When sweet potatoes are done, remove aluminum foil and slit potato lengthwise. Press in the ends to open potato. Spoon cranberry, orange and pecan topping over each sweet potato and serve. Nutrition information per serving: 261 calories, 5 grams fat. Reference: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service.

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If you have a recipe you’d like to see made more healthful, e-mail the complete recipe along with your first and last name, city or town, daytime telephone number and details about the recipe to Becky Varner, R.D., L.D., at beckyvarner@cox.net.

Elijah congregation, which formed in October 1920. The first priest of the church at 1118 NW 2 had a familiar family name: Shadid, first name Shokrallah. The Shadids along with the Naifehs, Homseys and Farhas, to name a few, have been pillars of the Oklahoma City community since — and members of St. Elijah. The parish moved to 1920 NW 30 in 1930 then to 2101 NW 16 in 1949, where it stayed until the land the church currently occupies was bought in 1994. The first services were held two years later. The Food Festival and Bake Sale started in 1976 to fund the church’s expansion. Lifetime member Harvey Homsey said proceeds from the event now are used, in great part, to support schools and local charities such as Infant Crisis Center, The Children’s Center, Tree House, Prevent Blindness, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Mercy Hospice, YMCA, Diabetes Solutions, The Pantry, City Rescue Mission, Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma and Greenvale Elementary. The success of the event revolves around the kitch-

en. And the kitchen is run by Renee Shadid. She told me she starts planning for the event in August and works on it daily until it’s complete. Planning for the following year will begin almost immediately. The result is a collection of Lebanese delicacies. Cabbage Rolls: They are stuffed with lean ground beef and rice. Talami: A homemade bread handed down from generation to generation from the congregation’s founders. You’ll find it topped with meat for Sfihas, cheese or sumac and thyme for Zatars. Taboula: You say Taboula; I say Tabbouleh. Regardless, when you mix chopped parsley and cracked wheat, tomatoes, onions and lemon juice, it’s fresh and flavorful. Baked Kibba: Trimmed and ground London broil with fine ground wheat, onions and pine nuts; sort of a Mediterranean meatloaf. Baklawa: Here’s another for the Grammar police. The Greeks and the Lebanese agree on the nuts, phyllo dough, sugar and butter. The big difference, besides the “w” instead of the “v” in the name, is the topping. The Greek version is topped

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AP Food Editor

What’s a few cultures clashing in the name of good food? Such is the case in this chicken and rice burrito. It may sound and look Mexican, but the flavor is all Indian. For simplicity, we let the grocery store do most of the cooking for you. We start with a rotisserie chicken, the meat from which is tossed with coconut milk, curry powder and finely diced paneer (a type of Indian cheese). Then the mixture gets stuffed inside a flour tortilla with rice and briefly heated in the oven. It also could be done in the microwave. For condiments, you could go with mango chutney or mango

salsa. Either way, a dollop of sour cream or plain Greek-style yogurt would be a fine finish. If you have trouble finding paneer, substitute feta or Gouda. Neither is similar to paneer in taste, but either would be delicious in this recipe.

CURRIED CHICKEN AND RICE BURRITOS

FROM PAGE 1D

making stock for winter soup. But those parts such as the neck, bones and giblets figure into the size. For a moderate amount of leftovers, figure a pound per person. That still doesn’t exactly sound like the Weight Watchers recommendation of meat portions the size of a deck of cards, but there will be those never-plated turkey parts to figure into your needs. Looking to waste not in order to want not? Do you think guests will be fine with a mix of white and dark meat? Then you can get by with a mere three-fourths of a pound per person. You could really skim that down to half a pound per person if half the diners are children or include several skinny aunts who eat like birds. This three-fourths-pound rule seems a bit risky for most families, as the big eaters have a way of balancing out the needs. If you have a lot of white-meat people around the table, consider supplementing the bird with a turkey breast or even a spiral-sliced ham. Most Thanksgivings, I just get all the meat separated into bags in the fridge, and the big guys are dropping into the kitchen for halftime turkey sandwiches. You might as well stock up on some heavyduty paper plates, sliced bread, mayon-

Start to finish: 30 minutes Makes 8 servings 2¼-pound cooked rotisserie chicken 1 cup coconut milk 1 tablespoon curry powder 1 teaspoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

4 ounces paneer (a firm Indianstyle cheese), diced 1 medium red onion, diced 2 cups cooked basmati rice 8 large (burrito-size) flour tortillas Mango salsa or mango chutney, to serve Heat oven to 400 degrees. Spritz a large baking dish with cooking spray. Remove meat from chicken, discarding bones and skin. Chop any large pieces of meat into bitesize pieces. In a large bowl, whisk together coconut milk, curry powder, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Add chicken, paneer and onion, tossing to coat. Mix in rice. Microwave tortillas about 10

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Turkey: The hunt begins naise and leafy lettuce. If your house is like ours over Thanksgiving, these supplies are required if you want to spend more time with family and friends.

Consider appliance space The other big consideration for determining the bird’s size is practicality. How is your oven and refrigerator space? How long will it take to thaw (if you are buying a frozen bird) in the refrigerator or cold water? Lifting a 22-pounder in and out of the oven just may not be one of your options this year. Availability and price are huge considerations in picking a bird. Do you have a pan that will hold the biggest bird safely? Holding out for that pre-Thanksgiving frozen turkey sale? Be sure to get a size that will thaw in time to roast properly. Keep in mind how long it will take to cook the bird. Brown-in bags reduce the time and may need to be figured into your pre-Thanksgiving grocery list. Get the size appropriate to the bird, and get them early to avoid last-minute availability issues. Warning: When steam is released from the bag, the heat can cause injury. Planning and preparing the Thanksgiving meal is one of the most satisfying of cooking experiences. So, get out there and hunt down that bird.

Enjoy Indian flavor by way of chicken and rice burrito BY J.M. HIRSCH

with honey; at St. Elijah, it’s topped with homemade simple syrup. The baklawa is also offered as a sundae, served with ice cream and chocolate syrup. Kafta Beef Sandwich: Charcoal-fired ground beef mixed with onions and parsley in pita bread. Kafta Chicken Sandwich: Lean chicken cooked over hot coals served on a pita. Ruzz and Yahknee: Vermicelli pasta sauteed in butter plus seasoned rice topped with a tomato sauce that includes green beans and sliced sirloin. Ghouraybi and Mamoul Cookies: They’re essentially the same recipe, but the Ghouraybi was an inexpensive way of treating families to dessert. When a little extra money was available, nuts were added, and the Mamoul was born. Both are made from dough that mixes sugar, flour, butter and orange blossom water. Visitors can sit down to a full plate of food for $14, order a la carte or visit the Culinary Cupboard, where most of the goods are offered for sale to enjoy at home. For more information, call 535-7552 or go to www. stelijahokc.com.

seconds to make them pliable. One at a time, place each tortilla flat on the counter. Spoon about ¾ cup of the chicken mixture across the center of the tortilla. Fold both ends in, then roll up. Place each burrito, seam side down, in prepared baking dish. When all burritos are assembled, spritz the tops with cooking spray. Bake the burritos for 15 to 20 minutes or until heated through. Serve with either mango salsa or mango chutney. Nutrition information per serving: 682 calories (253 calories from fat), 28 g fat (12 g saturated; 0 g trans fats), 140 mg cholesterol, 67 g carbohydrates, 42 g protein, 3 g fiber, 1,053 mg sodium.

