Page 1

MUSIC

FOOTBALL

INSIDE

Country couple plan to wed

Switzer assembles the old gang

Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert are engaged.

Barry Switzer and his 1975 recruiting class shared tales of the glory days.

NEWS, 7A

SPORTS, 1C

ELECTIONS

MAYOR TO KEEP HIS JOB

THE OKLAHOMAN WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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COVERING OKLAHOMA SINCE 1907

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TWISTERS’ TOLL BECOMES CLEARER Casualties: Fatal storms Tornadoes: More than Damage: More than injured more than 100 dozen hit in Oklahoma 100 homes destroyed

After squeaking past a recall effort by just four votes, Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates, above, will get to hold on to his job. Elsewhere, voters decided on bond and other issues. STATE, INSIDE

MORTGAGES

STATE FARES WELL At 5.9 percent of homeowners with negative equity on their homes, Oklahoma has the lowest percentage in the country, according to a survey. BUSINESS, 1B

WEATHER

STRONG STORMS



Breezy High: 84 Tonight’s low: 52

BUSINESS, 6B

IN BRIEF

CARRIE GETS AWARD NODS

A worker surveys damage to an AT&T cell phone tower Tuesday in Little Axe. FROM STAFF REPORTS

PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

MORE COVERAGE

A day after a tornado outbreak spawned a dozen or more twisters across Oklahoma, survivors picked through the rubble and officials identified the dead. The number of fatalities dropped Tuesday evening. The state Department of Emergency Management said three children the department had previously reported dead are alive and being treated at an Oklahoma City hospital. Two people, including the children’s mother, were killed in the tornado, according to the state medical examiner’s office. A third, a woman whose name has not been released, suffered a fatal heart attack while trying to get to a storm shelter. Tammy Rider, 29, of Newalla, was killed and her three children injured Monday when a tornado destroyed their mobile home near the intersection of Rock Creek Road and Harrah-Newalla Road. Rider’s two sons, Jason Smith, 8, and Ethan Rider, 3, were in critical condition,

NEWS, 7A

HEALTH LAW TO COST MORE?

INSIDE

Picking up the pieces in Seminole

Congressional budget referees said President Barack Obama’s health care law could add at least $115 billion more to government health care spending over the next decade.

NEWS, 4A

› ›

Lake Thunderbird marina is a total loss How to help, get help NEWS, 6A

twisters’ paths › The › 911 calls reveal fears

NATION, 8A

STATE, 13A

› Scammers pose threat BUSINESS, 1B

ONLINE View videos, photos, interactive maps and more NEWSOK.COM/WEATHER

SEE STORMS, PAGE 3A

PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Friends of Christa and John French stand Tuesday in the driveway of the Frenches’ home in the Deerfield Estates addition south of Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road. A tornado Monday damaged or destroyed numerous homes in the neighborhood. Gov. Brad Henry toured the area Tuesday and spoke with several residents and surveyed the damage. Michael Baker reports on Page 5A.

Guard unit to deploy to Afghanistan next year BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

All 3,400 soldiers of the Oklahoma National Guard’s 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team will deploy to Afghanistan next year in what will be its

largest deployment since the Korean War, commanders announced Tuesday. By comparison, about 2,600 soldiers from the 45th deployed to Iraq in 2008 and some also deployed to Afghanistan in 2004. Col. Joe Ward, com-

Dear Lord, let us show patience as we try to love others. Amen. 4D 1B 1E 8E

mander of the brigade, said the mission will include everything from defending bases and moving troops and equipment with U.S. Army helicopters to conducting security operations with the Afghan National Security Forces. “We’ve done that both

in Afghanistan and Iraq,” Ward said. “One thing I’ve discovered since I took command of the brigade is that there is an incredible store of knowledge in the soldiers from the last two deployments. I think we will continue to build on that and utilize the les-

sons learned from previous deployments.” Brig. Gen. Robbie Asher, director of joint staff for the Oklahoma National Guard’s Joint Force Headquarters, said even with the large deployment, the SEE GUARD, PAGE 2A

DOCTOR WINS IN BOTOX CASE An Oklahoma County jury has awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the anti-wrinkle drug Botox. STATE, INSIDE

EATERY HAS COOL CONCEPT Before you dismiss Coolgreens as a health-food restaurant, know that its first commitment is to deliciousness, Food Dude Dave Cathey writes. FOOD, 1D

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

TODAY’S PRAYER

Advice Business Classified Comics

Checotah native Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean and Lady Antebellum lead in CMT Music Awards nominations with three each.

Crossword Opinion Sports TV

8E 10A 1C 4D

Volume 119, 127 Six sections Copyright 2010 The Oklahoma Publishing Co., Oklahoma City All rights reserved

Teams, players take home state titles Idabel’s Zach Myers reads the green on No. 18 on Tuesday during the Class 4A boys state golf championship at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Find out which teams and individuals took home state championships. SPORTS, 4C

PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NEWS, TOO

ONLINE AT NEWSOK.COM

A closer look at today’s stories

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SHOES WEDGE THEIR WAY INTO LIFE I really want a pair of milehigh wedges. Never mind that I twisted my ankle a couple of weeks ago, and it’s still a little tender. Summer shoes are OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO so tempting this season. I love all the wedges, embellishments, cork and platforms. I tend not to wear super-high heels because, well, they hurt my feet and, honestly, the older I get, the more I worry about following in the footsteps of all those models who trip up on the runway. And they’re young. If they can’t walk in those killer stilettos, what makes me think I can? But I want new shoes and I want something with a higher power. I found two styles that I really like, but I’m hoping to find something similar and a little closer to the ground. Not flat, but not five inches in the air either. Be sure to check out Mood online at mood.NewsOK.com for my story on summer sandals and in Thursday’s Mood.

In this image from video, soldiers from the 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team listen Tuesday as commanders announce that the unit will be deployed to Afghanistan next year.

Guard: 80% have combat experience FROM PAGE 1A

VIDEO ON DEMAND MAKING THE MOST OF THINGS Oklahoman Editor Ed Kelley says maximizing one of Oklahoma’s biggest assets keeps getting more difficult.

There is an incredible store of knowledge in the soldiers from the last two deployments. I think we will continue to build on that and utilize the lessons learned from previous deployments.” COL. JOE WARD

ONLINE Video To watch a video from the announcement, go to NewsOK.com and search for “45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team.”

ployment and to serving again with their fellow soldiers in the 45th. “Knowing what you are going into and knowing that the guys around you know what we are going into is great,” Steelman said.

Recent additions to our “know it” topics.

Where Oklahomans help Oklahomans.

Getting help: Do you know someone with suicidal tendencies? Are you battling them yourself? There is hope and help available. Restoring order: Learn how you can bring organization to your home and to your life by using tips from the experts.

Good guys: “ ... Parents should be glad to have two role models such as (Zac) Robinson and (Sam) Bradford for kids to look to as examples of how a person can exhibit both athleticism and values.” — aprendido

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SETTING IT STRAIGHT Tuesday The Tulsa law firms of Seymour and Graham, LLP, and the David Garrett Law Office will split $5 million from the $10 million settlement in the federal lawsuit with Custer County. Seymour and Graham, the lead firm in the case, was omitted from the story on Page 1A of The Oklahoman.

WHAT YOU’RE READING 1. Oklahoma tornado: Fatalities confirmed 2. Oklahoma tornadoes: Medical Examiner IDs two dead in tornado aftermath 3. Deadly tornadoes move through central Oklahoma 4. Oklahoma City-area twisters leave path of destruction 5. Tornado watch issued for western Oklahoma 6. Oklahoma tornadoes: Another tornado fatality reported 7. Oklahoma City council OKs final plans for upgrades at Ford Center 8. Film Row’s developer sees Oklahoma City district coming into focus 9. Oklahoma Gov. Brad Henry declares state of emergency in 56 counties 10. Man accused of trying to push girlfriend from Penn Square Mall balcony

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Breaking News Editor: Kimberly Burk 475-3361, kburk@ opubco.com

Mayor Mick Cornett talks about a new promotion for the Oklahoma City Weight Loss Challenge.

Top stories on NewsOK.com for the last 24 hours:

“Oh man, I’m going to miss the whole toddler time, when the baby starts walking and starts talking a little bit,” Houston said. Both Houston and Steelman said they are looking forward to the de-

LET’S TALK

Vice President, News, Info. Ctr.: Kelly Dyer Fry 475-3979, kfry@ opubco.com

MAYOR TOUTS WEIGHT LOSS

In this image from a video shot Tuesday, Col. Joe Ward, commander of the 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, announces Tuesday the 2011 deployment of the unit’s 3,400 soldiers. PHOTOS BY TIM MONEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

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Results for the question: Do you like “Barons” for the Oklahoma City AHL team’s name? Today’s question: Do you have a tornado shelter in your home? Vote at NewsOK.com.

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NEWSOK POLL

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Guard will have thousands of soldiers capable of responding to state emergencies. Asher also said 80 percent of the soldiers in the 45th are combat veterans. One of those veterans is Sgt. Josh Houston, 26, of Oklahoma City. He was one of 2,600 members of the unit who were activated in October 2007 and deployed to Iraq in January of 2008 following training at Fort Bliss, Texas. Houston said he takes comfort that he’s been in a war zone with his men before. “I know the people from the last deployment have my back,” Houston said. “I don’t have to worry if these guys stayed awake in training. I know they have experience. A lot of these guys have seen actual trigger time. They know how to think on the run.” Spc. Ryan Steelman, 32, of Mustang, also has a deployment to Iraq under his belt. He said the experience will also help his wife and his three kids deal with his absence. “They’ve been through this. They know what to expect,” Steelman said. “We try to keep the kids busy, get them involved in extra activities like soccer and dance so the time kind of flies for them.” Houston said he is moving up his wedding because of the deployment. His fiancee, Dorothea Pruiett, is also in the military. She is eight months pregnant. Houston said having a fiancee in the military has its advantages and disadvantages. Pruiett knows where to go if she needs help and knows what to expect while he is gone. But she also knows how dangerous his job will be. Being away from his new baby will be the toughest part of the deployment, he said.

Editor, The Oklahoman: Ed Kelley 475-4090, ekelley@ opubco.com

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STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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BY THE NUMBERS TWISTERS’ TOLL Deaths: At least three died, including a woman who died of a heart attack while trying to get to a storm shelter. State emergency management workers have said there were six deaths, including the heart attack victim, but the state medical examiner’s office has confirmed only three.

Shelley Heston Bolles, left, and Gidget Miller react Tuesday as they celebrate finding a 4-weekold puppy that belongs to Heston Bolles in Little Axe.

Little Axe Fire Department Capt. David Spector walks across the Country Boy grocery store parking lot Tuesday in Little Axe. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

PHOTO BY BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Storms: More warnings were issued FROM PAGE 1A

and her daughter, Reagan, 1, was in serious condition Tuesday at The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, a hospital spokeswoman said. “I know she was an excellent mother,” said Ashley Christofferson, Tammy Rider’s niece. “She was loved by her mom. She was her only daughter.” Rider died of blunt force trauma, medical examiner spokeswoman Cherokee Ballard said. Her death was accidental. Wilbern Patterson, 55, of Oregon, died after he stepped out of his recreational vehicle near SE 59 and Peebly Road, Ballard said. High winds blew the vehicle over on top of him. Patterson, who apparently was visiting relatives in Oklahoma, died of traumatic asphyxia, Ballard said. His death was accidental. More than 100 people were treated at hospitals for storm-related injuries. At least five — including Rider’s sons — were admitted in critical condition, hospitals reported.

Near Little Axe John Treadway, 78, owner of BJ’s Bar and Grill, east of the destroyed Country Boy grocery store on State Highway 9 near Little Axe, asked all of his customers to leave and go home when the storms started getting bad. He watched from his driveway as the storm worsened overhead. “I saw it getting together right up yonder,” he said, pointing to the west of his business. “Then I said the heck with it, went inside, grabbed a Coke and crouched behind the bar.” He heard the loud rush of the storm as it broke apart the grocery store just across the parking lot. When he emerged from the building, he saw several overturned vehicles and the remains of the store. Yellow and pink insulation hung on the branches of the trees around his bar, and hundreds of paper towel rolls were strewn behind it. What appeared to be a section of the grocery store roof had been pitched across the highway. Another piece had smashed into his old Ford pickup. “It was awful, but I guess I’m lucky,” he said. Only the roof to Treadway’s business was damaged.

CONTRIBUTING Staff Writers Ken Raymond, Johnny Johnson, Michael McNutt, Chris Casteel, Randy Ellis, Michael Baker, Bryan Painter, John Estus, Vallery Brown, Matt Dinger, James Tyree and Michael Kimball

er ran into a bathroom for cover. When she closed the bathroom door, she was thrown back against the wall and onto the floor. “I was just looking down and praying,” she said. “I thought if I looked up the worst would happen.” Starkey and her family worked Tuesday to remove belongings they could salvage from the destroyed home. “It was so fast,” Starkey said. “Thirty seconds took everything.” About five houses to the west of Starkey’s on Highland Street, 75-year-old Mary Clark looked around counting her blessings. A large tree, more than two feet in diameter, was uprooted and split in half, crushing her neighbor’s car. “It was like the famous freight train they always talk about,” she said. “That’s exactly what it sounded like.” Clark’s home was only slightly damaged by a tree limb that had fallen on the roof of her garage. “I don’t know how all of this happened around us,” she said, surveying her neighborhood. Decimated homes like Starkey’s were steps away from homes that appeared to have little damage.

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City’s main water treatment plant remained without power Tuesday, leaving many across the southern metro area with low water pressure or no water at all. The water shortage prompted most metroarea cities to enact outdoor watering bans. Residents were ordered to cease outdoor watering and turn off sprinkler systems. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. spokesman Brian Alford said he expected power to be restored by late Tuesday to the Lake Stanley Draper water treatment plant,

ONLINE

Holly Starkey gathers her belongings Tuesday from her home in Tecumseh. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

which supplies half the city’s water. However, city officials were unsure how long it would take to restart the water filtering processes that were halted by the power outage. The filtering makes water safe to drink. “I can’t remember a time when it (the plant) just shut down like this,” Oklahoma City utilities spokeswoman Debbie Ragan said. “There will have to be a process of restarting pumps.” Oklahoma City water utility crews rerouted water from the city’s Lake Hefner and Lake Overholser plants to the southern metro area, but many customers were still without water Tuesday, Ragan said.

Tuesday’s weather While crews were still out assessing Monday’s damage, a tornado watch was issued by the Norman forecast office for counties in central, northwest, southwest and western Oklahoma. Severe weather is likely in Oklahoma again today. Rick Smith, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Norman, said there may be more warnings today, but the intensity of the storms will not be as great. Oklahoma County has now had at least 100 tornadoes since 1950, according to the weather service. Before Monday, there had been only three tornadoes in the state this year. That’s the slowest start in terms of tornadoes since officials began keeping statistics in 1950, said Gary McManus of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. Oklahoma averages 53 tornadoes a year. The average for May is about 20.

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In Tecumseh, a tornado ripped through a residential area near U.S. 177 and Highland Road. Tecumseh police, emergency management workers and members of the Pontotoc County Fire Department went from home to home in the neighborhood surveying the damage. They marked each house they checked with a neon orange X with a circle around it. By afternoon, Emergency Manager Melvin Potter said the men had identified more than 100 homes that were destroyed and more than 200 that were damaged. Holly Starkey, 29, was at her home near Highland Road when she heard television reports of a tornado headed her way. Starkey and her 61-year-old moth-

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Injuries: More than 100 people were treated at Oklahoma hospitals for storm-related injuries. At least five were hospitalized in critical condition, according to hospital officials. Tornadoes: There were more than a dozen tornadoes in Oklahoma during Monday’s outbreak, according to the National Weather Service in Norman. They occurred along a path stretching from the Red River to the Kansas-Oklahoma state line. Warnings: The weather service in Norman issued 31 tornado warnings and 19 severe thunderstorm warnings Monday. Damage: The state Department of Emergency Management reported more than 100 homes and 40 businesses were destroyed and more than 130 homes were damaged. State of emergency: Gov. Brad Henry declared a state of emergency for 56 Oklahoma counties: Alfalfa, Atoka, Beaver, Blaine, Bryan, Caddo, Canadian, Carter, Cleveland, Coal, Comanche, Cotton, Craig, Creek, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Garfield, Garvin, Grady, Grant, Harper, Haskell, Hughes, Jefferson, Johnston, Kay, Kingfisher, Kiowa, Lincoln, Logan, Love, Marshall, Mayes, McIntosh, McClain, Murray, Muskogee, Noble, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Seminole, Sequoyah, Stephens, Tillman, Tulsa, Washita and Woodward.

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Last year, Oklahoma had only four confirmed tornadoes in May.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

McLoud woman survives wild ride BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

Yolanda Suarez talks on her cell phone in what is left of the bedroom of her mobile home Tuesday in Seminole. Several tornadoes swept through Oklahoma on Monday, leaving a path of destruction, including Suarez’s home. AP PHOTO

Seminole residents begin recovering after tornado BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

SEMINOLE — Larry Jernigen, 62, spent much of Tuesday retelling his neardeath experience of riding out a tornado inside his pickup. Jernigen is already a celebrity of sorts in Seminole for having lived to tell about two other brushes with death. He survived an airplane crash in 1985 and a car accident with a tractor-trailer rig in 1995. Jernigen was about to leave his cabinet shop on State Highway 99 when a tornado hit Monday. He took cover on the floorboard of his 1999 Chevy pickup while debris battered its metal body and shattered the windows. “It sounded like a demolition derby,” he said. “And then the truck started to move, and I thought I was going airborne.” There were many stories of survival and property loss along the one-mile stretch of SH 99 where the tornado delivered the brunt of its force. City Manager Steve Saxon said the damage path was about 11⁄2 miles wide and 17 miles long, leaving 30 families homeless and damaging as many as 300 roofs. Power lines Tuesday hung off broken wood poles like limp spaghetti. Twisted metal lay on greenbelts. Glass and debris littered the highway. The tornado left Yolanda Suarez’s mobile home in pieces. Suarez tried Tuesday to salvage a few belongings. Little was left. She had been alone in the mobile home when the tornado carried threefourths of it to a neighboring business. Suarez escaped by taking cover in a bedroom that was anchored by a fallen tree. She climbed out a window and was rescued by a volunteer firefighter. “I felt like I was going die,” Suarez said. At the Seminole airport, the tornado ripped off hangar doors and tossed planes several feet. The airport runway appears to be in good shape, but there is at least $2 million in damage to hangars and the terminal, the Seminole city manager said. The tornado destroyed a classroom at nearby Varnum Schools. It also caused roof damage in several school buildings, dislodged a concrete baseball dugout and left acres of trees uprooted. Superintendent John Sheridan said classes for the 268 students will likely

ONLINE To watch video from Seminole, go to NewsOK.com/ weather.

A small airplane rests on its top Tuesday afternoon after being blown out of a hangar at the Jimmie Austin Airport when a tornado touched down on the north side of Seminole on Monday night. PHOTO BY ANN KELLEY, THE OKLAHOMAN.

be canceled until the end of the week, and possibly next week. All field trips and graduation ceremonies have been put on hold. Prekindergarten teacher Leigh Ann Azlin on Tuesday hauled a few plastic containers of teaching ma-

terials, left untouched by Monday’s storm, out of her classroom. “I was warned before I got here that it was bad,” Azlin said. “I thought I was prepared, but the sight of it brought me to my knees.”

Doresa Byus gripped her steering wheel, closed her eyes and prayed Monday night when a tornado lifted her sport utility vehicle off the road west of McLoud. The thick, brown swirl of dust and debris was the last thing she saw before closing her eyes. “It’s a hard feeling to describe,” she said. “You just feel helpless. There’s nothing you can do. There’s nowhere you can go.” Byus was driving home to McLoud from Midwest City. She had been watching the sky and listening for news from her husband’s calls and the radio, but the signal kept cutting out. She said she didn’t see the tornado until it was right beside her on SE 29 Street, east of Peebly Road. The next thing she knew, her Isuzu Rodeo was being enveloped. The rear window shattered and the front windshield cracked like a spider’s web, Byus said. She felt a whoosh of air and she thought her roof had blown away, but Byus kept her eyes closed. In a matter of minutes, the tornado released her car and moved away, leveling several houses in its path. “It was like being in a ride,” Byus said. “It just twisted and dropped.” She expected to find her car on top of someone’s roof. To her surprise, the car was mostly intact and resting in the road near where it had been. The tornado had spun the SUV in a circle, Byus said. She pulled shingles out from under her windshield wipers and looked around. Houses on both sides of the road were destroyed,

Doresa Byus

ONLINE To watch a video of Doresa Byus telling her story, go to NewsOK.com/ weather.

but Byus was unhurt. Several other drivers who were in the tornado’s path also were OK, she said. Power lines were down in front of them and emergency workers blocked the road behind. Byus’ husband, Claude, who is a layout manager for the pressroom at The Oklahoman, feared the worst. He had been trying to call his wife since he heard about a tornado that touched down near Choctaw Road — not far from where she was driving. Claude Byus said he was going to tell his wife to get off the road, but the signal wouldn’t go through. He set out to look for her as soon as the storms passed. He reached the point where the road was blocked, just over the hill from his wife. He was turning around to find another way when she called. She managed to tell him she was OK before the signal cut out, he said. “I know that God just kind of had his hand on her right then,” Byus said. “That’s our belief. All I can say is thank you.”


STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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Devastation stuns victims of storm BY MICHAEL BAKER Staff Writer mbaker@opubco.com

Within moments of a tornado whipping through and destroying most of the homes on the corner of Valley Creek Drive and SE 75, Steven Blair exited his laundry room and sprinted next door to check on his neighbor. Most of the homes on this street corner in Deerfield Estates just west of Choctaw Road and south of Interstate 40 were destroyed. Among the homes destroyed was that of Blair’s neighbor. “There was an issue where they could have been trapped,” Blair said. “I smelled natural gas.” Blair’s neighbors — Air Force Sgt. Scott Thiels, his wife, Lisa, their twin 11year-old boys and the dog — rode out the tornado in their bathroom. “We all laid down in the bathtub and after about 10 seconds the house exploded,” Scott Thiels, 35, said. Thiels emerged from his bathroom and was a bit stunned to see daylight and his neighbor. “It’s a little hard to ex-

ALSO ... DAMAGE NEAR I-40 Several neighborhoods south of Interstate 40 near Choctaw and Hiwassee roads in Oklahoma County showed on Tuesday the swath of damage caused by a tornado rushing through. Families spent the muggy day cleaning the rubble that once was home. “But the kids are alive and well. That’s my blessing in the whole thing,” said Dava Hight, who was at her son’s home at 8801 S Hiwassee Road to help clean up. Miles Maynor has lived at the home he and his wife built for about a year. “We love this piece of property,” he said. “I have my life, and my wife has hers, and the dogs are OK, so we’re good to go.” A similar refrain was repeated by homeowners in the area as they sifted through rubble and tried to find their belongings. Steven Blair, who lives in a neighborhood just south of I-40 and west of Choctaw Road, said he found his child’s high chair suspended in what was an attic and still can’t find his barbecue grill or porch swing. “I’d like to know how my tractor made it over there.” FROM STAFF REPORTS

Friends remove items from Scott and Lisa Thiels’ home Tuesday, a day after a tornado damaged homes in the Deerfield Estates and Deerfield Estates West additions south of Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

plain,” he said of the sensation. “Today (Tuesday), I’m really not upset,” he said as he looked over the debris that was once home. “Everything that was in that house and breathing is still breathing.”

Tornado’s path The tornado crashed through about 5:40 p.m., leaving more than a dozen homes damaged and at

least six destroyed. Some residents in Deerfield Estates — a relatively new neighborhood filled with several young families — watched the twister run over homes in Deerfield West before jumping a creek and heading for their houses. Another neighbor, David Reid, said he watched the tornado as it came over a hill to the west. “We saw it coming and

Governor takes step to secure federal aid FROM STAFF REPORTS

Gov. Brad Henry declared a state of emergency Tuesday in 56 counties across Oklahoma. The executive order is the first step toward seeking federal assistance. State Emergency Management Department officials are making preliminary assessments to determine the damage caused by Monday’s storms. Henry also issued a second executive order, which exempts trucks that are providing direct assistance for the restoration of essential services from weight and permit requirements. That executive order will aid utility companies and municipalities as they attempt to repair infrastructure and restore services. Henry flew over some of the hardest hit areas Tuesday and toured areas in Oklahoma, Cleveland, Pottowatomie and Seminole counties. “Our hearts and our prayers simply go out to these families who have lost a loved one or lost their home,” Henry said during a news conference.

“There’s damage everywhere. I think it’s about as bad as I’ve seen.” During the news conference, he answered a call from President Barack Obama. “Right now they are focused on the devastation we have in Oklahoma,” Henry said about the president and his staff. “The president stressed that he will see to it that any request for disaster aid would be processed quickly.” Henry was flanked by his wife, Kim, and U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Oklahoma City, in front of a destroyed Love’s Travel Stop at Choctaw Road and Interstate 40. Dozens of motorists and staff survived the tornado in the travel stop by crowding into a cooler. Full statewide damage totals were not available Tuesday, but emergency officials reported more than 100 homes and more than 40 businesses had been destroyed. More than 130 homes were damaged. The Seminole Municipal Airport and the Little River Marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park incurred millions of dollars in estimated damage.

then it looked like it had dissipated, so we were thinking we were OK, but then all of a sudden debris started flying and we got to

the closet,” Reid, 38, said on Tuesday. Reid and his wife, Robyn, could barely fit in the small closet near the center of their home. “We couldn’t get the door shut and we saw the roof go off,” he said. “We heard louder and louder crashes and then all of a sudden we saw light.” Wall board is all that remained between the Reids and the destruction. A couple of houses around the corner, Christa French, 35, rushed her 11year-old and 9-year-old daughters into a closet. “We just heard the windows start shattering,” French said. “I just threw the girls in the closet. I saw my closet door fly off and I just dove on my girls.” On Tuesday, French was cleaning up and hoping her husband, John, who is in the Air Force and in South America, could catch a

plane home to be with their family. A print of dogs playing poker survived the storm, but the two family cars did not survive as well. “I just can’t get over the garage door wrapped around the truck,” French said. Residents recounted several incidents of damage from the storm. Blair couldn’t find his barbecue grill or porch swing. His shed was shredded and littered across several different yards. A tree had been blown into the middle of what was once the Reid home and a trailer chained to a tree had blown into another tree. Scott Thiels looked for his grandfather’s World War II U.S. Marine Corps dress cap. It had hung on the wall in the home before the tornado.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Ducks swim Tuesday by the boats damaged by the tornado at the marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park in Norman.

PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Tornado’s direct hit closes state park BY JAMES S. TYREE Staff Writer jtyree@opubco.com

NORMAN — Bob Davis

has owned the Little River Marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park for 20 years, but he hardly recognizes it following Monday’s tornado. Davis said the marina, worth about $2 million — not including the 275 or so boats that were docked there — is a total loss. “It was a direct hit,” he

ONLINE To watch a video of the marina damage, go to NewsOK.com/weather.

said Tuesday morning. “The whole marina is wrapped tight into a cluster. I can’t even identify one dock from another.” Leslie Blair, public information officer at Lake Thunderbird, said the state park was closed Tuesday out of safety con-

cerns and to assess the park’s extensive damage. The Little Axe and Fisherman’s Point campgrounds and Little River Marina are closed indefinitely, Blair said. The lake’s north side will be closed at least until Monday, she said, and the

Clear Bay Point and South Dam areas will be closed only until power and water can be restored. “Right now we’re assessing the damage so we’re urging people to stay away from the park,” Blair said. Less than a mile west is the Central Oklahoma Master Conservancy District, which pumps water from Lake Thunderbird to Norman, Midwest City and Del City. The tornado turned the

facility’s workshop into a twisted pile of metal rubble, damaged the plant, and knocked out its electricity. The facility operated Tuesday on backup generators. “We can’t run on full capacity, in fact we’re on minimum capacity,” said Randy Worden, the facility’s manager. He estimated minimum capacity to be about 20 percent of maximum, though he said Norman al-

AT A GLANCE: WHAT THE TORNADOES LEFT BEHIND

In Little Axe Left: Standing on a fallen tree, Caden Bolles looks over damage to his family’s home on Tuesday. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Below, left: Linemen work to restore power Monday at 156th Avenue and Little Axe Drive. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Below: Students, teachers and administrators form a line to pass paperwork out of the debris of the Little Axe School central office on Tuesday. The school was hit by a tornado Monday. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

so has ground wells and a water agreement with Oklahoma City and the other cities could as well. Still, Worden urged people to be patient and to use as little water as possible. Meanwhile, he has no idea how long it will take to get power restored, or to get his workplace back to normal. “It got the shop,” he said of the tornado. “We’ve got all our hand tools and power tools out there in the lake.”

HOW TO HELP Here is information about how to help tornado victims and how victims can find help:

DONATIONS Oklahoma County crews are working to assess the damage, but volunteers are needed, County Commissioner Brian Maughan said. To help, go to the District 2 barn, 7501 S Anderson Road, 8 a.m. through 5 p.m. Friday. “We have jobs for young and old,” he said. The American Red Cross of Central Oklahoma is accepting cash donations for the disaster relief fund. Text “redcross” to 90999 to make an automatic $10 donation billed to your cell phone. People can also donate by phone at 228-9500. The Salvation Army is accepting financial donations at www.salvationarmyusa.org and (800) 725-2769. Donations should be designated for Oklahoma tornado assistance. No in-kind donations are needed.

FOOD A mobile feeding unit at Interstate 240 and Anderson Road is run by the Central Oklahoma Area Command of the Salvation Army. Mobile feeding units are traveling throughout Little Axe, Moore, Norman, Seminole, Shawnee and surrounding areas. The Salvation Army workers are from Ardmore, Enid, Shawnee, McAlester and Tulsa. Emotional and spiritual care is available from Salvation Army crews throughout the area.The American Red Cross of Central Oklahoma also has feeding sites in affected areas. All sites serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Feeding locations Harrah: Harrah Church, 101 S Dobbs Road. Norman: CrossPointe Church, 24th Avenue SE and State Highway 9. Seminole: Seminole State College Haney Center, 2701 Boren Blvd. Tecumseh: City Hall, 309 E Chicago Blvd.

› › › ›

ONLINE More coverage To see video and more photos from the storms that hit the state on Monday, go to NewsOK.com/weather. For more on severe weather, go to knowit.NewsOK.com/severeweather.

HEALTH Medical workers from the Oklahoma City-County Health Department and area fire departments will continue giving free tetanus vaccinations today to residents and volunteers cleaning up rubble in tornado damaged areas. The nurses and paramedics will travel to affected neighborhoods to administer the tetanus shots. Free shots are also available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oklahoma County District 2 barn, 7501 S Anderson Road. Shots are also given at the health department, 921 NE 23.

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In Seminole Larry Jernigan, 62, of Shawnee, laughs while recalling events of Monday night when he rode out a tornado inside his 1999 pickup on State Highway 99 in Seminole. He hunkered down in the front seat as the twister moved his truck about 10 feet. All of the truck’s windows Downed power lines block East Highland Street on were blown out, and the body received heavy damage. He escaped Monday. without injury. PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

In Tecumseh

U-Haul is offering 30 days of free storage to residents whose homes or businesses were damaged by tornados. Residents also can participate in a box swap. Those with empty boxes are encouraged to drop them off at U-Haul locations so tornado victims can use them for free. For more information, call (800) 522-4236 or 737-6505.


ENTERTAINMENT

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

MUSICIANS WITH OKLAHOMA TIES ARE AMONG THE FAVORITES FOR THE SHOW

CMT award nominations announced BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Checotah native Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean and Lady Antebellum each hold a leading three nominations in the final round of competition for the CMT Music Awards. Miranda Lambert, Toby Keith, Reba McEntire, Brooks & Dunn, Blake Shelton and Rascal Flatts also were among the stars with Oklahoma ties to earn nominations when Country Music Television announced Tuesday the last round of nominees for its fan-voted awards show. The 2010 CMT Music Awards will air June 9, live from Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn., on CMT and www.cmt.com. Detroit-based rocker/ rapper Kid Rock, a 2009 CMT Music Award winner, will host the show, which will feature performances by Underwood, Lambert, Keith, Lady Antebellum and Keith Urban.

Fan voting to determine the CMT Music Award winners is open through June 8 at www.cmt.com. The final nominees for the top award, video of the year, will be announced at the beginning of the awards show, and fans will be able to cast their ballots online and via text message throughout the live broadcast. Underwood’s sassy hit “Cowboy Casanova” is nominated for video of the year and female video of the year, while her “CMT Invitation Only” rendition of “Temporary Home” will compete for CMT performance of the year. Lambert, who lives in Tishomingo, also garnered a video of the year nomination for the mini-movie to her first No. 1 song, “White Liar.” “White Liar” is up for female video, as well. Norman resident Keith earned video and male video of the year nods for his rowdy chart-topper “American Ride.” McEntire, who grew up

Carrie Underwood arrives at an annual pre-Grammy Gala on Jan. 30 in Beverly Hills, Calif. AP PHOTO

in Chockie, received nods for her ballad “Consider Me Gone,” nominated for female video of the year and performance of the year from “Invitation Only” performance. Brooks & Dunn, which includes former Tulsan Ronnie Dunn, is nominated in the duo video of the year category for the ballad “Indian Summer.” Since Dunn and Kix Brooks plan to split up after their summer “The Last Rodeo Tour,” this will be their last CMT Music Awards nomination as a duo. Ada native and Tishomingo resident Shelton shares a nomination with

BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton

An Ada native, Shelton married his high school sweetheart, Kaynette Williams, in 2003 but they divorced in 2006. Much of his 2007 album “Pure BS” dealt with the breakdown of his marriage. This will be the first union for Lambert, 26, a Lindale, Texas, native who bought a Tishomingo farm near her beau’s spread about three years ago. They enjoy hunting and fishing together when they are home. No word has been given on when the wedding will take place, but it will cap a big year for both stars. Lambert recently notched her first No. 1 hit with “White Liar” and won three Academy of Country Music Awards, including album of the year for “Revolution.” Shelton won his first ACM award for “Hillbilly Bone,” his chart-topping duet with Trace Adkins. On Tuesday, Lambert earned two nominations and Shelton garnered one

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Legendary entertainer, Norman resident dies FROM STAFF REPORTS

Country singers planning to wed Oklahoma country music stars Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert are officially engaged after five years of romance. Lambert told www. people.com that Shelton popped the question Sunday in the woods near her Tishomingo farm. The proposal mixed formality and casualness. “He called my dad and got his blessing first,” Lambert told the publication about Shelton’s surprise proposal. “That was so Southern and oldschool and perfect.” She also praised Shelton, 33, for the diamondand-platinum ring he picked out on his own. “I was so proud of him,” Lambert told People. “We’ve been together five years, so he knew exactly what I wanted but it’s so much more perfect than I could have picked out myself.” The couple celebrated Lambert’s “yes” answer rather informally: “We had a couple of Bacardi and Diet Sprites — in a Solo cup!” Lambert told the magazine, which will have more on the pair’s engagement in Friday’s issue.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

nod in the final round of the fan-voted CMT Music Awards, which will air live June 9 from Nashville, Tenn. CONTRIBUTING:

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buddy Trace Adkins for collaborative video of the year for their raucous chart-topping duet “Hillbilly Bone.” Rascal Flatts, which includes Joe Don Rooney of Picher, is nominated in the group video of the year category for “Here Comes Goodbye.”

NORMAN — Doris Eaton Travis, the last surviving member of the legendary Ziegfeld Follies, died Tuesday at age 106. Travis performed with the famous dance troupe from 1918 to 1920 and went on to star in musical revues, Broadway comedies and silent films. Travis made her final public appearance in April. In a statement released to BroadwayWorld.com, Tom Viola, executive director of Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights AIDS, said, “Since first meeting her at the very young age of 94 in 1998 when she appeared at the 12th Annual Easter Bonnet Competition at the New Amsterdam Theatre, through the 24th annual competition two weeks ago at the Minskoff. ... Doris was simply a delight. She taught us all a little bit about how to celebrate the past and live for today. We will miss her forever.” In 1936, Travis joined Arthur Murray’s New York dance studio as a tap in-

Doris Eaton Travis

structor. She later moved to Detroit where she opened an Arthur Murray studio. Under Travis’ leadership, the franchise grew to include 18 dance studios throughout Michigan. She met her husband Paul Travis in Detroit. They were married 50 years. Doris and Paul Travis moved to Norman in 1970 to begin a horse breeding operation. She operated their 880-acre ranch until her death. Travis earned her college degree from the University of Oklahoma at age 88. She wrote about her life and family in a 2003 book titled “The Days We Danced: The Story of My Theatrical Family.”


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NATION | WORLD BUDGET OFFICE RELEASES NEW ESTIMATE THAT INCLUDES DISCRETIONARY FUNDING

Health care overhaul bill could cost $115B more BACKGROUND LAW EXPANDS COVERAGE The health care law provides coverage to more than 30 million now uninsured. When Congress passed the bill in March, the Congressional Budget Office estimated the coverage expansion would cost $938 billion over 10 years, while reducing the federal deficit by $143 billion.

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s new health care law could potentially add at least $115 billion more to government health care spending over the next 10 years, congressional budget referees said Tuesday. If Congress approves all the additional spending called for in the legislation, it would push the ten-year cost of the overhaul above $1 trillion — an unofficial limit the Obama administration set early on. The Congressional Budget Office said the added spending includes $10 bil-

lion to $20 billion in administrative costs to federal agencies carrying out the law, as well as $34 billion for community health centers and $39 billion for Indian health care. The costs were not reflected in earlier estimates, although Republican lawmakers argued that they should have been. Part of the reason is technical: the additional spending is not mandatory, leaving Congress with discretion to provide the funds in followon legislation — or not. “Congress does not always act on authorizations that are put into legislation by drafters,” said Kenneth

Coburn wants pork online BY CHRIS CASTEEL Washington Bureau ccasteel@opubco.com

WASHINGTON — Sen. Tom Coburn, who helped create an online government database of federal spending, now wants Congress to make it easy for people to search for lawmakers’ pet projects on the Web. Coburn, R-Muskogee, introduced bipartisan legislation on Tuesday to establish an earmark database showing projects requested by lawmakers and how much money was approved for them. “While Congress has taken some steps to make the earmark process more transparent, some members and special interest

groups still prefer to keep the process a secret,” Coburn said. “The American people should not have to obtain search warrants to understand how Congress is spending their money. I’m pleased my colleagues on both sides of the aisle have come together to answer President (Barack) Obama’s call to establish a single, searchable database of all congressional earmark requests.” Because of recent reforms, lawmakers now post their earmark requests — typically projects ranging from road improvements to medical research — on their websites with explanations. The House Appropriations Committee website has a

link to House requests. Some outside groups like Taxpayers for Common Sense dig through spending bills after they’ve been approved and then post the funding amounts for earmarks. Coburn, who doesn’t request earmarks and refers to them as “the gateway drug to spending addiction in Congress,” coauthored legislation with Obama in 2006 that created the federal website www.usaspending.gov, which includes a database of federal contracts and assistance payments. Lawmakers joining Coburn on the earmarks bill are Sens. John McCain, RAriz.; Russ Feingold, DWis.; and Kristen Gillibrand, D-N.Y.

VIOLENCE MAY LEAD TO EXTENDING WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE

IN BRIEF SUSPECT CALLED ‘HOMEGROWN’ NEW YORK — The

A man grieves as the coffin of a relative killed in a bombing is taken for burial Tuesday in the Shiite city of Najaf. south of Baghdad. AP PHOTO

Military considers delaying pullout of troops in Iraq BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — American commanders, worried about increased violence in the wake of Iraq’s inconclusive elections, are now reconsidering the pace of a major troop pullout this summer, U.S. officials said Tuesday. The withdrawal of the first major wave of troops is expected to be delayed by about a month, the officials said. Waiting much longer could endanger President Barack Obama’s goal of reducing the force level from 92,000 to 50,000 troops by Aug. 31. More than two months after parliamentary elections, the Iraqis have still not formed a new government, and militants aiming to exploit the void have carried out attacks like Monday’s bombings and shootings that killed at least 119 people — the country’s bloodiest day of 2010. The threat has prompted military officials to look at keeping as many troops on the ground, for as long as possible, without missing the Aug. 31 deadline. A se-

curity agreement between the two nations requires American troops to be out of Iraq by the end of 2011. In Baghdad and Washington, U.S. officials say they remain committed to the deadline, which Obama has said he would extend only if Iraq’s security deteriorates. Getting out of Iraq quickly and responsibly was among Obama’s top campaign promises in 2008. Extending the deadline could be politically risky back home — but so could anarchy and a bloodbath following a hasty retreat. Two senior administration officials said the White House is closely watching to see if the Aug. 31 date needs to be pushed back. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the internal discussions. Shortly before the election, there were 96,000 U.S. troops in the country. As of last week, there were about 92,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, meaning an average of 10,500 a month would have to be pulled out.

suspected driver in a failed car bombing of Times Square fits the profile of a recent wave of “homegrown” terrorists threatening America, New York police officials warned Tuesday. The officials said Faisal Shahzadhad roots in working- or middleclass society, some college education and no previous criminal record, but became radicalized in part by traveling to overseas terrorist hotbeds. The Times Square threat was “a classic case of homegrown terrorism,” Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said at a briefing for private security executives.

GROUP MAY GO ON BLACKLIST WASHINGTON — The

government may add the Pakistani Taliban to a terrorism blacklist that would impose travel and financial sanctions on members of the group, which officials believe is linked to the failed Times Square car bombing. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said Tuesday the U.S. already was considering designating Tehrik-eTaliban Pakistan a “foreign terrorist organization,” before the incident in New York, but the process accelerated since the failed attack.

Baer, a spokesman for the White House budget agency. Congressional estimators also said they had not had enough time to run the numbers. “If Congress were to approve all of this new discretionary funding authorized in the health care bill, almost all of the administration’s highly touted savings would be made null and void,” said Jennifer Hing, spokeswoman for Republicans on the House Appropriations Committee. But Baer said Obama would demand that added spending be offset with cuts in other domestic programs.

IN BRIEF NATION

WAR MEMORIAL CROSS STOLEN LOS ANGELES — A cross erected on a remote Mojave Desert outcropping to honor American war dead has been stolen less than two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed it to remain standing while a legal battle continued over its presence on federal land. Versions of the memorial have been vandalized repeatedly in the last 75 years, but the theft was condemned Tuesday by veterans groups that support the cross and by civil libertarians that saw it as a violation of the constitutional separation of church and state.

WORLD

CAMERON BECOMES PRIME MINISTER LONDON — David Cameron, the youthful leader

who modernized the party of right-wing icon Margaret Thatcher, became prime minister Tuesday after the resignation of Gordon Brown — capping a gripping election saga that returns the Tories to government after 13 years of Labour Party rule. Following tradition, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Cameron at Buckingham Palace after a behindthe-scenes dogfight between Cameron and Brown for the cooperation of Britain’s third-place party, after an election that left no party with a majority.

FOURTH SCHOOL ATTACK REPORTED BEIJING — A Chinese news agency says seven

children were hacked to death and at least 20 others injured in a violent rampage early today at a kindergarten in northwest Shaanxi province, in the lastest in a string of attacks on schools. It comes after three attacks at schools and kindergartens late last month left dozens of children injured and raised questions on security. FROM WIRE SERVICES


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MONOLOGUE

OPINION OUR VIEWS | STATE KNOWS HOW TO COPE WITH DISASTERS

Nature’s wrath, residents’ resolve put on display CIENCE and technology can only go so far in explaining what we see after tornadoes like those that swept across the state Monday. Why do they level one home and leave the house next door standing? Why do they leapfrog entire neighborhoods and ravish others? Why can we see some coming for miles while others drop down and disappear in almost invisible fashion except for the obvious destruction left behind? What we know for sure in Oklahoma is this: We have survived worse. And together, we’ll survive the chaos of this week and whatever else Mother Nature has in store this spring. The scenes from Monday’s series of tornadoes are nothing short of devastating. Twisters reduced homes to rubble, uprooted trees and sucked grass from the earth. That’s what they do, with no regard for life or memories or history. And we’re helpless to stop it. Yes, we can prepare. Evidence of that was widespread as video showed neighbors rescuing nearby families from their shelters. Some people died. But how much worse could it have been? Mobile home parks were flattened. The twisters hit in afternoon rush hour and blew vehicles off the road, flipping some of them in the process. And despite wall-to-wall television coverage, not

S

every tornado that touched down had much specific advance warning. Mother Nature still rules over technology. Now we’re left with the aftermath. Families wonder what will become of their blown-away homes and scattered keepsakes. Officials of damaged schools must figure out whether they can finish the school year. And those families who lost the most — their precious loved ones — mourn for those they can’t bring back. Yet the aftermath is when Oklahoma is at its best. Neighbors checked on one another. First responders weren’t far behind. Makeshift emergency shelters went up almost immediately. And help to restore power and begin the massive work of cleanup began pouring in, slowed only by the need to check for injured and other dangers like downed power lines and potential gas leaks. It took only seconds for the tornadoes to wrap Oklahoma in destruction. But Oklahomans will be there for each other for the long haul, making sure families are fed and housed even as we mourn alongside them. The long list of tragedies that preceded Monday has taught us how to do that. Oklahomans know how to care for one another. It’s what we do.