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TV | PUZZLES

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Dallas police women in national spotlight BY SCOTT GOLDSTEIN The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — National television audiences have watched armored Dallas SWAT members bust down doors in search of criminals. They’ve seen homicide detectives interrogate suspects. Now comes trash-talking yet tender crime-fighting women who can wrestle combative men to the ground more easily than they can manage the attitude of a stubborn teenage daughter. It’s just another episode of the Dallas Police Department’s latest reality television program featuring five women — a demographic police officials have historically struggled to attract to the profession. Department brass hope “Police Women of Dallas,” 8 p.m. Thursdays on TLC, will draw more female applicants while also portraying a positive image of the organization to a national audience. “This is not a soft female-focus show,” said Nancy Daniels, senior vice president of production and development for TLC. “Women watch it and feel empowered and amazed, and men watch it and they’re like, ‘Yeah, that’s kick a- -.’ ” But it’s not all harmless entertainment. While Dallas avoided major controversies tied to reality television programs so far, mixing reality TV with law enforcement is potentially messy. That’s why Dallas police have rejected numerous offers over the years and don’t agree to do shows without certain contractual guidelines. Officers in Detroit were accused of playing to the cameras in May. With cameras from the reality show “The First 48” rolling, officers in search of a murder suspect used a flash-bang grenade as they raided a home. In the commotion, an officer’s gun fired. The bullet struck and killed a 7-year-old girl. Amid a community firestorm that followed, that city’s mayor banned reality television crews from tagging along with police units. The incident may have also played a role in the police chief’s firing two months later. TLC promotional materials say “Police Women of Dallas” showcases “Southern grace and Texas swagger” in a city “known for its relaxed lifestyle, art, cuisine and football. But behind the cowboy boots and Tex-Mex food, like all cities, Dallas struggles with a wide array of crimes.” Last week’s premiere included longhorns, oil drills, hay fields, boots and a windmill. The images move to a more familiar Dallas, as Senior Cpl. Melissa Person races to a car accident involving robbery suspects along Riverfront Boulevard. The female officers — each being paid up to $5,000 for services outside of their police duties — say the cameras took some getting used to at first. “Every time I got a call … everybody was trying to come help me,” Sgt. Tracy Jones said. Judging from the first episode, these five women can lay down the discipline, via talk, Taser, pepper spray and physical force. But they also show a tenderness not typically associated with tough cops. “We all look different; we’re all shaped different; we all do our job differently,” Jones said. “But we still have the same outcome. … Because you know by us being women, I think we can relate to a lot of different problems that we encounter, and we can be sensitive and emotional and all at the same time and still get the job done.”

TODAY’S TOP TV PICKS

“Undercovers,” 7 p.m., KFOR-4. Shaw (Gerald McRaney) sends Steven, Samantha and Leo (Boris Kodjoe, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Carter MacIntyre) to Peru to foil a plot to assassinate the president-elect (Alex Fernandez). “Circus,” 8 p.m., OETA-13. Step right up as this six-episode documentary miniseries opens with 150 performers and crew members of the Big Apple Circus as they assemble in Walden, N.Y., to begin putting together their tour.

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◊NewsChannel ◊(:35) The 4 at 10PM (CC) Tonight Show With Jay Leno (CC) Alguien te Mira Autoridades Noticiero Tel- Aurora (En Esbuscan a un multihomicida. (En emundo Pedro téreo) (SS) Estéreo) (SS) Sevcec. The King of The King of My Wife and Express Credit Queens (In Ste- Queens “Buggie Kids “The Maid” Auto reo) (CC) Nights” (CC) ◊(:01) In the Spotlight With ◊Eyewitness ◊(:35) Nightline Robin Roberts: All Access Nash- News 5 (CC) (CC) ville LeAnn Rimes; Brad Paisley. (In Stereo) (CC) ◊The Defenders “Las Vegas v. ◊News 9 at 10 ◊(:35) Late Black Betty” A client reveals PM (CC) Show With Dadangerous information. (In Stevid Letterman reo) (CC) (CC) My Name Is That ’70s Show According to Frasier Frasier Earl (In Stereo) “Take It or Jim (In Stereo) causes sports(CC) Leave It” (CC) caster to quit. ◊Fox 25 News (CC) ◊Fox 25 Late ◊TMZ (In SteEdition (CC) reo) (CC)

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(In Stereo) ‘R’ CMT 39 166 327 525 The Dukes of Hazzard Sister Wives Sister Wives Sister Wives LA Ink “Kat Minus Sixx” ◊LA Ink “Kat in Wonderland” LA Ink “Kat Minus Sixx” TLC 40 178 280 250 Sister Wives The Ultimate Fighter Blue Mountain Blue Mountain SPIKE 45 168 241 145 UFC: Best of 2009 (In Stereo) Don’t Forget My Big Friggin’ Wedding I Love Money (CC) ◊I Love Money (CC) ◊Real and Chance VH1 46 162 335 518 Don’t Forget Cops (CC) Full Throttle Saloon ◊Most Shocking Black Gold Forensic Files Forensic Files TruTV 48 204 246 165 Cops (CC) Ghost Hunters “The Fear Cage” Ghost Hunters “Titanic Terror” ◊Ghost Hunters “Home Is Ghost Hunters “Home Is Where ◊Hollywood ◊Hollywood Where the Heart Is” (In Stereo) Treasure Treasure “Joe the Heart Is” (In Stereo) (CC) SYFY 49 122 244 151 Bed and breakfast. (In Stereo) Artifacts from the Titanic. (In (CC) Stereo) (CC) (CC) Goes Ape” 106 & Park: 10 Years The Mo’Nique Show (CC) BET 50 124 329 155 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live } ›› “National Security” (2003) Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ Man v. Food Man v. Food Man v. Food ◊Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ◊Food Wars Man v. Food ◊101 Challenges (CC) Travel 51 215 277 254 Man v. Food Johnny Test Would Happen Destroy Build Ed, Edd, Eddy Ed, Edd, Eddy King of Hill King of Hill Family Guy Family Guy Cartoon 52 176 296 325 Total Drama Raymond ◊Harry Loves Harry Loves Roseanne Roseanne TVLand 54 106 301 138 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Raymond Colbert Report Chappelle’s Chappelle’s Swardson Futurama ◊South Park ◊Ugly Amer Daily Show Colbert Report Comedy 56 107 249 140 Daily Show Unwrapped The Next Iron Chef “Respect” Bobby Flay Bobby Flay ◊Tailgate Warriors-Guy Fieri Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Food 57 110 231 452 Good Eats House Hunters Property ◊My First Place Income Prop. Professional House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Crasher My First Place HGTV 58 112 229 450 Hunters Int’l I’m Alive “Gold” (CC) I Shouldn’t Be Alive (CC) ◊I Shouldn’t Be Alive (In Stereo) I Shouldn’t Be Alive (CC) ANPL 59 184 282 252 Maneaters “Lions” (CC) 19th Hole (Live) Top 10 Top 10 Big Break Dominican Republic 19th Hole Golf Central 19th Hole Golf 60 401 605 641 Quest-Card American Pickers (CC) ◊Marijuana: A Chronic History (CC) Hooked: Illegal Drugs History 61 120 269 270 Hooked: Illegal Drugs Seinfeld House/Payne House/Payne Meet, Browns Meet, Browns ◊Meet, Browns ◊Meet, Browns ◊Lopez Tonight TBS 62 139 247 112 Seinfeld (4:30) } ››› “Saratoga } ››› “The Magic Box” (1951, Biography) Robert Donat, Maria Moguls and Movie Stars: A His- (:15) } ››› “Nickelodeon” TCM 63 132 256 790 Trunk” (1945) Gary Cooper, In- Schell, Margaret Johnston. The life of movie camera inventor Wil- tory of Hollywood “Peepshow (1976) Ryan O’Neal, Burt ReynPioneers” grid Bergman. ‘NR’ (CC) liam Friese-Greene. ‘NR’ (CC) olds, Tatum O’Neal. ‘PG’ (CC) 15 Unforgettable Hollywood Tragedies ◊What’s Eating You ◊Chelsea Lat E! News E! 64 114 236 134 ◊E! News Intersections Intersections Pinks - All Out Stealth Rider Stealth Rider Intersections Intersections Speed 65 150 607 652 NASCAR Race Hub Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. ◊Top Chef: Just Desserts Top Chef: Just Desserts Bravo 67 129 273 181 Top Chef: Just Desserts Who’s the Who’s the Little House on the Prairie An } “Love Is a Four Letter Word” (2007, Romance) Teri Polo, Rob- The Golden The Golden invention broadcasts Laura’s love ert Mailhouse, Barry Bostwick. Respective attorneys for a divorcing Girls “Stan’s Girls “That Was Hallmark 165 185 312 176 Boss? “Sports Boss? “ReBuddies” quiem” (CC) for a new boy in town. Return” (CC) No Lady” couple have an affair. (CC) The Bad Girls Club (CC) } ›› “Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous” (2005) Sandra Bullock. Miss Con. 2 Oxygen 166 127 251 368 The Bad Girls Club (CC) Cox WGN-A

SHORT TAKES TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

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Actor-dancer Ken Berry, 77. Actor-radio personality Shadoe Stevens, 64. Singer Lulu, 62. Actresscomedian Roseanne Barr, 58. Actress Kathy Kinney, 57. Actress Kate Roseanne Barr Capshaw, 57. Comedian Dennis Miller, 57. Singer Adam Ant, 56. Actor Dolph Lundgren, 53.

› › › › › › ›

TV BRIEF ‘THE HASSELHOFFS’ TO PREMIERE IN DECEMBER The reality series “The Hasselhoffs,” spotlighting the life of single dad David Hasselhoff and his two daughters, Taylor Ann, 20, and Hayley, 18, will premiere at 9 p.m. Dec. 5 on A&E. Produced by “American Idol” producers FremantleMedia North America, the 10episode, half-hour series brings viewers inside the Hasselhoff household where “The Hoff” is just “Dad.” Despite juggling many entertainDavid ment and business Hasselhoff endeavors, he is the ultimate “stage dad” and will do anything to help guide his daughters’ decisions as they pursue entertainment careers and manage their group “Bella Vida.” The series tags along with David and Taylor Ann performing side-byside on the set of “The Young and the Restless,” goes behind-thescenes with Hayley at “Huge,” steps in-studio with “Bella Vida” to record, write songs and meet with producers, watches David’s preparations for a comedy roast and travels to Austria, where he orchestrates a production of an epic scale. FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS


ADVICE | ENTERTAINMENT

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

OU troupe delights with premieres PERFORMANCE | ELEMENTS CREATE VARIED MOODS IN SHOW BY CONTEMPORARY DANCE OKLAHOMA ARTISTS NORMAN — A Contemporary Dance Oklahoma concert in which each number creates its own special, distinctive mood is being staged through Sunday at the University of Oklahoma’s Rupel Jones Theatre. Seven men and three women came out of large picture frames, which they ultimately returned to, in the first work, “Portraits.” It was choreographed by Derrick Minter to the strange, static-distorted music of Alva Noto. The 10-member ensemble danced with great energy and athleticism, although “Portraits” was more powerful as an almost abstract, stylized work than as a family narrative related to traditional portrait photography. Wearing modern violet and red costumes that showed off their well-developed bodies beautifully, the performers also made good use of a movable double screen with its own steps (and silhouettes) in “Portraits.” Much briefer and offering a nice contrast to “Portraits” was “Voic-

DANCE REVIEW

Contemporary Dance Oklahoma › When: 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 3 p.m.

Sunday. Where: Rupel J. Jones Theatre, 563 Elm, Norman. dInformation: 325-4101 or www.ou.edu/finearts/dance.

es From the Sea,” choreographed by Kozaburo Yukihiro, a former director of modern dance at OU. A single seashell and a small bridge were the only props of this minimal but delicately poetic and quietly evocative meditation on mortality and the bombing of Hiroshima during World War II. Performing to music by Gustav Mahler in “Voices From the Sea” were Diana Robertson and Anna Claire Brunelli, clad in pink-peach dresses, and Dwayne Cook Jr.,

wearing shades of gray and a white shirt. Much more direct and delightful was “I Could Be Dancing,” choreographed by Austin Hartel to music of the disco era. A ninemember OU dance company had a great time and made the audience have an even better time as it recreated the wonderfully outrageous moves, look and feel of disco to some of its biggest hits. Equally delightful, but very different, was “Ensorcelled” (which means “bewitched or enchanted”), an offbeat fairy tale also choreographed by Hartel, to music composed by OU music faculty member Michael Lee. Terra Easter played the sleeping princess in a curtained bed that seemed to move by itself (with the help of Katherine Irwin) in “Ensorcelled.” Struggling over her were good fairy Brunelli and evil queen Clare Springer, not to mention Mario Romero as a prince, riding his enchanted squirrel steed, Adryan Moorefield, who nearly stole the show.