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

Utah alarm: Politicians should note Bennett’s loss

Speak up: Abuse suspicions must be reported

Some observers are missing key points in U.S. Sen. Robert Bennett’s failure last weekend to win the Republican nomination in Utah, ousted from the state’s primary by a pair of tea party-endorsed candidates who’ve never held political office. One view is that Bennett’s loss means all incumbents, not just Democrats, could be in jeopardy come November. Another is that if a staunch conservative like Bennett can’t win re-nomination in bright-red Utah, the tea party members largely responsible for his ouster are way out of the political mainstream. We’ll buy the first — with an important footnote — but not the second. Yes, incumbents of both parties have good reason to run scared this fall, especially if they’ve been part of the recent Sen. Bob Bennett Washington spending spree. Bennett was an Appropriations Committee member and a TARP supporter. In his state he was seen as part of the spending machinery that’s the object of national frustration reflected in the tea party movement. As for using Bennett as proof the tea party crowd is a collection of conservative nuts that can be marginalized, careful. By Washington standards Bennett was conservative. But maybe not in Utah, at least not as conservative as he needed to be — the teaching point being that members of Congress who don’t match their constituents’ interests could be in trouble this fall. This year voter energy is focused on spending, the deficit and Washington’s dismissal of public opposition to Obamacare. Politicians on the wrong side of those issues face a tough road ahead.

The case of a Tulsa school administrator accused of inappropriately touching a student should serve as a warning and reminder: reporting potential child abuse isn’t optional. A counselor at Tulsa’s Skelly Elementary told the school principal in October that she had witnessed Assistant Principal Robert Yerton inappropriately touching a student. It wasn’t until last month that police officials searched the school and Yerton’s home. He was arrested last week on three sex offenses, including two that authorities said involved a male relative. Police are concerned there might be more victims. Yerton is a longtime educator and former children’s minister at a Tulsa church. State law requires anyone who suspects child abuse to report it to the state Department of Human Services. It’s not enough for teachers or other educators to report it to a supervisor and hope it gets passed on. Oklahoma, like other states, has an unfortunate history of teachers who’ve been proven guilty of inappropriate touching or sexual relationships with students. In many of those cases, the teachers had no criminal history so routine background checks didn’t turn up potential problems. Some, though, had been the subject of suspicion and rumors. Child abuse allegations are serious and can ruin lives and careers even if proven untrue. But that doesn’t change the obligation we all have — especially those entrusted daily with children’s safety — to protect them. Now’s a good time to make sure those in positions of trust — including teachers, child care workers and church leaders — are clear on their reporting responsibilities.

Oprah did her show from New York to celebrate the 10th anniversary of O magazine. Dr. Phil allowed them to shave his moustache, which is currently being used to sop up oil in the Gulf.” JIMMY KIMMEL

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!”

Expansive silence of Elena Kagan WASHINGTON — From the supporters of Elena Kagan’s nomination to the Supreme Court, we have learned that as Harvard Law School’s dean she provided free bagels and coffee to students, improved the gymnasium and added a multipurpose ice rink. Her detractors have reported on liberal columns she wrote — as a college student in the Daily Princetonian. Profiles have informed us that during Kagan’s Supreme Court clerkship, Justice Thurgood Marshall dubbed her “Shorty.” The chattering class is focused on such trivia because there is not much else to say. The single most prominent thing about Kagan is her extraordinary ability, while holding high-profile jobs in the legal profession, to say nothing about the major issues of the day. It is the one judgment that Kagan observers of all ideological backgrounds seem to share. Tom Goldstein, a Kagan supporter, admits, “I don’t know anyone who has had a conversation with her in which she Michael expressed a personal Gerson conviction on a question of constitutional law in the past decade.” Carrie Severino, a Kagan critic from COMMENTARY the right, concludes, “She’s been so careful for so long that no one seems to know exactly what she does think.” Kagan has been a leader in the field of law without having a distinctive legal voice. She has been a leader in academia without having left a discernible academic mark. This has become the path of least resistance to the Supreme Court — being eminent without being conspicuous. But no public life is without a trace. In her story we can discern at least a few things. First, we know that she is connected to just about everyone in the legal establishment, and most seem to like her. She was a classmate of former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and legal commentator Jeffrey Toobin, and was a protege of historian Sean Wilentz and Judge Abner Mikva. As dean of Harvard Law School, she hired conservative scholars and treated them decently. On a personal level, she is not a vicious partisan. Second, we know from friends and colleagues that Kagan is a social liberal. Kagan hails from a very small ideological neighborhood — Manhattan, Princeton University, the University of Chicago and Harvard Law School. To paraphrase President Obama, she shows a keen understanding of how the law affects the daily lives of people on the Upper West Side and in the Ivy League. Third, we know, or at least suspect, that Kagan is favorable to strong executive authority. Her writings endorse presidential control of federal agencies on domestic issues. During her confirmation hearings for solicitor general, Kagan also seemed to approve the detention of enemy combatants without trial during a time of war.

Knowing views would be helpful So: Kagan is a fair-minded social liberal who favors a strong executive. Sound like anyone you know? It would seem that Obama has chosen a version of himself. Wouldn’t it be helpful to know Kagan’s political, legal and constitutional views? The political culture surrounding judicial nominations — driven by attack ads and advocacy groups — undermines this possibility. “The Framers intended the Senate to take the broadest view of its constitutional responsibility,” a senator once explained, including the scrutiny of a nominee’s “political, legal and constitutional views.” That was Joe Biden announcing his opposition to Judge Robert Bork in 1987. Bork’s vivid opinions were used by opponents to sink his nomination. Kagan’s confirmation strategy, implemented over a lifetime of blandness, is likely to be more effective. Yet Kagan’s expansive silence leaves a broad range of plausible interpretations. Is she a temperamental moderate who doesn’t like comprehensive pronouncements or judicial activism of any kind? Is she a consensus-oriented liberal who will be able to pull Justice Anthony Kennedy to the left on key votes? Is it possible Kagan lacks any wellformed constitutional perspective at all? Who knows? Who could possibly know? WASHINGTON POST WRITERS GROUP


OPINION

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Free-market system: Pro-rich or pro-poor? Listening to America’s liberals, who the open, highly competitive and more now prefer to call themselves progresfree market end of our economy. sives, one would think that free markets Restricted, regulated and monopolized benefit the rich and harm the poor, but markets are especially handicapping to little can be further from the truth. people who are seen as less preferred, First, let’s first say what free markets latecomers and people with little politiare. Free markets, or laissez-faire capcal clout. For example, owning and opitalism, refer to an economic system erating a taxi is one way out of poverty. where there is no government interfeIt takes little skills and capital. But in rence except to outlaw and prosecute most cities, one has to purchase a lifraud and coercion. It ought to be apcense costing tens of thousands of dolparent that our economy cannot be lars. New York City’s taxicab licensing described as free market because there is law is particularly egregious, requiring a extensive government interference. We person, as of May 2007, to pay have what might be called a mixed $600,000 for a license to own and opereconomy, one with both free market and ate one cab. Business licensing laws are socialistic attributes. If one is poor or of not racially discriminatory as such, but modest means, where does he fare betthey have a racially discriminatory efter: in the freer and more open sector of fect. our economy or in the controlled and The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931, still on highly regulated sector? Let’s look at it. the books today, had a racially discrimiDid Carnegie, Mellon, natory intent and has a Rockefeller and Guggenracially discriminatory heim start out rich? Aneffect. It is a federal law Walter drew Carnegie worked as a Williams that mandates “prevailing bobbin boy, changing wages” be paid on all fedspools of thread in a coterally financed or assisted ton mill 12 hours a day, six construction projects and days a week, earning $1.20 as such discriminates a week. A young John D. against non-unionized COMMENTARY Rockefeller worked as a black construction conclerk. Meyer Guggenheim tractors and black workers. started out as a peddler. Andrew Mellon During the 1931 legislative debate, quite a did have a leg up; his father was a lawyer few congressmen expressed racist moand banker. Sam Walton milked the tives in their testimony in support of the family’s cows, bottled the milk and delaw, such as Rep. Clayton Allgood, Dlivered it and newspapers to customers. Ala., who said, “Reference has been Richard Sears was a railroad station made to a contractor from Alabama who agent. Alvah Roebuck began work as a went to New York with bootleg labor. watchmaker. Together, they founded This is a fact. That contractor has cheap Sears, Roebuck and Co. in 1893. John colored labor that he transports, and he Cash Penney (founder of JC Penney puts them in cabins, and it is labor of department stores) worked for a local that sort that is in competition with dry goods merchant. white labor throughout the country.” It wasn’t just whites who went from Today’s supporters of the Davis-Bacon rags to riches through open markets; Act use different rhetoric, but its racially there were a few blacks. Madam C.J. discriminatory effects are the same. Walker, born Sarah Breedlove just two The market is a friend in another years after the end of slavery, managed unappreciated way. In poor black neighto build an empire from developing and borhoods, one might see some nice selling hair products. John H. Johnson clothing, some nice food, some nice cars founded Johnson Publishing Co., which but no nice schools. Why not at least became an international media and cos- some nice schools? Clothing, food and metics empire. There are many modern- cars are distributed by the market mechday black millionaires who, like other anism while schools are distributed by millionaires, black and white, found the the political mechanism. route to their fortunes mostly through CREATORS.COM

STEVE BREEN/SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

JOHN DEERING/ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE

YOUR VIEWS

Economic suicide

Former President Bill Clinton tours the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum with executive director Kari Watkins. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

POINT OF VIEW | OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL

Museum speaks to us BY FORD W. BELL

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, which I had the honor to visit for the first time on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of the bombing, occupies a singular place in the array of American museums. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is the nature of its collection. Most Americans think of museums as collecting institutions, the civic pillars in society that collect, preserve and interpret our national heritages — cultural, natural, historic. Museums protect for us the artifacts and objects that define America, and in so doing tell us where we’ve been and, perhaps, provide a glimpse of where we Ford W. Bell might be headed. Here in Washington, D.C., one can sample the greatest such collections in our country, at the various museums that comprise the Smithsonian Institution. But at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, the collection is composed of something seemingly more ephemeral but perhaps even more enduring: memory. There are other museums also at the task of collecting and preserving memory, honoring and passing that memory down to our children, and to their children. Museums are stewards of the spirit and of the conscience of what has come before us and, too often, of what has passed from us forever. The collections of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum — 1

million documents, artifacts and photographs — ensure that we will not lose the memory or the lessons of that horrible day, April 19, 1995. Not far from the myriad exhibits of the Smithsonian are two institutions that share the distinct status of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. One is the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, where a moving exhibit of shoes collected from doomed concentration camp prisoners has moved visitors to tears. Like the stunning memorial in Oklahoma City, it transcends time to convey the souls of the millions of innocents whose loss made such a museum necessary. Just down the National Mall is yet another memorial occupying the unique place of the Oklahoma City National Memorial. In the self-generating ethos of our times, visitors to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial have created their own museum, leaving precious items that invoke the essence of those individuals whose names are there etched in black granite. Dutifully collected and stored by the National Park Service, these objects have significance to but a few, yet they hold meaning for us all. And so it is with the moving collection of the Oklahoma City Memorial and Museum. What greater good can a museum offer us than this act, of watching over the memory and the spirit of those who died in Oklahoma City — who they were and what they meant to us, and what their absence means now to those of us still here? Eventually, something must fill the silence that comes with loss. The Oklahoma City National Memorial fills that silence. And it speaks to us, every day. Bell is president and CEO of the American Association of Museums.

The cap-and-trade bill seems to be warming up again in Congress. Before we get carried away with this program, some key issues must be faced. First, is the science really settled? None of the heating that was predicted by the computer models has occurred in the last dozen years. Second, to fully implement the program (an 80 percent reduction in CO2) will require reducing per capita energy consumption to 1875 levels, thus destroying our industrial society. The cost of doing this has been estimated at $35 trillion. Have alternatives, such as learning to cope with higher temperatures, been fully evaluated? Third, the proponents of this program hope that some viable alternative energy scheme will emerge. Biofuels, wind and solar are only workable on a small scale, due to limited land area for growth of corn or cellulose, and the fact that wind and sunshine are intermittent and need backup. Fourth, such a scheme will only work if the whole world joins the program. If we destroy our economy, China, India and others will be the beneficiaries. Our industries will simply move there. The world has survived this long. It can surely survive until the science has indeed been fully verified or disproved, and if verified, we have viable alternative energy plans, and everyone else is on board. Further, it must be demonstrated that it’s a better plan than learning to live in a warmer world. Otherwise, we will simply be committing economic suicide. Ted Rado, Oklahoma City

NO EASY FIX “Shameful: Kids lose when bad teachers win” (Our Views, May 5) offered the example of charter schools as a fix for the nation’s education woes. Specifically, the article cited the importance of being able to remove bad teachers from the classroom. A New York Times article on May 4 offered a contrasting view of charter schools. Test scores at charter schools differed little from those of public schools. The author, Charles Murray, makes an observation that I believe is key. Murray writes, “What happens in the classroom can have some effect, but smart and motivated children will tend to learn to read and do math even with poor instruction, while not-so-smart or unmotivated children will often have trouble with those subjects despite excellent instruction.” As an educator and the

husband of an elementary school teacher, I could not agree more. I don’t disagree with the notion of removing bad teachers from the classroom, but other factors including parental involvement, family structure and socioeconomic status may play more important roles than what happens in the classroom. Charter schools certainly offer some students an avenue for success, but standardized testing may not demonstrate the gains that proponents hope to see. Perhaps our efforts would be better concentrated on building more cohesive families and a social system that raises expectations. Jeremy Dunn, Oklahoma City

PROUD OF THUNDER We just wanted to let the Oklahoma City Thunder know how much we enjoyed the season. Knowing there were sell-out Thunder coach Scott crowds at Brooks was voted most of the NBA Coach of the home games, Year. we want you to know you were surrounded by fans all around the state via broadcasting of all the games. We never missed one and were always part of the crowd, cheering you on. The team has been so well coached, which was shown through the attitudes of the players. We are so proud of our Thunder. We can’t say enough about the team and the vision you have had by bringing an NBA team to Oklahoma. Gary and Loretta Hall, Elk City

WHAT ABOUT ‘PATRIOT’? Since the illegal alien debate has resumed, I’ve heard the labels “racist,” “Nazi” plus unprintable words directed at the citizens of Arizona and other segments of U.S. society. One word I haven’t heard labeling them is “patriot.” Wake up America! We citizens have to obey our laws, why shouldn’t non-citizens be expected to respect our laws? This applies to all illegal immigrants, regardless of their point of entry into this country or their place of origin. Henry Benton, Shawnee


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO

Bank helps children get on financial path BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children To Save Day. The annual, nationwide event teaches children their financial ABCs. The National Teach Children to Save Day was April 27, when bankers made presentations in schools across the country to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Legacy Bank took part in the event for its fifth consecutive year, but spread the lessons out over the past several weeks. Employees presented to more than 1,000 secondgrade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. The presentation incorporated the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain. The program, The Bear Basics of Savings, covered the personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, the importance of saving, and how interest makes money grow. Students had an opportunity to apply concepts and practices through discussion of the story and

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are planned at a Metropolitan Library System branch. Go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

FRIDAY What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

TODAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 7407374. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509. McLoud Board of Trustees, 7 p.m., city hall, 107 N Main. McLoud School Board, 7 p.m., administration building, 117 N Main.

FRIDAY Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 6033576.

SATURDAY Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 9427355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave. Mid-Del Farmers Market, 8 a.m., Charles J. Johnson Central Park, SE 29 and Air Depot, Midwest City. Edmond Farmers Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Place, Second and Broadway, 359-4630.

MONDAY A Legacy Bank employee reads to students at Ida Freeman Elementary in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JULIE NOAKES, LEGACY BANK

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

adults. This book is somewhat harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides.

Del City Council, 6 p.m., city hall, 3701 SE 15, 677-5741.

Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 6033576. McEvoy Toastmasters, 6:30 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa Ave., 787-1598. Oklahoma City School Board, 5:30 p.m., school administration building, 900 N Klein. Putnam City School Board, 6 p.m., school administration building, 5401 NW 40, Warr Acres.

TUESDAY Bethany City Council, 7:30 p.m., city hall, 6700 NW 36. El Reno City Council, 7:25 p.m., city council chambers, 101 N Choctaw. Jones City Council, 7 p.m., city hall, 110 E Main St. Mustang City Council, 7 p.m., 224 State Highway 152. Oklahoma City Council, 8:30 a.m., city hall, 200 N Walker Ave. The Village City Council, 7:30 p.m., city hall, 2304 Manchester Drive. Yukon City Council, 7:30 p.m., Centennial Building, 125 S Fifth. Warr Acres City Council, 7 p.m., city hall, 5930 NW 49. Oklahoma City Stamp Club, 7 p.m., Asbury United Methodist Church, 1320 SW 38, 632-3378. Advanced E-mail, 10 a.m., Moore Public Library, 225 S Howard, 793-5100.

ONLINE

other activities. For more tips and ideas about saving, go to www.legacybank.com/ bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day for parents and teachers, go to www.aba.com/ abaef/tcts.htm.

Make sure all your school or nonprofit events are entered into wimgo.com, the Web site for all activities in Oklahoma. IT’S EASY TO DO Go to wimgo.com and log in using your NewsOK.com log-in and password. Click on “Add Event.” Enter all the information about your event, and wimgo will help you with each step.

› › ›

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

CALENDAR

The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

SPRING’S BOUNTY BLOOMS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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UCO theater series to close with musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

Wildflowers grow in the Centennial Grove at Interstate 35 and Covell Road in Edmond. PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Signs of spring throw a splash of color.

A truck drives by a patch of wildflowers in Edmond.

Camp Fire USA honors four students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a term which is short for work, health and love. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is

also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information about Camp Fire USA, call the council office at 4785646.

‘24 Works on Paper’ has Norman exhibit FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking.

Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to

“Summer of ’42” stars UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro as Dorothy and Pete. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

fight the war in the Pacific. “The musical begins as an older Hermie returns to the island and reflects back on that time in his life,” White said. “The story plays on dualities — the coming of age, a husband killed, the American sense of World War II. It is the moment before innocence lost and is as much about America as it is about Hermie,” he said. For tickets, call the Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Bike to Work Day activities planned BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

At least seven metroarea cities plan to participate in Bike to Work day May 21, and Edmond is scheduled to launch a Bike to School Day. The Association of Central Oklahoma Governments is coordinating activities for Oklahoma City, Guthrie, Midwest City, Moore, Norman, Yukon and Edmond. For the first time, Edmond is having a Bike to School Day in conjunction with the Bike to Work Day activities, said Tim Tillman, chairman of the Edmond Bicycle Committee. Students will gather at Stephenson, Hafer or Bickman-Rudkin parks at 7 a.m., and all the student riders will end up at Edmond Memorial High School. “This is the first one since you and I were kids riding bikes to school,” Tillman said. Each of the seven metroarea communities have activities planned that focus on a group ride which intends to show the motoring public the number of active cyclists and participants. Each community also has a specific route and end-of-

SAFETY TIPS BICYCLE COMMUTING 1. Always wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. 2. Wear appropriate shoes and comfortable clothes in bright colors that enhance your visibility. 3. Before riding, inspect your bike for safety and mechanical concerns. 4. Plan and know your route by walking or driving it first. Select a route that uses less-traveled streets and avoids busy roads and intersections. 5. Share the commute with a co-worker or friend. 6. Obey all traffic laws — stop signs, traffic lights and other posted signs. Signal turns, lane changes and stops. 7. Continuously scan for traffic, look for road hazards and ride in a predictable manner with the flow of traffic. 8. Ride with the flow of traffic as far to the right as practical unless passing or turning. 9. Be aware of turning automobiles, buses making frequent stops, passengers exiting parked vehicles, vehicles exiting driveways and pedestrians. 10. Carry water, emergency maintenance tools and a mobile phone. SOURCE: ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA GOVERNMENTS

ride ceremony. Bike to Work Day 2010 is part of a national campaign to promote bicycling as a healthy and efficient transportation alternative. The League of American Bicyclists has recognized the month of May as National Bike to Work Month since 1956. National Bike to Work Day, the third Friday in

May, annually offers metropolitan areas the opportunity to call attention to the benefits of bicycling and to increase safety awareness among bicyclists and motorists. Complete details for Central Oklahoma Bike to Work Day 2010, can be found at bikedayok.com or call Ryan Billings or Jerry Church at 234-2264.

Campaign collects quarters to help kids with diabetes BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City. The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent

childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches inside retail stores are excluded. On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and N Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of

$

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day baby-sitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17 and 18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants are asked to bring a lunch. They will earn a certificate. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration is $15 and classes are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22 and 23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating class for age 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. Preregistration is $5. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. The morning session is from 9 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session is from 1to 4 p.m. Five-day sewing camps will be offered July 12-16 and July 26-30. Registration is $50. Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information, call 713-1125.

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Bud Hightree levels a pot Saturday that will become a fountain at the Cleveland County Master Gardeners’ demonstration garden at the fairgrounds. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs have raised more than $500,000 for sick and injured children receiving care through The Children’s Hospital and OU Medical Center. The funds recently created a metabolic lab for children with diabetes. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

Store Summer The Mattress Special Purchase Pillow Top Set workshops Full Queen King 179 199 299 available Latex Eurotop Set for youth Full Queen King $

A watering spot in the garden

$

$

369

$

$

499

NW 10th & Portland, Oklahoma City

405-943-4771

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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17A

COWBOYS, COWGIRLS GET READY TO RODEO Contestants wait for their turn to compete during the rodeo. Kids 4 and under can participate in goat undercoating, by foot only.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo at the Carl Benne Arena. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer. Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Poet to read in Norman FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. The reading is free.

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo. The rodeo has events for children of all ages.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

II

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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20A

II

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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ELECTIONS

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State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NORTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

INDEX Deaths Records

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14A

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO GROWING THE GARDEN TAKES SOME WATER

Linda Garms with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners waters plants in a demonstration garden Saturday at the fairgrounds. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is somewhat harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, al-

lowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel

in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

SATURDAY What: Main Street’s Rockin’ Reunion When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: All ages What: Craft Club: Create a kite When: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 5 and older

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Oklahoma State UniversityOklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576.

Del City Council, 6 p.m., city hall, 3701 SE 15, 677-5741. Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576. McEvoy Toastmasters, 6:30 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa Ave., 787-1598. Oklahoma City School Board, 5:30 p.m., school administration building, 900 N Klein. Putnam City School Board, 6 p.m., school administration building, 5401 NW 40, Warr Acres.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 740-7374. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509.

SATURDAY Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 942-7355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave. Edmond Farmers Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Place, Second and Broadway, 359-4630.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Award given to 4 students from metro FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a term which is short for work, health and love. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is

also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information about Camp Fire USA, call the council office at 4785646.

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Poet to read Sunday at Santa Fe Depot FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday

Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other poems.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

‘HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?’

Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck.

Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane during the Touch-a-Truck event Saturday in Norman. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Above: Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter. Right: Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while OEC journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

Firehouse to exhibit ‘24 Works on Paper’

Civil

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, with stops in both large and small communities, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Spring Planting Time Is Here! Come See Our Selection of Homegrown Bedding Plants, Hanging Baskets, Shrubs, Rosebushes, Groundcover, Pottery and Much, Much More!

330 W. Memorial • 748-6983 Monday - Saturday 9-6, Sunday 12-5

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Other Legal Notices

772

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

COWBOYS, COWGIRLS GET READY TO RODEO

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo at the Carl Benne Arena. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

III

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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III

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

SOUTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

INDEX Deaths Records

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IV

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO

Bank helps children get on financial path BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children To Save Day. The annual, nationwide event teaches children their financial ABCs. The National Teach Children to Save Day was April 27, when bankers made presentations in schools across the country to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Legacy Bank took part in the event for its fifth consecutive year, but spread the lessons out over the past several weeks. Employees presented to more than 1,000 second-grade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. The presentation incorporated the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain. The program, The Bear Basics of Savings, covered the personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, the importance of saving, and how interest makes money grow.

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students at Ida Freeman Elementary in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JULIE NOAKES, LEGACY BANK

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students.

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

INFORMATION For more about saving, go to www.legacy bank.com/bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day, go to www.aba. com/abaef/tcts.htm.

Legacy Bank employee Kim Cherry discusses the importance of savings with second-graders.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is some-

what harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

FRIDAY

TODAY

SATURDAY

What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

What: Main Street’s Rockin’ Reunion When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: All ages

THURSDAY

What: Craft Club: Create a kite When: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 5 and older

What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

SUNDAY What: I can’t believe I shot that: Teen film When: 2 to 4 p.m. Where: Downtown Ages: All ages

IN BRIEF POET TO READ AT DEPOT ON SUNDAY NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other original poems. The reading is free and open to everyone. FROM STAFF REPORTS

CALENDAR TODAY

SATURDAY

Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 942-7355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ THURSDAY Market, 8 a.m., 400 West Women’s ConnecN Portland Ave. tion, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Mid-Del Farmers Country Club, 4001 NW 39, Market, 8 a.m., 740-7374. Charles J. Johnson Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Central Park, SE 29 Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, and Air Depot, Mid691-0509. west City. Edmond Farmers FRIDAY Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Place, Second and Broadway, 359Drive, 603-3576. 4630. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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A GARDEN WATERING SPOT

Linda Garms with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners waters plants in a demonstration garden Saturday at the Cleveland County fairgrounds. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Collecting coins to help children BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City. The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches

inside retail stores are excluded. On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs have raised more than $500,000 for sick and injured children receiving care through The Children’s Hospital and OU Medical Center. The funds recently created a metabolic lab for children with diabetes. They also have partnered with Children’s Hospital Foundation and community donors to create a $15 million childhood diabetes program. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

Summer workshops available for youth FROM STAFF REPORTS

Cake decorating, sewing, baby-sitting certification and cooking classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day babysitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17-18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants are asked to bring a sack lunch. They will earn a baby-sitting certificate. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration for the workshop is $15 and classes will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22-23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating

INFORMATION Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information about enrollment, call 713-1125.

class for ages 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. Pre-registration is $5. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. The morning session is from 9 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session is from 1 to 4 p.m. Five-day sewing camp sessions will be offered in the mornings July 12-16 and in the mornings and afternoons July 26-30. Registration is $50. Sewing camps are limited to 10 participants.

Bud Hightree levels a pot Saturday that will become a fountain in the demonstration garden.


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

GETTIN’ READY TO RODEO Left: Contestants wait for their turn Friday to compete during the Edmond Junior Rodeo. Kids 4 and younger can participate in goat undercoating, by foot only. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo. The next rodeo will be May 21-22.

Ryan Fatzer, 6, competes in a Mutton Bustin’ event.

Seasonal Allergies? Don’t let a runny nose and itchy eyes keep you from having fun this spring!

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Let Dr. Molina evaluate your allergies and prescribe some relief. Marco Molina, MD Board Certified Family Medicine

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Call Today To Schedule An Appointment!

((405) 405)) 636 636-7407 36 6 7407

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

4221 S. Western, Ste. 3030 | Oklahoma City, OK 73109 Mon-Fri, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Wed, 8:30 a.m. - Noon

Camp Fire honors 4 students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a Camp Fire USA term, which is short for work, health and love. The WoHeLo Award is the organization’s highest achievement. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area. Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information, call the Heart of Oklahoma Council office at 4785646.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?

Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter.

Above: Parents, kids and trucks are reflected in a fire truck’s mirror Saturday during the Touch a Truck event in Norman.

Left: Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck.

Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while Oklahoma Electrical Cooperative journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Above left: Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother, Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane.

Firehouse Art Center to exhibit ‘24 Works’ FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Artists participating in “24 Works on Paper” are MJ Alexander, Oklahoma City; Narciso Arguelles, Edmond; Sarah Atlee, Oklahoma City; Nick Bayer, Oklahoma City; Eleanor Davy Carmack, Tulsa; Marty Coleman, Glenpool; Bryan Dahlvang, Tuttle; Leslie Waugh Dallam, Norman; Don Emrick, Claremore; Dixie Er-

ickson, Norman; Michelle Himes-McCrory, Stillwater; Bradley Jessop, Sulphur; Trent Lawson, Oklahoma City; Katherine Liontas-Warren, Lawton; Regina Murphy, Oklahoma City; Romy Owens, Oklahoma City;

Christopher M. Owens, Tulsa; Cindy Pauchey, Walters; Liz Roth, Stillwater; Clarissa Sharp, Oklahoma City; Rob Smith, Cushing; Tom Wester, Oklahoma City; George Wilson, Oklahoma City, and Betty Wood, Norman. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

IV

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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IV

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EAST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perry

Ardmore

NORMAN

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

CALENDAR

METRO, TOO

OU clock tower gets a ‘face-lift’

An Allied Steel crane operator lifts a clock face toward its new home on the west side of the University of Oklahoma clock tower. PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

BY JAMES S. TYREE Staff Writer jtyree@opubco.com

NORMAN — John Snellings of the University of Oklahoma Facilities Management department looked up at a new clock face as it was lifted atop the 110-foot-tall OU Clock Tower. “My how time flies,” he said. Amanda Toohey of OU

Facilities Management said the acrylic clock face installed on the tower’s west side replaces one that blew down and smashed to the ground during the Christmas Eve winter storm that produced high winds and record snowfall. The clock tower is an OU landmark just outside Bizzell Memorial Library. The Verdin Company office in Dallas made the $18,000 custom-built

clock and its staff helped install it in the tower. Once the clock was in place, the workers installed its motor, put the clock hands on its face, and then reinforced clocks on the tower’s other three sides to prevent future mishaps. OU hired Allied Steel of Oklahoma City to lift the clock face on Thursday and help with installation. University employees also were there to assist.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is some-

what harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17

What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

TODAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 740-7374.

A Verdin employee inside the clock tower reaches for the clock face.

Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509. McLoud Board of Trustees, 7 p.m., city hall, 107 N Main. McLoud School Board, 7 p.m., administration building, 117 N Main.

FRIDAY Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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Other Legal Notices

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UCO theater series to end with musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman

University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro star as Dorothy and Pete. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to fight the war in the Pacific. “The musical begins as an older Hermie returns to the island and reflects back on that time in his life,” White said. “The story plays on dualities — the coming of age, a husband killed, the American sense of World War II. It is the moment

before innocence lost and is as much about America as it is about Hermie,” he said. For tickets, call the Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/ broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.

Quarters collected to help children who have diabetes BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City.

Summer workshops available for youth FROM STAFF REPORTS

Classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day baby-sitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17 and 18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants should bring a sack lunch. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration is $15 and classes are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22 and 23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating class for age 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. Five-day sewing camp sessions are July 1216 and July 26-30. Registration is $50.

INFORMATION Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information about enrollment, call 713-1125.

The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches in retail stores are excluded.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

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personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

17A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

V

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF NORMAN

EDMOND | STATE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perry

Ardmore

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Grads will soon join the real world Do you fear the future, as it will soon be in the hands of this class of graduating seniors? You’re not alone.

Consider what a wise man once said: “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for

authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the ser-

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

John A. Williams jwilliams@ opubco.com

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND, TOO CLEGERN ELEMENTARY KIDS GET A DAY TO PLAY IN THE PARK

IN BRIEF ASSOCIATION PLANS COFFEE The Downtown Edmond Business Association will have its monthly morning coffee at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Barry Rice Building, 16 S Broadway. For more information about the association, call 2499391 or go to www.downtownedmondok.com.

SCHOOLS TO BE RECOGNIZED The University of Central Oklahoma-based Oklahoma A+ Schools will recognize its five new member schools at the annual Oklahoma A+ Schools celebration at 4 p.m. today at the state Capitol. The new schools include Deer Creek Elementary in Edmond, Darnaby Elementary in Tulsa, Hinton Middle School in Hinton, Kaiser Elementary in Oklahoma City and Locust Grove Upper Elementary in Locust Grove. For more information about Oklahoma A+ Schools, go to www.aplusok.org.

WINE STORE PLANS EVENTS Vintner’s Cellar of Oklahoma and Holland America Cruise Line have teamed up to offer a Cruise of Wines & the Caribbean. These events will be from 6 to 8 p.m. May 17 and 18. The wine tastings include wines and hors d’ouvres of the Caribbean region. The Vintner’s Cellar of Oklahoma also is offering special pricing on a trip to the Eastern Caribbean April 8-15. Reservations to these events are required as availability is limited. Vintner’s Cellar Custom Winery of Oklahoma is at 1389 E 15th St. Call 359-9463 to make reservations. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Third- and fourth-graders play soccer Monday during a Play in the Park program at Clegern Elementary School. Play in the Park is sponsored by the city of Edmond Parks and Recreation Department. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Edgar Anzaldo with the Edmond Parks Department plays soccer with the students.

John: Step into the future FROM PAGE 13A

They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” This quote is attributed to the Greek philosopher Socrates who lived from 469-399 B.C. I used this same quote when I delivered a class address during my high school graduation ceremony in 1973. I’m sure many adults feared the future as it was being entrusted into our hands.

HAVE GOOD ADVICE? What is the best piece of advice you would offer to graduating high school seniors? Send your comments to jwilliams@opubco.com.

Things haven’t changed much at all, have they? These seniors who are completing their education from Edmond, Deer Creek, private schools and home schools will be let loose among us and soon will face tough decisions on their own. They are continuing their education by facing the responsibilities, opportuni-

ties and challenges ahead. These students are going through a commencement — a beginning, not an ending. As they step away from their formal secondary education and take the first step into an uncertain future they will need our hearts and prayers and guidance more than ever.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

Site plan extension put on 2-week hold EDMOND | FOX LAKE PLAZA DEVELOPER DUE IN COURT MONDAY BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — The fate of

Fox Lake Plaza remains on hold for two more weeks after city council members delayed taking action Monday to extend the site plan. Expressway Development, the developers of Fox Lake Plaza, a proposed shopping center just north of Walmart Supercenter along Interstate 35 at 15th Street in Edmond, has filed a bankruptcy petition. Frank Battle, manager of Expressway Development, is attempting to get an extension on the site plan so the property will continue to be of interest for any

Camp Fire USA honors 4 students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the WoHeLo Award. To earn the award, the member chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. This year, four are from the metro: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe. Howard is in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High and plays softball and soccer. She is a member of Teens in Action, is on Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High and is in band and color guard. She volunteers at local horse rescue missions. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High. He is in Teens in Action, was a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church.

› ›

BACKGROUND Residents in the adjacent Fox Lake housing addition have been at odds with the developer since the project was approved by Edmond City Council in June 2004.

possible buyers or investors, attorney Randel Shadid said. The bankruptcy stay does not allow the council to take any action, Shadid said. Battle is scheduled to be in court Monday to review a plan for Chapter 11 reorganization bankruptcy. Council members will consider the extension May 24. City Attorney Steve Murdock wasn’t at the meeting because of a

death in his family. The bankruptcy petition was filed after two bank mortgages, totaling more than $8.4 million plus interest, were not repaid. Union Bank and Spiritbank held mortgages on the property where a shopping center was planned before the economy took a downturn. The bankruptcy action is expected to delay the project even longer.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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ACHIEVERS EDUCATION

Edward Khiwa, associate professor and director of Health Administration and Gerontology at Langston University, was named president of the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society, a national organization with more than 150 chapters worldwide that recognizes scholarly achievement in international education. Khiwa is president of the local chapter of Phi Beta Delta, Langston University’s Epsilon Epsilon, and has been a member of Langston’s faculty for 21 years. IF YOU KNOW OF SOMEONE IN THE EDMOND COMMUNITY WHO DESERVES TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR ACHIEVEMENTS, CALL JOHN A. WILLIAMS AT 475-3940 OR E-MAIL JWILLIAMS@OPUBCO.COM.

Sequoyah Middle School Orchestra members pose with trophies from the Arbuckle Wilderness Contest. The band earned a "Superior" rating, "Group of the Day" and "Group of the Week." Pictured left to right: Erin Lupardus, Joe Geatches, Riley Choquette, Libby Caldwell and Sung Choi. PHOTO BY HOLLY RANDALL AND SHANNA ROLFS, SEQUOYAH MIDDLE SCHOOL

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

UCO theater series presents musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who

University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the “Summer of ’42.” UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro star as Pete and Dorothy. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to fight the war in the Pacific. For tickets, call the

Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/ broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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17A

Sidewalk plans get students excited

Wellston Elementary students walk from their school to downtown Wellston in honor of a new sidewalk grant. PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

FROM STAFF REPORTS

WELLSTON — Almost 300 elementary school students walked Monday from their school into downtown Wellston to celebrate soon-to-be-

built sidewalks. Wellston Elementary School Principal Scott Roper said the town recently received a $200,000 grant from the state Transportation Department through a federal

program that will allow about a mile of sidewalks to be built near the school this summer. To celebrate, he took his kindergartners through fifth-graders on a “walk to town,” about six blocks

UCO academy offers music workshop series BY ADRIENNE NOBLES NewsOK.com Contributor

SIGN UP NOW

The Academy of Contemporary Music at University of Central Oklahoma will offer a series of summer workshops, open to teenagers and adults, starting May 22 at its Bricktown campus. The first workshop is “Music Production for Beginners Using Garage Band” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 22. The one-day workshop is open to age 16 and older and costs $75. Participants will learn the basics of music production using the Garage Band program. “Beatles Band Camp” is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays June 5-26. Participants will take a musical journey through some of The Beatles’ most legendary songs. Individuals will

To register for any of the workshops, e-mail get.info@ acm.uco.edu.

work in instrumental groups and perform together June 26. This workshop is for age 18 and older and costs $190. “Apple Logic for Beginners” will teach participants how to create music using the Apple Logic Express 9 digital audio program, and will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays June 7-30. Participants will learn to record audio via computer, as well as mixing, editing, bouncing and more. This workshop costs $190. “Rock Camp for Kids” is

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

ADRIENNE NOBLES IS THE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING AT UCO.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Brayden Bailey, 9, rallies his classmates during the walk.

a weeklong program for students ages 12 to 17, and will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 28-July 2. The camp is taught in groups by instrument and will teach participants various rock tunes. Participants will work in instrumental groups in the morning and in a band setting in the afternoon with a focus on rehearsal and performance techniques. The course ends in a performance July 2. This camp costs $190. “Pro Tools for Beginners” will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays July 7 to Aug. 2. Open to age 16 and older, the workshop will teach the basics of the Pro Tools LE system recording software. Cost is $190.

Bankers help teach savings to students During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children to Save Day. Although the National Teach Children to Save Day was observed on April 27, Legacy Bank spread the lessons out over several weeks to more than 1,000 second-grade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. Incorporating the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain, the program, “The Bear Basics of Savings,” covered personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, and how interest makes savings grow. For more tips and ideas about saving, go to www.legacybank.com/ bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day for parents and teachers, go to www.aba.com/ abaef/tcts.htm.

from the school. Town officials provided the students with a hot dog lunch before they headed back to school for fun and games during their annual field day, Roper said.

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

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[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Little cowboys, cowgirls ready to rodeo

Contestants wait for their turn to compete during the Edmond Junior Rodeo at Carl Benne Arena on Friday. Kids 4 and younger can participate in goat undecorating, by foot only. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready for the rodeo.

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry at the start of the rodeo.


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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19A

Edmond chamber has golfers teeing off

Rick Metheny, with Intrust Bank, putts as team members Scott Overstreet, Mike Scheitzach and Billy Harris watch.

Drew McGowen, with Mercy Health Center, tees off Monday at the Edmond Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual golf tournament at Coffee Creek Golf Course. The tournament is one of the chamber’s biggest fundraisers. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Dr. Michael Olay, with Mercy Health Center, tees off.

Sam Curtis chips onto the green.

my edmond classified ___________________________________ Place your ad today, call 475-3000. www.newsok.com/edmond

Community ads powered by you, published by The Oklahoman

Data Entry/ Customer Service Hiring full & part time. Busy tag office. Apply at 7527 N. May Ave, MF, 2-4. No phone calls. RECEPTIONIST Okla based company in the healthcare industry is seeking entry level Receptionist for busy office. Duties include answering the telephone, greeting clients & other secretarial duties as assigned. Must be organized, dependable, possess excellent people skills, good communication & grammar skills. Mon-Fri, 9AM-5PM $7.50-$9.00. Fax resume to 405-917-5527

700 R4 OD trans Chev complete, works good $200. 405-615-5712

1953 Dodge 2 door, Coronet v8 hemi, 99% complete, $3500. 222-5567

'95 Buick Roadmaster, 109K, Good Cond, grey & silver, fully loaded. Selling due to health $4250 OBO. ¡ 405-830-1501

'95 Chevy Caprice classic 4.3, a/c, 145K mi, $2300, » 826-4899 »

2006 Civic LX, 40K mi, 1 owner, like new, $12,900 848-1699 or 844-3141.

'04 H2, 70K mi, red, Jesse James chrome, $23,000 obo, 919-2211

'92 Lexus SC400, white, all power, sunroof, great cond., $3300, 822-2748

2008 Mini Cooper, pepper white, premium pkg, 27,200 miles, auto, $16,500. 405-312-9579

RECEPTIONIST Aerospace Company looking for Full time receptionist with customer service, excellent communication and computer skills Available shift 5:30AM-2PM. Great benefits. EOE Submit resumes to airplanejobs@gmail.com or Fax 405-709-0124 before May 21, 2010 Receptionist, exp., Self-starter, multi-tasker, punctual, positive attitude, dependable, no tobacco on property, 943-2191 BKD, LLP, a regional CPA firm, seeks full-time Word Processor/Admin. Asst. Excellent MS Word, Excel, grammar and number skills required in this fast-paced, multiproject, team environment. Detail oriented, multitask, strong work ethic. Word processing experience preferred, Pleasant professional environment. Competitive benefits. BKD is an EEOC. Send resume and salary history to squinn@bkd.com or fax to 918-584-2931.

DANCERS WANTED

Day & Night shifts. Lucky's Bar, 4007 NW 10th Call 601-0229 MANAGER experienced for large Night Club in OKC. Should be familiar with promoting, scheduling, & inventory control. Send resume to PO Box 12713, OKC, OK 73157

1993 Nissan Altima, 5spd, tagged, $1250. 209-0817

'00 Solara convertible, loaded, great car, $5750, 650-4072

1980 Datsun long bed, 4 cylinder, runs great, looks great, school/work, $900, 778-8896. 1998 Chev 1/2 ton ext cab, 5.0 v8 auto, new tires brakes air comp exc cond, $5800. 222-5567 '90 Chevy O long bed, 4x4, 2 owner, $2800, 570-5284 Guthrie '07 Ford F-250 Crew Cab, 4x4, dsl, LB, pwr, warr. 77K $21,500 922-7236

Field Technician for POS, PC, Printer repair. OKC area. Must pass background check. Email resume to: sherron.thompson@ ncr.com

ATTN: Class A&B Drivers We need you now! HAZMAT or no HAZMAT, 943-3304

DRIVER WANTED M-F 8:30-4:00 $10 hr + gas. Must have own car. Nothing heavy. 410-2490 leave message

DRIVER needed for busy electrical contractor. Pickup and deliver parts to job sites. Warehouse knowledge helpful. CDL license recommended but not required. Apply in person at 1524 S May, OKC. 405-634-8844 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS seniors & grads ages 17-38. Call 800-492-4841.