Adding to the magical atmosphere of “Ensorcelled” was a supporting cast of woodland creatures and garlanded “gentle fairies” who “frolic happily,” almost like escapees from Sandro Botticelli’s “Primavera.” Moorefield returned for a stunning short solo, acting out a song by Gladys Knight with a starry night backdrop in “With a Smile,” a tribute by Minter to Denise Jefferson, director of the Ailey School, who died recently. Eleven dancers mastered the stylized, forceful movements of Martha Graham to portray various aspects of love in the final work, “Diversion of Angels,” choreographed by Graham and staged by Minter. Wearing white, red and yellow to symbolize mature love, erotic love and youthful infatuation convincingly in “Diversion” were Renee Beneteau, Allyson Yates and Brunelli. The OU dance program is highly recommended. — John Brandenburg

Wedding invitation stirs painful past DEAR ABBY: A male cousin greeted warmly, you should say sent me an invitation to his wed- something to your cousin’s fianding. I have met his fiancee a few cee before she marries him. times at family reunions and wedYou could benefit from talking dings, and she to a counselor who seems very sweet. specializes in sexThe problem is my ual abuse to make cousin sexually sure the effects of Jeanne abused me for what happened to Phillips many years when I you don’t affect was younger. I have you in the future. no desire to attend The counselor can his wedding. help you decide DEAR ABBY Am I obligated to what to do from send a card or a there. If you don’t gift? I don’t want his fiancee to attend the wedding, you are under think I don’t like her, but it makes no obligation to send a gift or a me sick to think of celebrating his card. marriage after what he did. What DEAR ABBY: I could never figdo I say when other family mem- ure out why “Margaret,” my wife bers ask why I’m not going? Am I of 20 years, married me. After our obligated to tell her what he did? wedding she tried to give me an Needs to Know in Texas image makeover. She’d buy me DEAR NEEDS TO KNOW: A clothes I left hanging in the closet. young man who sexually abuses She’d contradict and correct me in someone “for years” is a predator. public. In general, she’d find fault And while the news may not be with almost everything I did. She

THEATER REVIEW

“Mindgame” › When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, through Nov. 13. One 8 p.m. performance Nov. 11. Ghostlight Theatre Club, 3110 N Walker. › Where: Information: 286-9412 or www.ghostlight › theatreclub.com.

Ghostlight offers satisfying suspense with ‘Mindgame’ Ghostlight Theatre Club has chosen Anthony Horowitz’s “Mindgame” for the second slot of its 201011 season. “Mindgame” is a refreshing exercise for suspense-seeking viewers. Expertly directed by Lance Garrett, “Mindgame” takes place in an asylum for the criminally insane. Fairfield is situated in an out-of-the-way corner of Suffolk County, England. Mark Styler, a seemingly naive author, journeys to Fairfield to interview an inmate for his newest book. He meets Dr. Farquhar, who, though unprepared for his arrival, questions him about his interest in lunatic criminals. After some discussion, Farquhar agrees to have Nurse Plimpton provide a spot of tea and a sandwich. Terry Veal gives a wonderful reading of Farquhar, and Linda McDonald offers a fearless and superb characterization of Nurse Plimpton as they join Chris Crane as Styler. Garrett’s set design makes the most of the small space

and is complemented beautifully by the sound, lighting and costuming design. Christi Newbury leads the technical crew to synchronize perfectly with Garrett’s concept. Twists abound in this thriller, which terrorizes and tempts the audience to laugh as each new and unexpected event occurs. The end of the show happens almost too soon, as the performances are so enjoyable — yet soon enough as the audience members realize that, despite everything, they have been had. “Mindgame” is an excellent show to tweak the intellect, stimulate the creative centers and impress the senses, and Garrett’s interpretation brings out the best for the actors. The show has been called a farce, but directed as a straight offering, it’s far more terrifying than a farce would be. And far more amusing. Garrett’s direction and casting create a forceful, dynamic and entertaining change for Oklahoma audiences. — Elizabeth Hurd

put me down often, and if I reacted, she would either claim it wasn’t what she meant to say or tell me, “You do it, too.” I finally gave up and left her. Margaret has an excellent reputation, so people try to pry into why I left her. When I tell them I won’t bad-mouth her, they tell me she says plenty about me. My response is, “Then you know all there is to know, don’t you?” Two women close to my age, plus one college-age girl, are pursuing me. I’m afraid if I don’t leave this area, Margaret will allege that I left her for one of them. Your thoughts, please. Keeping Mum in Cleveland DEAR KEEPING MUM: You didn’t mention how long ago your marriage ended or whether your divorce is final. But regardless, aren’t you tired of worrying about what your ex is saying about you? The marriage is over — kaput! A move isn’t necessary. An effective

way to ensure that no one spreads a rumor that you left Margaret for one woman would be to spend time being seen dating all of them. DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have been together for two years, and he still doesn’t know my mother’s last name (it’s different from my maiden name), nor does he know the names of all of my siblings. He doesn’t think it’s a big deal. What is your opinion? Name Game, Knoxville, Tenn. DEAR NAME GAME: Either your husband is not much of a family man or he’s not detail-oriented. Remembering someone’s name is a sign of respect, and it appears your husband of two years has little of that for your family. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order “What Every Teen Should Know,” send a business-size, self-addressed envelope plus check or money order for $6 to Dear Abby — Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.) UNIVERSAL UCLICK

Unescorted trick-or-treaters were often frightfully rude DEAR MISS MANNERS: I write to ask about the balance between community responsibility for children without visible parents and politeness. I had large numbers of unaccompanied children at my door for trick-ortreating. Not one of the unaccompanied children (nor several of those with parents) said thank you when receiving my candy. One even went so far as to declare, upon my opening my door, that I have a “messy house.” These children all live in my apartment complex, where it is safe for them to wander alone, but I’m not sure how to deal with outright insults such as the messy house comment, or impoliteness such as not saying thank you. I didn’t say anything about the lack of a thank you, but I did respond to the mess comment with a rather miffed, “Excuse me?” and had to resist the urge to take back the candy I had just given the girl who should have been old enough to know better. Miss Neat Police eventually said, “Trick or treat,” and ended with “Happy Halloween” but not thank you. Please advise me

Judith Martin MISS MANNERS about what to do next year. GENTLE READER: Maybe go to the movies that night. You know that Miss Manners sympathizes with you about the need for children to learn manners. She also believes that the community can help. But not by grabbing them in the middle of a candy frenzy and chastising them. That will only make you known as The Mean Lady in 705. If you truly want to influence them, you will have to make friends with them. You could invite one or two over for a treat and slip in a few mild directives: “I hope you like the cookies. When people say ‘Thank you,’ that’s how we know it was a good idea to offer them. Or if not, they can say ‘No, thank you.’ Now tell me more about your game coming up.” No doubt this is more than you bargained for.