HOUSEKEEPER

w/experience. Apply in person @ Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St-OKC 691-9221

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128

Computerist/Graphic Designer needed part-in OKC for small business Must be responsible & energetic, must speak some Spanish, fax resume to (405)-528-0285

FT Shipping/Recieving M-F, 8-4:30. »»»»»»»»»»»» PT Painter 20 hours/week, must be self starter, able to work on own. Apply at 940 NE 13th B300, Garrison Tower Crothall Healthcare Call 271-2255

Front Desk Position for dynamic personality. Experience preferred. 32-40 hours. APPLY IN PERSON Comfort Inn & Suites Quail Springs, 13501 N Highland Park Blvd. OKC

Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office Hiring Clericals. Starting salary $1785.00 monthly 401K Plan, Deferred Comp. Plans, Benefits: Health, Dental, Vision. 201 N. Shartel OKC, OK 73102

Certified Medical Assistant Full or Part Time. Apply in person, 5500 NW Expressway, Suite A 722-8100 Come join our team! Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, LLC is searching for an energetic Front Office Patient Representative for our busy Edmond office. The ideal candidate will have strong customer service skills, be familiar with Microsoft computer applications, and be able to work effectively in a team environment in a fast paced office. Prior experience in a medical/dental front office setting is preferred but not required. Excellent pay and benefits. Qualified applicants should fax their resume to 848-8020 or by mail to Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, Attn: Steve Dodge, Administrator, 3727 NW 63 Street, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. LIC PHYSICAL THERAPIST FT M-F at outpt ortho clinic in Norman. Exp/ interest in orthopedics. Fax/e-mail resume to: OSC Attn: D Mason (405)310-6894 dmason@ orthonorman.com MEDICAL ASSISTANT needed with pediatric experience for FT position. Fax resume to 405-945-4959. Patient Account Rep and duties to include verify insurance, enter data into computer and contact patients for payments. NW OKC, M-F 8:30-5 pm. Fax resumes to 608-4269 RN/LPN/CHHA Looking for the best job you ever had? Then our hospice is looking for you! Call 948-4357

Visual Display Coordinator We are a furniture retail store looking for an exp. Visual Display Coordinator. This position will be resp. for creating & maintaining a compelling presentation of merchandise that will engage customers and help stimulate sales. Change and/or rotate displays & signage to reflect changes in inventory or promotion; develop ideas or plans for merchandise displays or window decorations; arrange properties, furniture, merchandise, backdrops and other accessories. We offer a competitive salary & benefit package. Please Fax resumes to 405.671.2758.

A&P Technician positions available with local company. Send resume to PO Box 23749, OKC, OK 73123 » » AUTO TECH» » $3000 sign-on onus for the right tech! Business is booming! Call 513-2431 today.

Field Oiler/Lube Service Person Paving contractor looking for experienced heavy equipment Oiler/Lube Service person w/HAZMAT. Benefits available. Apply at: 10200 NW 10th St. OKC, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm

Journeyman Electrician Full time for local established Co. Competitive pay & benefits. Apply at lecrecruiting@yahoo.com

3 bed 2 bath, 2 car garage, storm shelter, 1302sf, gas & electric, 3514 Liberty Dr, $115,000, 405-642-7783

Sat/Sun, 2-4 PM, FSBO, 20 acre ranch, 4 bed home, barn, paddocks, shop, 5821 N Douglas Blvd, Arcadia, 844-4004.

Lake Murray State Park K ac, well, new roof & a/c, 3/2, storage, trees, golf $129.9K 972-416-6303

Snapper Rear Eng, 20 hrs use, Exc Cond, 5 spd $1500 Call 789-6334 Simplicity hydro tractor, 38" cut, like new, $550. 625-4894

Plumber, Service & Remodel Top $/per hour + sales comm., vacation, holidays, hlth ins, 401K & co truck. Must have plumbing license & good driving record. 524-3737

HEPA-filtered shop vac's and dust-extracted sanders for lead-based paint operations. Festool Plunge Guiderail Saws, 10% discount. SNYDER TOOL, 405-844-1044.

PLUMBERS Licensed Journeyman & Experienced Apprentice. Experienced in new construction. Pay DOE. Call 350-0879.

7x12, 76"x16' util, 6x10, 7x18 enclosed, 7x12 vending trlr, never used, ac/elec $1250-$8500 922-7236

SAND PLANT OPERATOR with Dredge experience. Must have Mining Card. Apply @ R&M Resources, 405-354-7577.

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128 TIRE & LUBE TECH $1000 sign on Bonus for the right person. Call 513-2431 for more info. (Edmond) Western Lawns a leading landscape management company, has an immediate opening for a full-time Irrigation Technician. Irrigation system experience, good driving record, and customer skills required. Email resume to jobs@Western Lawns.com, or apply in person at 14900 N Sara Road, Yukon, OK 73099. EOE.

Antiques, Art, Collectibles 501

Christopher Place Apartments in Edmond, has apartments available for move in this week. Rates from $427. Call 341-2517 or stop by 101 N. Boulevard.

412 NW 25TH 2bd ch&a all elec $400 /$200dep 314-9606 3815 NW 23rd, 2/1K , w/d hkup, cov. park, $495+ $200dep 550-8066

307 Greengate Dr., 3bd, 2ba, 1car, $750/m + $700/d sec 8 ok 936-9058

1 bd furnished, utilities paid, Moore area, appls $550/mo $250/dep, 405-641-8452

3 bed, 1ba, 1c, ch&a, 3620 Woodside Dr. $550, $350 dep. 642-3806, 6406260 1328 McDonald 4bd 1K ba ch&a fncd, sec 8. $670 mo 354-7413, 642-3847.

CLERK POSITIONS Immediate, full time. Cash register & phones with good customer service skills. Schedule includes weekends. Salary DOE + bonus. Apply in person Wholesale Recreation Warehouse. 525 W. Memorial

Mr Cash

is handing out cash to the right people. If you are able to start today call 405.600.8098 Secretary needed also.

Nice 3/1/1, FP, ch&a, new paint. Ready Now. 645 N Janeway. No pets. $750+ $500 dep 426-0028

Homes For Sale

309.9

4 bed, 3 bath, with upstairs Game Room, 3150sqft, gated neighborhood, built in 2007, 405-990-4821

Lse Purch 3/1/1, brick, ch&a, Carl Albert Sch, low dn $650mo 630-0649

Historic 5 bed, 2 bath, new carpet, refinished wood floor, ch&a, 2917 NW 27th, $950 month, Large 2 bed, $645 month, ch&a, 3108 NW 28th; no sec 8; 470-1700.

Large 2 bd, corner lot, lg. carport/patio, no pets, $650mo+dep. 232-9704

4/2/2 newer home, pool, Mustang schools, no pets, $1150, $1150 sec. 905 Exter Cir. 265-0205

German Shepherd puppies, AKC, pop, large, 6wks $350 405-420-1297 Golden Retriever pup, 8 weeks, female, AKC, all shots current, $425, Blanchard 706-6164 Lab Mix 7 mos, spayed, housebroke, shots, very loving, $25. 722-9384

Lab, AKC Pups, 1M, 14 weeks, vet ckd pop, s/w $250 405-323-0020 Lab AKC, black, 6 weeks 5 Female, 4 Male, $100 each. 405-740-1315

Morkies, 2 females, 6 weeks old, $200 each, 204-4036.

Sheet Metal 10x3, screws & trim, Mon-Sat, Call (405)-390-2077 American Bulldog, UKC/NKC, Champ. bldlns All colors w/ health & hip guarantee $500-$800 580-318-4105 goodtimesbullies.com American Bulldog Pups, Reg. $200, 580-4814239, 580-471-8212. Aus Shep, reg, $200, 3 sizes, stnd-mini-toy, blue merles, 317-2763 Aussie Toy, Female 13 weeks old, s/w, reg. Moving must sell. $200 602-349-5580 cell Beagle Puppies, 2 M, 2 F, cutest cuddliest babies, wrm $80 cash. 412-2786 Beagles & Mini Dachshunds, ACA, S/W, M & F, $100-$125 918-385-2090 8630 JD 4WD Tractor, 3 point, PTO, very good condition and 24' JD chisel, both for $19,900. 350-0265

'03 Neuholland TN65, 2422 hours w/scoop, $12,000, 386-5140

Couch & loveseat, king & queen bedroom sets, bunk bed, dining set, king size mattress & box spring, $125-$450, 397-1801 Moving Sale: Roll-a-way bed $50; Futon $80; both almost new, 741-0976 or 778-9219 Matt sets, full $90, twin $75; Lift chair $250; Frig $350; 606-2450.

Pekingese, AKC, 3 M, 3 F 6 weeks, POP, S/W $500-$600 580-816-0314

2 Registered horses $5000 -$10,000 thehorseteacher.net 580-277-0146

PIZZA & BBQ Restaurant NW OKC for sale/lease , 640-8206

300 chicks, $1-$3 sell 100 mixed chicks for $80. 405-356-4162. LAYING HENS, 60 AT $12 EACH, 282-2927

Service Directory

Executive Htg. & Air $69 svc call, free est & 2nd opinion 626-4210 lic 75705

Carport, Patio, Awning All steel carports 20x20 $1595 patio covers, Free Est. 799-4026, 694-6109

Do it your way! 30 years exp. Edmond & NW OKC. Guar. 602-4844,282-5177 Sunshine Cleaning Service ins/bond 793-1630, 625-3930

Boston Terrier AKC, b/w F, 6 mos, vet chkd, s/w, $300. 405-323-0020 Boston Terrier AKC/ACA 8 F, 2 M, 1-4yrs old. $2000/all 580-318-4105

Pekingese 1M, very small, playful, guaranteed, $275. 405-380-8469

07 Yamaha mdnt Royal Star Venture 8700 miles NEW cond. drive shaft water cooled many upgrades email pics $11.500. 405 4108664

Pitbull (American) 4 females, 4 males, black & white, 8 weeks, $50 each 819-0671

1976 Honda GL1000 $1200 MUST SELL! N OKC. 405-206-7469

Poodles AKC Toy, M&F pair, must go together 3 years. $200. 761-8423 Schanuers Mini AKC, blk, dob 2/12, e/t/dc/1st shot $275, 580-497-7206 Schnauzers, teacup & toys, CKC, 6F, 4M, chocolate, white, e/t, 5-8 wks, $350-$550, 580-540-6354 Schnoodle Puppies, 2 white M, dob 1/24/10. T/DC/S/W $125 ea. 405527-9004 or 613-7122

Boxer puppies, AKC, 8 weeks, flashy brindle and fawn, s/w/dc, $200, »»» 549-2715 »»»

Shih Tzu, AKC registered, 6 weeks old, 4M, 1st shots, dewormed, $250 each, great Mother's Day gifts, 405-5772108 or 405-706-6012.

Chihuahua Pups, 8 wks, 2 Male, bi & tri colored, $75 each. 405-680-9463

Pronghorn Antelope Bow Hunt N.W. Oklahoma $500. Call Rick 254-855-1701

2006 Honda ST1300 Professionally maintained, serviced last week. 21,600 miles. Black color. Heated Corbin seat, oversized winshield. $8500 OBO 405-208-2915

Shih Tzu, 2 females, 6 weeks old, $200 each, 204-4036.

Chi-Poo, Shi-Poo, 6 weeks, M & F, black $50-$150. 761-8423, carmen1234@aol.com

Hunting/Fishing Leases 607.0

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppies Puppies are utd on shots and are started on heartworm preventative. They are AKC registered and ready to go. Sables and Black Tris $400 580829-4537 580-748-1216

BOXER PUPPIES 13wks old. 1M-Fawn w/black mask, 1FBrindle w/black mask, $200ea »» 708-3170

BOXERS, AKC, 6 weeks, 2 brindle F, 2 black w/ white M. Large sire. Championship pedigree. $250-$500 Stillwater »» 405-377-4386 »»

Pool Table, 8 foot, Like New! w/slate & green felt, $795, Call 615-4980.

Retired Contractor Repairs, remodels, paints, 25 yr exp free est, 314-3621

Lawn Service, trees, clean up & removal, install and repair fences. 365-2600 Cleanup, mow, bushes, trees, f-beds, Free Est, Lopez, 524-0506 Brshhog, boxblade, roto, $38/hr, 3hr min 227-3517

Pomeranian AKC 1 White 2 males 1 female s/w $300. 405-382-2304

4010 John Deere Tractor, Excellent Condition $3500 580-678-7838

Like new oak TV armoire w/pullout doors, $200. 32" Sony Trinitron TV, works great, $50, buy both together for $225. 691-5930 or 823-2083

Drink & Snack Route Great Loc Guaranty Must Sell now Financing avail. 800-648-2124

Excellent service, detail, $13/hr, 3hr min 625-0210

Min Pin Pups, 2 b/t, $50 & 7 Min Pin Mix, $25, 405-680-9463

Misc. metal building trim, pipe, post & rods, 6 ft brush hog, round bale hay cart. Pipe & steel. $5-$400, 405-476-3161.

Albino Baby Racoons, 4 weeks old, $300 each 405-222-2228 or 405320-8975 leave msg

Labs, AKC, 10wks, cream & white, blocky. champ pedigree, sire OFA'd, s/w/dc, $200, 818-4182

Mastiff Pups (Italian) full blood, not registered, $300. 405-535-3633

HP Computer, almost new, desk included, $450 obo, 741-0976 or 778-9219

Yorkie w/papers, 1 tiny male, w/t/dc, 1st shots, parents are 4-5 lbs., 12 weeks old, $300 405-229-2298.

LAB puppies, AKC reg, 2blk, 1 yel F. Chmp/hunt bldln $250 408-1426

W & D $79 & up. Refrig $99 & up. Stoves $99. warranties 405-420-6137

Dell Pentium 4, 2.8 Ghz, 1 gig DDR, 80 gb, complete system w/ mon., high speed ready $120 819-8691

YORKIES, AKC, POP, $200/M, $350/F, will be 5-6 lbs. t/dc, 265-0205

Distributorship for sale Earn $1,500 weekly 888-561-8983

Maltese 1M 1F, small cute, guaranteed, $250$375. 405-380-5859

AP Snack Machine $1500 Dixie Narco Drink Machine $750 obo; 326-9500

Brick 3bd 2ba 1car ch&a w/d hkups. Fncd $550mo $400dep 996-6271

5x8, 5x10, 6x12 w/gates, like new; 16 ft tandem; $550-$850 cash 670-1850

Yorkies, AKC, 2 Male, beautiful, must see, s/w, 13 weeks, $400 485-2869

G. Shep Pups, reg. 6 wks, POP, $225, 3F, 5M, 921-8439 or 454-6859

Clocks: German made Westminister Clock with bevel glass on door $400. French FUSEE school clock, time only, very accurate, $250. Steeple clock striker spring needs repair $100. Call 340-6678

Furn 1BD most bills Paid + EMSA, no sec 8 and no pets, 524-2730

TH, PC schools, 2/1K /1, appls, w/d, fp, sec sys, $600 + dep 210-3903

WEBSITE/ TECHNOLOGY OSSAA position opening see website posting at www.ossaa.com

BUILDING MATERIAL SALES Established full line wholesaler seeks experienced inside sales person. Full benefit package. Send resume to PO BOX 76269, OKC, OK 73147

John Deere LA145, 22HP Briggs, twin cylinder, 48" cut, electric pto, automatic, excellent condition, $1550 405-778-9229

LABORER/OPERATOR Underground const co seeks operator, laborers & meter readers, will train good pay and benefits. Apply in person at 315 NW 59th St. OKC

Sprinkler Technician with experience. Must have Oklahoma Driver's License with clean MVR Landscape Enterprises 11101 N. Western.

English Bulldog, F, reg., 5 years old, brindle & white, $600 obo. 405428-0666, 405-428-0667

German Shep, White Pups XXL, 1M, 1F, POP $300-$400 740-7804

Houses for rent

18 year old company expanding. Need 9 people who need cash. FT/PT from home. Call today. »» 405-613-1810 »»

AC units, all sizes, never used, still in box, $500-$1000 405-417-8244

Dob/G. Shep, 6 weeks, only $50, both POP/reg, exc protect/fam pet, Lori 921-8439 or 454-6859

Shih Tzu, AKC, 7 weeks, s/w, home raised, will be small, very playful, $225 each. 580-572-8446

2001 Keystone Sprinter, 5th wheel, 29K feet, 2 slides, $9500, 627-1947. Carrilite 35 ft 5th wheel, great shape, $3750, 650-4072

Remington model 4 single shot, 22 cal. breech load, hex, rifled barrel $450. Winchester pre 64 model 94, 3030 cal. lever action $500. Miroku 12 gauge over & under shotgun, nice engraving $900. 340-6678 Two 12 gage A-5 (light twelve) Browning shotguns, $750 each, both guns in EC, 306-6566 .38 special pistol and 12 ga double barrel shotgun, $700 both, 203-0590 AR15 CMMG w/extras, $1800 obo, 405-473-9810

Shih Tzu, AKC, 7 weeks, s/w, home raised, will be small, very playful, $225 each. 580-572-8446 Siberian Huskies, 7 wks, agoti & white, w/papers, $250-$400, 706-5888

Chihuahua Puppies, 6 weeks, 2 F, 2 M, $125, ea also Dad, $80. 822-0974

Wolf/Husky Mix, 6 weeks, 4 males, 3 females, wormed, $200. 495-7272, 308-7501

Jazzy Jet 7 powered chair, 250 lbs, new batteries-8 mos old, chair is like new, $400, 830-1501

Dachshund, beautiful small male 2 yrs, red, very sweet, $50, to good home, 879-2241

Yorkie Mix, 1 M $250, 1 F, $300, 8 weeks, s/w/hlth guar. look like fullblood. 405-919-2575

Electric Wheelchair & Electric Scooter, $450 each 753-4928

DACHSHUND Minis Mom's Day M/F, S/W, $75-$100. 580-892-3294

Yorkiepoo, 9wks, extra small, black, 1F, 1M, $300, 527-6132

Above Ground Pool, With liner $995, 405-615-4980.

LICENSED 405-476-2534

Garay's Roofing, re-roofing specialist-all types of roofs, free est, 370-3572

D&D TILE & REMODEL Afford. & Prof. 971-4492 25yrs exp. No job too small!

Blackhawk Top Soil, del sand/gravel, 255-0275

Trees-shrubs-brush-trim or remove/stump grind, clean ups & hauling. Ins. 921-8970 or 681-3705. Wood Chucks Tree Svc Removal, Trimming & more! Insured. Call 881-6559 Tree service: lowest reasonable price guar, total satisfactaction 600-0577


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

21A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

I

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com (2) Adjoining Lots at Chapel Hill, $1000 each. Garden of Devotion - very close to entrance 918-408-6836 John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 5 cemetery plots at Rose Hill off NW Grand Blvd in OKC, asking $3000 each, will negotiate, Call Chip 580-320-0489 (4) Rose Hill cemetery plots, retail $2295 each, (or make offer), Must Sell!! »»» 946-4371 »»» BAGPIPER FOR HIRE. 405-603-5306 www.jessebillspiper.com ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $2975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060 RESTHAVEN MEMORY GARDENS 5 PLOTS RETAIL: $2900ea, SELL FOR $1500ea. 337-477-3405, 337-274-9911


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF NORMAN

NORMAN | STATE

13

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

A look at storm’s path

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered.

Ponca City

Medford

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Perry

WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show Choctaw the location and Stella Yukon movement of Monday’s Norman Tecumseh Seminole tornadoes. The Tecumseh Noble Seminole tornadoes may not have actually been on the ground the Sulphur entire track. Duncan Ardmore

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

Tishomingo

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store south of Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon.

911 calls reveal range of fears after storm BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City emergency dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metro, trying to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of calm and togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family mem-

home residents, said Ashley Olivo, head of the Senior Olympics Committee. The Senior Olympics are at 9 a.m. outside McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church at University Boulevard and Webster Avenue. Besides arm wrestling, games include basketball, football, golf, volleyball, a

domino tournament, shot put, bowling, bottle ring toss, horseshoes, fishing and wheelchair races. The games are sponsored by Heartland Hospice in honor of National Nursing Home Week, which is this week. Not to be outdone by the regular Olympics, the Senior Olympics will

include an opening ceremony, complete with a torch run. Cathy Ozeroglu’s second-grade class at All Saints Catholic School has been invited to sing the national anthem. A closing ceremony will include the awarding of medals. Olivo is urging members of the community to

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT

bers, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handicapped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” At least one caller made a proactive attempt for help. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Seniors gear up for annual gameday NORMAN — You’re never too old to arm wrestle. Just ask one of the octogenarians who plans to participate in Thursday’s second annual Senior Olympics. Arm wrestling — sometimes from a wheelchair — is one of the most popular events of the Olympic competition held especially for nursing

MUSKOGEE

Jane Glenn Cannon

JCannon@ opubco.com

Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen.

NORMAN

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

volunteer or just turn out to watch the fun. Last year, about 80 seniors participated in the games. To volunteer, call Olivo at 923-8799.

INDEX Deaths Records

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

CALENDAR

NORMAN, TOO

TODAY

BASEBALL SKILLS PUT TO TEST

Jaycob Willis, 9, watches another hitter. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

ONLINE Noah Loffer, 9, connects with the ball Saturday during the Aquafina Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit & Run competition at Griffin Park for kids age 7 to 14. The Norman event was a local qualifier for a national skills tournament that culminates in July at the Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Youth sports Looking for a team, a coach, or other help? Join our “know it” message board, “Let’s Talk,” and get in the game. KNOWIT.NEWSOK .COM/YOUTHSPORTS

Caeden Guthary, 8, winds up to throw.

Norman Farm Market, 8 a.m. to noon, Cleveland County Fairgrounds, 615 E Robinson, 360-4721. Cleveland County Gardens tours, 9 a.m., demonstration garden, 601 E Robinson, 3214774. Microsoft Word 2007 Part 3: Shortcuts and Special Features, 9:30 a.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620. York International Toastmasters, noon, York International UPG Headquarters, 5005 York Drive, 4196403. Internet 1, 1 p.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620.

Second Wednesday Book Discussion Group, 4 p.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 7012620. Zumba fitness class, 6 p.m., Whittier Recreation Center, 2000 W Brooks St., 292-9703. Andy Frasco , 9 p.m., Coach’s Brewhouse, 110 W Main, 321-2739.

ONLINE

Submit for free Go to wimgo.com. Use your News OK.com log-in and password, or choose to create one. Click on “Add Event.”


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

VI

15A

GARDEN FOUNTAIN Left: Bud Hightree levels a pot that will become a fountain at the Cleveland County Master Gardeners’ demonstration garden at the fairgrounds.

Art gallery to display ‘24 Works on Paper’ FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a year, with stops in large and small communities, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Artists participating in “24 Works on Paper” are MJ Alexander, Oklahoma City; Narciso Arguelles, Edmond; Sarah Atlee, Oklahoma City; Nick Bayer, Oklahoma City; Eleanor Davy Carmack, Tulsa; Marty Coleman, Glenpool; Bryan Dahlvang, Tuttle; Leslie Waugh Dallam, Norman; Don Emrick, Claremore; Dixie Erickson, Norman; Michelle Himes-McCrory, Stillwater; Bradley Jessop, Sulphur; Trent Lawson, Oklahoma City; Katherine LiontasWarren, Lawton; Regina Murphy, Oklahoma City; Romy Owens, Oklahoma City; Christopher M. Owens, Tulsa; Cindy Pauchey, Walters; Liz Roth, Stillwater; Clarissa Sharp,

Oklahoma City; Rob Smith, Cushing; Tom Wester, Oklahoma City; George Wilson, Oklahoma City, and Betty Wood, Norman.

Linda Garms, with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners, waters plants Saturday in the demonstration garden. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN


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NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Preschool Picassos to have artwork displayed at Depot FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Paintings by some of Norman’s youngest talents will be featured in a special exhibit at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave., May 17 through 23. The young artists are enrolled in St. Joseph’s Early Childhood Development Center, 425 E Tonkawa St. This is the third year the center has sponsored an art show at the depot. “This show involves so many aspects of school life. Parents, grandparents and teachers make the frames, stretch and paint the canvases in preparation for the children. With the younger babies, teachers dip tiny feet and hands into paint to create woodland scenes

Grant Rieger, 4, paints a canvas for an art show at the Santa Fe Depot. PHOTO PROVIDED BY DEBRA MARTINELLI

and abstracts,” Director Maureen Dolan said. Works will be on display from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 17 through May 21. A reception and silent

OU TEAM CHEERS FOR OLYMPIANS

auction will be from 5 to 8 p.m. May 23. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to everyone. All proceeds benefit the center.

Left: Special Olympics coach Melissa Welsh and athlete Hannah Bailey get high fives from OU women’s basketball players Jasmine Hartman and Lyndsey Cloman and assistant basketball coach Chad Thrailkill.

Poet to read at Depot on Sunday FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Stu-

dio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired

Above: University of Oklahoma women’s basketball players, from left, Lauren Willis, Whitney Hand, Carlee Roethlisberger, Danielle Robinson and Joanna McFarland cheer Monday with Special Olympics athletes at a pep rally at Longfellow Middle School.

public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other original poems. The reading is free and open to everyone.

PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

my norman classified ____________________________________ Place your ad today, call 475-3000. www.newsok.com/norman

Community ads powered by you, published by The Oklahoman

'07 Altima 2.5S, CVT CD, navy blue, $12,500 obo, 405 364-1905

1977 Chev 1/2 ton 350 auto, runs great, needs paint, $1450, 830-0197 1996 Ford F-150, 6 cylinder, automatic, 100K 1 owner miles, runs good, $3000, 794-7387. 1987 Jeep 2WD, auto, new tires, very nice, consider trade, 3321 S Shartel, 209-2421.

Factory stock race car, 112'' wheel base, Chev, no engine or trans, $400. 615-5712

'01 Chev Suburban XLT, absolutely perfect, loaded, $6650, 209-5297

'90 F-150 motor or trans, $300, runs good, $300. 794-9157 '98 Sebring, 4 cylinder, runs good, $900. Title-42, 794-9157

Field Technician for POS, PC, Printer repair. OKC area. Must pass background check. Email resume to: sherron.thompson@ ncr.com

ATTN: Class A&B Drivers We need you now! HAZMAT or no HAZMAT, 943-3304

DRIVER WANTED M-F 8:30-4:00 $10 hr + gas. Must have own car. Nothing heavy. 410-2490 leave message

DRIVER needed for busy electrical contractor. Pickup and deliver parts to job sites. Warehouse knowledge helpful. CDL license recommended but not required. Apply in person at 1524 S May, OKC. 405-634-8844 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS seniors & grads ages 17-38. Call 800-492-4841.

Save $50ea - $200 Store Gift Cert. $150 ea. Tires/ Auto Repairs, 431-9588

Norman Public Schools • Hearing Impaired Teacher • Elem Library Media • Hd Girls Tennis Coach EOE. For questions call 405-366-5873. Applications online www.norman.k12.ok.us

1+2 beds $425 & $385 Sec 8 + everyone welcome, 427-7566

WEBSITE/ TECHNOLOGY OSSAA position opening see website posting at www.ossaa.com

2bd liv appls ch&a $460, No Sec 8/pets 2343 NW 15, 557-1288, 301-5979

Houses for rent

CLERK POSITIONS Immediate, full time. Cash register & phones with good customer service skills. Schedule includes weekends. Salary DOE + bonus. Apply in person Wholesale Recreation Warehouse. 525 W. Memorial

w/experience. Apply in person @ Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St-OKC 691-9221

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128

Classics Wanted $$$$ 946-4371 $$$$

1976 Triumph TR6 w/32k original miles on very nice 3rd owner Mimosa Yellow California Car with overdrive feature in Norman, Ok. $11,500 405-650-7732

FT Shipping/Recieving M-F, 8-4:30. »»»»»»»»»»»» PT Painter 20 hours/week, must be self starter, able to work on own. Apply at 940 NE 13th B300, Garrison Tower Crothall Healthcare Call 271-2255

2006 Z4 Convertible. Black, low miles $21,000 329-2886 co '01 Z3, 5 sp, runs great, loaded, like new, a real looker, silver w/black top, $10,350. 209-5297

'96 Riviera, VGC, all extra's, $1700. 625-4894 '95 Buick Roadmaster, 109K, Good Cond, grey & silver, fully loaded. Selling due to health $4250 OBO. ¡ 405-830-1501

2002 Chevy Malibu, good cond. hwy miles, 4 dr. dependable $2700 405-227-7531 '01 Camaro 121k, loaded, t-tops, runs great, red, $3750, 209-5297

'04 Sebring Convertible, fun in sun, like new, runs great, $4650. 209-5297

'08 Dodge Charger, 2.7L, dual exhaust, hood scoop low miles, $14,000 obo 405-324-2776, 209-0524

1997 Mustang V6, auto, bright red, mags, runs/drives gd, nice car, $2150 OBO » 799-1802

1987 Jeep 2WD pickup, auto, new tires, very nice, consider trade, 3321 S Shartel, 209-2421

2007 Range Rover black. Low miles $41,900 329-2886 CO.

'94 Towncar, white 125k, loaded, leather, exc. cond & body, $3,000, 405-946-7955

Computerist/Graphic Designer needed part-in OKC for small business Must be responsible & energetic, must speak some Spanish, fax resume to (405)-528-0285 RECEPTIONIST Okla based company in the healthcare industry is seeking entry level Receptionist for busy office. Duties include answering the telephone, greeting clients & other secretarial duties as assigned. Must be organized, dependable, possess excellent people skills, good communication & grammar skills. Mon-Fri, 9AM-5PM $7.50-$9.00. Fax resume to 405-917-5527 RECEPTIONIST Aerospace Company looking for Full time receptionist with customer service, excellent communication and computer skills Available shift 5:30AM-2PM. Great benefits. EOE Submit resumes to airplanejobs@gmail.com or Fax 405-709-0124 before May 21, 2010 Receptionist, exp., Self-starter, multi-tasker, punctual, positive attitude, dependable, no tobacco on property, 943-2191 BKD, LLP, a regional CPA firm, seeks full-time Word Processor/Admin. Asst. Excellent MS Word, Excel, grammar and number skills required in this fast-paced, multiproject, team environment. Detail oriented, multitask, strong work ethic. Word processing experience preferred, Pleasant professional environment. Competitive benefits. BKD is an EEOC. Send resume and salary history to squinn@bkd.com or fax to 918-584-2931.

'02 Mini Cooper, 5 sp, silver w/black racing stripe, loaded, all power $6750, 209-5297

2000 Miti Mirage, $850 obo, '98 Mit Montara $1850, 844-6694

DANCERS WANTED

Day & Night shifts. Lucky's Bar, 4007 NW 10th Call 601-0229

Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office Hiring Clericals. Starting salary $1785.00 monthly 401K Plan, Deferred Comp. Plans, Benefits: Health, Dental, Vision. 201 N. Shartel OKC, OK 73102

Certified Medical Assistant Full or Part Time. Apply in person, 5500 NW Expressway, Suite A 722-8100 Come join our team! Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, LLC is searching for an energetic Front Office Patient Representative for our busy Edmond office. The ideal candidate will have strong customer service skills, be familiar with Microsoft computer applications, and be able to work effectively in a team environment in a fast paced office. Prior experience in a medical/dental front office setting is preferred but not required. Excellent pay and benefits. Qualified applicants should fax their resume to 848-8020 or by mail to Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, Attn: Steve Dodge, Administrator, 3727 NW 63 Street, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73116.

4010 John Deere Tractor, Excellent Condition $3500 580-678-7838

4 bd 2 ba 2 car, Lake Front, gated, pool, convenient location, Blt. in '99, 2,000sf hdwd flrs, $1350 mo, 990-0488

Moving Sale: Roll-a-way bed $50; Futon $80; both almost new, 741-0976 or 778-9219

746 NW 5th, 3bd, 1ba, CH&A, 3 car det. gar, $700 + $500dep 631-8220 A&P Technician positions available with local company. Send resume to PO Box 23749, OKC, OK 73123

Field Oiler/Lube Service Person Paving contractor looking for experienced heavy equipment Oiler/Lube Service person w/HAZMAT. Benefits available. Apply at: 10200 NW 10th St. OKC, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm Framers/Concrete & General Labor. Experience preferred. Bilingual a plus. Building wood frame bldgs with Steel Siding 412-7665 HVAC Journeyman & Apprentice Installers Must have experience. We offer health, life insurance, paid vacation & retirement. Apply in person, Randall's Temperature Control, 131 SE 4th St in Moore Journeyman Electrician Full time for local established Co. Competitive pay & benefits. Apply at lecrecruiting@yahoo.com LABORER/OPERATOR Underground const co seeks operator, laborers & meter readers, will train good pay and benefits. Apply in person at 315 NW 59th St. OKC PLUMBERS Licensed Journeyman & Experienced Apprentice. Experienced in new construction. Pay DOE. Call 350-0879. SAND PLANT OPERATOR with Dredge experience. Must have Mining Card. Apply @ R&M Resources, 405-354-7577.

TECHNICIAN

HP Computer, almost new, desk included, $450 obo, 741-0976 or 778-9219

3 bed 1 bath, ch&a, hdwd flrs, 2012 Vickie Dr. $675 mo, $500 dep. 692-0042

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HOUSEKEEPER

Save $50ea - $200 Store Gift Cert. $150 ea. Tires/ Auto Repairs, 431-9588

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3 bed 2 bath 2 car gar. blt. 2001, 1600 sf, $1,000 mo, 990-0488

BUILDING MATERIAL SALES Established full line wholesaler seeks experienced inside sales person. Full benefit package. Send resume to PO BOX 76269, OKC, OK 73147

Best Acreage + Home in OKC! 7.3 acres + 3 bed home, $47,500 cash. HURRY HURRY HURRY! 301-6495

Homes For Sale

309.9

4 bed, 3 bath, with upstairs Game Room, 3150sqft, gated neighborhood, built in 2007, 405-990-4821

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3 bed 2 bath, 2 car garage, storm shelter, 1302sf, gas & electric, 3514 Liberty Dr, $115,000, 405-642-7783

AC units, all sizes, never used, still in box, $500-$1000 405-417-8244

2 Ninco 1/32nd Master Digital Slot Car Set, $1500 invested, $1,000 obo, 245-2938

Several 2 bed homes, Sec 8 ok, $450-$525 mo. Call 843-6693 310 NW 118st, section 8 approved, 3 bedroom, $700/month. 706-8669 Sec. 8 OK, 3 bd, 336 NW 85th 942-3552

5 bed, 2 bath, $950 month, 508 SW 46th; 2 bed, $500 month, 2512 SW 38th; 882-1054. 3 bd, 1 ba, carport, appls, fenced, storage bldg, $600+$200 dep, 682-3297

Snapper Rear Eng, 20 hrs use, Exc Cond, 5 spd $1500 Call 789-6334

2 Never used Furniture quality Bath Vanities distressed/ornate w/granite tops & sinks. $250 ea. Never used Jetta Garden Tub w/pump, 72x42, Cost $1500, asking $450, Lg. Klaussner Ent. Ctr w/strg $375, 408-2502

3 Boat Trailers, exc. cond $200-$350 Cash 670-1850

Blue Heeler & Red Heeler Pups, 6 weeks, working parents, ranch raised, $100, 224-6903 Boston Terriers, 8 weeks 2 males-$200 each, 1 female-$250, shots/wormed, 405-2475207, 580-450-3832 Bull Mastiff Puppies, AKC, 2 Pretty Girls, $800 ea OBO.. Call 405-245-3691 or email tgbmast@yahoo.com Cairn Terriers, 8 weeks, 3 females, 3 males, registered, s/w, $250. 405-684-1855 jbay21@yahoo.com

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1992 HR Aluma Lt. 33' great shape, ready! $12,500, 405-397-4871 WANTED TO BUY: 2000 or up Rialta RV, good cond, 918-465-3916

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Shih Tzu, Imp., 2F, 5M, paper trained, reg, POP, s/w, $225-$300 370-8223 puppylovefarms.com Siberian Husky Puppies, 2M's, 2F's, 7 wks, 3 blk & wht, 1 red & wht, blue eyes, S/W, POP, $200 each-Cash Only. 405-997-8902 405-997-8810 Earlsboro, OK Yorkie adorable AKC Pups, 2 M 2 F, s/w, $250-$500, 570-9134 Yorkie AKC Male, 3K lbs, born Oct. 2008, proven stud, has tiny toy puppies, beautiful, loving & sweet, home raised, $700 Cash, 405-224-8584 Yorkie K , Chihuahua K , 7 wks, Xtra Xtra Cute! $125 Cash ’ 224-6903 Yorkie Puppies Reg., 9 wks F, crate tr'd, s/w, $400 ea, 580-660-1000 Yorkies, 9 wks AKC, 2 F 1 M s/w, $300-$700 405-623-8771 Yorkie w/papers, 1 tiny male, w/t/dc, 1st shots, parents are 4-5 lbs., 12 weeks old, $300 405-229-2298.

6'x6' Pallets to haul & store small square bales of hay, $22 ea 350-0781

Drink & Snack Route Great Loc Guaranty Must Sell now Financing avail. 800-648-2124 Distributorship for sale Earn $1,500 weekly 888-561-8983

Service Directory

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MEDICAL ASSISTANT needed with pediatric experience for FT position. Fax resume to 405-945-4959.

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NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

VI

17A

Goldsby festival pays tribute to armed forces, veterans FROM STAFF REPORTS

GOLDSBY — The fourth annual Goldsby May Festival started with a tribute to veterans and the armed forces at the town’s veterans’ plaza. The tribute was soon followed by children’s activities, car and tractor shows, concerts and a free community picnic. EvinceAble, the Justin Fox Band and the Kylie Morgan Band performed at the park’s gazebo. “I have enjoyed watching people talking to people, visiting with each other,” Goldsby Mayor Cindy Scott said near the children’s inflatable slide. “We just want people to have a good time.” The May Festival took

Above: Betty Dowdle, and her husband, Dale Dowdle, a World War II Army veteran, looks down to read names of veterans on bricks that encircle the Goldsby Veterans’ Memorial Plaza. Elly Allison, 5, of Goldsby, thanks Blanchard clown “Top Hat” for making her a pink balloon rabbit Saturday during the fourth annual Goldsby May Festival.

place at the park next to the town center. The park is undergoing improve-

ments that include a walking trail, playground equipment and the veter-

HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?

Above: Parents, kids and trucks are reflected in a fire truck’s mirror Saturday during the Touch a Truck event in Norman. Above left: Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother, Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane. Below left: Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter.

Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while Oklahoma Electrical Cooperative journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

ans’ plaza that was dedicated at last year’s May Festival.

Left: “Top Hat,” makes a balloon monkey. PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN


18A

VI

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

19A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

VI

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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20A

VI

NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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VI

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


STATE

TORNADO DAMAGE

Enough is enough

After the storm

Reports of public drunkenness during the daytime, assaults and other problems have Bricktown Association saying enough is enough to the annual Cancer Crawl.

Love’s says it will rebuild its store, which was demolished by a tornado Monday. Also damaged were another truck stop, a Sonic, a grocery story and construction company. PAGE 3B

PAGE 2B

CONSTRUCTION

BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT | FUNDS WILL GO TO 4 COMPANIES TO HELP EFFORT

OKLAHOMA HAS FEWER UPSIDE-DOWN MORTGAGES THAN ANY OTHER STATE

State remains afloat in underwater market BY ROBERT EVATT Tulsa World robert.evatt@tulsaworld.com

BY SUSAN SIMPSON Business Writer ssimpson@opubco.com

Four companies have joined the Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program and pledge to create 633 new jobs here within the next decade. Paycom Payroll plans to add 414 jobs in Oklahoma City. Paycom processes payroll by the Internet for small and midsize businesses across the country. The company is building a new headquarters near Memorial Road and Rockwell Avenue, said CEO Chad Richison. The company will qualify for rebates of $4.5 million from the state. Richison said he expects to add 400 jobs in the next three years. The company employs 380 now in offices along Northwest Expressway.

B THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Quality Jobs set to add 600 spots

TOPPING IT OUT

Although millions of people owe more on their homes than they’re worth, Oklahoma has the lowest percentage of upsidedown mortgages in the country. Just 5.9 percent of Oklahoma homeowners, or

23,724 mortgage holders out of a total of 402,187 recorded, have negative equity on their homes, according to a survey released Tuesday by business data company CoreLogic. The state’s number is well below the national average of 23.7 percent.

ALSO ... LOWEST NEGATIVE EQUITY 1. Oklahoma .................................................5.9 percent 2. New York ....................................................7 percent 3. Montana...................................................7.3 percent 4. Pennsylvania ...........................................7.4 percent 5. North Dakota .............................................8 percent SOURCE: CORELOGIC

IN BRIEF

MARKETS Coverage, 5B [ DOW JONES 36.88, 10,748.26 X NASDAQ 0.64, 2,375.31 [ OIL $0.43, $76.37 [ NATURAL GAS $0.039, $4.131 [ CATTLE $0.27, $96.52 X WHEAT $0.101⁄2, $5.39

MARKET DIVE UNDER REVIEW The head of the Securities and Exchange Commission told a congressional panel that regulators need more time to figure out what caused last week’s stock market plunge. SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro, shown above, said her agency has yet to pinpoint the exact reason for the selloff that sent the Dow Jones industrial average falling nearly 1,000 points in less than half an hour. The agency’s review found no evidence of terrorist activity or computer hacking. Jim Beres, right, and Allen Vollmer, middle, both with Good Guys Construction, on Tuesday show Eric Ingram, owner of Aegis Roofing, temporary roof repairs made to a home in Moore. The home was damaged in the severe weather Monday. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

LOCAL CONTRACTORS WARN OF THREAT FROM SCAMMERS BY PAULA BURKES Business Writer pburkes@opubco.com

$602M spent so far Borets-Weatherford US is a supplier of oil-field submersible and industrial pumping systems. The company is opening a research and development center in Tulsa and plans to add 50 jobs. And a new Tulsa company, Bearwood Concepts — which manufactures fixtures for retail stores — plans to employ 125 people. The company’s customers include Macy’s, Dillards and Saks Fifth Avenue. Bearwood will qualify for rebates of $1.35 million. The Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program provides quarterly cash payments of up to 5 percent of new taxable payroll directly to a qualifying company for up to 10 years. Since its debut in July 1993, the state has issued more than 555 contracts to locating, expanding and startup businesses, and paid out more than $602 million in performancebased wage rebates.

PAGE 4B

SEE MORTGAGE, BACK PAGE

Some jobs pay $100K Paycom is hiring 10 to 15 new employees each month. Jobs will include client specialists, software developers, managers, business developers and human resources employees. Pay ranges from about $35,000 annually to more than $100,000. “I think Quality Jobs makes it easier for us to expand,” Richison said. “We operate without debt and sometimes you have to hire ahead of revenue.” The other new Quality Jobs companies are from Tulsa. Road Science, a technology supplier to the road paving industry, plans to add 44 jobs, qualifying it for rebates of $1.29 million. Road Science helps other firms procure specified asphalt products and locate licensed contractors for construction.

Oklahoma Medical Research Fund has topped out its new tower with a piece of structural steel, signed by all of its employees.

Though it took only seconds for Monday’s storms to ravage hundreds of homes and businesses across central Oklahoma, property owners should take their time in hiring roofers and other contractors to repair the damage, say experts in the homebuilding industry. Consumers should be wary of potentially shady storm chasers who invariably will pour into the area, said Mike Curtis, owner of Crossroads Roofing Supply. “If they’re not from here, you run the risk of putting a roof on, something going wrong and their not being able to come back to fix it,” Curtis said.

Watch low bids Moreover, low bids, he said, could come from thieves who stole their materials from others’ driveways and roofs. Such robberies have occurred within the past several weeks in the metro area, Curtis said. “Say a reputable company offers to roof your house for $15,000, and a company you’ve never heard of says they’ll do it for $10,000. Just asking where they got their stuff could stop you from contracting thieves,” he said. Eric Ingram, co-owner of Aegis

Jim Beres, left, and Allen Vollmer, right, of Good Guys Construction, working with Aegis Roofing, on Tuesday look at temporary roof repairs done at a home in Moore.

Roofing, advises homeowners against signing anything they don’t understand or paying upfront for work. “A contractor may say, ‘Sign this so we can take a look at your roof,’ and the document could say they’re the sole contractor to do work on your roof,” Ingram said. Reputable contractors, he said, should have an ample credit line to cover materials and labor. Mark Dale, president of the CenSEE DAMAGE , PAGE 3B

AVOIDING SHADY CONTRACTORS

› › › ›

Use local companies that are bonded and insured. Get written estimates. Check references. Be wary of upfront cash requests. SOURCES: CENTRAL OKLAHOMA HOMEBUILDERS ASSOCIATION, AEGIS ROOFING, CROSSROADS ROOFING SUPPLY

FROM WIRE REPORTS

UTILITY WILL SEEK REVIEW Within about two months, AEP-PSO will file a request with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission to review its base rate structure, but a company official said Tuesday this will not necessarily result in an increase for customers. The rate case will be the utility’s first major review since $81.4 million in annual rate hikes was approved in January 2009. American Electric Power-Public Service Co. of Oklahoma expects to file the application around June 18 and no later than July 15. The notice and review are required as part of a capital reliability rider agreement, said AEP-PSO spokesman Stan Whiteford. FROM TULSA WORLD REPORTS

GAS PRICES AAA’s average for regular unleaded: Nation $2.901 Week ago $2.904 Month ago $2.863 Year ago $2.226 Record $4.114 (set) 7-17-08 Tuesday

State $2.774 $2.793 $2.744 $2.101 $3.955 7-16-08


2B

...