You wanted to snatch the candy back or perhaps to snap at the children or their parents that they have no manners. Aside from being rude, this would be ineffective. DEAR MISS MANNERS: I just saw a post on my (pregnant) cousin’s Facebook page that is beyond an embarrassment. I would love to hear your comments so that I can share with her your thoughts and how unbelievably rude and tacky her post was. She wrote: “If you are not able to make it to my baby shower or I wasn’t able to invite you because of limited space but you still want to get me a gift, I am registered here, where you can buy online and have it sent by mail!” GENTLE READER: Nice offer: I’ve forgotten about you, but you might want to remember me. That is Miss Manners’ thought, but she cautions you that to repeat it for the sake of triumphing over your cousin would be rude. Miss Manners is written by Judith Martin. Go to www.missmanners.com or send questions or letters via postal mail to Miss Manners, United Media, 200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New York, NY 10016. UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

BILLY GRAHAM DEAR DR. GRAHAM: I grew up in a religious home, but I’ve come to the conclusion that religion is just superstition, and I don’t believe in God. D.B. DEAR D.B.: I feel very sorry for you, and I mean this sincerely. You’ve lost something that everyone on Earth yearns for, and that something is hope. If there is no God, then you and I are absolutely alone in this universe. We have no one to comfort us when we grieve and no one to turn to when we need wisdom. Nor does life have any meaning; we are simply like a fallen leaf drifting aimlessly down a stream. But more than that, if God doesn’t exist, we have no hope of anything past this life. As Job said in a mo-

ment of despair, “My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle, and they come to an end without hope” (Job 7:6). But life doesn’t need to be this way, and the reason is because God not only exists, but He loves us and cares what happens to us. The most important thing I can urge you to do is to look at Jesus Christ. He was God in human flesh. Do you want to know what God is like? Look at Christ as He is revealed in the pages of the New Testament. As you open the Bible I challenge you to make this prayer: “God, I’m not even sure You exist. But if You do, speak to me through this book. And if You do that, I’ll not only believe in You but I’ll give my life to Jesus and become His follower.” TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

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5D

HOROSCOPE

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You demonstrate success with your every move. This includes your move to relax this evening and do as little as possible. After all, successful people know how to pace themselves. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Not one to wait around to be entertained, you will take the initiative and do the things that excite you. This evening, you’ll be surrounded by people who are not only interesting but also excellent company. GEMINI (May 21June 21): You are careful about how you go about things. By practicing the right actions accompanied by the ideal thoughts and feelings, you will achieve the desired results. CANCER (June 22-July 22): You’ll spend time doing activities that will reinforce a loving, supportive family dynamic. The events you’ll participate in are not necessarily your first preference, but whatever makes your loved ones smile is so worthwhile to you. LEO (July 23Aug. 22): You’ll mix and mingle with important people, and there is an opportunity for you in this connection. These types appreciate how you get right to the point and say what you have to offer them. VIRGO (Aug. 23Sept. 22): Part of you loves pressure and challenges; they are what push you to the level of greatness. You don’t know what you can do until someone squeezes you, and then you like what you find out. LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct. 23): Your activities are in line with your heart’s desire. What’s more, you have as much time as you need. Doing the things you enjoy without interference — this is true happiness. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21): Instead of worrying about what others are doing, you’ll focus on being the best you can be. You are no longer worried about who is ahead. Because of this, you have already won. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your energy level will be high, and the ideas just keep coming. The questions become where to put your attention and which impulses are worthy of your action. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Though you have made some conservative choices, deep down inside you are an adventurer. You need to be where the action is. You’ll be drawn to likeminded people — risk-takers who, like you, will go for broke. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Take measures to separate yourself from the influence of others for a while. The shift in perspective will help you zero in on what you really think and feel. PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): You don’t quite buy the socalled official story. And though there’s something in you that wants to poke around and get to the truth, you may also decide to leave things well enough alone.

CREATORS SYNDICATE


6D

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC

Members of Rascal Flatts, from left, Jay DeMarcus, Gary LeVox, and Joe Don Rooney, share a s’more with Ben Richardson while tailgating before the Sept. 11 NCAA college football game between Ohio State and Miami (Fla.) in Columbus, Ohio. AP PHOTO/THE HERSHEY COMPANY

TENNESSEE HOSPITAL NAMES WING FOR RASCAL FLATTS

Zach Galifianakis, left, Bradley Cooper, center, and Ed Helms are shown in a scene from 2009 comedy blockbuster "The Hangover." WARNER BROS. PHOTO

COMEDIAN ZACH GALIFIANAKIS HAS A ‘DUE DATE’ WITH FAME BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt University is naming its pediatric surgery center for Rascal Flatts. The country music superstars have performed for children who are patients and donated more than $3 million to the hospital during the past five years. The band, which includes Gary LeVox, Jay DeMarcus and Picher native Joe Don Rooney, performed for the children Friday after the announcement and handed out candy during trick-or-treat room visits. The Rascal Flatts Surgery Center will include new specialized radiology suites to improve treatment. More than 12,700 children undergo surgery at the hospital each year. Friday’s performance started a busy run for the group, which is up for a Country Music Association Award on Nov. 10 and releases a new album Nov. 16. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Zach Galifianakis

has reached a level of popularity few comedians and actors attain: He has become a Halloween costume. Actually, his baby-toting, sunglasses-wearing character from the blockbuster what-happens-in-Vegas comedy “The Hangover” last year became a favorite persona not only at Halloween soirees but also at Oklahoma City’s own Flaming Lips New Year’s Freakout No. 3. There is a difference, Galifianakis learned. “We were shooting ‘Due Date’ in Albuquerque last year for Halloween, and I went to a Halloween party. I didn’t really know anybody. I went with a couple of people from work, and I was just dressed like this,” said Galifianakis, who sported a navy sweater over a plaid shirt at a news conference last week to promote his new comedy “Due Date.” “And there was a guy there dressed as the character from ‘The Hangover.’ And I thought that it would be interesting to walk up to him and say, ‘Hey. You’re dressed as me. I’m the real person.’ And he goes, ‘Yeah, right,’ and he just walked away. “So that was a bit freaky.” The bearded comic-turned-actor has become the go-to guy for roles that call for “a bit freaky.” In “Due Date,” Galifianakis reunited with “The Hangover” writer/director Todd Phillips to play Ethan Tremblay, an aspiring actor and oddball man-child offering high-strung architect Peter Highman (Robert Downey Jr.) a cross-country ride so Peter can attend the birth of his first child. It’s the least Ethan can do after they meet on a plane and his clueless comments get Peter and him booted off the Atlanta-to-Los-Angeles flight and onto the no-fly list. Although he is known for his random and unpredictable stand-up

NEWS ROCKER’S PHEASANT HUNT MAY BE AFOUL OF GAME LAW

Robert Downey Jr., left, and Zach Galifianakis are shown in a scene from, “Due Date." WARNER BROS. PHOTO

style, the North Carolina native doesn’t think he is much like his “Due Date” character, the type of guy who mentions his allergy to waffles only after eating a plate of waffles at a Waffle House. “I don’t think that Ethan Tremblay is anything like me. Oh God, I hope not. My stand-up is more like how I am in real life. I don’t really do a character thing in stand-up. It’s just a bunch of sentences that are supposed to be funny. This Ethan guy is a lot more complicated, I think,” Galifianakis said, initially asking a reporter, “Do you want me to perform right now?” when the journalist presses him to elaborate. “His reasons are not intentional, I think. When you’re doing stand-up, you’re kind of doing, ‘Hey, I thought of this. This may be funny.’ But Ethan has no idea he’s being funny, and I think that people that are not selfaware and kind of a truck with no brakes is really kind of funny. He’s saying things, but he doesn’t understand why they’re funny, which I think is inherently funny.” Along with his breakout role in “The Hangover,” the top-grossing Rrated comedy in box-office history,