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Another version of free (with strings attached) Some businesses keep trying to stick it to consumers when it comes to free credit reports. This isn’t the first time I’ve written about websites that offer “free” credit reports that end up costing consumers, and it probably won’t be the last. The industry leader and worst offender is freecreditreport.com, which is owned by Experian, one of the three major credit reporting bureaus. Users who sign up for a credit report online at free creditreport.com are charged a monthly $15 fee if they don’t opt out within seven days. The plethora of advertising sponsored by the

Don Mecoy dmecoy@ opubco.com

TRADE TALK site proves that it is a viable — if less than noble — business model. Last month, the Federal Trade Commission ordered sites offering “free” credit reports with strings attached to note that completely free reports are available, by law, at annualcreditreport.com. If you take only one thing away from this column, let it be that website: annualcreditreport.com.

The freecreditreport .com site has posted the required language and link to annualcredit report.com. However, at experian .com, the company has begun offering credit reports for $1. And at that site, there is no mention of annualcreditreport.com. It continues a longrunning battle between regulators and the credit reporting agencies. In recent years the FTC has obtained nearly $3 million in civil penalties through lawsuits against the three major credit reporting agencies. It’s not clear yet who will prevail on this issue. Experian, which does a

IN BRIEF METROTECH SITES OFFER TRAINING

lot of things other than credit reporting, recorded more than $2 billion of sales in North America last year. The company maintains credit information on about 215 million American consumers. As consumers, we have become accustomed to the “opt-out” business model. We may not like it, but we typically recognize it. Two things are different about Experian’s version — the seven-day window to cancel is very short. And the product — a credit report — is available for nothing elsewhere. As a business model, it’s legal, but it ain’t honest.

Metro Technology Centers are accredited by the Environmental Protection Agency to provide training for the new renovation, repair and painting rule, and will begin classes Thursday. The training is for people working for hire or under commercial contract in pre-1978 housing to obtain required certification in lead-based paint renovations. For more information and to enroll, register online at www.metrotech.org. All training is provided by certified instructors and all courses are held at Metro Technology Centers’ Springlake Campus in Oklahoma City.

EARNINGS ADDVANTAGE TECHNOLOGY GROUP TULSA — ADDvantage Technology Group Inc. reports fiscal second-quarter earnings of $1.1 million, or 11 cents per share, up from net income of $700,000, or 7 cents per share, in the same quarter a year ago. Revenue for the three-month period ended March 31 was up as well, reaching $12.1 million compared with $10.1 million last year, according to a news release Tuesday from the Broken Arrow-based cable television equipment company. Ken Chymiak, president and chief executive officer, said in the release that cost-reduction efforts and an increase in sales were behind the better results, and he predicted further improvement for the rest of the year. FROM THE OKLAHOMAN AND TULSA WORLD REPORTS

CRAWL FOR CANCER BANNED FROM BRICKTOWN REVELRY

IN STOCK BOEING CO.

BY STEVE LACKMEYER Business Writer slackmeyer@opubco.com

Organizers of the Bricktown Crawl for Cancer are being told not to return to the entertainment district after reports the fundraiser had participants urinating from building balconies, jumping into the canal, getting into fights and verbally assaulting families — all in broad daylight. More than 60 members of the Bricktown Association voted unanimously to let the fundraiser organizers — David Tedford, Mark Nance and Suzanne Taylor — know their event is not welcome in the entertainment district. Avis Scaramucci, owner of Nonna’s and the Purple Bar, said she was upset last year when one of the cancer crawl participants urinated off the balcony of her building onto the sidewalk below. “This year I was standing outside and a couple was crossing the street with a small girl and a baby in a carriage,” Scaramucci said. “And this group was out there in these (Bricktown cancer crawl) shirts and they were yelling, ‘What in the world are you doing having kids down here? This is no place for kids.’ And the parents had this stunned look on their faces. I just wanted to die,” she said. The verbal assault took place at 2:30 p.m. and wasn’t the only trouble associated with the event, which required teams of 10 people each to visit five pubs starting at 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 1. At 7:30 p.m. that same day, police were called to America’s Pub in Bricktown, where a patron was beaten unconscious by an assailant described as being “extremely intoxicated” and wearing a shirt that read “crawl for cancer 2010.” The victim was hospitalized and the attacker fled from the bar. An executive with the Bricktown Hampton Inn reported an “unresponsive” participant was dropped off and abandoned in the hotel lobby. Andrea Griggs, coowner of Put a Cork in It, reported participants were being loud and foulmouthed along the Bricktown Canal and some even jumped into the water. “I had a friend who lost her life to breast cancer,” Griggs said. “The only crawl was to the bathroom following chemo. I just think this is disrespectful.” The Facebook and website for the Bricktown Crawl for Cancer list David Tedford, Mark Nance and Suzanne Taylor as organizers. The event started at 1 p.m. and ended at 5 p.m. — a day in which Bricktown was being visited by families riding the canal

The streets and canal of Bricktown won’t be disturbed by the Crawl for Cancer again, the Bricktown Association decided Tuesday. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER

water taxis, seeing movies at Harkins Theater and attending a RedHawks game at the AT&T Bricktown Ballpark.

Participants paid $40 Tedford, vice president of environmental health and safety at Integra Wind Services, said he was unaware of such problems and thought the event went “smoothly.” He said about 1,800 participated in the latest cancer crawl, paying about $40 each to be part of 10member teams that had to visit five Bricktown bars. Tedford said he would comply with the Bricktown Association’s wishes. “Unfortunately it is what it is. It’s disappointing that a handful out of 2,000 have to ruin it for everybody. ... I would like to think there’s more self-control than what’s been on display this time around.” Tedford said local organizers were not given a choice about the timing — that the 1 p.m. start was dictated by Crawl for Cancer Inc., a for-profit Kansas City, Mo., company that organizes the fundraisers nationwide. Some Bricktown bars and restaurants have already sworn off participating again. A representative of Hooters said the restaurant backed out of the event last year, while Charles Stout, co-owner of the Bricktown Brewery, said he too will turn down the event if it’s held again. This year’s local beneficiaries are Ally’s House and the Oklahoma Brain Tumor Foundation. Tedford said he could not yet estimate how much was raised this year, but the groups each received a $5,000 check from the 2009 event. “It’s a nonprofit fundraising event,” Tedford said. “It’s one day a year. ... We put it together and try to have some fun and raise money.” Even so, Tedford said his involvement ends with the May 1 event. “It’s not going to happen in Oklahoma City again,” Tedford said. “At least I won’t be involved with it at all.”

ALSO ... PARTICIPANTS VARIED WIDELY IN FOCUS AND FANCINESS Supporters of the 2010 Bricktown Crawl for Cancer include several restaurants and bars, the family-friendly Hampton Inn and the upscale Colcord Hotel. Science Museum Oklahoma was tapped for its ample parking and plenty of space as the distribution location for T-shirts. Alex Mattison, communications coordinator for the museum, emphasized the shirt distribution was hosted after hours and not around families. “It was only for three hours,” Mattison said. “This was to help raise money for kids with cancer. “Our understanding was this was to be a familyfriendly event,” Mattison said, acknowledging he had reviewed the organization’s website which called for teams to visit and drink alcohol at a minimum of five Bricktown bars. Mattison said the museum’s involvement will be reviewed after being told about reports of cancer crawl participants fighting, engaging in lewd behavior and verbally assaulting families in Bricktown. “This does give us pause,” Mattison said.

Chg.

May 10 367.75 370 358 369.75 Jul 10 375.25 377.75 365 377 Sep 10 378.25 384.50 372.75 384 Dec 10 390.25 393 381 393 Est. sales 446,825 Mon’s. sales 200,882 Mon’s open int 1,166,257 up 2687.00

+6.75 +6.50 +6.25 +6.50

May 10 198.25 198.50 195.25 Jul 10 205 205 198 Sep 10 210.50 212 207 Dec 10 225.25 225.25 220 Est. sales 1,976 Mon’s. sales 1,886 Mon’s open int 16,852 up 101.00

197.75 202.75 211.25 223.25

+2.50 +2.50 +2.50 +2.25

May 10 280.50 282.30 276.50 Jul 10 279.70 281.90 276.10 Aug 10 276.50 278.70 273.50 Sep 10 270.10 271.60 267.40 Est. sales 75,859 Mon’s. sales 30,737 Mon’s open int 179,461 off 1837.00

282.30 281.60 278.40 271.60

May 10 38.11 38.31 37.88 Jul 10 38.45 38.62 38.10 Aug 10 38.65 38.80 38.33 Sep 10 38.81 38.95 38.50 Est. sales 89,916 Mon’s. sales 50,511 Mon’s open int 286,508 up 24.00

38.03 38.32 38.52 38.68

May 10 956.75 961 946.50 Jul 10 966 969 953.25 Aug 10 961.75 964.75 951 Sep 10 945 948.25 936 Est. sales 173,101 Mon’s. sales 71,226 Mon’s open int 456,758 off 1721.00

958.25 966 962.50 946

OATS (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 100 tons- dollars per ton

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 60,000 lbs- cents per lb

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

WHEAT (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 10 Jul 10

484.50 495

487.25 498.50

481 489

483.75 493.25

+4.10 +2.90 +2.90 +2.10

-.07 -.07 -.07 -.08

+5.50 +5 +4.75 +3.25

+1.25 +.50

Open

High

Low

Chg. +.75 +1.25

May 10 506.50 506.50 502 Jul 10 506.50 513.50 506 Sep 10 523.50 525 520.50 Dec 10 542.75 542.75 538 Mon’s. sales 12,468 Mon’s open int 153,173 up 1227.00

502.50 509.50 521.25 539

+1.50 +1.50 +1.50 +1.50

Jun 10 96.87 96.97 96.10 Aug 10 95.40 95.55 94.55 Oct 10 96.80 96.90 95.97 Dec 10 97.97 98.15 97.30 Est. sales 35,191 Mon’s. sales 80,844 Mon’s open int 372,978 off 847.00

96.80 95.37 96.85 98.10

+.10 +.30 +.25 +.13

May 10 112.20 112.85 111.55 Aug 10 115.62 116.00 114.65 Sep 10 115.50 115.95 114.85 Oct 10 115.25 115.40 114.50 Est. sales 1,599 Mon’s. sales 4,345 Mon’s open int 42,400 up 45.00

112.10 115.60 115.80 115.35

-.52 -.32 -.17 +.10

May 10 87.85 89.15 87.70 Jun 10 85.25 85.80 84.40 Jul 10 85.27 85.90 84.37 Aug 10 85.00 85.80 84.20 Est. sales 23,458 Mon’s. sales 45,575 Mon’s open int 220,117 off 3175.00

87.92 85.32 85.47 85.02

-.68 -.53 -.68 -.73

102.00 101.50 100.25

+1.00

HOGS-Lean (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

PORK BELLIES (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 10 102.50 102.50 Jul 10 100.00 101.50 Mar 11 99.50 100.25 Est. sales 15 Mon’s. sales 8 Mon’s open int 209

102.00 100.00 99.50

$48.94 $42.89 $32.75 $4.17 $21.66 $29.51 $18.27 $28.38 $31.48 $22.18 $32.91

+0.25% +12.13% +2.09% -2.11% +1.55% -0.64% +3.98% -3.76% -2.08% -0.67% -0.09%

YTD CHG. +5.25% +40.48% +7.87% +24.11% -3.09% +16.55% -2.61% -7.56% -5.01% +38.63% +21.80%

COMPANY

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

Altria Colgate Palmolive Dow Chemical DuPont Ecolab General Electric Kimberly Clark PPG Ind. Whirlpool Corp.

$21.59 $82.83 $27.89 $38.10 $48.85 $18.00 $62.79 $66.43 $105.24

+1.55% -0.05% -4.84% -1.30% +0.54% -3.12% +2.61% -2.98% -3.57%

+9.21% +0.41% -1.10% +12.12% +8.48% +18.27% -2.33% +12.02% +29.32%

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

CLOSING PRICE $51.18 $16.21 $71.42

WEEK CHG. +1.67% +1.89% -1.88%

YTD CHG. +8.48% +42.07% +28.18%

$100.21 $88.11 $12.31 $0.02 $33.38 $45.85 $36.17

0.00% -1.41% -4.20% 0.00% +1.40% -2.16% -0.08%

+1.52% +4.63% +21.04% -90.00% +30.95% +15.75% +11.09%

$89.88 $83.10

-2.84% -2.69%

+2.25% +9.53%

Allegiant Air Arvin Meritor Boeing Burlington Northern Santa Fe FedEx Ford Motor Co. Frontier Airlines Harley Davidson Honeywell JB Hunt L-3 Vertex Aerospace Lockheed Martin Northstar Aerospace Spirit Aerosystems Toyota US Airways Group Visteon YRC Worldwide

$2.60 $21.94 $77.46

+39.78% +126.09% +4.13% +9.65% +1.80% -8.60%

$6.83 $1.55 $0.48

-0.44% +41.12% -4.32% +5066.67% -6.16% -44.83%

State Grains

510.25 539.75

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

WEEK CHG.

MANUFACTURING

CASH WHEAT Mostly 1 to 2 cents higher. 3.70-4.20 Alva . . . . . . . . . 4.10 Banner. . . . . . . 4.09 Buffalo. . . . . . . 4.05 Cherokee . . . . 4.10 Clinton . . . . . . . 4.00 Davis . . . . . . . . 3.70 El Dorado . . . . 4.10 El Reno . . . . . . 4.09 Frederick. . . . . 3.98 Geary . . . . . . . . 4.13 Hobart . . . . . . . 4.03 Hooker. . . . . . . 4.20 Keyes . . . . . . . . 4.15 Lawton . . . . . . 3.94 Manchester . . . . 4.15 Medford . . . . . .4.11 Miami. . . . . . . . 4.06 Okarche . . . . .4.04 Okeene . . . . . . 4.18 Perry . . . . . . . . 4.10 Ponca City . . . . 4.17 Shattuck. . . . . 4.10 Stillwater . . . . 4.10 Temple . . . . . .4.00 Watonga . . . . 4.13 Weatherford . . .4.00 Gulf. . . . . . . . . . 4.89{ FEED GRAINS MILO Alva . . . . . . . . .5.01 Buffalo. . . . . . .5.01 Hooker. . . . . . 5.39 Keyes . . . . . . . 5.39 Manchester. .5.13 Medford . . . . .5.17 Miami. . . . . . . 5.89 Ponca City . . . 5.48 Shattuck. . . . 5.66 Weatherford . . 5.33 Gulf. . . . . . . 7.58{

Settle

CATTLE (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

AFLAC AIG Allstate Citigroup First Cash Fin. Lincoln National Manulife Fin. Morgan Stanley PSEG Funding RiskMetrics Group Wells Fargo

CLOSING PRICE

Summer is around the corner, and Oklahoma Citybased At the Beach just opened its 53rd tanning superstore. President and CEO Brian Belt talks about the company’s growth and future plans.

Sep 10 516.50 516.50 505.75 Dec 10 540.25 544 535 Est. sales 113,263 Mon’s. sales 84,240 Mon’s open int 456,432 off 2546.00

WINTER WHEAT (KCBT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

COMPANY

RETAIL

discounted rates to Dog › Wormy s Pub participants) › America’ › Drinkz › Colcord Hotel (ofs Alley fered discounted rates › JJ’ to participants) › Red Pin Bowling Lounge › Science Museum Street Cafe Oklahoma (hosted › Bourbon Bar distribution of shirts, › Rok Ugly registrations) › Coyote Brewery › Bricktown › Sapphire › Tapwerks › Hampton Inn (offered

Agri Markets

FINANCIAL

TOMORROW IN BUSINESS

PARTICIPANTS IN THE 2010 BRICKTOWN CRAWL FOR CANCER

Open High Low Settle CORN (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

Boeing Co. workers who assemble C-17 planes went on strike Tuesday, shutting down the production line for the jumbo cargo jets in a feud over medical and pension benefits. Nearly all of the 1,700 unionized mechanics at Boeing’s Long Beach plant heeded the strike call, but about 3,000 nonunion workers continued in jobs ranging from engineering to supply and sales, Boeing spokeswoman Cindy Anderson said. The Chicagobased company shut down the C-17 production line indefinitely.

-.70

SOYBEANS Alva . . . . . . . . 8.70 Buffalo. . . . . . 8.70 Hooker. . . . . . 8.60 Medford . . . . .8.71 Miami. . . . . . . 9.28 Ponca City . . . 8.86 Shattuck. . . . 8.30 Stillwater . . . 8.96 Gulf. . . . . . . . . 10.11 CORN $3.13-$3.60 per bushel. COTTON Grade 41, Leaf 4, Staple 34 cotton in southwestern OK 73.75 cents per pound, FOB rail car or truck. KANSAS CITY GRAIN Wheat, No.2 Hard, bu.............. $4.35-$4.43{ Corn, No. 2 yellow.......................$3.50-$3.69} Milo.............................................................. $5.45-$5.94 Soybeans, No. 1.......................$9.35\-$9.55{


BUSINESS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BUSINESS BRIEFS NATION

STORE TO SELL GENETICS TEST NEW YORK — The

largest U.S. drugstore chain, Walgreen Co., will start selling genetic testing kits at many of its stores later this month, according to Pathway Genomics, which makes the kits. Pathway said Tuesday that Walgreen will sell saliva swab kits that are used to determine predisposition for chronic diseases, and response to common drugs like Plavix, Tamoxifen and Coumadin. They can also be used to determine if a person carries a gene for diseases like Alzheimer’s, cystic fibrosis, and Tay-Sachs disease. The tests will be available at Walgreen stores starting in mid-May.

SOUTHWEST TO ADD ROUTE DALLAS — Southwest

Airlines plans to begin flights to South Carolina next year and isn’t waiting to learn if the Legislature there will provide subsidies. The low-cost carrier said Tuesday it will add Charleston and Greenville-Spartanburg to its schedules. Southwest flies to 68 cities in the U.S. but still has some holes in its route map. It doesn’t land anywhere between Raleigh-Durham, N.C., and Jacksonville, Fla. The airline said it will release details such as start dates, destinations and fares for the South Carolina service later. South Carolina lawmakers are considering providing subsidies to attract lowfare airlines. The push for state incentives grew after AirTran Airways pulled out of Charleston.

NEW YORK SUES ADVISORY FIRM NEW YORK — In the late 1990s, executives at the financial advisory firm Ivy Asset Management decided something about Bernard Madoff didn’t add up, and began urging clients to back away from the man later revealed to be Wall Street’s greatest fraudster. Those warnings weren’t loud enough, New York’s attorney general now says. The state sued Ivy and two of its former executives Tuesday, claiming they had “disturbing” evidence years ago that Madoff was lying about his investment methods, but played down those suspicions because they feared losing millions of dollars in management fees. Ivy’s customers wound up losing $227 million when the scheme collapsed, according to the lawsuit.

SENATE SEEKS SPILL ANSWERS WASHINGTON — Con-

gress called BP and its drilling partners to account Tuesday for a “cascade of failures” behind the spreading Gulf oil spill, zeroing in on a crucial chain of events at the deep-sea wellhead just before an explosion consumed the rig and set off the catastrophic rupture. In back-to-back Senate inquiries, executives of the three companies at the heart of the massive spill were chastised by senators over attempts to shift the blame to each other. And they were asked to explain why better preparations had not been made to head off the accident. The blame game shot into the open as the Senate began a hearing into the oil spill that has been contaminating water in the Gulf of Mexico for three weeks and threatens marine life in the Gulf.

NEW OFFICE TO BE UNVEILED SEATTLE — Microsoft

Corp. is rolling out a new edition of its Office programs to businesses today. And for the first time it’s offering versions of Word and other programs that work in a Web browser, for free. Office 2010 marks a milestone in Microsoft’s efforts to keep up with an industry shift from programs that run on PCs to free, Web-based ones that can be accessed from any computer. And yet Microsoft must be careful not to undermine its lucrative desktop software business, which accounted for 29 percent of Microsoft’s revenue and 51 percent of its operating income in the most recent quarter.

AGENCY SPLIT IS PROPOSED

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

...

3B

Insurance commissioner issues emergency order BY DON MECOY Business Writer dmecoy@opubco.com

Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner Kim Holland issued an emergency order on Tuesday aimed at speeding up insurance claims in the state in the wake of Monday’s deadly horde of tornadoes. The declaration, which

is routine in cases of widespread insured property losses, enables emergency claims adjusters to be licensed temporarily to expedite the insurance claims process and provide immediate assistance. Dozens of homes and businesses were destroyed by Monday’s severe weather. “I am working to make

sure companies are able to bring in experienced adjusters from other states to expedite the claims process,” Holland said in a statement. Holland’s order allows for emergency adjusters to be licensed for 90 days and to adjust claims related to Monday’s severe storms. Assistant Insurance Commissioner Marc

Young said it would take days or weeks before an estimate of insured losses will be available. Jerry Johns, president of Southwestern Insurance Information Service, said insurance companies are expecting thousands of claims on residents’ homes, businesses and vehicles damaged or destroyed by the storms.

STORM DAMAGE WON’T KEEP VARIOUS BUSINESSES DOWN BY SUSAN SIMPSON Business Writer ssimpson@opubco.com

WASHINGTON — The

Obama administration is proposing to split up an Interior Department agency that oversees offshore drilling, as part of its response to the Gulf Coast oil spill. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar called for a plan to split the Minerals Management Service in two. One agency would be charged with inspecting oil rigs, investigating oil companies and enforcing safety regulations, while the other would oversee leases for drilling and collection of billions of dollars in royalties. That would separate the agency’s two core responsibilities, which critics say are diametrically opposed — making money off the industry, while also cracking down on it in ways that may affect the industry’s bottom line.

WORLD

SATELLITE DRIFTS OUT OF CONTROL LONDON — A TV com-

munications satellite is drifting out of control thousands of miles above the Earth, threatening to wander into another satellite’s orbit and interfere with cable programming across the United States, the satellites’ owners said Tuesday. Communications company Intelsat said it lost control of the Galaxy 15 satellite on April 8, possibly because the satellite’s systems were knocked out by a solar storm. Intelsat cannot remotely steer the satellite to remain in its orbit, so Galaxy 15 is creeping toward the adjacent path of another TV communications satellite that serves U.S. cable companies. Galaxy 15 continues to receive and transmit satellite signals, and they will probably interfere with the second satellite if Galaxy 15 drifts into its orbit as expected around May 23, according to AMC 11’s owner, SES World Skies.

SELL-OFF SEEN IN CHINA’S STOCKS BEIJING — China’s in-

flation accelerated in April, triggering a selloff in Chinese stocks Tuesday on fears of overheating and a possible credit clampdown by Beijing that might slow the country’s economic recovery. April consumer prices rose 2.8 percent from a year earlier, below Beijing’s full-year target of 3 percent but up 0.4 percentage points from March, the National Bureau of Statistics said. Foreign companies and investors are watching Chinese inflation because any moves to cool prices might slow economic growth that surged to 11.9 percent in the first quarter. FROM WIRE REPORTS

Love’s Travel Stops hopes to rebuild a store along Interstate 40 that was destroyed by a tornado on Monday and is finding new positions for about two dozen of its workers who were displaced. The remains of the 5,000-square-foot Love’s Travel Stop at Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road will be demolished while the company looks into the possibility of rebuilding, said Jenny Love Meyer, director of communications for the Oklahoma Citybased chain. A highway expansion project planned for 2012 at the interchange may determine whether Love’s can rebuild on the same site. “The store is a total loss at this point,” she said. “There’s lots of damage.” Employees are being offered jobs at other travel stops in the metro area, she said. Store employees and dozens of customers huddled in rest rooms and a beverage cooler when the tornado struck. There were no serious injuries, but the store was left in ruins, with collapsed walls and no roof. Gas and diesel from storage tanks under the store were pumped into tankers on Tuesday as the site was secured. The store was built in 1986 and was a popular stop for truckers and local customers. Meyer didn’t have a damage estimate but said the loss is “well into the six figures.” Across the highway, a Sonic Drive-In also sustained tornado damage and will be closed for several weeks for repairs, said spokeswoman Nancy Robertson. Four employees and one customer took shelter in the building. Signs, menu stands and

Tornado damage is seen Monday near Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

canopies were damaged. Nearby, the Anderson Travel Plaza also had heavy damage. Owner Jay Kumar said he hid under a table in his office as the storm raged. “I thought, ‘We are dead,’ ” he said. Other businesses sustaining damage were a Country Boy IGA grocery store near Lake Thunderbird, the Seminole Airport and several businesses near it. State Sen. Harry Coates said several businesses owned by his family were damaged or destroyed. Coates Roofing and Coates Metal Works were in metal buildings near the Seminole Airport. The metal works company, which manufactures sheet metal, was destroyed. The roofing company also lost several buildings. An erosion control company across the road at the former Miller Plant Farm also had damage. Coates said the family will rebuild and reopen the business, but estimates losses at about $1 million. The companies employ

Damage: Be wary of shady crews, local experts say FROM PAGE 1B

tral Oklahoma Homebuilders Association, recommends homeowners and contractors outline the scope and cost of the job, and when it will be done. “Even if it’s a one-page crude document, get it in writing,” Dale said. Tuesday, Curtis’ and Ingram’s staff and crews were working feverishly on temporarily covering holes in people’s roofs, until insurance adjusters could make on-site visits and claims be filed. By 10 p.m. Monday, Crossroads had sold all its 150 tarps and numerous boxes of nails that hold plastic sheeting. Curtis said his 20 employees reported at 6 a.m. Tuesday to start delivering materials that go under shingles to area homes. Immediately after the

storm, Aegis began fielding calls from 50 to 60 affected homeowners in Edmond, Mustang, Moore and Choctaw, Ingram said. “We did a sort of triage initially to find out who was in worse shape,” he said. “And then we began covering holes to temporarily keep the rain out.” Some homes are unsalvageable, he said, but have contents that need to be protected.

Commercial RE Investment Property For Sale 28 Unit Complex Near I-40 & Council Rd - 95% occupied. $550,000 »» 414-6090

ALSO ... HELP MAY BE AVAILABLE Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Oklahoma City, urged business owners to contact the Small Business Administration if they need help recovering from tornado damage. During a news conference in front of the damaged Love’s Travel Stop, Fallin said she had heard of several business that won’t be collecting revenue for a while and that many people may be without jobs. The Small Business Administration can help with business interruption services, Fallin said.

about 125 people and some workers were on site Tuesday cleaning up debris. In addition, Coates said two brothers and his mother lost roofs from their homes. Three aircraft owned by the family at the airport were not damaged. “I’m just thankful that no one was seriously injured,” he said. The roofing company has many commercial projects, including the contract for roofing the Devon tower building in downtown Oklahoma City. Aero-Tec Industries is near the airport and suf-

fered major building damage, said company president Charles Harbert. The maker of aircraft supplies is closed until electricity is restored at the site, he said. “It beat the living tar out of it and broke some windows out of the front,” he said. The company has five workers but no one was there when the storm hit. “We consider ourselves lucky the building is still standing considering the total devastation around us,” Coates said. CONTRIBUTING: STAFF WRITER MICHAEL BAKER

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4B

.

BUSINESS: STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Beam tops off OMRF’s new tower A steel beam signed by hundreds of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation employees was lifted to the top of the foundation’s new research tower as part of a “topping off” ceremony Tuesday for the 186,000-square-foot tower. The building is expected to be completed by year’s end. Although a tree is typically raised to top out buildings, OMRF President Dr. Stephen Prescott said that since the green building will have only low-water plants on its roof garden, “we decided to skip the tree.” The tower will be home to 34 new laboratories and a research clinic.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Q&A WITH BOB PHIBBS CONSULTANT OFFERS MAIN STREET ADVICE Q: You were in Oklahoma City last week for the National Main Streets Conference. What did you learn about Oklahoma? A: Wow, you guys have a vibrant city center — and wind! I liked all the restaurants in Bricktown and visited Cattlemen’s Steakhouse in Stockyards City. The Oklahoma City National Memorial was striking and an important reminder of how we stand on a lot of people’s shoulders to enjoy the lives we do. Q: How are Main Streets changing across the country?

The last piece of structural steel is lifted to the top of the new tower Tuesday during a ceremony in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY DON MECOY, THE OKLAHOMAN

OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Tuesday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. — $73.00 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. — $61.00 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted April 26: COMPLETION Garfield: Nytex Energy LLC; Winchester No. 3-9 Well; W1⁄2 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 09-21N-07W; 8 Barrels oil per day, 28,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 7,240. Grant: Nytex Energy LLC; Denver No. 1-34 Well; NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 34-27N-03W; 26 barrels oil per day, 41,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 4,465. Pawnee: Spess Oil Co.; Cude No. 2 Well; C E1⁄2 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 21-20N-06E; 28 barrels oil per day, 5,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 3,430. Pottawatomie: AmerRoyal Energy LLC; Austin No. 1 Well; SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 08-11N-03E; TD 5,196. Rogers: CEP Mid-Continent LLC; ECC/ Short Ranch No. 25 Well; W1⁄2 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 13-24N-14E; 82,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 1,388. INTENT TO DRILL Grady: Linn Operating Inc.; Wegener No. 1-18 Well; NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of

18-10N-07W; TD 10,600. Kingfisher: BRG Petroleum LLC; Creek No. 1-34 Well; C NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 34-18N-07W; TD 8,330. Logan: Husky Ventures Inc.; William No. 1-6H Well; E1⁄2 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (SL) of 06-15N-04W; TD 13,135. Oklahoma: CBL Resources LLC; Phillip No. 12-1 Well; SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 12-12N-01E; TD 5,800. Okmulgee: W C T Operating LLC; Morris No. 32-2 Well; C SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 32-16N-11E; TD 2,200. Pittsburg: Unit Petroleum Co.; Frederick No. 6H Well; C NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 26-07N-13E; TD 6,236. Pottawatomie: Scott Jerry Drilling Co., Inc.; Stark No. 1 Well; C NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 18-07N-04E; TD 3,950. Sequoyah: Panther Gas LLC; Kilgore No. 1-SWD Well; C SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 04-12N-24E; TD 1,850. Wagoner: W C T Operating LLC; Miller No. 27-2 Well; N1⁄2 S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 27-18N-17E; TD 1,000. Washita: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Bret No. 1-4H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 04-10N-17W; TD 17,250. SOURCE: OIL-LAW RECORDS CORP. Livestock Monday feeder cattle report from the Oklahoma City Stockyards.

Receipts: 11,879 Medium and Large No. 1: (weighted average): Steers: 380 lbs. $151.61; 433 lbs. $145.17; 473 lbs. $137.25; 520 lbs. $136.80; 564 lbs. $133.92; 614 lb. calves $118.48; 669 lb. calves $115; 626 lbs. $126.40; 682 lbs. $122.46; 728 lbs. $119.10; 776 lbs. $114.87; 828 lbs. $110.48; 874 lbs. $107.25; 925 lbs. $104.09; 968 lbs. $102.18; 1019 lbs. $99.42. and Large No. 1: (weighted average): Heifers: 340 lbs. $131; 367 lbs. $129; 409 lbs. $126.75; 481 lbs. $122.70; 536 lbs. $119.28; 578 lbs. $116.53; 631 lbs. $114.82; 678 lbs. $111.55; 728 lbs. $108.97; 767 lbs. $105.61; 819 lbs. $101.28; 878 lbs. $96.63; 928 lbs. $95.50; 962 lbs. $92.50. HOGS Slaughter Hog Receipts: 100. Compared to Monday: Barrow & Gilts: Steady. U.S. Nos. 1-3 220-270 lbs., $50. Sows: Steady. U.S. Nos. 1-3 300-500 lbs., $50-$56. U.S. Nos. 1-3 500-700 lbs., $58-$60. Boars: 200-250 lbs., $20; over 250 lbs $10 SOURCE: USDA-OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MARKET NEWS SERVICE

Bob Phibbs CEO of the Retail Doctor

A: There is a renewed emphasis on downtown because it is what gives each community its character. You don’t get that from a concrete, tilt-up big-box development. It’s no wonder the National Trust for Historic Preservation is behind the excellent Main Street program because America’s foundation for greatness has come from preserving the past. ... I teach that the key to any Main Street program is to remove the idea of “independent business” and understand it is “interdependent” businesses. Originally, Main Street had the saloon, the hotel, the livery, the general store, the church — all of the services — because they all needed each other. That interdependency is what spelled doom for so many downtowns in the 1970s and 1980s when they didn’t care what the other guy was doing. Now the best Main Street businesses understand, “if I close early, I could be hurting the very neighbors I depend on to make a living.” That’s what is so exciting about the Main Street program. Q: Do you think retailers are less interested in having a presence on a city’s Main Street? A: I think it is important to understand big-box retailers have no use in being on Main Street — they want to be out on the interstates due to their huge tractor-trailers of stuff from China and acres of parking. ... Smart retailers will find they can do with smaller footprints in this economy ... so expect to see more variety and selection as America rebuilds its core. It won’t happen easily or quickly, but clearly with over a thousand Main Street programs across the country, it is gaining steam. JENNIFER PALMER, BUSINESS WRITER


BUSINESS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

.

-

NASDAQ 2,375.31

-36.88

.

S&P 500 1,155.79

+.64

, /QPG[&/CTMGVU 30-YR T-BONDS 4.42%

6-MO T-BILLS .22%

-3.94

-

GOLD $1,219.90

-.0110

+19.50

Macy’s (M)

Whole Foods (WFMI)

Gold glows

As the second-largest department store operator behind Sears, Macy's can serve as a barometer of spending among middle-income shoppers. Look for any evidence that consumers are spending more on clothing and home furnishings – that could suggest they’re feeling better about the economy.

Whole Foods has had to shift its strategy to woo customers back during the recession. It lowered prices and put less of an emphasis on luxury goods. Shares have risen 41 percent the beginning of the year, as a result. Watch the company’s results for indications that shoppers are willing to embrace those expensive goods once again. That could signal a change in consumers’ attitudes.

The market’s recent turbulence has turned investors into gold bugs again. The price of gold rose $19.50 to $1,220.30 an n ounce Tuesday. That’ss just a few dollars away from f gold’s all-time high of $1,227.50 that it reached in December. Investors are warming up to the metal again because it’s seen as a safe investment during periods of volatility.

1,040

Price: $23.90 52-week price range: $10.27

25.25

Source: Thomson Reuters

S&P 500

2,520

Close: 1,155.79 Change: -3.94 (-0.3%)

2,340

Price: $39.48 52-week price range: $17.16

40.70

Source: Thomson Reuters

Nasdaq composite

Interestrates

Close: 2,375.31 Change: 0.64 (flat)

2,160

10 DAYS

1,250

TREASURIES

10 DAYS

2,600 2,500

1,200

2,400 1,150 2,300 1,100

2,200 N

D

J

F

M

5VQEMU4GECR Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NYSE

NASD

5,899 6,965 1721 1392 57 8

2,439 2,746 1612 1071 60 27

A

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

M

2,100

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

HIGH

LOW

CLOSE

CHG.

%CHG.

YTD

10874.54 4616.12 386.11 7311.03 2405.26 1170.48 807.58 12273.10 704.03

10685.38 4493.75 379.26 7177.05 2345.50 1147.71 787.77 12018.35 680.58

10748.26 4561.05 382.40 7221.66 2375.31 1155.79 798.34 12125.24 695.48

-36.88 +25.22 +0.75 -35.96 +0.64 -3.94 +2.20 -23.43 +5.87

-0.34% +0.56% +0.20% -0.50% +0.03% -0.34% +0.28% -0.19% +0.85%

+3.07% +11.26% -3.92% +0.51% +4.68% +3.65% +9.86% +4.99% +11.21%

Small Stocks, Big Gains Small-cap stocks remain on a tear. Don’t look for it to continue. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks has increased 101 percent since March 9, 2009, while the large-cap Russell 1000 is up 74 percent. But analysts say there are three main reasons why the rally will fade. 1. They’re expensive. The price-to-earnings ratio of the Russell 2000 is 42, almost twice its long-term average. The p/e of the Russell 1000 is 20. 2. Smaller companies were attractive while the dollar was rising against the euro because bigger companies do an average of 40 percent more business overseas than small caps. Revenue generated overseas translates into fewer dollars when the currency is rising. If the euro rallies, traders may shift to large-caps, said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist for Prudential. 3. Small-cap stocks typically do better early in a market recovery. In the second year of the past two bull markets, the gap between big and small stocks narrowed dramatically.

20%

15

10

Treasury prices changed little after plunging on Monday. That means mortgage and other consumer interest rates stayed steady.

(small caps) Includes: Denny’s, Palm, WD-40 0

Russell 1000 (large caps) Includes: 3M, Apple, Pfizer

-5 JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

Not the Ticket

MAY

S ""! % 

SOURCES: Thomson Reuters, Russell Indexes

Live Nation’s recent merger with Ticketmaster was meant to boost the company’s profits. So far, that hasn’t happened. The concert promoter, artist manager, venue owner and now ticketing company posted a first-quarter loss of $112 million, or 76 cents per share, up from a loss of $103 million, or $1.29, a year earlier. The company blamed those results on a 3 percent drop in concert attendance and costs related to its Ticketmaster merger. It completed its merger Jan. 25, but it’s now facing other issues. The company’s controversial ticket resale site, TicketsNow, got into hot water after it sold marked-up tickets to Bruce Springsteen fans last year, despite regular face value tickets still being available. Authorities pushed the company to cut links between TicketsNow and the main Ticketmaster site. That’s caused business to wither. Operating profits fell from $15 million per year to less than $2 million. Looking ahead, Live Nation said it expects 2010 adjusted operating income that is “flat to slightly down� from a year ago, when that figure was $444 million.

Company Spotlight

AP

he stock market mostly held on to its big comeback after investors set aside worries about Europe's debt struggles. The Dow fell about 37 points after fluctuating for much of the day. The broader S&P 500 index fell 3.94, or 0.3 percent, to Toyota TM Legg Mason

T

Close: $77.46 0.71 or 0.9% Cost cutting and a stronger economy helped the top carmaker return to profit even as investigations into its quality standards continue. $85 80

1,155.79. Analysts said it was encouraging to see the market hold on to most of its gains from Monday, when the Dow soared 405 points in response to the creation of a bailout fund for weak countries like Greece. LM Zale ZLC

Close: $33.38 3.43 or 11.5% The asset manager posted a fourth-quarter profit that beat expectations and announced a restructuring plan to improve profitability. $35

F

M A 52-week range

$71.00

M $91.97

Vol.: 1.1m (0.7x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $121.46 b

PE: ... Yield: 1.9%

Maidenform Brands

MFB

Close: $24.90 3.10 or 14.2% A recovery in consumer spending helped the company post its highest quarterly sales ever and boost its outlook. $25 20

25

2 F

M A 52-week range

$17.32

M $34.48

F

M A 52-week range

$10.52 Vol.: 1.3m (4.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $600.29 m SOURCE: Sungard

M $25.31

PE: 16.0 Yield: ...

1

F

M A 52-week range

$1.80

Vol.: 8.5m (3.5x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $5.39 b Yield: 0.5%

Vol.: 2.9m (1.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $99.85 m

Priceline.com

Gilead Sciences

PCLN

Close: $219.57 -30.18 or -12.1% The travel website operator warned its second-quarter profit may weaken after Iceland’s volcanic eruption hindered air transportation. $300

200

M A 52-week range

$98.00 Vol.: 7.1m (5.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $10.01 b

M $273.93

PE: 22.2 Yield: ...

35

F

$38.01

... ... ... ... -0.01

.17 .29 .44 .88 2.02

10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

3.53 4.42

3.53 4.41

... +0.01

3.17 4.18

BONDS

PVS

NET CHG

1YR AGO

4.15 5.10 3.28 8.88 4.95 4.36 54.91

... ... +0.04 -0.14 +0.12 +0.03 +0.17

4.00 5.30 4.15 14.08 5.60 6.77 40.64

YEST

British pound Canadian dollar Chinese yuan

CLOSE

PVS

.6685 1.0190 6.8353

.6720 1.0250 6.8306

CLOSE Euro Japanese yen Mexican peso

.7878 92.77 12.4666

NAME

LAST

25.11 2.95 35.02 52.45 28.71 45.72 56.00 47.15 8.64 30.00 52.23 76.79 52.05 7.00 19.10 3.85 15.25 49.13 18.71 48.60 13.21 7.85 42.25

AAON ADDvntgT AlliHold AllnceRes ApcoO&Gs ArenaRes BOK BncFstOK BroncoDrl ChesEng ContlRes DevonE DollarTh EduDv GMX Rs GrayMrkH GulfportE HelmPayne LSB Inds MagelMPtr MatrixSv NA Galvin OGE Engy

23.34 +.35 3.14 +.58 28.54 +.42 46.23 -.40 29.18 +1.86 33.79 +1.51 55.46 +.09 42.27 +.41 4.43 +.05 23.28 +.18 47.83 -.08 67.87 +.05 48.46 -.53 6.15 ... 6.72 -.07 1.45 +.07 13.15 +.39 36.63 -.34 16.97 -.26 45.33 +.73 12.14 +.10 7.47 -.02 38.88 +.39

18.00 1.49 18.12 30.78 12.25 26.52 34.47 31.47 3.34 16.92 22.33 48.74 3.81 4.40 6.25 0.95 3.37 26.64 10.62 31.31 8.26 4.61 25.34

CH.

-.43 -.30

Est. sales 862,779 Mon’s. sales 824,838 Mon’s open int 1,462,043 off 12539.00

NATURAL GAS (NYMX) 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 10 4.152 4.131 Jul 10 4.250 4.225

-.039 -.046

Est. sales 215,125 Mon’s. sales 286,184 Mon’s open int 868,697 off 4118.00

GOLD (COMX) 100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. May 10 1219.40 1219.90 +19.50 Jun 10 1219.90 1220.30 +19.50 Est. sales 239,274 Mon’s. sales 210,064 Mon’s open int 576,868 up 5941.00

SILVER (COMX) 5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz. May 10 1924.5 1927.2 +74.2 Jun 10 1932.0 1928.1 +74.2 Est. sales 60,226 Mon’s. sales 35,588 Mon’s open int 119,406 up 1237.00

NY HARBOR GAS BLEND (NYMX) 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 10 2.1904 2.1952 +.0226 Jul 10 2.1954 2.1999 +.0186

PVS .7810 93.10 12.5160

Est. sales 106,430 Mon’s. sales 111,646 Mon’s open int 287,310 off 6368.00

+19.8 +59.2 +4.1 +6.6 +32.0 -21.6 +16.7 +14.1 -12.6 -10.0 +11.5 -7.7 +89.2 +2.5 -51.1 -17.1 +14.8 -8.1 +20.4 +4.6 +14.0 +54.0 +5.4

35.40

27.00 OOK Inc n

33.60 +1.94

+4.6 0.08

...

50.85

26.08 ONEOK

48.81

+.35

+9.5 1.76

3.6

66.91

43.10 ONEOK Pt

60.42

+.58

-3.0 4.44

7.3

22.98

13.15 OrchidsPP

13.28

-.14

29.65

18.17 PanhO&G

24.38

+.28

53.05

30.68 PrepaidLg

45.51

+.48

+10.8

...

2.44

0.63

RAM Engy

1.86

+.05

-9.3

...

...

15.00

6.12

SandRdge

6.76

+.45

-28.3

...

...

13.11

8.07

SonicCorp

11.62

+.05

+15.4

...

...

15.60

5.96

SwstBc

15.42

+.53 +122.2 0.10

.6

3.35

1.64

Syntroleum

2.27

+.12

-14.7

...

...

51.00

24.11 Unit

42.35

+.26

-0.4

...

...

24.66

13.59 WmsCos

21.81

+.33

+3.5 0.50

2.3

42.75

16.88 WmsPtrs

39.55

+.60

+29.0 2.63

6.6

3.99

2.00

3.80

...

0.36 ... 1.86 3.16 0.08 ... 1.00 0.92 ... 0.30 ... 0.64 ... 0.48 ... ... ... 0.20 ... 2.84 ... ... 1.45

1.5 ... 6.5 6.8 .3 ... 1.8 2.2 ... 1.3 ... .9 ... 7.8 ... ... ... .5 ... 6.3 ... ... 3.7

NAME Barc iPathS&P VIX ST Direxion FinBear 3x Direxion FinBull 3x Direxion SCapBear 3x FaithSh Baptist Val FaithSh Catholic Val FaithSh ChristianVal FaithSh Lutheran Val FaithSh MethodistVal iShare Japan iShs FTSEChina25 iShs Emerg Mkts iShares EAFE iShares Rus 2000 OOK Inc PowerShs QQQ Trust ProSh UltraSht S&P SPDR Gold Trust SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr SPDR Financial

TKR VXX FAZ FAS TZA FZB FCV FOC FKL FMV EWJ FXI EEM EFA IWM OOK QQQQ SDS GLD SPY XLF

LAST 25.63 12.59 30.95 6.20 27.17 27.55 27.47 26.45 26.93 9.99 39.62 40.20 51.55 69.49 33.60 47.72 31.04 120.66 115.83 15.87

%YTD -24.8 -35.2 +25.3 -37.1 +7.6 +5.1 +4.8 +3.1 +3.3 +2.6 -6.2 -3.1 -6.7 +11.3 +4.6 +4.3 -11.4 +12.4 +3.9 +10.2

6JG1MNCJQOCPÂśU6QR /WVWCN(WPFU FUND NAV American Funds BalA m 16.70 BondA m 12.04 CapIncBuA m 46.63 CpWldGrIA m 32.29 EurPacGrA m 36.19 FnInvA m 33.09 GrthAmA m 27.76 IncAmerA m 15.53 InvCoAmA m 26.15 NewPerspA m 25.07 WAMutInvA m 25.22 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 30.78 Stock 99.49 Fidelity Contra 59.89 DivrIntl d 26.37 GrowCo 72.07 LowPriStk d 34.30 Magellan 66.29 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m 2.07 PIMCO TotRetA m 11.10 TotRetAdm b 11.10 TotRetIs 11.10 Vanguard 500Adml 106.66 500Inv 106.65 InstIdxI 105.95 InstPlus 105.96 TotIntl d 13.59 TotStIAdm 28.81 TotStIdx 28.80 Welltn 29.38

CH.

PERCENT RETURN 4WK. 12MO. 3YR. 5YR.

-.03 ... -.25 -.32 -.46 -.18 -.14 -.06 -.10 -.18 -.06

-1.8 +1.1 -4.0 -6.7 -8.1 -4.7 -4.4 -2.9 -3.9 -6.3 -2.6

+22.3 +14.7 +18.3 +21.8 +22.0 +26.3 +24.7 +25.7 +25.3 +26.4 +26.1

-1.8 +1.8 -4.9 -5.7 -5.1 -5.3 -4.8 -4.3 -5.8 -3.5 -7.4

+3.1 +3.1 +3.7 +5.4 +6.8 +4.8 +3.7 +3.4 +2.4 +6.1 +1.2

-.40 -.17

-8.4 +28.5 -4.6 +30.7

-8.2 -10.2

+4.9 +0.3

-.11 -.32 +.06 +.01 -.16

-2.9 -8.5 -4.0 -3.7 -3.9

+29.7 +19.3 +34.1 +37.4 +27.9

-2.1 -10.4 -0.6 -3.1 -7.0

+5.6 +2.8 +6.4 +5.5 +0.7

...

-1.8 +29.0

-1.9

+4.9

... ... ...

+0.8 +12.5 +9.5 +0.9 +12.7 +9.7 +0.9 +13.0 +10.0

+6.9 +7.1 +7.4

-3.1 -3.1 -3.1 -3.1 -9.3 -3.0 -3.0 -2.4

+1.9 +1.8 +1.9 +1.9 +4.4 +2.7 +2.6 +5.4

-.35 -.34 -.34 -.34 -.17 -.05 -.05 -.06

+29.9 +29.7 +29.9 +29.9 +22.2 +32.0 +31.9 +22.1

-6.3 -6.4 -6.3 -6.3 -8.8 -5.6 -5.7 -0.2

/WVWCN(WPF%CVGIQTKGU PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR

3.37 2.96 3.65 10.31 2.62 5.92

2.64 2.61 2.58

20.62 22.67 22.83

-1.65 -3.66 -3.96

3.20 3.09 2.65

-1.70 -7.07 0.24 -5.70 -3.96 -0.95 -5.85 0.40 -0.82

37.77 24.72 33.03 20.18 24.45 34.42 19.10 20.34 26.42

-1.90 -12.03 -9.38 -10.47 -8.85 -9.68 -10.95 -2.12 -7.24

12.59 3.06 4.36 2.78 3.96 5.71 2.22 4.62 3.30

5YR

BALANCED

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

LAST

XetaTech

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 26.08 14.14 10.50 3.79 28.73 23.19 25.18 13.79 4.95 2.01 52.53 34.77 36.86 24.75 3.70 1.74 75.07 40.28 111.00 65.02 3.08 1.50 19.86 10.57 76.00 38.92 11.34 5.57 70.52 25.06 59.45 42.54 60.53 38.62 17.52 10.57 49.99 37.75 25.40 9.86 76.54 58.46 34.55 9.52 63.47 47.09 18.84 9.98 38.24 17.31 35.22 18.11 37.03 22.27 25.14 9.11 48.20 31.59 66.20 53.86 83.00 59.16 87.19 67.39 28.54 18.02 47.75 26.00 45.60 27.56 81.50 50.86 50.09 33.61 90.99 58.67 6.54 3.33 28.49 13.89 60.06 40.01 31.60 21.29 22.82 12.29 21.58 6.78 125.42 49.80 13.97 6.14 5.94 2.78 27.59 12.52 28.71 10.24 32.00 19.51 90.52 55.23 47.48 36.34 70.89 46.41 34.13 26.49 56.27 47.35 49.19 32.87 11.72 5.86

NAME AAR AMR AT&T Inc AdmRsc AlcatelLuc AMovilL AEP AmShrd Anadarko Apache Arbinet BkofAm Boeing Celestic g Cimarex CocaCl ConocPhil Dell Inc EngyTsfr EthanAl ExxonMbl GaylrdEnt Genzyme Goodyear Group1 Hallibrtn HomeDp IntlBcsh JPMorgCh JohnJn LabCp LockhdM Lowes MetLife NobleCorp NobleEn OReillyA h OcciPet ParkDrl Petrohawk PlainsAA RepubSvc Rollins SeagateT SearsHldgs SwstAirl SprintNex Starbucks Terex TetraTc 3M Co UMB Fn UPS B VerizonCm WalMart XTO Engy Xerox VALUE

0.34 -2.65 -1.53 -3.62 -9.49 -0.65

Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

NAME

YTD %CH. DIV YLD

CH.

-33.7

...

...

-5.9 0.28

1.1

+26.2

...

...

...

5VQEMU QH .QECN +PVGTGUV

CH. +.55 +.11 -.33 -.14 ... +.05 -.05 ... ... -.23 -.73 -.74 -.85 +.46 +1.94 -.05 +.17 +3.09 -.33 -.06

18.81 22.47 26.23 22.49 67.94 39.70

$50.00

CH.

52-WEEK HI LO

2.85 2.85 1.02 -2.51 16.97 1.91

PE: 13.9 Yield: ... AP

CLOSE

YTD %CH. DIV YLD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

M

OPEN

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 10 76.47 76.37 Jul 10 80.29 80.22

1MNCJQOC+PE5VQEMU 52-WEEK HI LO

PE: ... Yield: ...

M A 52-week range

Vol.: 15.4m (1.2x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $35.42 b

.15 .22 .41 .83 2.25

YTD

40 F

.15 .22 .41 .83 2.24

SPECIALTY FUNDS

Close: $39.26 0.88 or 2.3% The biotechnology company’s board approved a three-year, $5 billion stock buyback plan, which would boost per-share earnings. $50

EXP.

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 1-year T-note 2-year T-note 5-year T-note

$8.51

GILD

FuturesTrading

1YR AGO

(QTGKIP'ZEJCPIG

M

45

250

15

Close: $3.11 0.11 or 3.7% Golden Gate Capital extended $150 million to the struggling jeweler in exchange for a potential big stake and two seats on its board. $4 3

30

75

NET CHG

PVS

'ZEJCPIG6TCFGF(WPFU

Russell 2000

Year-to-date percent change

YEST

Barclays LongT-BdIdx 4.15 Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.10 Barclays USAggregate 3.32 PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 8.74 RATE FUNDS Moodys AAA Corp Idx 5.07 .13 YEST 3.25 Barclays US Corp 4.39 .13 6 MO AGO 3.25 KBW Bank 55.08 .13 1 YR AGO 3.25

5

10

.

EURO 1.2694

+.02

Retailers take the focus today, as Macy's and Whole Foods report their latest earnings numbers. Both companies should offer some noteworthy information for investors.

1,140

70

-

GASOLINE $2.20

5B

.

Retail results

1,240

1,050

+.01

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

Today

DOW 10,748.26

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

LAST 23.39 6.94 25.64 16.86 2.65 50.00 33.15 2.66 55.84 96.66 2.01 17.16 71.42 9.46 68.16 53.61 57.28 15.48 46.87 20.20 64.46 27.27 52.05 12.70 30.02 28.34 35.63 22.16 41.55 64.67 76.94 83.10 27.10 43.23 36.35 68.55 48.23 83.03 4.97 19.56 56.28 29.99 22.28 18.40 113.22 12.86 4.13 26.70 24.84 23.29 85.04 42.61 66.99 28.40 52.46 45.44 10.10 BLEND

CH. -.04 -.03 -.03 -.48 +.04 -.48 +.01 -.07 -1.79 -1.61 +.04 -.14 +.42 -.33 +1.06 -.43 +.61 +.10 -.01 -.30 -.33 -.32 +.16 -.13 +.21 +.75 +.34 +.40 -.40 -.08 +.08 -.52 +.40 -.88 -.43 -4.52 -.14 -1.13 +.14 -.29 +.90 -.01 +.21 -.08 +3.03 -.10 +.10 -.34 -.17 -.37 -.93 +.57 -.49 -.21 -.12 -.33 -.04

YTD %Ch. +1.8 -10.2 -8.5 -23.5 -20.2 +6.4 -4.7 -9.8 -10.5 -6.3 -19.3 +13.9 +31.9 +0.2 +28.7 -5.9 +12.2 +7.8 +4.2 +50.5 -5.5 +38.1 +6.2 -9.9 +5.9 -5.8 +23.2 +17.2 -0.2 +0.4 +2.8 +10.3 +15.9 +22.3 -10.7 -3.7 +26.5 +2.1 +0.4 -18.5 +6.5 +5.9 +15.6 +1.2 +35.7 +12.5 +12.8 +15.8 +25.4 -14.3 +2.9 +8.3 +16.8 -14.3 -1.9 -2.3 +19.4

GROWTH

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

4.6 19.9 -11.1 0.0

LV

4.8 24.6 -3.4 3.2

LB

0.9 31.3 -3.5 2.0

LG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

10.7 39.6 -5.7 3.8

MV

9.4 39.2 -4.7 4.5

MB

8.3 36.7 -3.7 5.6

MG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

13.2 48.2 -1.5 6.1

SV

12.2 42.2 -3.7 5.5

SB

7.7 32.6 -3.7 4.1

SG

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni National Short (MS)

1SVI1YXYEP*YRHWPMWXIHEX2I[W3/GSQ

3.56 2.91 4.59 4.17 1.99 2.87 0.82

14.04 5.92 20.83 30.70 7.29 10.15 3.58

4.97 5.69 -0.95 2.99 4.06 2.91 3.23

4.46 4.65 1.70 5.77 3.67 3.23 2.96


.

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEATHER RELIABLE products , RELIABLE service, RELIABLE installation

69

Air Conditioning Tune-up & Safety Inspection ...$

T-Storms

95

Billings 53/36

= PEACE OF MIND

Guymon

82/44

Altus

72/37

Okla. City

Enid Lawton

Some sun, 81

Overcast, 77

Some sun, 83

Some sun, 38 Cloudy, 56

Showers

-10s -0s

Cloudy, 85 P/sunny, 84

T-storm, 58

Overcast, 57

Cloudy, 61 Forecasts and graphics provided by Accu Weather.com ©2010

Houston 89/75

Cloudy, 81

A t-storm, 84

Cloudy, 45

M/cloudy, 41

87/65

Cloudy, 70

T-storm, 66

P/sunny, 68

T-storm, 66

What’s ahead for Oklahoma City Thursday 60/52

Friday 69/60

Saturday 77/63

Sunday 81/61

Winds: N 10-20 mph

Winds: ENE 10-20 mph

Winds: ENE 10-20 mph

Winds: NNW 12-25 mph

Regional forecast

Major lake levels

For the record

Arkansas: Breezy today. A thunderstorm in the north; partly sunny in the south and central parts of the state. Mostly cloudy in the west and east. Texas: Windy today. A strong thunderstorm in the area in the north; not as warm in the panhandle. New Mexico: Windy today. Not as warm in central areas; a shower in the north. Kansas: Rain today. A few thunderstorms, some severe in the east; cooler in the north, southwest and central parts of the state. Missouri: Showers and a heavier thunderstorm today, except a morning thunderstorm in the south; cool in the north. Colorado: Snow today, 1-3 inches in the north and highest elevations; rain in the south, east and central parts. A shower in the west.

As of 7 a.m. yesterday Lake Normal Altus 1,559.0 Arbuckle 872.0 Arcadia 1,006.0 Brok. Bow 599.5 Canton 1,615.4 Copan 710.0 Eufaula 585.0 Ft. Cobb 1,342.0 Ft. Gibson 554.0 Ft. Supply 2,004.0 Foss 1,642.0 Grand 745.0 Hudson 619.0 Hulah 733.0 Kaw 1,009.1 Kerr 460.0 Keystone 723.0 Oologah 638.0 Salt Plains 1,125.0 Skiatook 714.0 Tenkiller 632.0 Texoma 615.0 Thunderbird 1,039.0 Webb. Falls 490.0 Wister 478.0

Yesterday in Oklahoma City:

Yesterday’s pollen Very High High Moderate Low Very Low

Trees Weeds Grasses Mold Mold and pollen counts courtesy of the Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic.

Current 1,549 872.21 1,006 600.10 1,615 710.08 585.05 1,342 552.77 2,004 1,641 742.48 619.74 733.55 1,009 459.48 723.63 637.52 1,126 713.85 632.59 625.92 1,038 490.12 478.22

Total Precipitation

Monday 79/60

Tuesday 81/59

Winds: WNW 20-30 mph

Yesterday in the state:

Winds: ESE 7-14 mph

Yesterday in the world: H Amsterdam 54 Baghdad 109 Calgary 57 Dublin 50 Frankfurt 64 Geneva 62 Hong Kong 85 Kabul 82 London 51 Madrid 63 Manila 97 Mexico City 83 Montreal 61 Moscow 80 New Delhi 109 Paris 48 Rio 79 Riyadh 109 Rome 73 Stockholm 57 Sydney 82 Tokyo 68 Toronto 53 Vancouver 64

H L Prc. 80 48 .00 Midnight 60 Enid 1 a.m. 61 Gage 82 39 .00 2 a.m. 58 Guymon 80 41 .00 3 a.m. 56 Hobart 89 46 .00 4 a.m. 52 McAlester 77 70 .00 5 a.m. 54 Ponca City 76 45 .00 6 a.m. 54 76 62 .05 7 a.m. 58 Tulsa Chickasha 86 50 .00 8 a.m. 61 Durant 84 69 .00 9 a.m. 63 83 42 .00 10 a.m. 64 El Reno 11 a.m. 66 Guthrie 82 49 .00 Noon 69 Idabel 85 69 .00 1 p.m. 73 Miami 78 59 .00 2 p.m. 78 Norman 83 53 .01 3 p.m. 82 OKC 84 50 .00 4 p.m. 82 5 p.m. 83 Shawnee 80 62 .00 6 p.m. 79 Stillwater 81 44 .00 7 p.m. 75 Woodward 77 46 .00 One year ago in Oklahoma City: 64/53 Normal high/low in Oklahoma City: 77/56 Record high/low: 94 in 1923/37 in 1981 National extremes yesterday: Laredo, TX, 103; Bridgeport, CA, 12

Jan. 1 - This date in 2007 ....................... 18.95 Jan. 1 - This date in 2008 ........................ 14.23 Jan. 1 - This date in 2009 ....................... 10.93

Miami 84/74

86/67

P/sunny, 82

6 a.m. tomorrow

Washington 80/58

El Paso 83/54

Ardmore

85/64

New York 55/47

Kansas City 70/50

Atlanta 84/69

McAlester

84/63

Windy, 72

Cloudy, 72

Denver 48/30

Detroit 58/46

Los Angeles 75/57

Idabel

84/56

Ada

88/54 90/60

Cloudy, 63

Tulsa

84/56

Minneapolis 48/40 Chicago 52/48

San Francisco 64/49

A strong afternoon or evening thunderstorm will move through central and eastern areas of the state today. Winds: S 20-30 mph.

83/41

ACROSS THE U.S.

Up-to-date video, forecasts, maps, radar and warnings, Seattle 65/48 go to NewsOK.com

721-3740

Woodward

6 p.m. today

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

St Lic #49746

6B

Jan. 1 - This date in 2010 ........................... 9.40 Normal Jan. 1 - This date ........................ 10.47 Oklahoma City annual precip. is ....... 35.85

L 39 81 30 30 48 50 73 48 38 41 78 49 36 53 82 45 65 78 58 36 55 60 37 45

Sky PtCl PtCl PtCl Shwr Cldy Rain PtCl Sun PtCl Cldy Sun PtCl PtCl PtCl PtCl Rain PtCl Sun Sun Sun Sun Rain Rain PtCl

Sun, moon: Sunrise today: 6:28 a.m. Sunset today: 8:25 p.m. Moonrise 5:14 a.m. Moonset 7:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow: 6:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow: 8:26 p.m.

New

First

Full

Last

May 13

May 20

May 27

Jun 4

0s

Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Cheyenne Chicago Cleveland Colo. Springs Columbus, OH Dal-Ft. Worth Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fairbanks Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS Jacksonville Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Mnpls-St. Paul Mobile Nashville New Orleans New York City Omaha Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Providence Raleigh Reno St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sault Ste. Marie Seattle Shreveport Sioux Falls Spokane Tampa-St. Pete Tulsa Washington, DC Wichita

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Yesterday H L Prec. 81 47 89 45 52 41 Tr 78 53 57 40 .07 54 41 Tr 84 57 52 42 69 42 .01 54 40 92 77 55 35 .13 79 66 74 48 .20 40 34 .08 52 44 .94 59 45 .42 51 41 72 45 .89 92 73 52 32 .08 59 48 .19 49 44 1.17 47 39 .16 92 59 58 34 60 29 51 40 Tr 85 72 92 76 78 49 .54 90 68 85 62 Tr 66 49 71 49 Tr 86 67 .05 69 53 78 56 .07 83 62 86 78 Tr 46 42 .99 46 41 .36 87 70 78 52 88 72 58 48 57 49 60 46 .07 78 64 51 42 .45 59 29 61 50 Tr 60 38 68 56 Tr 51 33 Tr 79 53 51 41 .16 91 73 64 56 63 45 56 36 62 46 91 69 49 40 .03 69 38 90 71 76 62 .05 56 46 .11 74 47

Today H L Sky 70 45 Sunny 78 37 Cloudy 55 42 Rain 84 69 PtCldy 59 49 Shwrs 53 36 Cloudy 86 69 PtCldy 48 35 PtCldy 66 43 PtCldy 50 40 Rain 91 75 PtCldy 54 40 Rain 85 65 PtCldy 78 61 T-Storm 40 25 Snow 52 48 Rain 56 48 Cloudy 52 31 Rain 68 58 Rain 90 72 PtCldy 48 30 Snow 54 42 Rain 58 46 Cloudy 53 35 Cloudy 83 54 Sunny 57 40 Cloudy 52 38 Rain 59 35 Cloudy 85 73 Sunny 89 75 PtCldy 70 64 Rain 90 69 PtCldy 87 63 Sunny 70 50 T-Storm 79 55 Sunny 88 68 PtCldy 75 57 Sunny 78 69 T-Storm 88 71 Cloudy 84 74 Sunny 50 43 Cloudy 48 40 Rain 87 68 Sunny 87 71 T-Storm 86 71 PtCldy 55 47 Rain 54 43 Rain 60 46 Shwrs 83 60 Sunny 67 52 Cloudy 56 36 Cloudy 68 49 PtCldy 52 39 Rain 84 65 T-Storm 66 40 Sunny 80 68 T-Storm 58 40 PtCldy 93 74 PtCldy 68 57 Sunny 64 49 Sunny 59 40 PtCldy 65 48 PtCldy 90 69 PtCldy 44 34 Rain 68 44 PtCldy 88 70 Sunny 84 56 T-Storm 80 58 T-Storm 78 47 T-Storm

Tomorrow H L Sky 71 49 Sunny 61 41 Cloudy 56 42 Cloudy 88 68 Sunny 61 52 PtCldy 60 39 Sunny 89 69 Sunny 64 38 Rain 71 45 PtCldy 59 48 PtCldy 90 75 PtCldy 57 52 Rain 87 67 Sunny 87 65 T-Storm 48 33 PtCldy 69 47 Rain 71 58 Rain 46 35 PtCldy 84 63 T-Storm 85 65 T-Storm 49 37 PtCldy 61 43 Cloudy 66 53 Rain 46 35 Rain 82 55 Sunny 55 37 Cloudy 61 48 PtCldy 67 37 Sunny 85 73 Sunny 89 72 PtCldy 79 55 T-Storm 87 65 Sunny 87 63 Sunny 62 47 Rain 82 61 PtCldy 85 66 T-Storm 78 57 PtCldy 85 64 Cloudy 89 69 PtCldy 86 77 Sunny 63 45 Rain 53 42 Rain 86 66 Sunny 87 69 PtCldy 86 69 Sunny 59 53 PtCldy 59 41 Cloudy 64 54 PtCldy 86 66 Sunny 74 62 T-Storm 62 43 PtCldy 77 50 Sunny 59 47 PtCldy 90 67 PtCldy 69 44 PtCldy 77 53 T-Storm 60 41 PtCldy 90 72 PtCldy 69 59 PtCldy 67 51 Sunny 54 40 Rain 72 49 Sunny 86 67 PtCldy 53 40 Cloudy 70 46 Sunny 89 71 Sunny 63 53 T-Storm 62 60 PtCldy 63 46 Cloudy

OIL WORKERS CLAIM COMPANY FORCED THEM TO SIGN PAPERWORK

Statement prompts lawsuits BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI, Fla. — Workers aboard an exploding offshore drilling platform were told to sign statements denying they were hurt or witnessed the blast that rocked the rig, killed 11 and spewed millions of gallons of oil into the ocean, their attorneys said Tuesday. Survivors floated for hours in life boats in the Gulf of Mexico following the disaster on the Deepwater Horizon, and were greeted by company officials onshore asking them to sign statements that they had no “first hand or personal knowledge” of the incident, attorneys said. “These men are told they have to sign these statements or they can’t go

home,” said Tony Buzbee, a Houston-based attorney for 10 Transocean workers. “I think it’s pretty callous, but I’m not surprised by it.” Guy Cantwell, a spokesman for rig owner Transocean Ltd., refused to answer whether Transocean or any company attached to the firm had supplied the statement, claiming it was inappropriate to comment on litigation. “Our focus has been on the crewmembers and their families, working with all parties in the response efforts and conducting a Transocean investigation into the incident,” he said Monday. The men were kept for at least 10 hours at sea, then taken to a hotel on shore in Louisiana to sign the forms and be de-

briefed, according to Buzbee and court documents filed in lawsuits already brought by some Transocean employees. While such statements have no legal force and are a common industry practice, they are often used to attack the credibility of workers who later sue or testify in a lawsuit, he said. “When I signed that I didn’t care what it was. I wanted to sign the papers to do whatever I had to do so me and my wife could leave to go home,” Chris Choy, a 23-year-old surviving worker said in an interview that aired Monday night with PBS’ “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.” “I’d been up for 40 hours and was just going through hell.” Choy said he tried to save Aaron Dale Burkeen

Mortgage: Prices rebound FROM PAGE 1B

John Hausam, president of ERA John Hausam Realtors in Tulsa, said the low rate is likely the result of Oklahoma skipping the last decade’s housing bubble, when prices in many regions skyrocketed, only to plunge. “We’ve never had the strong appreciation,” Hausam said. “We’ve averaged a 3 percent increase each year since 1981 up until the last year or so.” In its latest report, the Greater Tulsa Association of Realtors says the median price of a home was $126,000 in March, up 5 percent from a year earlier. And the median price for a home in Oklahoma City went up $609 in 2009 from the previous year. CoreLogic’s survey said the state with the next lowest rate of negative equity was New York at 7 percent, followed by Montana, Pennsylvania and North Dakota. Nevada had the highest negative equity rate by far at 69.9 percent of all homes. The national rate was even with this time in 2009, said Mark Fleming, chief economist at Santa Ana, Calif.-based CoreLogic. “The two most important triggers of

ALSO ... HIGHEST NEGATIVE EQUITY 1. Nevada .........................69.9 percent 2. Arizona .........................51.2 percent 3. Florida.........................47. 7 percent 4. Michigan .....................38.6 percent 5. California......................34.1 percent SOURCE: CORELOGIC

default, negative equity and unemployment, have stabilized over the last six months,” he said in a written statement. “As house prices grow again and borrowers pay down their mortgage debt, negative equity levels will begin to diminish. The typical underwater borrower is likely to regain their lost equity over the next five to seven years.” The report was based on data from 47 million mortgages representing 85 percent of all home loans. Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming were not included in the survey.

of Mississippi, one of 11 workers missing and presumed dead following the explosion, before being evacuated from the burning rig to a cargo boat where he watched the rig go down in flames. Robert Wine, a BP spokesman, reviewed the statement and said it had “nothing to do with BP.” Rig workers or their families have filed at least several wrongful death or

Boats work with a containment boom Monday on the shoreline of Grand Isle, La. AP PHOTO

personal injury lawsuits against Transocean, rig operator BP PLC and other companies involved in the offshore drilling operation. The explosion and sink-

ing of the Deepwater Horizon has triggered a major environmental disaster because an uncapped well continues to spew at least 210,000 gallons per day into the Gulf.


NBA PLAYOFFS

COMING SUNDAY

Boston takes 3-2 series advantage

Impact of conference expansion

Celtics took the upper hand in the Eastern Conference semifinals with a win over the Cavs.

How the Big Ten’s expansion plans could affect the Big 12 — and Oklahoma and Oklahoma State.

PAGE 3C

SPORTS

C THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

2010 HIGH SCHOOL SPRING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Day of championships Class 2A OCS › Team: Individual: Jack› son Ogle, OCS

Ogle led the Saints to the title with a consistent round of 1under 70.

Five teams and five individuals were crowned champions at the final rounds of the boys state golf tournaments on Tuesday. Here’s a look at this year’s champions:

Class 3A Class 4A Team: Heritage Elk City › › Team: Individual: Zac Hall › Idabel › Individual: Charlie Myers, Saxon, Tulsa Cascia The Elks posted a Hall The Chargers won their second state title in three years.

three-stroke victory to bring home the school’s sixth state boys title.

Class 5A Ardmore › Team: Individual: Taylor › Williams, Chickasha Williams needed four playoff holes to hold off McAlester’s Casey Fernandez.

Class 6A › Team: Edmond North › Individual: Taylor Moore, Edmond Memorial Moore finished his season with three straight tournament victories.

FOR COMPLETE COVERAGE OF THE STATE GOLF TOURNAMENTS, SEE PAGE 4C

From left, Elk City’s Joby Gray, Blake Jordan, Brock Walker and Berek Dyson, celebrate their Class 4A boys state golf championship. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

BASEBALL: FROM THE FIRST TIME JORDAN LOPEZ STEPPED UP TO THE PLATE, HE’S BEEN A STAR FOR THE EDMOND SANTA FE BASEBALL TEAM. SOCCER: FOR THE FOURTH TIME IN THE PROGRAM’S 13-SEASON HISTORY, NORMAN NORTH WILL PLAY FOR THE 6A STATE TITLE. PAGE 3C

INSIDE MLB

GRIFFEY REFUTES NAP REPORT Rex Norris, left, and Victor Hicks. PHOTO BY MICHAEL BANCALE, WACO TRIBUNE

From left; Greg Roberts, Barry Switzer, Billy Sims, Thomas Lott and Daryl Hunt all gathered to celebrate Lott’s induction into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. PHOTO PROVIDED

Seattle Mariners designated hitter Ken Griffey Jr. insists he was available to pinch-hit during a recent game despite reports he was taking a nap. PAGE 5C

Gene Hochevar, left, and Kenny King. PHOTO BY MICHAEL BANCALE, WACO TRIBUNE

ON NEWSOK TRAMEL BLOG

NBA PLAYOFFS HAVE BEEN A DUD

Barry Switzer said one final hello and goodbye to former Sooner Kenny Franklin. Franklin, who was battling cancer, died four days after his coach’s visit.

George Cumby, left, and Elvis Peacock.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Berry Tramel btramel@ opubco.com

Dave Campbell, left, and Barry Switzer

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BANCALE, WACO TRIBUNE

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BANCALE, WACO TRIBUNE

SWITZER TALES Barry Switzer’s reunion of many of his 1975 recruiting class produced tale after tale about the glory days of Switzer’s early years as the Sooner football coach. You can read many of the stories beginning today on Berry Tramel’s blog at blog.newsok.com/berrytramel and Thursday in The Oklahoman.

COMMENTARY

W

ACO, Texas — Thomas Lott walked through the Hilton lobby Saturday night and almost turned down a hallway, away from the surprise of his life. Then he heard a familiar voice. “BOOMER!”

Lott, Switzer’s bandanaed optioneer from 1976-78. “That’s my class. We’ve always been close. Anytime I see the guys, it warms my heart.” No heart was warmed like Switzer’s. His spirit soaring, Switzer sat in that lounge beaming like a grandfather who had all the kids back on the homestead.

said his associates can’t believe it when he tells them he has a weekly conversation with his old coach. “But sometimes,” Hicks said, “you just need somebody to tell you it’s going to be all right.” The old gang doesn’t get together often. Peacock flew in from Miami, Roberts from Tam-

The old gang BARRY SWITZER ASSEMBLES MANY OF HIS VAUNTED 1975 OU FOOTBALL RECRUITING CLASS TO HELP HONOR THOMAS LOTT Yep, Billy Sims was in the lounge. Barry Switzer had convened the old gang, many of his 1975 OU football recruits, to celebrate Lott’s induction into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. George Cumby. Greg Roberts. Kenny King. Daryl Hunt. Victor Hicks. Sims. Plus Elvis Peacock, class of ’74. And OU assistants Rex Norris and Gene Hochevar, and Jakie Sandifer and Spencer Tillman, Sooners of other eras. “Are you kidding me?” said

In what Switzer himself calls the fourth quarter of his life, the old friends, the players who made for so many glorious Saturdays when the world was young, seem more precious than ever. “Nostalgia,” says the softspoken Peacock, the speedy halfback recruited to OU in 1974. “He calls every couple of months to talk about old times.” Victor Hicks, the round tight end who started as a freshman on OU’s 1975 national-title team,

pa. And you know how it is; it’s hard to get everyone together, even with the guys who live close, in DFW or greater Oklahoma City. But as these Sooner icons approach their mid-50s, reunions are more treasured, renewing the ties that bind more important. King, the fullback jet, hasn’t been around so much, though he’s now relocated to Fort Worth. Lott and King hadn’t seen each other in years. King hadn’t seen Roberts, his Outland Trophy-

winning blocker, in 15 years. “It’s nice to see the guys, how they’re doing,” King said. “As we get older, you have to realize it’s important. King was lucky. He played in the NFL with one of the franchises, the Raiders, that most embrace fraternity. When Raider legend Gene Upshaw died in 2008, Raider czar Al Davis told King, “Get back to Oklahoma, embrace the university.” King, standing in the twilight of a spring Texas night, said, “You’re at that age, it’s nice to see the guys alive. No one is invincible. We’re all going to die.” ●●● Not every Switzer reunion is a celebration. Before Lott’s big night, the old Sooners had last assembled on a hot April day in a living room in Houston’s Third Ward. They had come to say hello to Kenny Franklin. Hello and goodbye. You probably don’t remember Franklin, a linebacker in Peacock’s 1974 class. Franklin never played much. But his teammates never forgot him. Hunt, the regal linebacker who also started as a ’75 freshman, recalled Franklin’s smile, “his exuberance of life he lived daily.” Every team has guys like that. SEE TRAMEL, PAGE 6C

Last season, Berry Tramel wrote about how great the NBA playoffs were and what a dud the NCAA Tournament turned out to be. Turnaround is fair play. This season, Tramel writes, the NCAA Tournament was spectacular while the pro playoffs have been boring. We’ve seen three conference semifinal sweeps. Read more of Berry Tramel’s blog at http://blog.newsok.com/berrytramel.

CONTACT US Have questions, concerns or comments? Let us know. The Oklahoman Sports Department P.O. Box 25125 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 (405) 475-3313 NewsOK.com sportsdesk@oklahoman.com Mike Sherman, Sports Editor (405) 475-3164, msherman@opubco.com

Mike Sherman


2C

...

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

TUNING IN

PAGE 2

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 11:05 a.m.

Sacramento at Oklahoma City

KEBC-AM 1340

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

GETTING TO KNOW.... OU NATIONAL CHAMPION TRACK STAR RONNIE ASH

NHL

Florida at Chicago Cubs Philadelphia at Colorado N.Y. Yankees at Detroit Oakland at Texas Houston at St. Louis

6 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

WGN (Cox 19) MLBN (Cox 264) ESPN (Cox 29) FSOK (Cox 37), KEBC-AM 1340 Cox 3, FSPLUS (Cox 267)

Montreal at Pittsburgh Boston at Philadelphia

WOMEN’S BOWLING 7 p.m.

US Open

VS (Cox 251) VS (Cox 251) joined in progress

ESPN2 (Cox 28)

RATINGS WATCH NBC’s final-round coverage of The Players Championship topped the week. Sports events May 4-10 1. The Players Championship fourth round, PGA Tour, Sunday, KFOR-4, 5.1. 2. Southern 500, NASCAR Sprint Cup, Saturday, KOKH-25, 5.0. 3. L.A. Lakers at Utah, NBA playoffs, Saturday, KOCO-5, 3.7. 4. Cleveland at Boston, NBA playoffs, Sunday, KOCO-5, 3.4. 5. Phoenix at San Antonio, NBA playoffs, Friday, ESPN, 3.2.

› › › › ›

OKLAHOMA SCENE OU’s Ronnie Ash, right, won the 60-meter hurdles at the NCAA Indoor Track Championships in 2010. PHOTO PROVIDED BY ZAC LEHR

Ash wants to do social work Ronnie Ash won the 2009 NCAA championship in the 60-meter and 100meter hurdles at BethuneCookman. He transferred to Oklahoma and was an indoor All-American in the 60-meter hurdles, and has

already broken the school records for both of his events. Ash told The Oklahoman a few things people may not know about him.

› “My major is sociology,

and I want to go into social work to help children in need.” “I come from a family of women. I have three sisters.” “As a child, I used to run around and flip around.

› ›

It was somewhat gymnastics, but I was never in an institution or anything like that. I just did it on my own with my friends; I was a little daredevil.” BY JASON KERSEY

Bringing home the goods

Sparky McEwen said. “We feel we’ve cured the problem that existed there.” Grady’s favorite target against the BattleWings was Anthony Hines. They connected for 137 yards and four touchdowns. “We’ve always had chemistry, but we didn’t have the time,” Hines said. “We didn’t have the line before like we did (Saturday).”

Yard Dawgz quarterback Tommy Grady was named the offensive player of the week by the Arena Football League on Tuesday. In OKC’s 88-79 win over Bossier-Shreveport Saturday night, Grady threw for 430 yards and 10 touchdowns. “It’s more of a team award than a self one,” Grady said. “I can’t throw the ball if I don’t have protection, and the receivers were doing a great job getting open.” The league also recognized Timon Marshall’s game-winning run-back as the highlight of the week. Down four points with 16 seconds left, Marshall took a missed field goal the length of the field to secure the win for the Yard Dawgz.

The biggest weakness of the Yard Dawgz’s offense has been the line because of injuries and the loss of Kelly Butler to the CFL. To address the problem, the team moved defensive lineman Mondre Dickerson

IT AIN’T OVER TIL IT’S OVER

Yard Dawgz quarterback Tommy Grady earned offensive player of the week honors. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

to offense and signed three-time Arena Bowl champ Dan Loney at center. Those two, with Howard Duncan, Kevin Myers

and Chad Cook, gave Grady the best protection he’s had all year. “Those guys protected Tommy very well,” coach

Even as fans started filtering out of the Cox Center with less than a minute left, McEwen knew the game wasn’t over yet. “For the most part, the crowd that is familiar with arena football knows that you don’t leave until there’s four zeroes on the clock because anything can happen,” McEwen said. Hines echoed McEwen’s sentiment. “That’s arena football,” Hines said. “You never know. I’ve seen games where you can score 21 points in 14 seconds. But it’s no hard feelings toward (fans who left early). They just missed a great ending.” BY JAMES CORLEY, SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

BEST OF NEWSOK

OU blog: Power Lunch recap OU beat writer Jake Trotter participated in the Power Lunch chat on Tuesday. Here’s a look at a few of Jake’s responses to questions from readers: Q: With this much smoke there has to be some fire...Do you think MU and NU will go to the Big 10? Jake Trotter: I think both would accept invitations if invited. That’s the key. The Big Ten holds all the cards. Depends if the conference wants to expand to 16 or 12. If it’s 16, then Missouri and Nebraska figure to get invites. Q: How good is Drew Allen? Will he ever start? Jake Trotter: He had a very good spring, in my opinion. I think he has a chance to start, but ever beating out Landry is going to be tough. Q: How good will Florida State be? Jake Trotter: Florida State is going to be better than it’s been. Their quarterback, Christian Ponder, has the chance to be among the best in the country. They’ve also assembled an impressive coaching staff with Jimbo Fisher and Mark Stoops as defensive coordinator. It’s not going to be a cakewalk for the Sooners. The rest of Jake’s Power Lunch chat can be found on his blog at blog.newsok.com/ou.

POWER LUCH SCHEDULE Join writers from The Oklahoman every weekday at 11 a.m. in the Power Lunch chat at NewsOK.com/sports. Here’s a look at the schedule for the rest of this week. Today: Columnist Berry Tramel Thursday: OSU beat writer Brandon Chatmon Friday: Columnist John Rohde

› › ›

Oklahoma State won its third game against a ranked opponent this season, 12-5 over No. 21 Rice on Tuesday at Allie P. Reynolds Stadium in Stillwater. The Cowboys (28-20) got home runs from Luis Uribe, Mark Ginther and Davis Duren. The trio drove in 11 runs. OSU’s previous two wins against ranked teams came against Oklahoma. Freshman Ian McCarthy picked up the win in relief of starter Thomas Keeling. McCarthy worked 4.2 innings and improved to 2-1. OSU opens a three-game home series against Texas A&M at 6:30 p.m. Friday.

LITTLE ALL-CITY HOOP GAMES SET The Little All-City girls and boys basketball games will be May 24 at Oklahoma Christian. The girls game at 6:30 p.m. will be followed by the boys game.

HONORS AND AWARDS

YARD DAWGZ NOTEBOOK

NEW AND IMPROVED FRONT LINE

OSU powers past Rice

OSU blog: Cowboys name Sidorakis captain Actually heard a rumor a few weeks back that Nick Sidorakis was leaving the OSU basketball program. Sounded off. Still, I sniffed around, and as instincts suggested, it was bad information. Way bad, turns out. Tuesday, Cowboys coach Travis Ford named Sidorakis a team captain for next season. “Nick has done an outstanding job since the end of this past season in stepping up as a team leader. He has done a terrific job of leading the team both vocally and in leading by his actions. he has been handed this honor deservedly.” The Pokes need a leader, after losing James Anderson and Obi Muonelo. Anderson was the silent type who got guys to respond with his work ethic and quest for excellence. Muonelo was never afraid to get in a guy’s grill when necessary. That tandem carried enough clout to command respect, and got it. Now, OSU is in transition, with its roster and its leadership. And, frankly, Marshall Moses and Matt Pilgrim, for now, must prove they can lead themselves, let alone a team. Sidorakis is a natural. He’s smart. Works hard. A senior. Has an investment, as an Oklahoma kid, in being a Cowboy. It means something to him and he’ll press his teammates to invest as well. Read more on the OSU blog at blog.newsok.com/osu BY JOHN HELSLEY

Oklahoma’s Brittany Borman was named the Big 12’s athlete of the week for the third time this season. Borman broke the meet record in the discus throw at the Sooner Open over the weekend.

MORNING ROUNDUP

Big Ten quashes expansion rumors Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany e-mailed conference officials Tuesday to stamp out a rumor that four schools had already been offered a chance to join the league. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said Delany quashed a report that the Big Ten had offered expansion spots to Missouri, Nebraska, Notre Dame and Rutgers. The Big Ten holds annual meetings next week in Chicago involving athletic officials, faculty representatives and football and men’s and women’s basketball coaches. But Smith said nothing would be decided about expansion.

TRIO HIGHLIGHT HALL SELECTIONS Willie Jeffries, the first black coach of a Division I school, and former Super Bowl standouts Troy Brown and Emerson Boozer head the divisional class selected for the College Football Hall of Fame. Jeffries was hired by Wichita State in 1979. Wichita State won only one game in his first season, but improved to 8-3 by his third year. He had a career record of 179-132-6. Brown, who won three Super Bowls with New England, was a member of Marshall’s 1992 Division I-AA championship team. Boozer, who helped the Jets beat the 18-pointfavorite Colts in Super Bowl III, was a four-year letterman at Maryland Eastern Shore.

SAINTS’ MEACHEM RECOVERING Saints coach Sean Payton said wide receiver Robert Meachem is recovering from recent surgery on his toe and is expected to be fine when training camp opens in late July. Payton said the injury occurred last season and continued to bother the former Tulsa Washington star during recent workouts. Meachem led the Saints with 10 TDs last season.

HORNETS TALK TO FRANK, WILLIAMS The New Orleans Hornets continue to interview candidates for their vacant coaching job; former NBA head coach Lawrence Frank and current Portland assistant Monty Williams are the latest. The Hornets also have met with former Dallas coach Avery Johnson, current Mavericks assistant Dwane Casey, former NBA coach Mike Fratello, former NBA player Mark Jackson and current Boston assistant Tom Thibodeau.

NASCAR OPENS HALL OF FAME The NASCAR Hall of Fame kicked off its opening day with a star-studded ceremony. North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue joined Charlotte-area dignitaries and representatives of NASCAR past and present on a stage outside the Hall for the hour-long ceremony. The city spent $195 million on the project and is touting it as the biggest and most technologically advanced Hall of Fame in professional sports. The inaugural class will be inducted May 23. FROM WIRE REPORTS

SETTING IT STRAIGHT

The Weatherford boys 3,200-meter relay team finished in third place with a time of 8:27.01 at the Class 4A state track and field meet in Ardmore last Saturday. The result was incorrect in Sunday’s editions of The Oklahoman. Duncan’s girls golf team won a fourth consecutive state championship when it won the Class 5A title on May 6 at SilverHorn Golf Course. The number of Duncan’s consecutive titles was incorrect in Friday’s editions of The Oklahoman.


SPORTS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

3C

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Lopez has plenty of clout BY ROBERT PRZYBYLO Staff Writer bprzybylo@opubco.com

ON PAGE 6C See the high school baseball state tournament pairings in Scoreboard.

EDMOND — From the first

time Jordan Lopez stepped up to the plate, he’s been a star for the Edmond Santa Fe baseball team. Coach Lonny Cobble took some heat three years ago for starting a freshman on a program that is loaded from top to bottom on a yearly basis and filled with talented upperclassmen. But when Lopez hit a home run his first time up, he silenced the critics — and saved his coach. “He really got me off the hook with that one,” Cobble said. “He took the pressure off himself as well.” Now a senior and one of the leaders of the team, not much has changed for Lopez. He’s still hitting home runs and making Cobble look good as well as playing solid defense in the outfield. “He’s really down to earth, and that’s helped the way he’s approached the game,” Cobble said. “And he’s a kid that just works so hard — nobody will work harder than

Senior Jordan Lopez and Edmond Santa Fe are hoping to win their first state baseball championship. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

him.” There isn’t much Lopez can’t do on a baseball field, but Lopez and the Wolves are looking to do something they haven’t done: win a state championship. The Wolves are no strangers to the final weekend of the baseball season as this is their eighth consecutive state tournament appearance. But Santa Fe has been denied every time. It’s not just Santa Fe, but every

BASEBALL PLAYERS TO WATCH has also been a solid deCLASS 6A

› Archie Bradley, Broken Arrow: The Tigers’

junior has a 1.31 ERA, leading the Tigers’ deep pitching staff. Dylan Bundy, Owasso: As expected, Bundy has been a force since coming over from Sperry, hitting .466 with 46 RBIs and going 9-1 with a 1.34 ERA. Casey Coyle, Putnam North: Coyle, an OU signee, has not only been the Panthers’ top hitter but

fensive catcher after moving there permanently this year. Drew Dahlberg, Edmond Memorial: After dropping from leadoff to No. 2 in the order, Dahlberg has been on a tear that carried the Bulldogs to the state tournament. Caleb Hallman, Edmond Santa Fe: On a team loaded with talent, it was Hallman’s performance at regionals that carried the Wolves. Ryan Wilson, Owas-

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west-side team has taken its lumps. Since baseball added a Class 6A championship in 1996, it has been won by an east-side team every year. Owasso has won it eight times, Jenks three times, Tulsa Union twice and Tahlequah once. And if the Wolves want to make history, they might have to go through the Rams, the three-time defending champions. This year’s Santa Fe so: Wilson is sometimes overlooked but powered the Rams in regionals, going 7 for 11 with 8 runs, 10 RBIs and 4 home runs.