Galifianakis, 41, has played a moody mental patient in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” a “mind reader” in “Dinner for Schmucks,” a guinea pig trainer in “G-Force” and, on the serious side, a fired employee in the acclaimed drama “Up in the Air.” On television, he has a regular role on the HBO comedic series “Bored to Death” and often appears on the sketch program “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job,” part of Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim block. In addition, he and Phillips are working together again on “The Hangover 2,” and the hotly anticipated sequel is due in theaters in May. “Todd has told me as of late that I’ve never thanked him for anything — and I’m here just to say that I’m probably not going to do it today,” Galifianakis deadpanned during the “Due Date” news conference at the Four Seasons hotel. “In all honesty, it’s strange to have a little bit of (fame). Todd helped me. He took a chance, I think, in plucking me out of the stand-up scene. And nobody knows a movie is going to be so big, and we just kind of got lucky, and I’m thrilled that it happened.” Travel and accommodations provided by Warner Bros.

Hall of Fame to honor state musicians BY GEORGE LANG Assistant Entertainment Editor glang@opubco.com

MUSKOGEE — The Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame will induct famed drummer Jamie Oldaker, Broadway star Sam Harris, country music pioneer Jean Shepard and Western swing balladeer Les Gilliam during a ceremony and concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Muskogee Civic Center, 425 Boston. Oldaker, a founding member of The Tractors with Steve Ripley, began his drumming career in his teens, playing gigs with various bands in Tulsa. He broke through on a national level in 1971, backing up Bob Seger, and eventually joined Eric Clapton’s recording and touring band in 1974. He stayed with Clapton until 1980 and then rejoined from 198386. Oldaker debuted with The Tractors in 1994, scoring a platinum award for the band’s first album. In 2005, Oldaker released “Mad Dogs & Okies,” an all-star album featuring Clapton, Peter Frampton, Vince Gill, swamp-rock legend Tony Joe White and

Sam Harris, a Cushing native who grew up in Sand Springs, has had more than two decades in the public eye with a career including singing, acting, writing, producing and directing. PROVIDED PHOTO

Willie Nelson, among others. Oldaker will perform with members of the backing band he assembled for that album, including drummer (and fellow Seger alum) David Teegarden, Jimmy “Junior” Markham, Dick Sims, Walt Richmond, original Tulsa Sound drummer Chuck Blackwell, Jim Byfield, guitarist Steve Hickerson, Tractors member Casey Van Beek, Larry Bell, Bill Davis and

I.J. Ganem. A native of Cushing, Harris hit big when he became the grand champion during the first season of “Star Search” in 1984. His first single, “Sugar Don’t Bite,” hit the Billboard Top 40 and helped launch Harris’ successful Broadway career. He has since appeared in “The Producers,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Cabaret,” and was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in the Tommy Tune-directed revival of “Grease.” Shepard, who was born in Pauls Valley, first charted with 1953’s “A Dear John Letter,” her duet with Ferlin Husky. She enjoyed some of her greatest success in the 1960s and 1970s, including the hits “If Teardrops Were Silver” and “Slippin’ Away.” In 2006, Shepard celebrated 50 years as a member of the Grand Ole Opry and is the longest-living female member of the Opry. Western swing bandleader Les Gilliam, a native of Gene Autry, was designated the Official Oklahoma Balladeer by the state Legislature in 1998 and has since been honor-

ed with the Governor’s Arts Award and a lifetime achievement award from the Gene Autry Museum. Teegarden has played with Bob Seger’s Silver Bullet Band and is working on a new Teegarden & VanWinkle album, “Radioactive.” Blues harmonica player Markham has played with artists including Bobby Taylor, Tommy Crook, Bill Snow, Jackie Dunham, Flash Terry and Feathers. Keyboardist Dick Sims will play with Oldaker along with pianist Walt Richmond, who has toured with Bonnie Raitt and is on tour with Eric Clapton. Songwriter Jim Byfield of Brothers of the Night has written songs for Clapton. Harris, Shepard and Gilliam will also perform Thursday. Tickets can be ordered at www.omhof.com or by calling (918) 687-0800. Tickets start at $10 for general admission and range from $25 to $50 for reserved seats. Single VIP tickets are $175, or $1,200 for a group of eight tickets. VIP tickets include an invitation to a VIP reception before the concert and induction ceremony.

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Rocker and celebrity hunter Ted Nugent, pictured, may have run afoul of South Dakota game laws by shooting pheasants after some of his hunting privileges were revoked in California. Nugent’s loss of his California deer hunting license through June 2012 allows 34 other states to revoke the same privilege under the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact, though each state can interpret and enforce the agreement differently. South Dakota honors other states’ license revocations through both the compact and a state law that doesn’t differentiate between large game such as deer and small game such as pheasant, said Andy Alban, law enforcement administrator for the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks Department. Alban wouldn’t confirm or deny whether the agency was investigating Nugent, but said: “In South Dakota, if a person had any hunting privileges revoked elsewhere, all of their hunting privileges would be revoked here.” THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TELEVISION ‘TRUE BLOOD’ STAR WORKS WITH PANTHERS NEW YORK —“True Blood” star Ryan Kwanten,

pictured, says he’s the “go to guy” when a production calls for working with panthers, even though he has a healthy fear of them. Real panthers were used in the HBO series, and Kwanten said recently that he was supposed to work with a panther in his new Australian Western, “Red Hill,” until he learned the feline turned on its owner in a deadly attack. Instead, Kwanten acted while writer/director Patrick Hughes pretended to be the feline off camera. Kwanten joked that it was his “finest bit of acting to keep a straight face and try to stay in it while my director was licking his paws and carrying on.” Another panther was filmed for scenes added in later. Kwanten, who plays Jason Stackhouse in “True Blood,” said the hairs on his back stand up when panthers are on the set, but the animals are always chained. “You’re definitely on your toes” when working with the big cats, he said. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOVIES WORK OUT WITH WOLVERINE With filming for “X-Men Origins: Wolverine 2” around the corner, Hugh Jackman will again be transforming his body into that of the superhero Wolverine. And now a lucky fan can sweat next to him. Jackman is auctioning the chance for one lucky fan to join him for a heart-pounding Wolverine Workout with celebrity trainer Don Scott at a private gym. Jackman is raising funds for The Global Poverty Project. The GPP has teamed with charitybuzz to raise funds for its 1.4 Billion Reasons campaign, which inspires everyday people to join the global movement to end extreme poverty through a powerful presentation. Jackman was recently a speaker at the nonprofit’s screening event at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Bidding is open through Nov. 11 at www.charity buzz.com/catalog_items/209202?source= carousel.