CLASS 5A

› Cale Coshow, Deer Creek: Coshow, an OU

signee, is a threat to go deep on every at bat. Colin Hightower, Chickasha: Hightower was a huge part of Chickasha’s 5A runner-up team a season ago as a sophomore and his arm helped the Chicks stay afloat early in the season.

team has the tools to end the east-side dominance. The Wolves have been ranked No. 2 for most of the year and are 34-3. But it’s something else, Lopez said, that sets it apart. “This team gets along better than some of the other teams I’ve been on. We have a real good chemistry,” Lopez said. The Wolves surprised people last year in what was supposed to be a rebuilding year. And with a bulk of last year’s team back, the confidence is high. Lopez signed with Texas Tech in the fall, and it allowed him to fully concentrate on his senior year and going out in style. “This year is going to be different,” Lopez said. “This is my final chance — the seniors’ final chance. We want to leave behind a legacy.”

› Axel Johnson, Tulsa Kelley: The left-handed

pitcher/outfielder has fueled the Comets all year and they’ll need it going into today’s game with Carl Albert. Jose Olazagasti, Collinsville: The shortstop is hitting .523 with 7 home runs, 45 RBIs and 50 runs scored for the Cardinals. J.T. Realmuto, Carl Albert: Realmuto, an OSU signee, leads the way for Carl Albert’s powerful offense, with 27 home runs.

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BY RYAN ABER

T-Wolves top Tulsa Union BY JUSTIN HARPER Staff Writer jharper@opubco.com

NORMAN — Individually, Will Smith and JT Harrison have both entered the realm of the top players in Class 6A boys soccer by way of their play throughout this season. As a tandem, though, the Norman North duo hasn’t had an equal this postseason. For the second straight game, Smith buried the game-winning goal off a feed from Harrison. And for the second straight game, the T-Wolves knocked off a state finalworthy foe 1-0. Given that, for the second time in three seasons and the fourth time in the program’s 13-season history, Norman North will play for the 6A state title. The T-Wolves toppled No. 2 Tulsa Union Tuesday by the lone goal after Smith notched his 6Abest 23rd goal just 15 minutes into the match. Last Friday, Smith hit the game-winner against No. 1 Putnam City North (which was the top-ranked team

Norman North’s Will Smith, right, scores the game’s lone goal in his team’s 1-0 win over Tulsa Union on Tuesday. Norman North will play for the Class 6A state championship. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

in the country earlier this season), just over two minutes into the match. Both times the Norman North defense made the early tally hold up. The reward is the chance to bag the school’s third boys soccer crown (2000 and 2003, previously) Saturday against Jenks at Tulsa University. Jenks spoiled what would have been an allNorman championship game by nudging Norman 3-2 in a shootout in the other 6A semifinal. As for No. 4 Norman North (14-3), the T-Wolves like their chances against

anyone after taking care of the top two ranked teams in 6A in a matter of five days. Then, of course, there’s the way Smith and Harrison (both juniors) have been connecting on clutch goals in the biggest matches of the season. “I’d say we have a good connection, a good feel for what each other is going to do,” said Harrison. “Usually, when I have the ball and look up, he’s looking right at me. And when I look up, I’m usually looking for him.” Smith and Harrison have known each other since they were 7, but

didn’t play on the same team until their freshman season in high school, when North made it to the state final. “This time feels better than when we were freshmen,” said Harrison. “We were just there to help out the older players then. This year, we’re all a lot bigger part of it.” First-year North coach Geo Claros, who won a state title with Norman as a player in 1997, the final season before Norman North opened, said Smith and Harrison have built a lot of trust between them and have delivered when it mattered most. “They definitely have a bond between them even off the field,” said Claros. “To win in the playoffs you have to have clutch players in key situations, and this team has had that.” Smith has piled up a lot of goals all season, but he recognizes the importance of the last two. “It’s always good to score goals,” he said. “But goals during the season are a lot different than goals in the playoffs.”

McGuinness moved on to the Class 5A girls soccer state final with a 2-1 victory over Tulsa Washington Tuesday. Rachel Tonseth and Alexa Gonce each scored for the Irish and goalkeeper Elyse Hight had five saves in the semifinal victory. The score was even at 1-1 at the break before Gonce netted her 27th goal of the season. McGuinness moved to 15-2 with the victory.

CHARGERS OUSTED The Heritage Hall girls soccer team could never get it going against topranked Verdigris on Tuesday night.

ON PAGE 6C See the high school soccer playoff scores in Scoreboard. And once the Cardinals found their groove, there was no stopping them in a 4-0 victory in a Class 4A semifinal matchup at Heritage Hall. Verdigris controlled much of the action in the first half but couldn’t dent the scoreboard. However, the Cardinals scored three in the first 15 minutes of the second half to take control. “We just had to stay focused and play our game,” said junior Emily Hahn, who scored the first goal. “In the second half, we played the way we

Celts rip Cavs, lead series 3-2 BY TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND — The Bos-

ton Celtics pushed Cleveland dangerously close to an early start to the Summer of LeBron. Ray Allen scored 25 points, Rajon Rondo scored all of his 16 in the second half and the Celtics, once thought too old to challenge for another title, beat LeBron James and the Cavs 120-88 in Game 5 on Tuesday night. Boston is one win from knocking the NBA’s top team from the playoffs. Paul Pierce added 21 and Kevin Garnett 18 for the Celtics, who handed the Cavs their worst home playoff loss in history and can end Cleveland’s season Thursday night in Game 6. “We cannot come back here,” Garnett said. “We have to think this is our Game 7 coming up, and we cannot afford to have the best team in the league have a Game 7 on their floor. Just not possible.” James, the league’s twotime MVP on the verge of an expected trip into free agency on July 1, had an atrocious game. He scored 15 points on 3-of-14 shooting, a startling outing for the 25-year-old who has been playing with a sprained elbow. Because of James’ uncertain future, Game 5 may have been his last at home for Cleveland, and it has set up Game 6 as the most important in franchise history: Win and force Game 7 on Sunday in Cleveland; lose and maybe watch James, the local kid trying to deliver this city its first pro championship since 1964, leave for good. Rondo, coming off a 29point, 18-rebound, 13-assist performance in Game 4, was held without a point in the first half as the

have the whole year and were aggressive.” The second-ranked Chargers end the year at 12-3. Verdigris advances into the 4A finals Saturday night.

EDMOND NORTH GIRLS WIN, MUSTANG FALLS In the Class 6A girls semifinals, Edmond North returned to the state final for the fourth time in the past five years with a win over Broken Arrow. Tulsa Union grabbed the other spot in the cham-

pionship game with a victory over Mustang. Edmond North, ranked second in 6A, has just one loss on the season. Meanwhile, Union, ranked fifth, is 10-6.

JENKS EDGES NORMAN After a 2-2 deadlock that lasted through a pair of overtimes, Jenks topped Norman in a shootout to advance to Saturday’s 6A boys championship game against Norman North. Norman, which started the season 2-5, won eight straight games before falling to the No. 6 Trojans Tuesday. BY JUSTIN HARPER AND ROBERT PRZYBYLO

CELTICS 120, CAVALIERS 88 BOSTON Pierce ...... Garnett ... Perkins.... Rondo...... RAllen ..... Wallace ... TAllen...... Davis ....... Robinson. Wllms ..... Finley ...... Daniels....

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

41:55 32:16 24:16 37:46 38:05 13:20 20:34 20:38 2:54 4:22 1:05 2:50

9-21 2-3 1-11 7 8-14 2-2 0-6 1 2-4 6-9 2-7 1 7-12 1-3 0-2 7 8-13 3-3 1-3 4 0-1 0-0 0-3 0 2-4 2-2 2-3 2 4-7 7-10 3-4 1 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 2-2 1-2 0-0 0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 2-2 0-0 0-1 1

3 2 5 4 2 5 2 4 0 1 0 0

21 18 10 16 25 0 6 15 0 5 0 4

Totals ...... 240:01 44-80 24-34 9-41 25 28 120

Percentages: FG .550, FT .706. 3-Point Goals: 8-15, .533 (R.Allen 6-9, Rondo 1-1, Pierce 1-3, T.Allen 0-1, Wallace 0-1). Team Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers: 10 (6 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Garnett 2, Perkins 2). Turnovers: 10 (Garnett 3, T.Allen 2, Rondo 2, Perkins, Pierce, Wallace). Steals: 6 (Pierce 2, R.Allen, T.Allen, Davis, Rondo). Technical Fouls: Perkins, 6:10 second; Rondo, 3:40 fourth. Cavalier James ...... Jamison ... O’Neal ...... MWilliams ........ Parker ...... Varejao..... Ilgauskas . West ........ Moon........ Gibson...... Hickson .... Powe ........

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

41:40 3-14 9-12 1-6 7 31:24 4-10 0-0 1-6 1 26:31 7-11 7-10 1-4 2

3 4 3

15 9 21

34:08 39:55 16:50 14:21 9:10 6:49 12:23 4:00 2:50

5 2 4 2 1 1 1 2 2

9 14 5 5 2 4 3 0 1

3-8 5-9 1-3 2-5 1-3 1-1 1-3 0-0 0-1

2-2 2-2 3-3 1-1 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0 1-2

0-1 1-2 2-8 1-3 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0

5 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0

Totals ....... 240:01 28-68 27-34 7-31 20 30

88

Percentages: FG .412, FT .794. 3-Point Goals: 5-15, .333 (Parker 2-5, Gibson 1-2, Jamison 1-2, M.Williams 1-2, James 0-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 17 (24 PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Ilgauskas 4, O’Neal 4, Jamison, Varejao). Turnovers: 17 (James 3, Jamison 3, O’Neal 2, Parker 2, M.Williams 2, Gibson, Ilgauskas, Powe, Varejao, West). Steals: 5 (James, Moon, O’Neal, Varejao, West). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 2:41 first; O’Neal, 6:10 second; M.Williams, 3:40 fourth. Boston ............................ 20 30 30 40 — 120 Cleveland ........................ 23 21 19 25 — 88 A—20,562 (20,562). T—2:47. Officials—Joe Crawford, Marc Davis, Greg Willard.

Cavs concentrated on stopping the point guard from penetrating into the paint. He finally got loose in the third, scoring 12 as the Celts opened a 21point lead. James finally checked out with 3:58 left and the Celtics leading by 27. He shrugged his shoulders and slapped hands with Cleveland’s coaches and teammate Shaquille O’Neal, who had 21 points. “It’s plain and simple,” said O’Neal, who came to Cleveland determined “to win a ring for the King.” “We’ve got to win two in a row. We’ve got to man up. I’ve been in this situation before.”

NBA PLAYOFFS EASTERN CONFERENCE Cleveland vs. Boston

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER ROUNDUP

McGuinness girls advance

Boston’s Paul Pierce goes to the basket as Cleveland’s Zydrunas Ilgauskas defends during the Celtics’ 120-88 win Tuesday. AP PHOTO

Saturday, May 1: Cleveland 101, Boston 93 Monday, May 3: Boston 104, Cleveland 86 Friday, May 7: Cleveland 124, Boston 95 Sunday, May 9: Boston 97, Cleveland 87 Tuesday, May 11: Boston, 120-88, Boston leads series, 3-2 Thursday, May 13: Cleveland at Boston, TBD x-Sunday, May 16: Boston at Cleveland, 2:30 p.m.

Orlando 4, Atlanta 0

Tuesday, May 4: Orlando 114, Atlanta 71 Thursday, May 6: Orlando 112, Atlanta 98 Saturday, May 8: Orlando 105, Atlanta 75 Monday, May 10: Orlando 98-84, Orlando wins series 4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Phoenix 4, San Antonio 0

Monday, May 3: Phoenix 111, San Antonio 102 Wednesday, May 5: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 102 Friday, May 7: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 96 Sunday, May 9: Phoenix 107-101, Phoenix wins series 4-0

L.A. Lakers 4, Utah 0

Sunday, May 2: L.A. Lakers 104, Utah 99 Tuesday, May 4: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 103 Saturday, May 8: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 110 Monday, May 10: L.A. Lakers 111-96, L.A. Lakers win series 4-0 x — if necessary


4C

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SPORTS/HIGH SCHOOL GOLF

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Birdie putt gives Williams 5A crown BY RYAN ABER

where both players looked finished at different points. On the first playoff hole, No. 10, Williams had all but conceded. Williams grabbed the pin and took off his hat after he bogeyed the hole.

But Fernandez’s eightfooter went just left, giving Williams new life. “I thought it was over then,” Williams said. “I was ready to shake his hand and congratulate him. “You’ve got to think he’s going to make that shot.” On the next hole, No. 18, it was Fernandez’s turn to earn another chance. His tee shot wound up in a creek, forcing him to take a drop approximately 279 yards out. Fernandez initially

reached for a hybrid club, electing to lay up. But after studying the shot, he decided to change clubs and attack the pin with a four wood. “I figured I might as well go for it,” Fernandez said. It worked out, as the shot went over a pond to wind up just off the edge of the green by the pin. A chip left Fernandez with a short putt to keep the tournament going as light rain began to fall. “That may be one of the shots of my life,” Fernandez said. “There wasn’t any give-up in either of us.” Williams was just as impressed with the shot. “That’s one of the best shots I’ve ever seen,” Williams said. “I thought I had it won right there, but that was just a brilliant shot — awesome.”

Williams didn’t even expect to be playing in the playoff after finishing his round well in front of the leaders. “I thought Talor Gooch was going to come in with a score,” Williams said. “I wasn’t even keeping an eye on Casey really.” But Carl Albert’s Gooch finished one stroke behind the pair, barely missing out on making it a three-way playoff and after a 15-minute break for the golfers to warm up, the playoff began with a large group of spectators following the pair. “It was exciting to be a part of,” Fernandez said. “It was fun. I wish we could’ve kept it going.” It was the third playoff for Williams, who won the other two playoffs he’s been a part of. This one, though, was the longest.

CLASS 5A BOYS

CLASS 4A BOYS

CLASS 3A BOYS

CLASS 2A BOYS

Myers to sign with OBU

Windy season pays off when it counts

OCS’ Purser shoots ace

Staff Writer raber@opubco.com

MORE ON VARSITY

BROKEN ARROW — Taylor Williams’ heart was racing as he stood over a putt about 10 feet from the hole. But somehow, three holes after he looked finished, the Chickasha golfer calmed himself enough to roll the putt in and the emotions flowed out. Williams pumped his fist and broke into a big grin as the putt gave him the Class 5A individual championship on the fourth hole of a playoff with McAlester’s Casey Fernandez at Emerald Falls Golf Club on Tuesday. “It was awesome,” Williams said. “This is what I live for. To finally get a championship is very special.”

For more stories from the boys state golf tournaments, go to NewsOK.com/Varsity.

Chickasha’s Taylor Williams won the individual Class 5A boys golf state championship on Tuesday in Broken Arrow. PHOTO BY DARYL WILSON, TULSA WORLD

Williams set up his birdie putt with an approach shot from 125 yards out with a pitching wedge that left just the putt and his nerves in between the junior and the title. The playoff was a backand-forth roller coaster

Ardmore rolls to team championship When the second round was washed out Monday at the 5A boys golf championship at Emerald Falls Golf Club, many of Ardmore’s golfers hoped the round would count and be finished so the Tigers could extend their lead. But Ardmore didn’t have any problems winning the team title Tuesday in the shortened tournament, coming out ahead of second-place Carl Albert by 41 strokes, 611-652. Ardmore had just one golfer in the tournament shoot higher than 80.

GOOCH MISSES OUT ON PLAYOFF

Edmond Memorial sophomore Taylor Moore won the individual Class 6A boys golf state championship on Tuesday in Norman. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

CLASS 6A BOYS

Bulldogs’ Moore goes under par for victory Edmond Memorial sophomore Taylor Moore wasn’t sure he had played well enough to win after shooting a 1-under-par 71 in Tuesday’s second round of the Class 6A state golf tournament at Jimmie Austin OU Golf Club. He was glad to find out he was wrong. With a two-round total of 3-under-par 141, Moore won 6A individual medalist honors by three strokes over Edmond North’s Austen Fuller. Moore showed he can handle the pressure of the big stage — in fact, he welcomes it. “I think I’m one of those guys that thrives on it,” he said.

HUSKIES WIN SIXTH STRAIGHT TITLE The Edmond North boys golf team won its sixth straight Class 6A title with a two-round total of 602, edging Norman North by six strokes. State titles might seem routine for the Huskies, but that wasn’t the case. Entering the year without a lot of state tournament experience, coach Jeff Doherty saw lots of work to be done to keep the streak alive. “This is the first time

coming in that I didn’t think we were the most talented team. Early in the season, I thought we were about the fifth-best team, but we were talented enough to make a run,” Doherty said, calling this title one of the most gratifying. With only one senior — Chase Griggs, who battled a back injury much of the season — the Huskies came together over the season’s final weeks.

MOORELAND REACHES TOP FIVE Playing as an individual, Shawnee sophomore Dillion Mooreland was one of the first players to finish the tournament. After shooting his second straight 74, Mooreland’s 36-hole total of 148 made him the leader in the clubhouse — a lead he held for more than two hours. Fifteen groups came in before someone knocked Mooreland out of the top spot. “I thought I had a shot,” Mooreland said. “It was getting windy, and I was just hoping the other guys would come in with worse scores. I finished 14th last year and cried all the way back to Shawnee. “I wanted to win it this year, but I fell short. I’ll just have to fight harder for it next year.” BY SCOTT WRIGHT

CLASS 6A BOYS RESULTS At Jimmie Austin OU Course (Norman) Par 72 Team Scoring 1. Edmond North ........................301-301 — 602 2. Norman North ........................307-301 — 608 3. Edmond Santa Fe ...................305-305 — 610 4. Edmond Memorial ................. 310-301 — 611 5. Bartlesville .............................315-297 — 612 6. Jenks ...................................... 318-295 — 613 7. Broken Arrow .........................313-304 — 617 8. Tulsa Union ............................ 312-314 — 626 9. Putnam North ........................ 321-316 — 637 10. Stillwater ............................... 321-320 — 641 11. Owasso ...................................325-322 — 647 Choctaw ................................. 326-321 — 647 Top Individuals 141 — Taylor Moore, Edmond Memorial, 70-71 144 — Austen Fuller, Edmond North, 71-73 145 — Bryce Barnard, Norman North, 73-72 147 — Brent Williamson, Broken Arrow, 75-72 148 — Dillion Mooreland, Shawnee, 74-74 149 — Colton Staggs, Jenks, 77-72; Brody Moses, Sapulpa, 79-70 150 — Jack Fiscus, Bixby, 75-75; Cody Reed, Edmond Santa Fe, 73-77; Zach Tucker, Putnam North, 76-74 Others Edmond North: Alec Heinen 75-76-151, Caleb Meyers 79-73-152, Chase Griggs 78-79-157 Eli Armstrong 77-81-158 Norman North: Jett Johnson 74-77-151, Drew Wright 80-74-154, Matt Krutz 80-78-158, Alex Newell 80-81-161 Edmond Santa Fe: Matt Helms 77-74-151, Landon Morgan 77-77-154, Max McGreevy 7877-155, Brandon Stewart 78-80-158 Edmond Memorial: Connor Kurtz 81-74-155, Bobby Todd 85- 74-159, Mason Wright 81-82163, Rex Greene 78-88-166

Bartlesville: Brad Hager 78-74-152, Braxton Clopp 79-73-152, Brandon Wong 78-75-153, Clint Jones 81-75-156, Josh Strimple 80-76-156 Jenks: Brandon Jelley 79-72-151, Aaron Davis 81-74-155, Will McDonald 81-77-158, Hunter Miller 82-83-165 Broken Arrow: Tate Williamson 74-78-152, Julian Rom 80-79-159, Sam Greenleaf 84-75-159, Nathan Swisher 88-79-167 Tulsa Union: Garrett Hagood 77-75-152, Bobby Goben 76-79-155, Brodie Hinkle 78-83-161, Ryan Allen 81-81-162, Brady Richardson 89-79168 Putnam North: Tripp Walcher 76-78-154, Sawyer McKaughan 84-83-167, Conrad Walcher 8583-168, Terry Wiles 89-81-170 Stillwater: Tyler Grantham 76-77-153, Taylor Onley 76-79-155, Parker Dolezal 80-77-157, Skyler Patton 89-87-176, Brice Clark 91-93-184 Owasso: Zach Enzbrenner 79-78-157, Austin Clark 80-82-162, Ryan Hunninghake 81-81-162, Brad Kershaw 85-81-166, Cole Morgan 86-85-171 Choctaw: Drew Posada 77-74-151, Luke Fesner 80-82-162, Hunter Eisenhour 83-86-169, Heath Vessels 86-83-169, Taylor Gossett 93-82175 Lawton: Russell Cozad 79-87-166 Lawton Eisenhower: Cullen Stahl 83-82-165, Tyler Jimenez 88-78-166 Moore: Ryan Harris 84-78-162 Muskogee: Stephen Allen 81-76-157 Norman: Kyle Raberding 75-81-156 Sand Springs: Cole Stephenson 90-82-172 Southmoore: Iain Tesney 86-78-164 Westmoore: Garrett Cooley 83-78-161, Cory Montgomery 85-92-177 Yukon: Adam Cooper 79-76-155

Carl Albert’s Talor Gooch finished one stroke off the lead, just missing out on the playoff between McAlester’s Casey Fernandez and Chickasha’s Taylor Williams. Gooch had three double bogeys but shot a 74. “I’m not quite as mad now, but I wasn’t happy right after,” Gooch said after Williams won the playoff on the fourth hole. “Every time I got something going, I’d bogey and drop right back.” Gooch spent Monday night worrying about whether his house in the Midwest City area had been damaged in the storms. “I don’t know yet how bad it is,” he said. Gooch will head to Wichita today for a U.S. Open qualifier. BY RYAN ABER

CLASS 5A BOYS RESULTS At Emerald Falls (Broken Arrow) Par 72 Team Scoring 1. Ardmore ................................... 311-300—611 2. Carl Albert ................................337-315—652 3. Lawton MacArthur .................. 328-325—653 4. Ada ........................................... 345-313—658 5. Deer Creek ................................339-325—664 6. McAlester ................................ 346-326—665 7. El Reno ..................................... 349-326—675 8. Duncan ..................................... 344-337—681 9. Altus .........................................352-339—691 10. Tulsa Kelley ..............................350-345—695 11. Tahlequah .................................352-342—694 12. Grove ........................................ 353-349—702 Top Individuals 148—Casey Fernandez, McAlester 76-72; xTaylor Williams, Chickasha 74-74 149—Talor Gooch, Carl Albert 75-74 150—Wyatt Robson, Ada 79-71 151—Ian Davis, Deer Creek 78-73; Seth Morgan, Ardmore 78-73 152—David McMurry, Ardmore 76-76; Sage Ranalla, Lawton MacArthur 77-75 153—Trey Payne, Ardmore 78-75 156—Tyler Busch, Grove 76-80 157—Cameron Ross, El Reno 81-76 159—J.C. Bowlin, Coweta 75-84 x-Williams won on fourth playoff hole Others Ardmore: Davis Rison 79-76—155, Daniel McMurry 79-81—160 Carl Albert: Blake Cooksey 82-81—163, Jake Dowling 87-91—178, Trent Crabtree 93-80—173, Ryan Trujillo 96-80—176 Lawton MacArthur: Blake Rhodes 80-79— 155, Evan Hixon 84-85—169, Aaron Calhoun 8786—173, Jacob Warner 88-92—180 Ada: Will Robson 87-77—164, Justin Powell 86-81—167, Adam Gourley 93-84—177, Blake Cong 93-89—182 Deer Creek: Daniel Helton 83-85—168, Matt Folsom 88-84—172, Garrett Hermanski 91-83— 174, Colton Conrady 90-86—176, McAlester: Joseph Robinson 83-83—166, Michael Million 93-80—173, Miles Tarron 94-84— 178, Colby Mowat 99-86—185 El Reno: Logan Gray 87-76—163, Collin Listen 84-82—166, Kaleb Vincent 97-98—195, Dylan Wells 104-92—196 Duncan: Ryan Cox 82-84—165, Tanner Harman 84-84—168, Joe Morales 90-83—173, Tyler Morrow 88-87—175, Spencer White 103-91—194 Altus: Thomas Malena 87-78—165, Skylar Shaw 87-83—170, Spencer Prough 85-88—173, Jarrod Wilhite 93-90—183, Victor Martinez 9597—192 Tulsa Kelley: Glenn Mattox 88-82—170, Andrew Alonso 88-85—173, Chris Karlovich 84-91— 175, Jake Mattox 90-88—178, Price Atkins 9490—184 Tahlequah: Travis Tinnin 83-82—165, Blade Girdner 85-82—167, Heath Pennington 93-87— 180, Chase Reed 97-91—188, Ryne Frank 91100—191 Grove: Trae Fairchild 85-83—168, Shelby Morris 94-95—189, Patrick Lippitt 98-91—189, Jared Perryman 107-104—211 Chickasha: Colby Powell 84-86—170, Brady Bellinger 94-88—182 Claremore: T.J. Hammons 94-92—186. Durant: Seth Wheeler 82-80—162, Jackson Stuteville 85-76—161, Cameron Hutchens 9282—174 Guthrie: Brice Betchan 85-81--166, Jack Klein 86-78—164 Noble: Greg Kilmer 109-111—220 Pryor: Bo Gaines 87-83—170, Zac Baumert 9988—187 Skiatook: Cody Rozell 89-87—176 Tulsa Edison: Drew Lucas 100-78—178

Today already was going to be special for Idabel senior Zac Myers, even before he captured the Class 4A boys medalist crown with a 3-under-par 69 on Tuesday. Myers will sign a letter of intent with Oklahoma Baptist today. “I couldn’t be happier,” Myers said after his twostroke victory at the Hefner North Course. “Winning this tournament is definitely a confidence-booster and something I can be proud of.”

SLOW START, FAST FINISH Despite standing 2-over after the first four holes, Myers shaved 11 strokes off Monday’s openinground of 80, which was played in high wind gusts. “I thought it was going to be just like (Monday) when I couldn’t get anything going,” Myers said of the second round. “I think I was pressing really hard because it was my senior year. I think I tried too hard. I didn’t think I had any shot at winning. I definitely didn’t think I was going to shoot 5under (31) on the back nine.”

ALL IN THE FAMILY Piedmont, which placed fourth, has a triple threat in the Cowan family. Junior Austin Cowan finished 15th, freshman Colton Cowan finished 16th and freshman Cameron Cowan shot 82 on Tuesday. BY JOHN ROHDE

CLASS 4A BOYS RESULTS At Lake Hefner North Par 72 Team Scoring 1. Elk City ................................... 316-301 — 617 2. Guymon .................................. 312-308 — 620 3. McGuinness ........................... 324-299 — 623 4. Piedmont ................................323-305 — 628 5. Idabel ......................................334-298 — 632 6. Sallisaw ..................................339-314 — 653 7. Clinton ....................................336-318 — 654 8. Fort Gibson ............................ 335-329 — 664 9. Cushing .................................. 354-327 — 681 10. Blanchard ............................... 357-331 — 688 11. Seminole ................................ 354-344 — 698 12. Muldrow ................................. 363-340 — 703 Top Individuals 149 — Zac Myers, Idabel 80-69 151 — Harrison Shipp, Idabel 79-72; Matt LeGrange, Guymon 75-76; Berek Dyson, Elk City 7774; Caleb Bills, Piedmont 79-72 152 — Sam O’Brien, McGuinness 78-74; Christian Keller, Stilwell 76-76; Kyle Ward, Tuttle 7874 153 — Trey Funkhouser, Guymon 75-78; David Krahl, McGuinness 78-75; Charlie Shields, McGuinness 82-71 Others Guymon: Caleb McMurry 83-74 — 157, Garrett Marlor 79-84 — 163, Dakota Wilson 90-80 — 170 Elk City: Joby Gray 81-73 — 154, Brock Walker 76-78 — 154, Keegan Hall 82-76 — 158, Blake Jordan 83-89 — 172 Piedmont: Austin Cowan 82-73 — 155, Colton Cowan 78-78 — 156, Alex Rice 84-87 — 171, Cameron Cowan 90-82 — 172 McGuinness: Nick O’Hara 86-79 — 165, Tyler Gann 89-83 — 172 Idabel: Bryce Shaw 86-77 — 163, Mason Leffel 89-80 — 169, Ty Capps 98-81 — 179 Fort Gibson: Tyler Carlson 78-79 — 157, Braden Carr 86-83 — 169, Relton Walters 88-82 — 170, Trey Lashley 83-88 — 171, Jake Gandara 9385 — 178 Clinton: Garrett Browning, 82-75 — 157, Jason Franco 84-81 — 165, Logan Oliver 84-82 — 166, Addison Dupree 86-83 — 169, Ethan Burton 11280 — 192 Sallisaw: Robert Raborn 81-75 — 156, Joseph Lufkin 92-72 — 164, Hayden Lillard 81-83 — 164, Skyer Williams 90-84 — 174, Chance Lowe 87-89 — 176 Cushing: Ben McNeal 81-76 — 157, Blake Murray 83-81 — 164, Nick Tanner 85-80 — 165, Dillon Wasson 105-90 — 195, Tim McCool 111-99 — 210 Seminole: Blake Knox 81-81 — 162, Caleb Conn 87-81 — 168, Michael Hudson 84-85 — 169, Dakota Anderson 105-97 — 202, Trevor Nelson 102110 — 212 Blanchard: Cole Brewer 87-79 — 166, Jared McElhaney 91-82 — 173, Tyler Christensen 87-87 — 174, Matt Dewberry 92-83 — 175, Kelton Williamson 100-89 — 189 Muldrow: Landon Powers 92-77 — 169, Jake Peterson 89-86 — 175, Ryan Farney 90-88 — 178, Brett Thompson 92-89 — 181, Joshua Harvell 109-96 — 205 Blackwell: Taylor Brown 86-78 — 164 Broken Bow: Caleb Richardson 91-83 — 174 Cache: Welston Ward 79-80 — 159, K.C. Colvin 85-75 — 160 Checotah: Zach Oliver 81-73 — 154 Elgin: Mitchel Pontikes 81-75 — 156 Harrah: Adam Williams 91-77 — 168 Hilldale: Dusty Miller 81-76 — 157 Mannford: Drake Boone 84-79 — 163 Okmulgee: Jackson Hess 81-75 — 156 Seq. Claremore: Sam Radley 93-76 — 169 Tecumseh: Tyler Montgomery 79-78 — 157 Wagoner: Jacob Boswell 82-76 — 158

Battling wind at the 3A boys golf state tournament at Cimarron Trails Golf Course in Perkins was nothing new for Heritage Hall. “We’ve played in four tournaments where the wind was over 30 mph, so it didn’t really bother us,” Chargers coach Andy Bogert said. Heritage Hall captured the team title with a 19stroke win over defending champion Tulsa Cascia Hall on Tuesday. The Chargers finished with a 946, while Cascia Hall shot 965 in the three-round, twoday tournament. Their consistency during the windy conditions, especially on Monday, paid off for the Chargers as Heritage Hall shot 313 in the first round, 317 in the second round and 316 in the final round.

SAXON WINS SECOND STRAIGHT TITLE For the second straight year, Tulsa Cascia Hall junior Charlie Saxon held off Bethel senior Kyle Lewis for the title. Saxon’s two-over 74 secured the win (219) after he entered the final round with a one-shot lead. Lewis shot a fourover 76 (222 overall). A one-shot win in 2009 helped Saxon overcome his nerves. “I knew what to expect and knew what I had to do,”he said. BY BRANDON CHATMON

CLASS 3A BOYS RESULTS At Cimarron Trails (Perkins) Par 72 Team Scoring 1. Heritage Hall ................ 313-317-316 — 946 2. Cascia Hall .................... 324-316-325 — 965 3. Plainview ...................... 329-327-331 — 987 4. Bethel ........................... 353-322-328 — 1003 5. Metro Christian ............ 351-340-312 — 1003 6. Victory Christian .......... 338-347-337 — 1022 7. Bristow ......................... 351-344-339 — 1034 8. Marlow ..........................345-350-345 — 1040 9. Dickson ......................... 345-360-349 — 1054 10. Sulphur ......................... 356-351-354 — 1061 Prague ...........................355-360-346 — 1061 12. Seq. Tahlequah ............. 362-371-354 — 1087 Top Individuals 219 — Charlie Saxon, Cascia Hall, 71-74-74 222 — Kyle Lewis, Bethel, 75-71-76 226 — Will Roberts, Plainview, 74-77-75 232 — Max Meyers, Heritage Hall, 74-81-77; Michael Varner, Cascia Hall, 77-79-76 234 — Michael Helton, Heritage Hall, 76-80-78 235 — Matt Woolslayer, Metro Christian, 7984-72 236 — Bennett Beard, Heritage Hall, 78-78-80; Tyler Hargus, Bethel, 86-76-74 237 — Trevor Montgomery, Bristow, 83-76-78 Others Heritage Hall: Gavin Mastell 90-78-81 — 249, Carson Yates 85-84-84 — 253 Cascia Hall: Corbin Wallace 84-75-85 — 244, Henry Saxon 92-88-93 — 273, Tim Curthoys 9799-90 — 286 Plainview: Trae Wilkins 86-80-80 — 246, Haden Coffey 83-83-89 — 255, Brendan Atencio 9287-115 — 294, Taylor Lehman 86-96-87 — 269 Bethel: Jason Mathis 93-85-93 — 271, Cale Jackson 99-90-85 — 274, Tyler Block 101-102-96 — 299 Bristow: Ryan Wilson 83-85-89 — 257, Garrett Lawrence 87-94-88 — 269, Taylor Rogers 107-9284 — 283, Brian Vandever 98-91-91 — 288 Dickson: Kaleb Edwards 81-90-90 — 261, Jerrid Wilkeus 82-86-87 — 255, Spencer Moore 9290-85 — 267, Jamie Reed 90-94-87 — 271, Brandon Offield 105-96-107 — 308 Marlow: Sean Hazel 78-81-84 — 243, Ryan Brooks 86-89-86 — 261, Colton Meek 95-88-91 — 274, Hunter Ortega 88-97-84 — 269, Abe Waller 93-93-91 — 276 Metro Christian: Jordan O’Dell 82-85-74 — 241, Ben Frizzell 93-85-80 — 258, Caleb McGuire 98-86-88 — 272, James Paulsen 97-89-86 — 272 Prague: Chase Bryant 79-83-79 — 241, Josh Martin 85-90-82 — 257, Eric Whitesel 92-97-90 — 279, Aftahn Linn 99-90-95 — 283, Aaron Wilson 107-103-97 — 307 Sulphur: Grant Bates 82-79-84 — 245, Malan Hardoin 87-91-91 — 269, Hayden Hancock 98-8889 — 275, Collin Hoyle 90-93-90 — 273, Jordan Barefoot 97-95-90 — 285 Seq. Tahlequah: Ryan Mouse 88-87-94 — 269, Leighton Mouse 92-95-83 — 270, Rylan Bunch 84100-90 — 274, Nick Wacoche 98-89-87 — 274, Tanner Alley 113-110-95 — 318 Victory Christian: Noah Parks 81-86-79 — 245, Rick Fenimore 79-83-81 — 243, Mike Ellsorth 8888-88 — 264, Collin Padilla 100-91-95 — 286, Ben Williams 90-102-89 — 281 Antlers: Trey Buchanan 84-87-78 — 249 Berryhill: Kyle Boone 98-89-93 — 280 Hugo: Zach Harbon 85-80-78 — 243 Kingfisher: Drew Henderson 85-84-86 — 255, Lane Wiersig 93-78-87 — 258 Newcastle: Graham Gilley 82-78-79 — 239 Nowata: William Wilson 90-91-83 — 264 Perkins: Michael Atkins 87-89-87 — 263 Perry: Chad Scott 85-83-83 — 251, Bryce Baird 93-86-91 — 270 Sperry: Austin Crandall 92-87-82 — 261 Stigler: Bobby Campbell 79-89-85 — 253

It’s tough to stand out among the Oklahoma Christian School golf team, as there isn’t a weak link. Shooting a 70 would be good enough, but shooting a hole-in-one will definitely do it, and that’s exactly what OCS’ Rustin Purser did in the final round of the Class 2A boys state tournament at Sugar Creek Canyon. Purser chose a 7-iron on the par-3 fifth hole from about 194 yards out and drained it. “I don’t want to say it was luck because I hit a good shot, but it was pretty exciting,” Purser said. “To have my first hole-in-one at state was really cool.” The Saints won the team title by 66 strokes and will return everybody from this year’s team.

OKARCHE POSTS STRONG FINISH With the heavy winds almost non-existent, many teams shot a lot better in the final round. But no team had a bigger improvement than Okarche. The Warriors shot 28 strokes better on the second day to place 10th. The biggest individual improvement for Okarche was from the No. 5 player Miles Heald, who shot 17 strokes better. BY ROBERT PRZYBYLO

CLASS 2A BOYS RESULTS At Sugar Creek Canyon (Hinton) Par 71 Team Scoring 1. Oklahoma Christian................ 315-290 — 605 2. Hinton..................................... 340-331 — 671 3. Oktaha.....................................340-334 — 674 4. Velma-Alma............................ 333-343 — 676 5. Pawhuska................................353-336 — 689 SW Covenant.......................... 356-333 — 689 7. Tishomingo............................. 344-346 — 690 8. Stroud..................................... 357-339 — 696 9. Burns Flat-Dill City.................363-341 — 704 10. Okarche................................... 379-351 — 730 11. Laverne................................... 377-367 — 744 12. Alva......................................... 387-373 — 760 Top Individuals 147 — Jackson Ogle, OCS, 77-70 151 — Alexander Hall, OCS, 76-75 153 — Rustin Purser, OCS, 83-70 154 — Myles Hartog, Turner, 80-74 155 — Isacc Smith, Oktaha, 78-77; Zach Novasad, Cimarron/Ringwood, 79-76 156 — Haden George, Hinton, 76-80; Justin Ary, Quinton, 82-74 157 — Cale Elam, Oktaha, 80-77; Luke Coppedge, Tishomingo, 81-76 Others Oklahoma Christian: Preston Schaefer 83-75 — 158; Scottie Verplank, 79-80 — 159 Hinton: Hunter George 88-84 — 172, Aaron Murray 89-86 — 175, Jonathan Brooks 90-81 — 171, Caleb Murray 87-93 — 190 Oktaha: Drake Lumpkin 84-90 — 174, Blake Pittman 98-90 — 188, Derrick Skinner 104-102 — 206 Velma-Alma: Kaleb Osmus, 80-83 — 163, Cord Gothard 83-80 — 163, LL Humphreys 87-83 — 170, Zac Cable 83-97 — 184, Tanner Jenkins 107100 — 207 Pawhuska: Jake Brooks 87-80 — 167, Matthew Free 93-77 — 170, Kevin Walker 85-86 — 171, Ethan Bruce 88-93 — 181, Wes Patterson 9895 — 193 SW Covenant: Kyle Perdew 85-78 — 163, Matthew Mangus 89-81 — 170, Trevor Shetley 96-84 — 180, Zach Nelms 89-92 — 181, Wade Woodard 93-90 — 183 Tishomingo: Tyler McCollum 78-80 — 158, Greg Ferguson 89-90 — 179, Patrick Kite 96-100 — 196, Bo Stallings 116-107 — 223 Stroud: Hayden Johnson, 79-81 — 160; Eric Gilbert 88-78 — 166, Hayden Hagen 90-93 — 183, Alex Hamilton 100-87 — 187, Chris Huber 104102 — 206 Burns Flat-Dill City: Trevor Jennings 90-77 — 167, Brian Wenninger 83-89 — 172, Jake Birdwell 98-86 — 184, Lamar Fite 94-89 — 183, Trenton Knight 96-110 — 206 Okarche: John Grellner 90-82 — 172, Jeremy Maass 88-91 — 179, Tyler Pfaff 95-89 — 184, Jacob Moffat 111-96 — 207, Miles Heald 106-89 — 195 Laverne: Seth Overstreet 82-84 — 166, Kale Crocker 88-94 — 182, Tucker Hickman 102-81 — 183, Justin Kanady 105-108 — 213, Bradon Long 111-118 — 229 Alva: Trey Stelling 83-88 — 171, Justin Pfieffer 89-88 — 177, Cole Pflieder 101-93 — 194, Jeremy Dowdy 114-104 — 218, Clay Bouziden 122-104 — 226 Alex: Wayne Heffington 94-79 — 173 Binger-Oney: Tyler Green 91-85 — 176 Central Sallisaw: Trey Rogers 90-77 — 167 Chisholm: Brian Highfill 98-88 — 186 Chouteau: Cole Cramer 79-81 — 160 Cimarron/Ringwood: Clayton Cunningham 82-76 — 158 Davis: Chris Campbell 83-87 — 170 Fort Cobb-Broxton: Gavin Steinmetz 89-90 — 179 Frederick: Tanner Oxford 85-91 — 176 Luther: Ryan Stults 81-92 — 173 Oklahoma Bible: Connor Walker 90-87 — 177; Doug Meier 98-86 — 184 Watts: Taylor Asbill 84-86 — 170


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

TUESDAY’S REDHAWKS GAME

BASEBALL

RedHawks 9, Sacramento 6

Cruz revisits Brick in win REDHAWK REUNION | SLUGGER EXPECTS RANGERS’ COMPETITIVE WAYS TO CONTINUE Nelson Cruz Rangers slugger went 1-for-5 for OKC on Tuesday.

BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz didn’t have to look far to find familiar faces in the RedHawks’ clubhouse on Tuesday afternoon. Cruz is in Oklahoma City for two rehab games as he recovers from a hamstring injury that landed him on the disabled list. He went 1-for-5 with a double and four strikeouts for OKC in a 9-6 win. With Cruz on board, the RedHawks had three players who were in the Rangers’ opening-day starting lineup. Catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and first

baseman Chris Davis are also here, as is Taylor Teagarden, who was Saltalamacchia’s backup. Despite so many moves, the Rangers have prospered. Texas began the day in first place in the AL West, a game ahead of Oakland. “They had to do whatever they can to get everything right,” Cruz said of

the moves up and down. “I think it will be good for the team and the players. Some guys who struggle can go down and come back up when they are ready and help the team.” He expects the Rangers’ competitive ways to continue. “The pitching has been there, and the hitting is starting to wake up,” he said. Sitting down was a difficult decision for Cruz. He was the hottest hitter in baseball to begin the season with seven home runs. Knowing your limits and when to rest is always a challenge. “It was really hard,”

Cruz said. “But I knew I had to spend some time build my hamstring. I was trying to play through it, but the best thing to do was sit down and rest so I can back to playing every day.” And in the meantime he can hang out in a place that brings back good memories. Cruz was the Pacific Coast League MVP in 2008 with 37 home runs. The Brick is the place where he relaunched his career. “Even before I played for the RedHawks, when I played in Nashville, this was a fun place to play,” Cruz said. “I’ve always liked it here.”

PCL SCOREBOARD Standings

South Division

Fresno (Giants) ....................... 21 11 .656 — Reno (Diamondbacks)............. 16 16 .500 5 Las Vegas (Blue Jays)............. 15 17 .469 6 Sacramento (Athletics) .......... 14 19 .424 71⁄2 Tuesday’s Games Albuquerque 6, Colorado Springs 5 Omaha at Reno, 8:05 p.m. Round Rock 10, Salt Lake 2 Fresno 8, New Orleans 4 Memphis 9, Portland 0 Nashville 4, Tacoma 3, 10 innings Oklahoma City 9, Sacramento 6 Iowa at Las Vegas Wednesday’s Games Tacoma at Nashville, 11:05 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 11:05 p.m. Omaha at Reno, 1:35 p.m. Albuquerque at Colorado Springs, 7:05 p.m. Round Rock at Salt Lake, 7:35 p.m. Fresno at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 7:05 p.m. Iowa at Las Vegas, 9:05 p.m. Monday’s Results

W

Nashville (Brewers) ................ 20 Memphis (Cardinals) .............. 15 Omaha (Royals) ...................... 14 Iowa (Cubs) ............................. 13 South Division

11 16 15 17

Oklahoma City (Rangers) ...... Albuquerque (Dodgers) .......... New Orleans (Marlins) ........... Round Rock (Astros)...............

13 14 16 19

W

19 17 14 13

W

L Pct. GB

.645 — .484 5 .483 5 .433 61⁄2

L Pct. GB

.594 — .548 11⁄2 .467 4 .406 6

Pacific Conference North Division

Colorado Springs (Rockies)..... Salt Lake (Angels) .................. Tacoma (Mariners).................. Portland (Padres)....................

W

17 15 14 13

L Pct. GB

15 16 16 19

.531 — .484 11⁄2 .467 2 .406 4

Pacific Conference

L Pct. GB

Portland 4, Reno 3 New Orleans at Omaha, ppd., rain Las Vegas 6, Tacoma 2 Nashville 7, Albuquerque 6 Oklahoma City at Iowa, ppd., rain Fresno 4, Salt Lake 2 Memphis 12, Round Rock 4 Colorado Springs 1, Sacramento 0

Totals

AMERICAN LEAGUE

E — German (2). LOB — Sacramento 5, OKC 8. DP — Sacramento 1. 2B — Suzuki, German 3 (9), Davis (5), Petit (4), Cruz, Saltalamacchia (5). HR — Suzuki, Petit (2), Daivs (2). SB — Sogard (3), Wimberly (12), Boggs. SF — Carter.

Oklahoma City ab r h bi ab r h bi

Suzuki c Recker c Sogard 2b Cust dh Carter 1b Taylor rf Tolleson ss Cardenas 3b Brown cf

232 200 300 301 200 400 400 300 410

3 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0

Wimberly lf

320 0

German 3b Petit ss Cruz rf Davis 1b Sltlmcch c Tracy dh Boggs cf Moreland lf Iribarren 2b

54 53 50 41 40 40 31 40 40

4 4 1 3 1 0 1 0 1

1 3 2 3 0 0 0 0 0

IP H R ER BB SO Sacramento

Godfrey Storey L.0-1 Kilby Bowers

5.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

9 4 1 1

6 3 0 0

6 3 0 0

3 0 0 0

7 1 0 2

4 0 0 0

7 0 0 0

3 0 0 1

Oklahoma City

Kirkman Ramirez W,2-0 Eyre Ogando S,1

4.0 3.0 1.0 1.0

3 0 0 0

6 0 0 0

WP — Kirkman. T — 2:54. A — 3,804.

Tuesday’s Games REDS 9, PIRATES 0

Tuesday’s Games MARINERS 5, ORIOLES 1

Johnny Cueto pitched a ›one-hitter for his first major

Cliff Lee earned his first win ›with Seattle and the Mariners

Lngrhn 1b JoWilsn ss GrffyJr dh RJhnsn c MSndrs lf Totals

CINCINNATI

BALTIMORE ab r h bi

4 4 4 5

0 0 0 0

2 1 0 0

0 1 0 0

4 3 3 4 4

1 2 1 1 0

1 2 0 2 2

1 0 0 1 1

35 5 10 4

ab r h bi

Lugo 2b AdJons cf Markks rf MTejad 3b Wggntn dh Wieters c Reimld lf Atkins 1b CIzturs ss

Totals

4 4 4 4

0 0 0 0

0 1 2 1

0 0 0 0

4 4 4 3 3

1 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1 0

0 0 0 1 0

34 1 8 1

Seattle............................ 000 023 000 Baltimore ....................... 000 000 100

— —

5 1

E—Figgins (4), Reimold (1). DP—Seattle 2, Baltimore 1. LOB—Seattle 8, Baltimore 6. 2B—I.Suzuki (5), M.Saunders (2), M.Tejada (6), Wigginton (7). HR—Langerhans (1). CS— M.Saunders (1). Seattle

Cl.Lee W,1-1 League S,1-4

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

71⁄3 12⁄3

8 0

1 0

1 0

0 0

2 0

Baltimore

Da.Hernandez L,0-5 Berken Meredith

52⁄3 21⁄3 1

5 3 2

5 0 0

4 0 0

4 1 0

4 0 0

WP—Da.Hernandez 2. Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, Joe West;Second, Angel Hernandez;Third, Paul Schrieber. T—2:32. A—12,614 (48,290).

Daisuke Matsuzaka allowed ›three hits in seven innings and Boston won its third straight.

FLewis lf A.Hill 2b Lind dh

BOSTON ab r h bi

4 0 2 1 4 0 0 0 4 0 0 0

V.Wells cf Overay 1b AlGnzlz ss JBautst 3b J.Buck c Snider rf Totals

4 4 3 3 3 2

0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 2 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

31 1 4 1

ab r h bi

Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b J.Drew rf VnEvry pr-rf Youkils 1b Lowell dh Beltre 3b Varitek c Hall lf DMcDn cf

3 1 0 0 4 1 2 0 4 1 2 1 0 1 3 4 3 4 4

Totals

0 1 0 0 2 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 0 1

0 1 0 0 1 1 1

30 6 7 5

Toronto ........................... 000 001 000 Boston ............................ 210 120 00x

— —

1 6

E—V.Wells (1). DP—Toronto 1. LOB—Toronto 4, Boston 10. 2B—F.Lewis (10), J.Buck (10), Pedroia (13), D.McDonald (4). HR—Varitek (6). SB—J.Drew (1). SF—Youkilis. Toronto

Eveland L,3-2 Camp Janssen Frasor Boston

Matsuzaka W,2-1 R.Ramirez Okajima

H

R

ER

BB

SO

4 2 1 1

5 0 0 2

6 0 0 0

5 0 0 0

4 4 0 0

2 1 3 1

7 1 1

3 1 0

1 0 0

1 0 0

0 1 0

9 1 1

Eveland pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. HBP—by Eveland (Youkilis). WP—Camp, Matsuzaka. Umpires—Home, Dan Iassogna;First, Dale Scott;Second, Jerry Meals;Third, Mark Wegner. T—3:04. A—37,609 (37,402).

ATHLETICS 7, RANGERS 6, (13)

Barton hit a two-out ›RBIDaric single in the 13th inning Pnngtn ss Barton 1b RSwny rf Kzmnff 3b EChavz dh Gross pr-lf ARosls 2b Pattrsn lf Fox ph ABaily p Dnldsn ph Wuertz p T.Ross p Powell c RDavis cf

Totals

TEXAS

7 7 7 7

0 1 0 1

1 2 2 1

1 2 0 0

4 2 5 3 0 0 1 0 1 4 6

2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

2 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

54 7 15 7

ab r h bi

Andrus ss MYong 3b Hamltn lf Guerrr dh ABlanc pr-dh Kinsler 2b DvMrp rf Smoak 1b Gentry pr Garko 1b Treanr c Borbon cf

Totals

4 4 6 6

1 1 1 0

1 1 1 1

1 1 2 0

0 6 6 2 0 1 4 6

0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0

0 2 2 0 0 0 2 2

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

45 6 12 6

Oakland ................... 000 020 102 010 Texas........................ 001 100 021 010

1 0

— —

7 6

E—Andrus (5). LOB—Oakland 12, Texas 9. 2B—Kinsler (3). 3B—Patterson (2). HR—Barton (2), E.Chavez (1), Hamilton (6), Dav.Murphy (2). SB—Powell (1), Andrus (14). CS—Borbon (1). S—Andrus, Garko, Treanor 2. Oakland

Cahill Blevins Ziegler BS,1-1 Breslow A.Bailey BS,1-7 Wuertz T.Ross W,1-0 BS,1-2 Texas

C.Lewis Oliver

3 2 1 0 2

1 0 1 0 1

1 0 1 0 1

0 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 1 2

HBP—by Ziegler (M.Young), by N.Feliz (Fox). Balk—Cahill. Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons;First, Tim Tschida;Second, Bob Davidson;Third, Alfonso Marquez. T—4:08. A—15,474 (49,170).

Pierre lf

MINNESOTA ab r h bi

5 1 3 0

Przyns c AnJons rf Konerk 1b Rios cf Quentin dh Teahen 3b Bckhm 2b AlRmrz ss Totals

5 4 4 4 4 3 3 4

1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1

1 1 2 2 0 1 0 1

2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

36 5 11 5

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

52⁄3 1 1 1 ⁄3 1 1

4 0 2 0 1 0

2 0 2 0 1 0

2 0 2 0 1 0

2 1 0 0 1 0

1 0 0 0 0 0

3

5

1

1

0

2

7 11⁄3

6 1

3 1

3 0

1 0

5 2

ab r h bi

Span cf OHudsn 2b Mauer c Mornea 1b Cuddyr rf Kubel dh DlmYn lf BHarrs ss Thome ph Tolbert pr Punto 3b

5 0 1 0

4 4 3 4 3 4 3 1 0 4

Totals

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 3 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 2

0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

35 2 11 2

Chicago ........................... 000 050 000 Minnesota...................... 000 101 000

— —

5 2

E—O.Hudson (2). DP—Chicago 2, Minnesota 2. LOB—Chicago 6, Minnesota 8. 2B—Pierre (1), Pierzynski (4), Konerko (6), Teahen (4), Al.Ramirez (6), Mauer (9), Delm.Young (7), Thome (5). HR—Morneau (8). SB—Rios (10). IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

7 1 1

9 1 1

2 0 0

2 0 0

2 0 0

3 1 1

F.Garcia W,2-2 Thornton H,2 Jenks S,6-7 Minnesota

Slowey L,4-3 Al.Burnett Mahay Crain Duensing

42⁄3 3 1 ⁄3 2 ⁄3 1 ⁄3

8 2 0 1 0

5 0 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1 0

2 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

3 2 2 2 0 3 0 2 0 1

2 0 2 1 0 3 0 1 0 0

40 9 15 9

3 3 1 0 0

WP—Jenks. Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg;First, Larry Vanover;Second, Angel Campos;Third, Jeff Nelson. T—2:39. A—38,764 (39,504).

Iwamr 2b AnLRc 3b AMcCt cf GJones 1b Doumit c Milledg lf DlwYn rf Cedeno ss Morton p Clemnt ph Carrsc p Tschnr p Karstns p Burres p Pearce ph

4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1

Totals

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Morton L,1-6 Carrasco Taschner Karstens Burres

27 0 1 0

— —

H

R

ER

BB

SO

9

1

0

0

0

8

6 1 ⁄3 0 12⁄3 1

7 1 2 5 0

3 1 1 4 0

3 1 1 4 0

2 1 1 0 0

4 0 0 2 1

METS 8, NATIONALS 6

Chris Carter, ›justPinch-hitter called up from the minors, delivered a tiebreaking double in his first at-bat for the Mets and New York scored six runs in the eighth inning to rally past Washington.

WASHINGTON

Morgan cf CGzmn 2b Bruney p Clipprd p Batista p Zmrmn 3b A.Dunn 1b

NEW YORK ab r h bi

4 3 0 0 0 3 5

0 2 0 0 0 2 1

0 2 0 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Wlngh lf IRdrgz c Dsmnd ss Tavers rf Olsen p Walker p

4 5 5 3 2 0

1 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 2 0 0

0 2 1 0 0 0

Slaten p AlGnzlz ph-2b

0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 35 6 9 6

5 4 0 1 0 4 4

1 0 0 0 0 0 2

2 1 0 1 0 0 3

1 0 0 1 0 0 1

4 5 3 4 1 0

2 1 0 1 0 0

3 0 1 2 1 0

0 1 2 2 0 0

1 0 1 0

Takhsh p Cora ph-2b

0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0

Totals

37 8 16 8

pitched six innings for his first win in two years.

E—Desmond (6). DP—Washington 3. LOB—Washington 10, New York 10. 2B— C.Guzman (6), Carter (1), D.Wright 2 (7), Barajas (4). HR—A.Dunn (7). SB—Bay (3), Francoeur (3). S—Olsen. SF—Francoeur.

ACarer ss GSizmr cf

5 0 0 0 4 1 2 0

Choo rf Hafner dh Kearns lf Branyn 1b AMarte 1b Peralta 3b Grdzln 2b Marson c Totals

5 4 4 5 0 4 2 4

1 1 3 2 0 0 0 0

1 0 2 3 0 1 1 0

0 1 1 3 0 2 1 0

37 8 10 8

DeJess rf Pdsdnk lf BButler 1b JGuilln dh Callasp 3b Aviles 2b Kendall c B.Pena ph Maier cf Blmqst ph YBtncr ss Getz ph

3 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 1 3 1

Totals

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0

2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

33 2 7 2

Cleveland........................ 020 200 301 Kansas City.................... 001 000 010

— —

8 2

E—Westbrook (1), Callaspo (3). DP—Kansas City 1. LOB—Cleveland 8, Kansas City 7. 2B—Peralta (7), Aviles (1). 3B—Podsednik (2). HR—Branyan 2 (2). SB—G.Sizemore 2 (4), Choo (6). S—Podsednik. IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

6 2 1

5 1 1

1 1 0

1 1 0

2 0 0

2 2 2

Cleveland

Westbrook W,1-2 J.Wright Ambriz Kansas City

Bannister L,1-3 Chen Rupe D.Hughes Soria

6 ⁄3 0 11⁄3 1 2

6 1 2 0 1

4 2 1 0 1

4 2 1 0 1

3 1 2 0 0

6 0 0 2 2

Rupe pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. WP—Bannister. Umpires—Home, Bill Welke;First, Mike DiMuro;Second, Tim Welke Third, Jim Reynolds. T—2:46. A—15,930 (37,840).

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Washington

Olsen Walker Slaten Bruney Clippard L,6-1 BS,5-5 Batista Niese Acosta Takahashi Valdes W,1-0 F.Rodriguez S,5-7

6 8

ER

BB

SO

51⁄3 2 ⁄3 1 0

9 0 1 2

2 0 0 3

2 0 0 2

1 0 1 0

2 0 0 0

⁄3 ⁄3

4 0

3 0

3 0

0 2

1 1

41⁄3 2 ⁄3 2 1 1

6 1 1 1 0

6 0 0 0 0

6 0 0 0 0

5 1 0 1 0

3 1 0 1 0

Bruney pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. WP—Valdes. Umpires—Home, John Hirschbeck;First, James Hoye;Second, Wally Bell;Third, Laz Diaz. T—3:23. A—31,606 (41,800).

MARLINS 3, CUBS 2

Ricky Nolasco pitched ›seven sharp innings and

Florida won its second straight after losing five of its previous six games. The Cubs lost for the seventh time in eight games.

Coghln lf GSnchz 1b Leroux p Nunez p HRmrz ss Cantu 3b-1b Uggla 2b JoBakr c

CHICAGO ab r h bi

4 4 0 0 4 4 3 4

0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Fukdm rf Theriot 2b Byrd cf D.Lee 1b ArRmr 3b ASorin lf Soto c SCastro ss

ab r h bi

3 4 3 4 3 4 4 4

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Totals

31 2 7 2

— —

3 2

E—Ar.Ramirez (6), S.Castro (5). DP—Florida 1, Chicago 1. LOB—Florida 3, Chicago 6. 2B—D.Lee 2 (4). HR—G.Sanchez (3), C.Ross (2). S—R.Wells. SF—Byrd. IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

7 1 1

5 2 0

1 1 0

1 1 0

1 1 0

3 1 1

8 1

4 0

3 0

3 0

1 0

8 1

Florida

Nolasco W,3-2 Leroux H,2 Nunez S,7-9 Chicago

R.Wells L,3-2 Caridad

Umpires—Home, Chad Fairchild;First, Mike Reilly;Second, Eric Cooper;Third, Bill Miller. T—2:31. A—38,007 (41,210).

SALTY’S HIT STREAK CONTINUES Catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia extended his hit streak to 16 games with a double Tuesday night. He has been with OKC since April 20. He is hitting .359 in that time.

SUZUKI IN TOWN Nelson Cruz isn’t the only big leaguer on a rehab. Sacramento has A’s starting catcher Kurt Suzuki in the starting lineup Tuesday. Suzuki injured muscles in his rib cage late last month. He had a home run and a double.

Jarrod Saltalamacchia Extended hitting streak to 16 games on Tuesday

UP NEXT

Sacramento (LH Lenny DiNardo, 1-4, 4.66 ERA) at RedHawks (RH Guillermo Moscoso, 1-2, 3.64 ERA), 11:05 a.m.

Glaus went deep for ›theTroy second straight night for the Braves, who will go for a three-game sweep of the Brewers on Wednesday afternoon. Atlanta had a season-high 16 hits.

ATLANTA

McLoth cf Prado 2b Heywrd rf McCnn c D.Ross ph-c Glaus 1b Hinske lf OFlhrt p Moylan p M.Diaz ph Saito p Venters p Infante ss Conrad 3b THudsn p MeCarr lf Totals

ab r h bi

4 6 4 4 1 5 2 0 0 1 0 0 5 4 3 2

1 1 3 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

1 2 2 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1

1 0 1 1 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

41 11 16 11

2 1 0 2 0 0 0 2

0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

4 5 5 3 4 4 3 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 1

Totals

0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 2 0 2 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

35 3 10 3

— —

11 3

H

R

ER

BB

SO

6 2 ⁄3 1 ⁄3 1 1

6 1 3 0 0

1 1 1 0 0

1 1 1 0 0

6 0 0 0 0

1 1 0 1 2

6 ⁄3 ⁄3 2 ⁄3 11⁄3

7 3 1 2 3

3 3 0 4 1

3 3 0 4 1

3 0 0 1 2

3 0 0 1 0

T.Hudson W,3-1 O’Flaherty Moylan Saito Venters Milwaukee

Bush L,1-3 Stetter Coffey Villanueva Suppan

1 2

HBP—by Villanueva (McCann). WP— T.Hudson. Umpires—Home, Fieldin Culbreth;First, Marty Foster;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Ed Hickox. T—3:31. A—30,678 (41,900).

hitters Cory Sullivan ›andPinch Humberto Quintero hit

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Astros outfielder Michael Bourn was suspended two games for making contact with an umpire but remained in the lineup while he appeals. Right-hander Kevin Correia was placed on the bereavement list by the Padres. His brother, 22year-old Trevor Brent Correia, fell from a 60-feet cliff while hiking off the Santa Barbara coastline on Saturday.

AMERICAN LEAGUE W

L

Texas ................... Oakland ............... Los Angeles......... Seattle.................

18 17 15 13

Minnesota ........... Detroit ................. Chicago ................ Cleveland............. Kansas City .........

21 18 14 12 11

Tampa Bay........... New York ............. Toronto ................ Boston ................. Baltimore ............

22 21 19 18 9

10 10 16 16 24

W

L

W

W

14 15 19 19 L

12 14 19 18 22 L

Pct

.563 .531 .441 .406 Pct

.636 .563 .424 .400 .333 Pct

.688 .677 .543 .529 .273

West Division GB

— 1 4 5

WCGB

— 41⁄2 71⁄2 81⁄2

Central Division GB

— 21⁄2 7 71⁄2 10

WCGB

— 31⁄2 8 81⁄2 11

East Division GB

— 1 ⁄2 41⁄2 5 131⁄2

L10

8-2 5-5 3-7 2-8

WCGB

— — 4 41⁄2 13

L10

6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8 L10

5-5 7-3 7-3 7-3 4-6

Str

Home

Away

Str

Home

Away

Home

Away

Str

Home

Away

Str

Home

Away

Str

Home

Away

W-4 W-2 W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-6 Str

L-3 L-2 L-2 W-3 L-3

11-6 13-7 9-9 8-10 11-6 10-3 9-10 6-8 4-9

9-6 10-2 7-10 12-10 4-9

7-8 4-8 6-10 5-9 10-6 8-11 5-9 6-10 7-13

13-4 11-8 12-6 6-6 5-15

NATIONAL LEAGUE San Diego ............ San Francisco ...... Colorado .............. Los Angeles......... Arizona ................

19 18 15 15 14

St. Louis .............. Cincinnati ............ Milwaukee........... Pittsburgh ........... Chicago ................ Houston...............

20 18 15 14 14 11

Philadelphia......... New York ............. Washington......... Florida ................. Atlanta ................

20 18 18 16 15

W

12 12 17 17 19 L

13 15 18 19 20 21 L

12 15 15 17 18

Pct

.613 .600 .469 .469 .424 Pct

.606 .545 .455 .424 .412 .344 Pct

.625 .545 .545 .485 .455

West Division GB

— 1 ⁄2 41⁄2 41⁄2 6

WCGB

— — 4 4 51⁄2

Central Division GB

— 2 5 6 61⁄2 81⁄2

WCGB

— 11⁄2 41⁄2 51⁄2 6 8

East Division GB

— 21⁄2 21⁄2 41⁄2 51⁄2

WCGB

— 11⁄2 11⁄2 31⁄2 41⁄2

L10

6-4 6-4 4-6 7-3 3-7 L10

5-5 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10

8-2 4-6 5-5 5-5 6-4

L-1 W-1 L-2 W-2 L-4 L-1 W-4 L-2 L-3 L-4 W-2 W-2 W-1 L-1 W-2 W-2

11-5 10-5 7-6 10-6 7-9

10-4 10-8 4-10 9-8 7-8 7-15

10-6 14-7 11-8 7-9 8-4

8-7 8-7 8-11 5-11 7-10 10-9 8-7 11-8 5-11 7-12 4-6 10-6 4-8 7-7 9-8 7-14

ST. LOUIS ab r h bi

5 0 2 1 3 0 0 0 4 1 1 1

Ca.Lee lf Pence rf Blum 3b Lyon p Lndstr p Manzell ss Cash c Sullivn ph Fulchin p Sampsn p

4 4 3 0 0 3 2 1 0 0

P.Feliz 3b Myers p Quinter ph-c

1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 1

1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

34 6 9 6

ab r h bi

Rasms cf Motte p Boggs p Stavinh ph Ludwck rf Pujols 1b Hollidy lf Freese 3b YMolin c Schmkr 2b B.Ryan ss Jay ph-cf Penny p Greene ph-ss

4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 2 2

0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

1 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 1

0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

Totals

35 3 11 3

Houston.......................... 000 000 420 St. Louis ......................... 101 000 100

— —

6 3

E—Y.Molina (2), B.Ryan 2 (5). DP—Houston 2, St. Louis 2. LOB—Houston 4, St. Louis 8. 2B—Pence (4), Ludwick (6). HR—Berkman (3), Pence (4). CS—Manzella (1). SF—Manzella. Myers W,2-2 Fulchino H,1 Sampson H,4 Lyon H,4 Lindstrom S,7-7 Penny L,3-3 Motte Boggs

Tom Glavine joins Hank Aaron, Warren Spahn, former teammate Greg Maddux and three others as the seventh Braves player to have his uniform number retired. The Braves will induct Glavine into the team’s Hall of Fame and retire his No. 47 on Aug. 6. The other Braves to have numbers retired are Aaron (44), Spahn (21), Eddie Matthews (41), Dale Murphy (3) and Phil Niekro (35).

W

ASTROS 6, CARDINALS 3

St. Louis

BRAVES TO RETIRE GLAVINE’S NO. 47

ab r h bi

Weeks 2b Gerut lf-rf Edmnd cf Fielder 1b McGeh 3b Zaun c Hart rf Villanv p Suppan p AEscor ss Bush p Counsll ph Stetter p Coffey p Inglett lf

IP Atlanta

Houston

Seattle Mariners designated hitter Ken Griffey Jr. insists he was available to pinch-hit during a recent game despite reports he was taking a nap. Quoting two Mariners who spoke anonymously, The (Tacoma) News Tribune wrote that Griffey was asleep in the clubhouse Saturday and unavailable to bat. Griffey was asked about the matter Tuesday and said he’s “available all the time.” He added that parts of the story are not accurate. As for being asleep during the game, Griffey waited and stared for several seconds after hearing the question. He then said, “Anything else you want to ask?”

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DP—Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1. LOB—Atlanta 11, Milwaukee 11. 2B—McCann (5), Glaus (3), Hinske 2 (5), Infante (5), T.Hudson (1), Gerut (3), Edmonds (8), A.Escobar (4). HR—Glaus (4), Conrad (1). SB—Heyward (1), Hart (3). S—McLouth.

Totals

Griffey refutes nap report

MILWAUKEE

Atlanta ........................... 010 101 341 Milwaukee ..................... 010 000 200

Bourn cf KMatsu 2b Brkmn 1b

AROUND THE MAJORS

BRAVES 11, BREWERS 3

HOUSTON

R

FLORIDA

32 3 4 3

R.Wells p Fontent ph Caridd p

consecutive RBI singles in a four-run seventh for Houston.

H

2

New York

— —

IP

1

3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

ab r h bi

Pagan cf LCastill 2b Valdes p Carter ph FRdrgz p JosRys ss Bay lf DWrght 3b I.Davis 1b Francr rf Barajs c Niese p Acosta p MthwsJ ph

Washington................... 300 030 000 New York........................ 010 001 06x

ab r h bi

9 0

IP

INDIANS 8, ROYALS 2

KANSAS CITY ab r h bi

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Taschner pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. HBP—by Cueto (Cedeno). WP—Morton. Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson;First, Gerry Davis;Second, Sam Holbrook;Third, Brian Knight. T—2:40. A—9,027 (38,362).

Totals

Russell Branyan homered ›twice and Jake Westbrook

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

DP—Cincinnati 1. LOB—Cincinnati 9, Pittsburgh 1. 2B—B.Phillips (10), Votto (6), Rolen (7), R.Hernandez (5). 3B—Bruce (3). HR—Heisey (1). SB—Bruce (3). CS—Heisey (1), Cedeno (1). SF—Votto.

Pittsburgh

3 1 1 2

Maybin cf Nolasco p Helms ph-3b

Florida............................. 021 000 000 Chicago ........................... 000 001 010

PITTSBURGH ab r h bi

Cincinnati....................... 200 001 240 Pittsburgh...................... 000 000 000

Cueto W,2-1

The White Sox put together ›their biggest inning of the CHICAGO

4 4 4 3 1 5 5 5 4 5

Cincinnati

WHITE SOX 5, TWINS 2

CLEVELAND

after homering in the 11th. ab r h bi

⁄3 1 1 1 1

2

Chicago

IP

OAKLAND

Totals

N.Feliz BS,2-11 F.Francisco Ray O’Day Nippert L,1-3

season in the fifth with seven runs.

RED SOX 6, BLUE JAYS 1

TORONTO

Red Sox starter Daisuke Matsuzaka throws in his team’s 6-1 win over Toronto on Tuesday. AP PHOTO

Heisey cf BPhllps 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Cairo ph-3b Bruce rf Gomes lf RHrndz c Janish ss Cueto p

ab r h bi

C.Ross rf

Totals

league complete game and Cincinnati won its fourth straight game.

won in a matchup of lastplace teams.

ISuzuki rf Figgins 2b FGtrrz cf JoLopz 3b

Chris Davis Homered for the RedHawks on Tuesday

38 9 15 9

Sacramento........................... 130 200 000 — 6 Oklahoma City....................... 220 203 00x — 9

Tuesday’s Game REDHAWKS 9, RIVER CATS 6 Sacramento

30 6 3 6 Totals

MLB SCOREBOARD

SEATTLE

Oklahoma City overcame a rough start from Michael Kirkman to win their series opener with Sacramento Tuesday night at AT&T Bricktown Ballpark. Kirkman gave up four runs on three hits, but also walked seven. But the offense rode to the rescue with home runs from Chris Davis and Gregorio Petit in the sixth inning that put the RedHawks on top for good.

BY MATT PATTERSON

American Conference North Division

5C

...

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

6 ⁄3 ⁄3 1 1

8 2 0 0 1

2 1 0 0 0

2 1 0 0 0

2 1 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 1

7 1 1

7 2 0

4 2 0

0 2 0

0 0 0

3 2 0

1 2

HBP—by Penny (K.Matsui, Blum). WP— Myers. Umpires—Home, Marvin Hudson;First, Derryl Cousins;Second, Jim Joyce;Third, Todd Tichenor. T—2:49. A—35,875 (43,975).

AMERICAN LEAGUE Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Danks 3-1) at Minnesota (Pavano 3-3), 12:10 p.m. Toronto (Marcum 1-1) at Boston (Wakefield 0-1), 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-0) at Detroit (Bonderman 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Seattle (Rowland-Smith 0-2) at Baltimore (Bergesen 2-2), 6:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 4-1) at L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 4-1), 6:05 p.m. Oakland (G.Gonzalez 3-2) at Texas (Holland 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 3-1) at Kansas City (Davies 2-1), 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Today’s Games Cincinnati (H.Bailey 0-2) at Pittsburgh (Duke 2-3), 11:35 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 4-3) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 4-2), 12:10 p.m. Washington (Stammen 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 4-1), 12:10 p.m. Florida (Volstad 3-2) at Chicago Cubs (Silva 3-0), 1:20 p.m. Philadelphia (Moyer 4-2) at Colorado (Hammel 0-2), 2:10 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-4) at St. Louis (Lohse 0-2), 7:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 3-1) at Arizona (E.Jackson 1-4), 8:40 p.m. San Diego (Richard 1-2) at San Francisco (Cain 2-1), 9:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE Thursday’s Games Seattle at Baltimore, 11:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Detroit, 12:05 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 1:05 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 1:10 p.m. Monday’s Results Detroit 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Boston 7, Toronto 6 L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 4, (11)

NATIONAL LEAGUE Thursday’s Games Houston at St. Louis, 12:40 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 2:45 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Florida, 6:10 p.m. Washington at Colorado, 7:40 p.m. Monday’s Results Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Florida 4, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 2 Philadelphia 9, Colorado 5 L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 3


6C

FOOTBALL

Mick Richard, Zac Tidholm (8) and Chad Carman. W — Tidholm (9-3). L — Steinmeyer (4-4). HR — OCU: Terrance Jackson 2(9); Steve Vitale (22); Garrett Regan (8).

AFL

High School

Standings

NATIONAL CONFERENCE Midwest Division W L T Pct Milwaukee.................... 4 1 0 .800 Chicago ......................... 4 1 0 .800 Cleveland ...................... 2 3 0 .400 Iowa .............................. 2 3 0 .400 West Division W L T Pct Spokane........................ 3 2 0 .600 Arizona ......................... 2 3 0 .400 Utah.............................. 1 3 0 .250 AMERICAN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L T Pct Tulsa ............................. 3 2 0 .600 Oklahoma City.............. 2 3 0 .400 Bossier-Shreveport...... 2 3 0 .400 Dallas............................ 1 3 0 .250 South Division W L T Pct Jacksonville.................. 4 1 0 .800 Alabama ....................... 3 2 0 .600 Tampa Bay.................... 2 3 0 .400 Orlando......................... 1 3 0 .250

PF 349 301 304 265

PA 294 266 307 296

PF 339 311 193

PA 306 327 240

PF 330 283 322 214

PA 312 306 346 221

PF 268 305 278 208

PA 235 286 289 239

Friday’s Games Dallas at Jacksonville, 6:35 p.m. Utah at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Tulsa at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Iowa at Chicago, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Bossier-Shreveport, 7:05 p.m. Orlando at Alabama, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Spokane at Oklahoma City, 2:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL

College

The following players have asked to removed from the list of “early entry” players eligible for selection in the 2010 NBA Draft. Lavoy Allen, Temple; Kevin Anderson, Richmond; Talor Battle, Penn State; Keith Benson, Oakland; Anatoly Bose, Nicholls State; Carlon Brown, Utah; Mike Davis, Illinois; Paul Davis, Winston-Salem State; Malcolm Delaney, Virginia Tech; Kenneth Faried, Morehead State; Jimmer Fredette, BYU; Anthony Gurley, Massachusetts; Jeremy Hazell, Seton Hall; Adnan Hodzic, Lipscomb; JaJuan Johnson, Purdue; Ravern Johnson, Mississippi State; Cameron Jones, Northern Arizona; Kenny Lawson, Creighton; Demetri McCamey, Illinois; E’Twaun Moore, Purdue; Arnett Moultrie, UTEP; Rico Pickett, Manhattan; Eniel Polynice, Mississippi; Herb Pope, Seton Hall; Jeff Robinson, Seton Hall; Tracy Smith, North Carolina State; Alex Tyus, Florida; Quinton Watkins, San Diego State; Chris Wright, Dayton

BASEBALL

Texas League Standings

North Division

W

L Pct. GB

Northwest Arkansas (Royals) 21 Springfield (Cardinals)............ 16 Arkansas (Angels) .................. 13 Tulsa (Rockies)........................ 12 South Division

10 16 17 19

Frisco (Rangers)...................... Midland (Athletics)................. Corpus Christi (Astros)........... San Antonio (Padres) .............

13 16 16 18

W

19 16 15 13

.677 — .500 51⁄2 .433 71⁄2 .387 9

L Pct. GB

.594 — .500 3 .484 31⁄2 .419 51⁄2

Tuesday’s Games Springfield 4, Arkansas 1 Midland 12, Frisco 2 Northwest Arkansas 4, Tulsa 1 San Antonio at Corpus Christi Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Corpus Christi at Frisco, 12 p.m. San Antonio at Midland, 7 p.m. Tulsa at Arkansas, 7:10 p.m. Northwest Arkansas at Springfield, 7:10 p.m. Monday’s Results Corpus Christi 8, San Antonio 1 Frisco 8, Midland 7 (12) Northwest Arkansas 7, Tulsa 3 Arkansas 10, Springfield 2

College Tuesday’s Results Nation

SOUTH Coll. of Charleston 20, S.C.-Upstate 3 Cumberland, Tenn. 9, Bethel, Tenn. 0 Duke 7-7, Presbyterian 5-6 E. Kentucky 7, Dayton 5 ETSU 13-11, UNC-Asheville 7-0 Tenn. Wesleyan 2, Milligan 1 TOURNAMENT Appalachian Athletic Conference Elimination Round Milligan 5, Reinhardt 2 Union, Ky. 8, Bryan 2 TranSouth Conference Elimination Round Lyon 12, Freed-Hardeman 5 Conference All Games W L T Pct. W L T Pct. Texas................ 21 3 0 .875 41 8 0 .837 Texas Tech ....... 12 9 0 .571 26 22 0 .542 Kansas St. ....... 11 9 0 .550 32 15 0 .681 Oklahoma ........ 12 10 0 .545 35 13 0 .729 Kansas ............. 10 10 1 .500 29 19 1 .602 Texas A&M ...... 9 11 1 .452 28 18 1 .609 Oklahoma St. .. 8 13 0 .381 28 20 0 .583 Baylor .............. 7 12 0 .368 25 20 0 .556 Missouri........... 7 13 0 .350 24 22 0 .522 Nebraska.......... 7 14 0 .333 23 24 0 .489 Note: Top eight teams qualify for Big 12 Championship. Tuesday’s Games Oklahoma State 12, Rice 5 Texas A&M at Houston Wednesday’s Game Centenary at Texas A&, 6:35 p.m. Friday’s Games Baylor at Texas Tech, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m. Texas A&M at Oklahoma State, 6:30 pm. Nebraska at Missouri, 7 p.m. Kansas State at Kansas, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Results Nebraska 10, Southeast Missouri 3 Kansas 10, Missouri 9 (10) Texas 6, Kansas State 5 Oklahoma 6, Oklahoma State 0

Tuesday’s Games OKLAHOMA STATE 12, RICE 5 Oklahoma State ab r h bi

501 0 5 0 1 10 411 0 411 1 421 1 311 1 200 0 302 2 400 0

Duren 2b 5 2 2 5 Rsthnhslr lf 4 1 1 1 Ginther 3b 4 2 3 4 Uribe rf 4 1 1 2 Belza ss 3 0 2 0 David c 4 0 0 0 Green 1b 4 2 1 0 Phillips dh 4 2 3 0 Harvard cf 2 2 1 0 34 5 8 5 Totals 34 12 14 12

Rice...................................... 010 200 020 — 5 Oklahoma State...................320 300 04x — 12 E — McCarthy 2 (3). LOB — Rice 9, OSU 7. DP — Rice 3, OSU 2. 2B — Hague (15), Seastrunk (11), Duren (15), Phillips (14). HR — Rendon (18), Rathjen (11), Duren (6), Ginther (10), Uribe (6). SB — Rosthenhaus (11).

IP H R ER BB SO Rice

Chargois L,2-1 Simmons Haynes McNair Duffey Fazio Anagnostou

1.0 0.2 2.0 3.0 0.2 0.1 0.1

4 1 3 2 3 1 0

3 2 3 0 4 0 0

3 2 3 0 4 0 0

0 1 1 2 1 2 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0

3 2 0

5 1 1

1 3 2

Oklahoma State

Keeling McCarthy W,2-1 Chambers

3.1 4.2 1.0

3 3 4 2 1 0

HBP — by Simmons (Green), by Simmons (Harvard). WP — McCarthy (3). T — 2:52. A — 2,947.

NORTHWESTERN 6, RSU 3

Northwestern................ 302 000 001 — 6 9 0 Rogers State................. 010 200 000 — 3 8 0 Danny Santiago, Josh Swain (7) and Wade Schwerdtfege. Tyler Garner, Casey Cassity (7) and Lance. W — Santiago (8-5). L — Garner (8-6). S — Swain (3). HR — O’Gorman (17).

OCU 13, SNU 4

CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday At OneOk Field, Tulsa Bracket A winner vs. Bracket B winner, 2:30 p.m.

Class 5A

BRACKET A At Jenks Wednesday’s Games Game 1: Deer Creek vs. Tulsa Washington, 1:30 p.m. Game 2: Chickasha vs. Claremore, 4 p.m. Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2, 4 p.m. Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4, 6:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 4 p.m. Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 6:30 p.m. (if necessary) BRACKET B At Tulsa Union Wednesday’s Games Game 1: Tulsa Kelley vs. Carl Albert, 1:30 p.m. Game 2: Collinsville vs. Duncan, 4 p.m. Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2, 4 p.m. Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4, 6:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 4 p.m. Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 6:30 p.m. (if necessary) CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday At OneOkField, Tulsa Bracket A winner vs. Bracket B winner, noon

Class 4A

At Shawnee Thursday’s Games Game 1: Berryhill vs. Metro Christian, noon Game 2: Hilldale vs. Clinton, 2:30 p.m. Game 3: Weatherford vs. Newcastle, 5 p.m. Game 4: Lone Grove vs. Fort Gibson, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Game 5: Winner Game 2 vs. Winner Game 3, 5 p.m. Game 6: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 4, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Game Game 7: Winner Game 5 vs. Winner Game 6, 5 p.m.

Thursday’s Games At Choctaw H.S. Game 1: Chandler vs. Eufaula, noon Game 2: Plainview vs. Bethel, 2:30 p.m. Game 3: Sperry vs. Beggs, 5 p.m. Game 4: Purcell vs. Verdigris, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games At Shawnee Game 5: Winner Game 2 vs. Winner Game 3, noon Game 6: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 4, 2:30 p.m. Saturday’s Game At Shawnee Game 7: Winner Game 5 vs. Winner Game 6, 2:30 p.m.

Class 2A

Thursday’s Games At Dolese Park Game 1: Dale vs. Pioneer, noon Game 2: Lincoln Christian vs. Latte, 2:30 p.m. Game 3: Mangum vs. Oktaha, 5 p.m. Game 4: Silo vs. Wister, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games At Dolese Park Game 5: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 3, 1 p.m. Game 6: Winner Game 2 vs. Winner Game 4, 3:30 p.m. Saturday’s Game At Shawnee Game 7: Winner Game 5 vs. Winner Game 6, noon

College

Game 2: Oklahoma City 15, Northwestern 13 Game 3: Southern Nazarene 10, Wayland Baptist 6 Tuesday’s Games Game 4: Northwestern 6, Rogers State 3 Game 5: Lubbock Christian vs. Wayland Baptist Game 6: Oklahoma City 13, Southern Nazarene 4 Game 7: Southern Nazarene vs. Northwestern Game 8: Winner Game 5 vs. Oklahoma City Wednesday’s Games Game 9: Winner Game 7 vs. Loser Game 8, noon Game 10: Winner Game 8 vs. Winner Game 9, 3 p.m., championship Thursday’s Game Game 11: If necessary, noon

Mozingo rf Hague ss Comerota 1b Rendon 3b Seastrunk c Rathjen dh Fuda lf Ratterree 2b Sltzbgh cf Totals

BRACKET B At Claremore Wednesday’s Games Game 1: Jenks vs. Edmond Memorial, 1:30 p.m. Game 2: Owasso vs. Norman North, 4 p.m. Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2, 4 p.m. Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4, 6:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 4 p.m. Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 6:30 p.m. (if necessary)

Big 12 Standings

At Oklahoma City Jim Wade Stadium Monday’s Games Game 1: Lubbock Christian 12, Rogers State

ab r h bi

BRACKET A At Bixby Wednesday’s Games Game 1: Edmond Santa Fe vs. Tulsa Union, 1:30 p.m. Game 2: Putnam North vs. Broken Arrow, 4 p.m. Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2, 4 p.m. Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4, 6:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 4 p.m. Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5, 6:30 p.m. (if necessary)

SOFTBALL

SAC Tournament

Rice

Baseball Pairings Class 6A

Class 3A

Big 12 Standings

8

SPORTS/SCOREBOARD

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

...

Southern Nazarene... 100 300 000 — 4 9 1 Oklahoma City........... 241 212 01x — 13 15 2 Andrew Steinmeyer, Mac Gordon (2), Chris Eastham (6), Adam Bies (9) and Ryon Butts.

Conference W L T Pct. Texas................ 14 2 0 .875 Oklahoma ........ 13 3 0 .812 Oklahoma St ... 12 6 0 .667 Texas A&M ...... 12 6 0 .667 Missouri........... 11 7 0 .611 Texas Tech ....... 7 11 0 .389 Nebraska.......... 7 11 0 .389 Baylor .............. 6 12 0 .333 Iowa State ....... 4 14 0 .222 Kansas ............. 2 16 0 .111

All Games W L T Pct. 41 11 0 .788 40 10 0 .800 43 13 0 .768 41 13 0 .759 44 10 0 .815 35 15 0 .700 29 26 0 .537 26 23 0 .510 26 28 0 .481 21 34 0 .382

Friday’s Games Texas Tech vs. Kansas, 5 p.m. Baylor vs. Iowa State, 5 p.m. Monday’s Results Georgia 9, Texas 0 Missouri 5, Nebraska 9

HOCKEY

NHL Playoffs Conference Semifinals (Best-of-7) Eastern Conference

Pittsburgh vs. Montreal Saturday, May 8: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 1 Monday, May 10: Montreal 4-3, series tied 3-3 Wednesday, May 12: Montreal at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Boston vs. Philadelphia Friday, May 7: Philadelphia 5, Boston 4, OT Monday, May 10: Philadelphia 4-0, Boston leads series 3-2 Wednesday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.

Western Conference

Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Tuesday, May 11: Chicago 5-1, Chicago wins series 4-2 San Jose 4, Detroit 1 Saturday, May 8: San Jose 2-1, San Jose wins series 4-1

SOCCER

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Norman 1, Edmond North 0, SO Jenks 3, Broken Arrow 2 Tulsa Union 5, Edmond Santa Fe 1 Norman North 1, Putnam North 0 Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Norman at Jenks Norman North 1, Tulsa Unio 0

Tuesday’s Game Norman North 1, Tulsa Union 0

Tulsa Union............................................0 0 — 0 Norman North....................................... 1 0 — 1 Goals — NN: Will Smith (JT Harrison). SOG — Union 8; NN 12. Saves — Union 7; NN 6.