2" chrome bed rails (stake pocket) $85. 670-3707

2008 Acura MDX AWD Teck Pkg navi sunroof every option only $31911 Kelsey Chevy Buick GMC 405-527-6565 '07 ACURA TL, loaded, roof, perfect, $20,988. 405-749-9000 co.

Lincoln Air Suspension Catalytic Converters Custom Dual Exhaust Rich 528-8811

'05 Acura TL w/ Nav Lthr AT Mn PW PL $15991 BH Nissan 478-5380

'08 A4 AVANT QUATTRO SHOW ROOM NEW! $23,985 co. 749-9049

'98 CENTURY 4dr, auto, smooth rides, runs and drives great, perfect starter car $1,995. BOB HOWARD TOYOTA 936-8600

'08 Audi A3 4dr Hatchbk 2.0T lth $19984 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'93 LeSbre, new tires, needs paint good running cond, $1400, 735-3088

2008 BMW 328i, White, 59K, Exc. Cond., Loaded $22,500. 822-4152

2010 CADILLAC STS, leather, roof, loaded, 12,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

’07 328I SEDAN, BLACK ON BLACK, ONE OWNER ONLY 21K MILES! $22,988 405-749-6000 co.

Affordable-Reliable Transmissions 635-0777

'10 CAD DTS Prem, navi, lthr, loaded, 6K mi, $38,777 405-749-9000 co.

'82 Chevy Short bed Stepside, 350 auto, runs good $2250 OBO 517-6899

'06 BMW 330i, leather, sunroof, low miles, $20,888. ESKRIDGE HONDA 631-4444

'79 Firebird Formula, rebuilt 6.6, Runs Good $2495 Call 636-0597

'06 325I LEATHER AUTO SUPER CLEAN $17,985 co. 749-9049

2010 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, leather, low mi, on sale, $26,995. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

2005 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, leather and loaded! Only 55K miles! Only $11,911. Heitz Chev...866-365-1354

1994 Olds Cutlassnice car with real clean body and interior. Needs engine (3100, v6) $500 obo 405-262-1336

1974 Chevrolet C-10, 3 speed on the tree restored collectors $5977 REYNOLDS - EDMOND 800-509-4157

2010 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, leather and loaded, just like new, only 7K miles! Call now! Heitz Chev...866-365-1354

WE BUY JUNK CARS Will PU » Will Pay Cash NO TITLE NEEDED 1-877-793-JUNK

'02 BMW 325 I 4dr, leather, loaded, alloys, cold, great heater, luxury ride for less $6,995. BOB HOWARD TOYOTA 936-8600

1966 Chevrolet pick-up runs good, some restoration, $3200 317-0044

2001 BMW 5 series blk on blk loaded $12,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

'09 BUICK LACROSSE, auto, power, air, loaded, only 9000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

2002 BUICK PARK AVENUE, LEATHER, ALLOYS, ONLY $6488. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171

'00 323i auto lthr rf loaded $7,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'08 BUICK LACROSSE, V6, auto, power, air, loaded, only 21,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

$WE PAY MORE$

Cash on the spot! Free Tow! 405-996-8888 PARTING OUT 1970 Cougar no eng or trans. $25-$500. Bill 274-6381 1997 Dodge Maxi van, w/security cage, parting out, $5-$500, 812-6253. 4 like new tires on rims, P235/75/15, 5 lug Chevy, $550 obo, 623-6938. 4 18'' tires & rims from Ford F150 must sell asap $500 540-845-6319

1964 VW Dune Buggy red, tan int. 1974 VW eng runs good w/chrome acces on eng. $4995 obo 1948 Ford Super Deluxe Coupe needs to be restored no title $3500 obo 399-1528 » 625-9893 '64 Chevy Short bed Stepside, 350 auto, disc brks, tilt ps, rebldr $2000 517-6899 1959 Rambler, 4 door $500. 1962 Corvair, 2 door, $800. 1971 Chevy pickup, $250. » 405-262-4758 »

'99 323i Sdn black beauty auto $5981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

2010 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, gold mist w/cashmere leather int., all power, loaded, save thousands. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

'07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL, leather, all power, loaded, 24,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 '06 BUICK LACROSSE CXL, leather, roof, all power, loaded, only 39,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

2002 BUICK PARK AVENUE, LEATHER, ALLOYS, ONLY-$6488. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171 2002 LeSabre Custom. 6 cyl 3800 eng. tan. very gd cond $3500 601-6860 '01 BUICK PARK AVE ULTRA, all the options, only 64,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 2000 BUICK LESABRE LIMITED, leather, loaded, 34,000 miles. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033

'10 CAD CTS, premium, navi, roof, loaded, $39,777 405-749-9000 co. '09 CAD SRX, lthr, loaded, roof, all power, 28K mi, $26,988. 405-749-9000 co. '09 CAD CTS, 3.6L, loaded, DI alum wheels, roof, $25,777. 405-749-9000 co. '09 CAD ESCALADE AWD, navi, roof, loaded, 26'' wheels, $51,777. 405-749-9000 co. '09 CAD CTS, sport, roof, lthr, loaded, $24,777. 405-749-9000 co. '08 CADILLAC CTS, direct injection, AWD, leather, roof, nav, 20'' wheels, all the options, low mi, on sale, $26,995. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 2008 CADILLAC SRX, nav, leather, roof, super clean cross-over, $25,988 BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171

'08 CAD CTS, all power, new body, loaded, like new, $25,988. 405-749-9000 co.

'07 CAD CTS, lthr, roof, loaded, auto, $21,888. 405-749-9000 co.

'08 CAD ESCALADE, roof, loaded, buckets, 40K mi, $39,777. 405-749-9000 co.

'07 CAD ESC., loaded, navi, white diamond, $33,888 405-749-9000 co.

'08 CAD ESCALADE ESV, navi, roof, buckets, loaded, $44,777. 405-749-9000 co.

'07 CAD SRX, all power, lthr, loaded, $22,777. 405-749-9000 co.

'08 CAD XLR, Alpine White, Spec. Edition, perfect, $48,777. 405-749-9000 co.

'07 CAD ESCALADE ESV, navi, roof, rear DVD's, $34,777 405-749-9000 co.

'08 CAD STS, V-6, lthr, roof, loaded, 19K miles, $29,988 405-749-9000 co. '08 CAD DTS, navi, loaded, low miles, $24,777 405-749-9000 co. '07 CADILLAC CTS, white diamond w/cashmere leather, heated seats, loaded, only 22,000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 2007 Cadillac CTS pearl white High Line BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 '07 CAD ESCALADE, wht diamond, buckets, loaded, $37,777. 405-749-9000 co. '07 CAD ESCALADE AWD, loaded, white dia, $34,777. 405-749-9000 co. '07 CAD CTS, auto, CD, lthr, loaded, $20,988. 405-749-9000 co. '07 CAD EXT AWD, navi, roof, 22's, loaded, $35,777 405-749-9000 co.

2006 Cadillac CTS Pearl White! Lux-Pk! Leather-Wood Int! Like New! 826-1010 $15,000. '06 CAD ESV AWD, navi, roof, buckets, DVD, $24,777 405-749-9000 co. '06 CAD XLR, Stud, all power, blk/blk, $36,777. 405-749-9000 co. '06 Cad SRX lthr loaded XXclean$11,981753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com '06 CAD CTS, lthr, auto, all power, $18,777. 405-749-9000 co. '90 Cadillac Deville loaded super nice call today! BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

2011 CHEVY MALIBU, GM certified, one owner, well equipped, only $17,777. Heitz Chev...866-365-1354

2010 CHEVY CAMARO SS, only 1480 miles on this bad boy, perfect car at the best price, $36,988. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171 2010 CAMARO 2SS/RS, auto, 20s, 1 owner, only 3K miles, call now-Won't last! Heitz Chev...866-365-1354 2009 CHEVY AVEO SEDAN, GM certified, 1 owner, with only 12K miles, only $8585. Heitz Chev...866-365-1354 2009 Chevy HHR only 45k miles pw pl cd Black Beauty $13,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552


2E

THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2010

CORVETTES! CORVETTES! CORVETTES! MARC HEITZ CHEVROLET OKLAHOMA'S CORVETTE CAPITAL! 1972 STINGRAY, 130 miles on complete frame off restoration, AWARD WINNING SHOW CAR! 2001 COUPE, auto, gorgeous magnetic red w/chrome wheels and heads up - Only 75K Miles! 2001 Z06, Blk/Blk, 1st year for the Z06! Great looking Vette - Very Well Kept! Only 44K Miles! 2005 CONVERTIBLE, auto, loaded, nav, mag ride, heads up display, jhust arrived, only $32,929. 2006 COUPE, only 20K miles on the rare Lemans blue 6 speed! Beautiful Vette! Call Now! 2007 CONVERTIBLE 3LT, auto, power top, chrome wheels, this one is immaculate - Only 9K miles, $39,993. 2007 COUPE, auto, chrome wheels, super clean and very well taken care of Only $28,988.

'07 CORVETTE SILVER/BLK, COMP GREY WHEELS, AUTO, 12MO/12K WARRANTY $29,988 405-749-6000 co. 2007 Chevy Impala only 39k miles pw pl like new black $12,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

'07 Impala LTZ AT AC PWL Alloys Spoiler $13991 BH Nissan 478-5380

'09 PT Cruiser auto air CD lo mi $9988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'07 Chevy Cobalt Slvr Sips Gas Priced to Go $8292 BH Nissan 478-5380

'09 300 Touring 3.5L auto lthr $16,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2006 Chevy Monte Carlo SS Hard to find black beauty, loaded $14,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

'08 PT Cruiser air CD lo mi $8988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2006 CHEV IMPALA LT, 1 owner, only 3000 mi, that's right, 3000 mi. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 '06 HHR LT auto pwr low miles $8464 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com '06 CHEV IMPALA LT, all power, $13,777. 405-749-9000 co. ’05 CORVETTE, ORANGE 6SPD, GLASS TOP, POLISHED WHLS, 12MO/ 12K WARRANTY, $25,988 405-749-6000 co.

2008 COUPE, 6 speed, black/black, This gorgeous 1 owner just arrived! Hurry $33,933.

2005 Impala, V6, clean, $4450, 692-8855 or 326-8855.

2009 COBALT LT COUPE, GM certified, 1 owner, will not last at $9999. Heitz Chev...866-365-1354 '09 HHR LT auto air CD $11,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '09 Aveo LT auto air CD $8988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '08 CORVETTE WHITE, AUTO, POLISHED WHLS, ONLY 18K MI! 12/MO/12K WARRANTY $33,988 405-749-6000 co. '08 CHEV IMPALA, auto, power, air, $10,995. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 '08 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 3LT, both tops, loaded, $35,777. 405-749-9000 co. '08 COBALT SS, YELLOW, 6SPD, ONLY 18K MILES $15,988 405-749-6000 co. '08 Aveo LS auto pwr CD gas saver$7981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

2005 Impala, V6, clean, $4450, 692-8855 or 326-8855. 2004 Cavalier, 2 door, white, very clean, auto, air, stereo, 79K, $4895. 630-0290 or 3621 N May '04 MALIBU ALL POWER 59K MILES $6855 co 749-9049 2003 Chevrolet Cavalier 2Dr, good cond, 105K mi, $1950, 228-3994 '02 CHEVY CAMARO, Ttops, 60K miles, $7988. ESKRIDGE HONDA 631-4444

2007 Chevy Impala LT lthr snrf sport wheels white $13,488 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

1987 Chevy Corvette Convertible low low miles $8,911 Kelsey Chevy Buick GMC 405-527-6565

2007 Chevy Impala pw/pl 41k miles $13,599

1967 CAMARO CONVERTIBLE 350CI, 4 speed, must see this car!!! Call now!!! Heitz Chev...866-365-1354

2008 Dodge Caliber SXT 39k miles $11,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 '08 Nitro RT auto lthr roof loaded $14,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '08 CALIBER auto 2.0 air CD $9988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED, ALLOYS, LEATHER, WON’T LAST LONG AT-$25,988. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED, LEATHER, POLISHED ALLOYS, FORD CERTIFIED AT $26,988. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171 2010 FORD EDGE SEL, PWR GROUP, ALLOYS, ONLY 13,000 MILES, $25,988. BOB HOWARD Downtown FORD PRE-OWNED 405-232-7171

'07 PT Cruiser Touring auto pwr $7991 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'07 Nitro SXT auto air alloys lo mi $13,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser turbo 47k mi lthr snrf chrome whls $10,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552

'07 Dodge Caliber SE Sweet PW/L/M $8,993 BH Nissan 478-5380

2010 Escape UT, red. 2300 miles, $23,000, Call 216-272-3468

'06 CHRY. PTC TOURING, auto, power, air, $7995. Bob Moore Buick - GMC NW Expwy 888-504-5033 2006 CHRYSLER 300 leather, loaded,, $14,988. 217-7000 co. 2005 Chrysler PT 52k miles $8,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 2005 Chrysler 300 blk on blk only $8,988 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 '05 Chrysler Sebring Cpe Ltd sunrf white lthr 51k chrme whls $11,488 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser 51K miles $7,995 BRYAN'S Car Corner III 732-9292 919-0552 '05 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING, loaded, all power, $9877. 405-749-9000 co. '05 PT Cruiser Touring Pkg pw/pl, silver. Nice & Clean! $4950 210-443