Class 6A Girls

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Edmond North 3, Edmond Memorial 2 Broken Arrow 2, Jenks 0 Tulsa Union 4, Ponca City 1

Tramel: Making memories

Mustang 2, Westmoore 0

Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Edmond North at Broken Arrow Mustang at Tulsa Union

Class 5A Boys

FROM PAGE 1C

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Northwest 3, Durant 1 Tulsa Kelley 7, Tulsa Memorial 0 Tulsa Washington 2, Tulsa Rogers 1 Deer Creek 3, McGuinness 2, SO Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Tulsa Kelley at Northwest Tulsa Washington at Deer Creek

Class 5A Girls

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Deer Creek 3, Carl Albert 0 Tulsa Kelley 8, Tulsa Edison 1 Tulsa Washington 3, Claremore 1 McGuinness 11, Chickasha 1 Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Tulsa Kelley at Deer Creek McGuinness 2, Tulsa Washington 1

Tuesday’s Game MCGUINNESS 2 TULSA WASHINGTON 1

Tulsa Washington................................. 1 0 — 1 McGuinness........................................... 1 1 — 2 Goals — TW: Nsen (Taylor); McG: Tonseth (unassisted), Gonce (Akin). SOG — TW: 11; McGuinness: 5. Saves — Verden 0; McGuinness: Hight 5

Class 4A Boys

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Madill 3, Classen 0 Metro Christian 3, Stilwell 1 Cascia Hall 5, Verdigris 0 Santa Fe South 3, OKC Dove Science 2, 2OT Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Madill at Metro Christian Cascia Hall at Santa Fe South

Class 4A Girls

Quarterfinals Friday, May 7 Heritage Hall 1, Elk City 0, OT Verdigris 3, Cascia Hall 0 Seq. Claremore 2, Fort Gibson 1, OT Oklahoma Christian 3, Bethany 1 Semifinals Tuesday, May 11 Verdigris 4, Heritage Hall 0 Seq. Claremore at Oklahoma Christian

TENNIS

High School Tuesday’s Results Regionals Class 4A Boys

At Tulsa, LaFortune Tennis Center Team Scoring 1. Metro Christian 2. OBA 3. Seminole 4. Hugo 5.Perry 6. Bristow 7. Cleveland 8. Chishiolm 9.Antlers #1 Singles 1. Jason Proctor- Metro Christian 2. Sam Cannon- OBA 3. Chance Schweer- Perry 4. Jordan Turner- Seminole #2 Singles 1. Mitchel Knight- Metro Christian 2. Luke Thomas- OBA 3. Dar Patel- Perry 4. Danny Robinson- Bristow #1 Doubles 1. Richison/Brothers- Metro Christian 2. Dexeus/Herr- OBA 3. Carrell/Trammell- Seminole 4. Payne/Hodson- Cleveland #2 Doubles 1. Pride/Hays- Metro Chrisitan 2. Choate/Richmond- Seminole 3. Ramseyer/Marshall- OBA 4. Andrew/Hague- Perry

Friends and comrades who might never make the spotlight but find a place in teammates’ hearts. “He called all the time,” said Switzer, who can say a lot with few words. “Great kid, great person. Kids loved him. He was a talker. Great smile. Bust his (butt). Wasn’t big enough to play. Recruited back when you could take more players.” A few years back, Franklin got colon cancer. But his spirit never waned. Always upbeat. Then on April 12, Hicks talked to a different Kenny Franklin. Franklin’s cancer had spread to his liver. “He was tired,” Hicks said. “He called me that Monday, told me, ‘it ain’t gettin’ no better. It probably won’t be long. But be happy for me.’” Hicks hung up the phone and immediately called Hunt, who lives in Houston. “Make sure you put eyes on him today,” Hicks told Hunt. Switzer, too, received a call from Franklin. “This thing’s got me,” Franklin said. “Coach, just wanted to let you know I love you.” Switzer called Hicks and said they couldn’t wait a week. They had to get to Franklin. So two days later, Switzer, Hicks, Sims and Joe Washington flew to Houston, met Hunt and Sandifer, and drove to Franklin’s home. Franklin was waiting in his bed, placed in the front room, wearing an

OU cap and shirt. For more than four hours, the friends told stories and relived the old days as a big electric fan moved the warm air. Franklin’s family and neighbors stood sentry as he sat up, got up and eventually returned to his bed. “Sad time,” Hunt said, “but it was a good time for us to get back together.” Hicks, who played in Orange Bowls and caught three touchdown passes for the 1980 Los Angeles Rams, said, “Nothing made me feel as good as that did. Knowing we were there for a teammate. A teammate that may not have gotten all the accolades, may not have gotten all the playing time. But he was a Sooner. “That’s at the top of my list. You could see the joy in his eyes, to see that he was happy to know that people care.” Four days later, Kenny Franklin died. ●●● Switzer wanted Lott’s old backfield together. That was impossible for the ’78 backfield, since David Overstreet died in that 1984 car crash. But the ’77 backfield — Lott, King, Sims, Peacock — was together. “I know what it means to have their teammates around them to celebrate individual awards,” Switzer said. Switzer tried the same thing two years ago, when Joe Wylie went into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. Switzer

wanted to assemble the great ’71 backfield. Leon Crosswhite and Greg Pruitt made it to Waco, but cancer had made Jack Mildren too weak for the trip. Two weeks later, Mildren was dead. Switzer is 72. He’s buried too many of his former players in their 50s or before. He seems to realize that memories are our most precious possession. Seems intent on building as many as possible in the time he has left. “I enjoy being with ‘em,” Switzer said. “Like I always said, when you recruit ‘em, you got ‘em for life.” These Sooners are not unique, though the charisma of their coach might be. Many a ballteam builds a bond that, as Lott said, “never goes away.” But these Sooners, pushed by Switzer, seem intent on celebrating those bonds. “When you get to a place like Oklahoma, you’re told how you’re going to make lifelong relationships,” Hicks said. “You hear it, but you don’t realize it. Coaches that truly care about you. Teammates that truly love you.” The big bear of a man stood in a Waco hall and wiped a tear from his eye. Soon enough, he was back with the gang, celebrating the priceless gifts of friendship and memory. Berry Tramel: 405-760-8080; Berry Tramel can be heard Monday through Friday from 4:40-5:20 p.m. on The Sports Animal radio network, including AM-640 and FM-98.1.

TRANSACTIONS Tuesday’s Deals

BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Named Jerry Krause director of international scouting. MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed INF J.J. Hardy on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 5. Recalled INF Matt Tolbert from Rochester (IL). National League SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled LHP Cesar Ramos from Portland (PCL). Placed RHP Tim Stauffer on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 10. Recalled RHP Adam Russell from Portland. Placed RHP Kevin Correia on the bereavement list. Eastern League TRENTON THUNDER—Announced that RHP Josh Schmidt was transferred back to Trenton from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Southern League CAROLINA MUDCATS—Called up RHP Daryl Thompson from Billings (Pioneer). Announced OF/INF Michael Griffin has been promoted to Louisville (IL). American Association GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS—Released RHP Wade Townsend. Signed RHP Jared Schrom. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Signed RHP Ron Hill and LHP Mitchell Davidson. ST. PAUL SAINTS—Signed INF Kevin Millar. SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS— Released RHP Ray Maldonado and RHP Ricky McGraw. Acquired RHP Chandler Barnard from San Angelo (United) for future considerations. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Signed INF Eric Scott, RHP Michael Gardner and RHP Wade Morrison. WICHITA WINGNUTS—Traded RHP Luke Demko to Lake County (Northern) for a player to be named. Released RHP Kyle Frets, OF Eric Williams and RHP Brock Piper. Can-Am League BROCKTON ROX—Released INF Daniel Berg. United League AMARILLO DILLAS—Agreed to terms with RHP Zachary Cole. BASKETBALL NBA NBA—Announced the Board of Governors approved Mikhail Prokhorov WNBA PHOENIX MERCURY—Waived F Ashley Paris and G-F Nyeshia Stevenson. SEATTLE STORM—Waived F Laura Kurz. FOOTBALL NFL BUFFALO BILLS—Signed RB Chad Simpson. Released DT Marlon Favorite. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Placed WR Limas Sweed on the injured reserve list. Signed WR Isaiah Williams. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Announced the resignation of director of pro personnel Doug Williams. Signed OT Jeremy Trueblood to a one-year contract. HOCKEY NHL DALLAS STARS—Agreed to terms with G Kari Lehtonen on a three-year contract extension through the 2012-13 season. COLLEGE CENTENARY—Promoted Adam Walsh to men’s basketball coach. OHIO—Named Jamall Walker men’s assistant basketball coach. PITTSBURGH—Named Patty Coyle women’s assistant basketball coach. ROBERT MORRIS—Named Andrew Toole men’s basketball coach. RUTGERS—Named Jimmy Martelli men’s assistant basketball coach. STEPHEN F. AUSTIN—Named Jodi Greve and A’Quonesia Franklin women’s assistant basketball coaches.

Barry Switzer, left, visits with Texas High School Football Hall of Fame inductee Bill Gravitt. PHOTO BY MICHAEL BANCALE, WACO TRIBUNE

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ONLINE

FOOD

On to Fish are jumping Sherwood One of the ripple effects from The tournament of champions continues, as Robin Hoods throughout the ages face off in a Planet 46 tournament. PLANET46.COM

the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is rising prices at seafood markets across the country. Find out how Oklahoma is affected. PAGE 3D

GOT A MINUTE?

LIFE

D

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Dave Cathey dcathey@ opubco.com

FOOD DUDE

Out with it! Where’s best patio dining? With the arrival of spring come two Oklahoma traditions: tornadoes and patio dining. Plains-sweeping winds turn hot in summer and brutally cold during winter, so we don’t get a lot of optimal dining time on the veranda. But that doesn’t mean we don’t have options. I could recommend a few, and I reckon I will. But the intent of this column is to gather information. I want to know where you like to partake of patio this time of year. It’s hard to beat the view of downtown from The Bossa Nova Bar above Cafe do Brasil. And few places have a stronger reputation than The Mont in Norman when it comes to dining under the stars. Flatire Burgers in Edmond offers the best of both outdoor eating worlds, offering a covered patio topped by an elevated deck. When Pearl’s Oyster Bar moved a few miles west a few years ago, it didn’t leave behind the patio seating it was famous for throughout the 1980s and ’90s. Iguana Mexican Grill has a small but well-appointed patio in Automobile Alley. Practically every venue along the Bricktown canal offers seating along the water. It’s certainly tough to beat the views of Lake Hefner from Lakeside Fish Grill, Redrock Canyon Grill, Mama Roja’s or Louie’s on the Lake. I do miss the old courtyard at Laredo’s, but its new incarnation, Casa De Los Milagros, does have a patio — it’s still got a few growing seasons to go before it can catch up to the beauty of its predecessor. But as I said, I want to hear from you. Tell me your favorite spots for outdoor dining, and I’ll visit and report back before the weather returns to its regularly scheduled severity.

YOUR TURN Send your feedback by e-mail to dcathey @opubco.com; via Twitter: @TheFood Dood; or leave a comment on The Food Dude’s blog: blog.newsok.com/ fooddude.

QUICK FRESH LOCAL

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

GREENS ORGANIC CHOICE

PHOTOS BY DOUG HOKE / ILLUSTRATION BY MATT CLAYTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Coolgreens’ goal: delicious, healthy food BY DAVE CATHEY Food Editor dcathey@opubco.com

Coolgreens executive chef Trey Ferguson says his job is not just presenting a nice plate of food. “I see the customer as a product of my food,” he said. Customers entrust him with feeding them, so he reciprocates with the most delicious food he can muster while contributing to their good health. “I like my customers,” Ferguson said. “Why would I want to serve them something that would harm their health?” But before you dismiss Coolgreens as a health-food restaurant, know that its first commitment is to deliciousSEE COOLGREENS, PAGE 3D

Drop by the Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market in the Glenbrook East parking lot, just west of Grand Boulevard on NW 63. Featuring local fruits, vegetables, cheeses and other goods, the market is open from 2:30 to 7 p.m. today.

DINING

COOL

Top right: The Skinny Wrap and Skinny Pizza from Coolgreens. Above: Customers can choose signature menu items or custom order pizzas, salads or wraps, choosing from fresh, organic ingredients. Below: The “greens” margarita pizza.

TAKE YOUR PICK OF FARMERS MARKET

DINING

Coolgreens › Where: New location will open Monday in Quail Village shopping center, 14201 N May Ave., Suite 209. The original location was at 6475 Avondale Drive. Information: www.mycool greens.com.

BLOG Read the Food Dude’s review: BLOG.NEWSOK.COM/FOODDUDE

VIDEO Hip to be Healthy Sheli Reynolds will walk you through Coolgreens: MOOD.NEWSOK.COM

RAPTOR RIDGE WINE DINNER The Tasting Room, 4322 N Western Ave., will present a wine dinner with special guest Annie Shulls, owner of Oregon’s Raptor Ridge winery, at 6:30 p.m. Saturday. The evening will include a five-course dinner with wine pairings. Cost is $75 per person plus tax and gratuity. For reservations, call 409-6320 by Thursday.

PEOPLE DAREDEVIL’S SON EYES IDAHO JUMP TWIN FALLS, Idaho

— A spokesman for Robbie Knievel says the motorcycle jumper wants to follow in his daredevil father’s footsteps and attempt to jump the Snake River Canyon in southern Idaho. Jeff Lowe says Knievel was to be in Twin Falls on Monday to discuss the plan with local officials, and that the jump is tentatively set for the July Fourth weekend in 2011, almost four decades after his father’s try. Evel Knievel, who died in 2007, failed to clear the chasm in 1974 in a rocketpowered “Skycycle” when the parachute malfunctioned and deployed after takeoff. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDEX Food TV / Puzzles Dear Abby Horoscope

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

CLASSES

FOOD

TODAY Taste of Mexico — Carolyn Pendley, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $29. THURSDAY Biscotti, Crackers and Scones — Karen Moseley, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $29. SATURDAY Southwest BBQ Chicken — chef Jermiah Duddleston, Gourmet Grille, 1 to 1:45 p.m., free. MAY 17 Natural Dog Treats — Karen Moseley, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $29. MAY 18 Cooking 101— Jill Nevard, Jamie’s Culinary, 6 p.m., $50. Tempura Cooking — Michiko Dowling, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $29. MAY 19 Sharpen Your Knife Skills — Reina Mohan, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $29. Meat and Potatoes I: Grilling and Roasting — chef Beau Stephenson, A Taste of Art, Artspace at Untitled, 6 p.m., $75. MAY 20 Catch of the Day — Howard Moseley, Francis Tuttle, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., $39. MAY 22 The Ultimate Tomato and Fresh Mozzarella Salad — chef Jermiah Duddleston, Gourmet Grille, 1 to 1:45 p.m., free.

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CONTACTS Sherrel Jones’ Hold the Mayo Chicken Salad.

PHOTO BY SHERREL JONES, THE OKLAHOMAN

NO NEED TO SACRIFICE TASTE IF YOU MUST SAY ‘NO’ TO MAYO NUTRITION | CREATIVE OPTIONS OFFERED FOR SANDWICH SPREAD, SALAD DRESSINGS

Sherrel Jones

VIDEO

sjones@ opubco.com

Watch Sherrel Jones show Angi Bruss how to make Hold the Mayo Chicken Salad: NEWSOK.COM

A PASSION FOR FOOD

“Hold the mayonnaise” is a phrase folks with high cholesterol know well, but if you love a good old-fashioned chicken salad with more than a generous dollop, it can be hard to reform. Those of us who cook and prepare food daily for heart-healthy living approach this hold-the-mayo issue as a “cease or decease” order. This challenge at our house meant some retraining of our tastes to enjoy other options for salad dressings and sandwich spreads. You don’t have complete control when dining away from home, but “hold the mayo” can become a necessary automatic response if your doctor says you must. My husband enjoyed his mother’s fabulous chicken salad made strictly by the recipe of Neiman-Marcus cooking and dining maven Helen Corbit. My mother-in-law even sent me to a Helen Corbit cooking class in Houston to make sure I mastered her techniques. Mayonnaise was key to potato salad, chicken salad and tuna salad. Steering my husband away from these lifelong favorites was not easy, but it has become possible. I must say I have nothing against

mayonnaise. I was a mayonnaise fan after being shown by a childhood friend how to make a mayonnaise sandwich: Spread the stuff nice and thick on white bread, fold over and chow down. It was best made with bread so fresh it stuck to the roof of your mouth and behind your front teeth if you had them. Mayonnaise was and is good stuff. Many of us just have to find other options now. Mustard, of course, becomes a player, but it doesn’t exactly fit with a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich. Of course, the BLT is out anyway. All that high-fat, high-sodium stuff is supposed to be off-limits, and that can be discouraging to the person who cooks and especially the one who is forced to change the way he has been eating. It’s easy to use low-fat mayonnaise in smaller amounts, but here are more ideas to make the change: Potato salad. Use a couple of tablespoons of low-fat mayonnaise per half-cup of thick, Greek-style yogurt. (Use plain yogurt, not the vanilla variety.) Add a little garlic powder or chopped fresh dill to brighten the flavor. Thin it with a couple of tablespoons of olive oil. If a

SHERREL’S CITRUS HONEY DRESSING This simple three-ingredient dressing works well on many salads. It is great on fruit salads and especially a fruit and chicken salad using thinly sliced chicken, apples, oranges, fresh seasonal fruit such as strawberries or blueberries, and topped with walnuts or pecans. Makes ½ cup of dressing, enough for 4 salads. 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime, lemon or orange juice or combination to make 3 tablespoons 1 tablespoon honey ¼ cup olive oil

recipe calls for a cup of mayonnaise, try half as much of this yogurt-infused version first. Tuna salad. Add finely chopped sun-dried tomatoes marinated in olive oil with some mustard or only a teaspoon or two of low-fat mayonnaise to bring the tuna together with some pickle relish, minced onion and celery. This also works as a spread. Sandwich spread. Try a little mashed avocado with a few drops of lemon juice and a couple of teaspoons of olive oil. Chicken salad. Use a different approach for my Hold the Mayo Chicken Salad, thinly slicing leftover cooked chicken breast over a bed of lettuce with sliced apple, celery, oranges, fresh strawberries, blueberries or grapes and pecans or walnuts. Dress the combination with a simple honey-lime vinaigrette such as my Citrus Honey Dressing (see below). You can use any cold chicken: fried, smoked, grilled, poached, rotisserie or roasted. Even if you use fried chicken, most of the fatty skin or coating falls away as you slice it. Preparing enough of any maincourse meat to have leftovers for lunching is heart-smart. The need for buying high-sodium-infused deli meats is eliminated. Get other ideas from heart-healthy publications such as “Better Homes and Gardens Heart Healthy Living.” Such publications provide a real boost if you are short on ideas for heart-healthy cooking. It is like having a team of dietitians serving as menu coaches.

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Squeeze juice into a small bowl and remove any seeds. Add other ingredients and blend together using a small whisk or fork. Or use a small jar and shake until all ingredients are well-combined. Drizzle about 2 tablespoons of dressing over each of four individual salads. Cook’s notes: You can change the personality of this dressing easily with the addition of fresh herbs. Use a little finely chopped rosemary with lemon juice for a Mediterranean touch. Add chopped cilantro with lime juice and a dash of cumin for a flair of the Southwest. Try a little chopped fresh mint with orange juice on an all fruit salad. Source: Sherrel Jones.

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Peanut brittle from Governor’s Mansion DEAR MELBA: A reader asked for Shirley Bellmon’s peanut brittle recipe. Shirley Bellmon was my mother, and one thing I remember about Mother’s peanut brittle is that it was paper thin. When we lived in the Governor’s Mansion, we would grease a long stretch of countertop, and two or three of us would work with it until it was very thin.

SHIRLEY BELLMON’S PEANUT BRITTLE 2 cups sugar ½ cup water 1 cup light corn syrup 2 cups raw peanuts Dash of salt 1 heaping teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon vanilla Combine sugar, water and corn syrup in a heavy, large saucepan and boil to hardball stage. Check ei-

Melba Lovelace mlovelace@ opubco.com

SWAP SHOP ther by cold water method or use candy thermometer. Remove from heat. Add raw peanuts and salt. Mixture will be thick. Return to heat and boil until mixture is golden brown, and the nuts smell done. Take from heat. Add baking soda and vanilla. Pour out on well-buttered surface and smooth to thin. If thicker pieces are desired, simply spread mixture over a smaller surface. Crack when cooled. Gail Bellmon Wynne, Enid Betty Pannell, of Pauls Valley, also shared.

DEAR MELBA: Mildred Cable expressed interest in home remedies that use apple cider vinegar. She said she had read an article about it that included an address for ordering a book about it. Dr. Peter Gott recently mentioned a health report called Understanding Osteoarthritis in his column. It may be what Mildred wants, and she can order it by sending a self-addressed, stamped, business-size envelope and a $2 check or money order to Newsletter, Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title. Kay Burns, Edmond DEAR MELBA: Many years ago, there was a NoBake Fruitcake recipe on a graham cracker box. I know it isn’t near Christmastime, but time passes quickly. Maybe we could ask for the recipe now.

I would love to make it for my son if someone still has the recipe. Leona Lovelady, City DEAR MELBA: Here are a few messages I’ve seen on church signs: No God, no peace. Know God, know peace. A lot of kneeling will keep you standing. Home improvement — Bring your family to church. Lena Barrios, City

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DEAR MELBA: Here is one more church sign: If you kneel before God, you can stand before anyone. Rikki Abrams, City DEAR MELBA: And one more: 7 days without God makes one weak. Dennie Hall, Edmond If you have a problem other readers might help solve or an idea you’d like to share, write to Melba’s Swap Shop, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. Please include your name and address.

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Jamie’s Culinary, 9313 N Pennsylvania, 8799999, info@jamiesculinary.com. Gourmet Grille, inside Buy for Less, 3501 Northwest Expressway, 715-2668 or 576-3354. A Taste of Art, Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3, 815-9995, www.artspaceatuntitled.org or info@art spaceatuntitled.org. Francis Tuttle Technology Center, 717-4900, www.francistuttle.com or jmansell@francistuttle. com.

EVENTS ARTINI FUNDRAISER SATURDAY The Young Patrons, Allied Arts’ young professionals group, will hold its annual ARTini fundraiser from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Oklahoma City Public Farmers Market, 311 S Klein. Eleven local restaurants will provide martini tastings and appetizers. Live music, dancing and a silent art auction featuring original work by local artists are also planned. Proceeds will benefit Allied Arts and the 20 local arts groups it supports. Participating restaurants will create and serve original martinis with the goal of winning the Best ARTini award or People’s Choice award. Local celebrity judges will crown the Best ARTini, while guests will select People’s Choice. Each restaurant will reflect this year’s theme, ARTini Time. ARTini tickets are $65 in advance and $75 at the door, and dress is urban chic. For tickets and more information, go online to www.alliedartini.com, call 278-8944 or visit the Allied Arts office at 1015 N Broadway, Suite 200.

WINE, DINNER EVENT OFFERED The Western Concepts Restaurant Group will hold two customer appreciations dinners at The Tasting Room, 4322 N Western Ave. Dinners are planned for 6:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday. The evenings include a five-course meal with wine pairings prepared by each of the chefs at Western Concepts restaurants, which include Sushi Neko, Musashi’s, The Lobby Bar, The Tasting Room and The Coach House. Call 409-6320 by Thursday for price information and reservations.

BEER BREWER USES OKLAHOMA RED WHEAT Mustang Brewing Co. launched its new beer, Mustang Washita Wheat, on Monday at McNellie’s in Midtown. Brewed with Oklahoma red wheat, the new beer is available in six-packs and on tap. “We developed this beer because wheat beers are great beers to drink, and we wanted to support the agriculture community in Oklahoma,” Mustang owner Tim Schoelen said. “I wanted to create a wheat beer from an Oklahoma company for Oklahomans to enjoy.”

‘WILD BREW’ BEER IN STORES TULSA — The Wild Brew committee has launched its own beer, a Belgian-Style IPA, brewed in collaboration with Oklahoma’s Choc Brewing Co. and Marshall Brewing Co. The limited-release beer was brewed in recognition of the Wild Brew festival and is available in Oklahoma and western Arkansas. Members of the Wild Brew committee celebrated the release of the beer with a party May 3 at Dilly Deli. The 12th annual Wild Brew will be July 31 at Exchange Center at Expo Square in Tulsa. Funds raised will support avian research and conservation around the world. Tickets are $50 and must be bought in advance. Those attending must be 21 or older. For more information, go online to www.wild brew.org or call (918) 633-1308.

DINING SKIRVIN NAMES CATERING DIRECTOR The Skirvin Hilton Hotel has named Marc Mansour its new director of catering. Mansour, who has been with the hotel since its reopening in 2007, has served as senior catering manager for the past three years, a role in which he focused on weddings, nonprofit events and galas for the hotel. Mansour holds a degree as a chef in French and Lebanese cuisine from the L’Ecole Hotelier in Beirut, Lebanon, and a degree in hotel and food service administration from the University of Central Oklahoma. He also brings more than 10 years of food service expertise to the position. For more information about the Skirvin and the Park Avenue Grill, go online to skirvinhilton.com or parkavegrill.com or call 272-3040. FROM STAFF REPORTS


LIFE / FOOD

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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Instant savings can lead to peel-off theft Last week we discussed why it’s wrong they just don’t care. I apply the IRCs one to use a coupon on a different item than a week and return the next for a followmanufacturer intended. This week, we up visit only to find that someone has hear from a manufacturer’s removed every single IRC representative who witfrom product packages. nesses a different kind of The stores tell me they ofJill coupon usage problem. Cataldo ten spot customers pullQ: I am a retail merchaning the IRCs off. When apdising representative. proached by store personOne of my duties is to apnel and questioned about ply Instant Redeemable it, the customers say that Coupons (many shoppers COUPON QUEEN there is no law against recall them “peelies,” since moving the IRCs. True, you peel them off the there is no written law. product package) directly to products Are shoppers aware that manufacturon the shelf. These IRCs are placed on ers put a lot of time and money into specific products for specific purposes. placing the IRCs for a specific reason? Sometimes a product is being discon- Without them, the store may lose a sale tinued, and the manufacturer wants to or may get stuck with the product. help move the product off the shelf so Could you educate your readers on this that excess stock won’t have to be problem? shipped back to the reclamation center. A: We’ve touched on in-store coupon Many times the packaging is being theft before in my column, but I thought it changed, and manufacturer uses IRCs was important to feature this letter beto quickly close out products with dat- cause it represents the manufacturer’s perspective instead of the shopper’s. Maned packaging. Many consumers apparently aren’t ufacturers use peelies on certain products, aware of the purpose of these IRCs, or and the peelies’ purpose is closely tied to

moving those particular products off the shelf. I’ve always considered coupons that are stuck to a product to be part of the product’s packaging. Imagine if that coupon were printed on the surface of the box rather than stuck to it. Would you tear apart the box in the store in order to remove the coupon and then leave the product on the shelf? I hope not. And yet, that’s essentially what many shoppers do when they remove peelies without buying the product. Why do people take them? The most common reason seems to be that the shopper wants to buy the product, but not the particular flavor or variety that the peelie is stuck to. They remove the coupon from the first product and use it to buy the second. As we discussed last week, this often results in “off-label” couponing — using a coupon on a product for which it was not intended. Not long ago, my grocery store had a sale on toaster pastries. They were on sale for $1.25 a box, already a good price. The highfiber variety happened to have $1 peelie coupons stuck to the boxes. Do the math.

Now, as I stood in the aisle, snapping up boxes of cheap, high-fiber varieties of the pastries, I witnessed several other shoppers peeling off coupons from the high-fiber boxes then putting a corresponding number of chocolate, brown sugar and creme varieties of the pastries in their carts. Of course, the peelie coupons stated “$1 off high-fiber” toaster pastries. Due to the current bar code setup, the peelies would scan on the other flavors, because the products share the same family code. Unfortunately, the store was left with a shelf half-full of high-fiber toaster pastries, the packages clearly showing peeloff residue where coupons used to be attached. This poses a problem for the store, too, because attractive packaging is a factor in sales. People don’t want to buy products that appear less than perfect. The simple answer? Don’t remove peelies from packages unless you’re actually buying the product to which they are attached. Period. Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three, never passes up a good deal. Learn more about couponing at her website, www.supercouponing.com. CTW FEATURES

Gulf oil spill may cause increase in seafood cost ENVIRONMENT | IMPACT ON PRICE DIFFICULT TO FORESEE BY DAVE CATHEY Food Editor

AND NATALIE MIKLES Tulsa World Scene Writer

Exterior front of Coolgreens restaurant’s newest store, 14201 N May Ave. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Coolgreens: Healthful food FROM PAGE 1D

ness. “Eating healthy doesn’t have to be punishment,” partner Chris Lower said. It helps to have a classically trained chef, such as Ferguson, a graduate of The Coach House apprenticeship program, conceive the menu and execute it with fresh ingredients that are organic and local whenever possible. What you will find are wraps, salads, flatbread pizzas and soups that are made with those ingredients, locally baked bread, house-made dressings and condiments artistically prepared and expertly executed. You’ll also find frozen tart yogurt served with fresh fruit and house-made granola. What you won’t find are potato chips or soda pop. Nor will you find Skittles, toffee or crumbled Oreo cookies to mix with the yogurt. With the temptation of processed foods removed, it’s much easier to try it healthy and learn that delicious doesn’t come in a can, box or aerosol can. “Some of my friends said, ‘You’re not even going to have Diet Coke?’ ” managing partner Allan McMurrain said. “And we almost caved in.” “But then we decided we had to stay true to what this place is all about,” Lower said. The credo is simple: delicious, healthy food. No concessions. If it’s delicious but unhealthy or healthy but not delicious, go elsewhere. “We don’t have any high-fructose corn syrup,” Ferguson said. “The only sugar in any of our food is in the frozen yogurt right now, but we’re trying to find a way to change that.” Change is risky considering how successful the place has been. Despite a menu that one would think lent itself best to the spring and summer, Coolgreens opened in mid-September 2009 and breezed through fall and winter, building a growing fan base each month. That brought

The Gulf Coast oil spill disaster created an initial run at many fish markets across the state, but the long-term effects are difficult to forecast. “I restocked 500 pounds of shrimp that first weekend without a price increase,” said Delancey Miller, primary buyer for Avalon Seafood, 7712 N May Ave. Miller said the store purchases Gulf shrimp from Alabama, but his source has not yet been affected. “I’m being told the real answers will come six to eight months from now. We’re

mostly worried about oil ruining the shrimp larvae.” Miller said the real concern now is about Gulf oysters. Miller, however, said his store doesn’t stock Gulf oysters. Down the street at Gulfport Seafood, 8016 N May Ave., Don Steele said his store stocks Gulf oysters, but the area his source harvests from hasn’t been contaminated. Steele said he hasn’t seen a spike in prices either. Gene Pounds, manager of Bodean Seafood Market in Tulsa, said the market had one of its busiest weeks in the days following the oil spill. Some customers are coming to buy shrimp and seafood, but others have come in with questions about the safety

of seafood brought in from the Gulf. “We assure them we wouldn’t sell a bad product,” Pounds said. “And no one is going to harvest a bad product.” Pounds said availability of Bodean’s Gulf Coast shrimp is unlikely to be affected because they buy seafood from the Texas side of the Gulf. But with more retailers going to the Texas side, the cost is expected to soon increase. “Within a week, we’ll likely be able to notice a difference in pricing,” he said. Steele agreed it won’t take too long to feel the effect if efforts to stop the spread of oil fail. “It’s pretty simple,” Steele said. “If oil touches it, it’s dead.”

Staff photographer honored in food journalists contest FROM STAFF REPORTS

Coolgreens owners, from left, Trey Ferguson, Allan McMurrain and Chris Lower. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

about the happy accident of soup, and flatbread pizzas, too. “We were saving our chicken scraps,” McMurrain said. “And Chris was looking for a way to fit the menu in better with the seasons.” “So we came up with soup,” Ferguson said. “And Trey’s soups, well, you can tell he worked at The Coach House for a long time,” Lower said. “The flatbreads were about trying to warm up the menu, too.” All the breads used at Coolgreens come from Prairie Thunder Bakery. Coolgreens recently introduced an Oklahoma Market Fresh Salad that is made up of only Oklahoma ingredients. The menu contains several signature salads, soups, wraps and pizzas, or you may create your own. Coolgreens is set up similarly to Chipotle or Qdoba, and diners can choose ingredients and watch their meal being prepared. The idea for Coolgreens sprang from the nation’s capital. While visiting his daughter while she attended Georgetown University, local lawyer Tom Wolfe happened upon a place called Sweetgreen, which sold salads and yogurt emphasizing highquality ingredients. “Tom, who’s a lawyer, called me and said he had a client interested in some restaurant consulting,” McMurrain said. The client turned out to be Wolfe, whose pitch interested McMurrain. They planned a trip together to Washington to check out

Sweetgreen. “The place was a little like the Soup Nazi,” McMurrain said. “You turn a corner to get to the counter, and you better be ready to order.” But the food was good enough to compel McMurrain to reach out to one of Oklahoma City’s most successful restaurateurs: Lower. Lower, who owns The Metro Wine Bar and Bistro and a stake in Irma’s Burger Shack and Big Truck Tacos, is not only one of the city’s most prominent restaurateurs but is also a gifted designer. The man who opened and designed the interiors for TheRoosevelt Grill and The Coach House also is responsible for the look of Coolgreens. “When I was giving Chris my pitch, I got the sense that he hated the idea,” McMurrain said. “I even said, ‘You hate this idea, don’t you?’ But he said he was very interested, so we took another trip to D.C.” McMurrain said they reached out to the Sweetgreen owners, three Georgetown graduates, to form a partnership. “Two of them are from New York, and the other is from L.A. They told me they didn’t know anything about the Midwest and were so busy with their operation, they wished us well.” Almost six months after the first store opened, a second store is ready to open its doors at 14201 N May Ave. Plans are set for a third store, which Lower said will be downtown with a fall opening planned.

The Oklahoman staff photographer Chris Landsberger’s photo of a fork holding several food items was one of three Best Food Visual winners in a national contest. Landsberger won the award in the Association of Food Journalists’ Awards Competition 2010 for his photo that appeared on the cover of the Life section’s Dec. 9 edition. The photo showed a fork holding mashed potatoes, grilled vegetables, mac and cheese, ham and turkey. It was featured with a story by Food Editor Dave Cathey on holiday food preparation and gourmet food from Market-C, 401 NW 23. Yvette Walker, director of presentation and custom publishing, said the photo was the first one used in a redesign of Life’s food section. It also was the first time The Oklahoman has won in the national contest. The association announced the winners in the contest and listed them in alphabetical order with each category. The placement of the winners (first, second or third) will be announced at the group’s annual conference Sept. 2 in Santa Fe, N.M. Other winners in the Best Food Visual category are David Carson, of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Richard Stokes, of Reno (Nev.) Magazine.

This photo by staff photographer Chris Landsberger was one of three photographs honored by the Association of Food Journalists. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

‘Man v. Food’ series films at 3 area eateries BY DAVE CATHEY Food Editor dcathey@opubco.com

Production crews for the Travel Channel’s “Man v. Food” were in the Oklahoma City area last week to visit three restaurants for an upcoming episode. The show, hosted by Adam Richman, highlights an eating challenge in a given city or area while featuring two other eateries in the same locale. The challenge segment was shot Thursday at the Steak and Catfish Barn, 5175 E Waterloo Road in Edmond. Dino Smalley, who owns the place with his wife, Maria Vitale, said Richman was going for the

title of Top Cat, which is a yearly challenge to customers. The record for most catfish eaten in a single sitting is 28. The Steak and Catfish Barn opened in 2004; it was previously Vitale’s Italian Kitchen. Smalley and Vitale also own a second Steak and Catfish location at N Walker Ave., where they still offer Italian food. The crew also spent time shooting at Sid’s Diner in El Reno and Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, which was shot on Mother’s Day. Richman and the film crew spent all day Sunday filming in Cattlemen’s kitchen and the restaurant. Richman also visited

The Drunken Fry and Big Truck Tacos for eats and drinks, but no filming was done at either place. Smalley was told by producers that the episode of “Man v. Food” will air in August.

Don’t just go to the movies, GO HOLLYWOOD!

SPOTLIGHT 14 • NORMAN 1100 N. Interstate Dr. • 579-0911

For Show Times call 579-0911 or visit

www.gohollywood.com


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Actress relates to matriarch role BY JACQUELINE CUTLER Zap2it

Actors aren’t usually thrilled when unimaginative journalists ask how they’re like their characters. After all, their job is to slip into different personae. Julie Bowen, however, cheerfully volunteers how much she is like Claire, her character on ABC’s comedy “Modern Family,” airing at 8 p.m. Wednesdays. Like Claire, she is the mother of three; Bowen has twin 1-year-olds and a 3-year-old, all boys. Q: How are you like Claire? A: As I am talking to you, I am wildly multitasking: preparing lunch for the 3-yearold to take to school, and I am cleaning the kitchen. I believe if you are sitting still, you are doing something wrong. We both feel if we are not driving the train, it will never leave the station. It is an incredible amount of arrogance on my part thinking that no one could operate without me. Julie Bowen Q: What are you great at as a mom? A: I have a lot of energy. If it involves energy and strength, I can do it. I am good at planning and getting everybody from one place to the next. I don’t mind hauling a lot of gear. I am a pack animal. I am good at feats of strength and stamina and endurance. I look at it as an athletic contest. Q: What are you terrible at? A: Consistency and disciplining is the worst. I do it. It’s just so hard. ... It’s incredibly challenging. I can be a real control freak in life anyhow. Is it being a good parent or a control freak? Q: What’s the worst meal you ever served? A: Oh, my God, really? There are so many, many bad meals to choose from. I am a terrible cook. One night my son just wanted processed turkey, sandwich turkey. I can’t get him to eat anything else; give him luncheon meat, and he will eat. Q: What do you find yourself doing as a mom that you never thought you would do? A: Everything! I never, ever, ever thought I would be somebody that would — Lord, all the things I do, I can’t believe the things that I do. I grew up in a house with three girls. I didn’t even go to school with boys until I was 14. That I can spend a long time making a train set and know all of the trains from “Thomas.” I never had strong opinions on guns and children. It doesn’t matter if you give him a gun or not. My son can turn a flower into a gun. Q: What will you absolutely not do as a mom? A: Put my kids in the business. And I work with kids all the time, and they are great, and their moms are great, but I want them to have an out-of-work experience for their childhood. Q: What’s your guilty pleasure as a mom? A: Running. Running used to be exercise — something I had to do and get over with. Now it is my selfish joy, my selfish, selfish pleasure. My runs get longer and longer.

WEDNESDAY EVENING 6 P.M. Cox DS DR UV KFOR-4 NBC

KTUZ-30 TELE

KOCO-5 ABC

KWTV-9 CBS

KOCB-34 CW

KOKH-25 Fox

OETA-13 PBS

KSBI-52 Family

KAUT-43 MyNet

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“The Middle,” 7:30 p.m., KOCO-5. Mike decides that he and Brick should try to be more social at the Heck family barbecue. “Mercy,” 8 p.m., KFOR-4. Veronica finds herself in the right place at the right time to help two boys trapped in an abandoned building.

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10 P.M.

10:30

◊NewsChannel ◊Extra Edition ◊Minute to Win It Musician ◊Mercy “That Crazy Bitch Was ◊Law & Order: Special Victims ◊NewsChannel (:35) The 4 at 6PM (CC) (CC) 305 Kevin Jonas plays for charity. (In Right” (Season Finale) Sonia Unit “Wannabe” Authorities 4 at 10PM (CC) Tonight Show 4 725 Stereo) (CC) 8021 treats a psychic patient. (In Ste- search for a rapist. (In Stereo) 7066744 With Jay Leno reo) (CC) 6299 (CC) 9763 78634096 12 Corazones 99522 El Clon Un amor capaz de romp- Perro Amor No hay apuesta más ¿Dónde Está Elisa? 66152 T 30 Noticias Decisiones er la barrera del tiempo. 10928 peligrosa que la del juego del 61251 704473 30 amor. 29676 ◊Eyewitness ◊Wheel of The Middle ◊The Middle ◊Modern Fam- ◊Cougar Town ◊(:01) Happy Town “Polly Wants ◊Eyewitness ◊(:35) Nightline News 5 (CC) Fortune “State “The Fun Axl sets out to ily “Hawaii” The “Breakdown” a Crack at Her” An ominous News 5 (CC) (CC) 66246980 5 9541 Fair” (CC) 7913 House” (CC) clean the family kids get into (In Stereo) (CC) hawk soars over Haplin. (In Ste- 6654831 2305 pool. 9305 mischief. 8725 4119251 reo) (CC) 52386 ◊News 9 at ◊Entertain◊The New Ad- The Big Bang ◊Criminal Minds “Exit Wounds” ◊CSI: NY “Unusual Suspects” A ◊News 9 at ◊(:35) Late 6:00 PM (CC) ment Tonight ventures of Old Theory (In Ste- Garcia investigates murders in 14-year-old boy is shot. (In Ste- 10 PM (CC) Show With Da9 4893 (In Stereo) (CC) Christine (CC) reo) (CC) 4657 Alaska. (In Stereo) (CC) 94386 reo) (CC) 74522 9313560 vid Letterman 8473 5893 46810102 Two and a Half Two and a Half ◊America’s Next Top Model The ◊America’s Next Top Model My Name Is That ’70s Show According to Frasier “Roz, Men (CC) 5305 Men (CC) 6657 Earl “Sticks & (CC) 92893 Jim “The Hot a Loan” (CC) models face a double elimination. (Season Finale) The winner is 34 Stones” 91725 Wife” 77096 86744 (CC) 30102 announced. (CC) 16522 The Simpsons The Simpsons Lie to Me “Lack of Candor” Se- ◊American Idol One contestant ◊Fox Primetime (:45) Fox 25 ◊Fox 25 Late ◊TMZ (In “Bart After “24 Minutes” crets about Reynolds. (In Stereo) Sports Wrap is eliminated. (In Stereo Live) News at 9 (CC) Edition (CC) Stereo) (CC) 25 Dark” 23305 (CC) 14657 (PA) (CC) 18560 Up 61482015 76183 (CC) 94980 1129676 85831 The People’s Business 45034 State of Cre- ◊Secrets of the Dead “Churchill’s ◊Nightly Busi- Oklahoma ◊American Masters “The Doors: When You’re News Report ativity (CC) ness Report Strange” History of the Doors. (In Stereo) (CC) Deadly Decision” French fleet is 13 (CC) 1589 87675 (CC) 7909 79763 destroyed. 44305 Judge Hatchett My Wife and Matlock “The Gambler” (In Ste- In the Heat of the Night “...And The King of The King of My Wife and Paid Program Kids Parents reo) (CC) 87676 Justice for Some” (In Stereo) Queens “S’no Queens (CC) Kids “Empty 47657 52 (CC) 54251 meet. 78831 (CC) 63096 Job” 48299 61725 Nest” 38909 Law & Order: Special Victims The Unit Bob is forced to run The Unit “Whiplash” Members ◊Oklahoma’s Star Trek: The Next Generation M*A*S*H “Crisis” of the team are forced to hunt News Channel “Homeward” (In Stereo) (CC) (CC) 85265 43 Unit “Persona” Abused house- interference when the team’s wife. (In Stereo) (CC) 26638 plans go awry. (CC) 47034 down one of their own. 23454 4 at 9 99909 850152 Ghost Whisperer Melinda’s rela- Ghost Whisperer “Leap of Faith” Ghost Whisperer “Thrilled to Ghost Whisperer “Stage Fright” Ghost Whisperer “Cursed” Doll62 tionship with Sam is in limbo. (In Sam saves Melinda from mortal Death” Mysterious woman. (In A ghost wreaks havoc on a soap house full of ghosts in need. (In Stereo) (CC) 847589 danger. 462812 Stereo) (CC) 471560 opera. 468096 Stereo) (CC) 461183 Hasta que el Dinero nos Separe (SS) Don Francisco Presenta (SS) Impacto Extra Noticiero 36 Mi Pecado (SS) Behind 9251 Jeffrey 8015 Bible 5299 Van Impe Pres Praise the Lord (CC) 22183 14 Billy Graham Classic 93522 Celebration 36928 Evans 95183 Wisdom 34657 Casey 94541 K. Copeland 563 Reagan 25725 Hagee 49305 Rod P. 96725 Joni Lamb

ÊMLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals vs. Houston Astros (Live) Ford Weekly 3 - - - Ford H.S. 183 Sports 763 ◊WGN News at Nine 460454 Scrubs 111676 Scrubs 197096 19 239 307 180 Funniest Home Videos 849947 } ››› “Lethal Weapon” (1987) Mel Gibson. ‘R’ 622367 Grey’s Anatomy “Some Kind of Grey’s Anatomy “Scars and Sou- } ›› “Feast of Love” (2007, Drama) Morgan Freeman, Greg Will & Grace Will & Grace 25 108 252 360 Miracle” Meredith gets a visit in venirs” The race for chief heats Kinnear, Radha Mitchell. Friends tell tales of love, pain and happi- (In Stereo) (CC) “Dolls and Dolls” the afterlife. 890638 up. (CC) 433367 189034 165454 ness. ‘R’ (CC) 446831 Malcolm-Mid. Malcolm-Mid. Chris 930560 Chris 926367 Lopez 467299 Lopez 619725 Nanny 903676 Nanny 989096 26 170 299 314 Troop 642893 SpongeBob Dog 925638 Dog the Bounty Hunter 785229 Dog 913893 Dog 454725 ◊Billy 606251 Billy 990102 Billy 7132980 27 118 265 166 The First 48 (CC) 634034 Live 1502003 ÊBowling USBC Women’s U.S. Open. From Dallas. 5496812 SportsNation (CC) 1207693 E:60 8057170 28 144 209 606 Football Live Baseball Tonight (Live) 565305 SportsCenter (CC) 535164 29 140 206 602 ÊMLB Baseball Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) 634396 True Life (In Stereo) 451763 City 277638 Hills 289473 ◊The Challenge 457947 The Challenge 450034 30 160 331 502 True Life (In Stereo) 818034 ÊNBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) 688744 ÊNBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) 329589 31 138 245 108 ◊Weird or What? (CC) 109763 MythBusters (CC) 185183 ◊Worst-Case ◊Worst-Case Weird or What? (CC) 108034 (3:30) } ››› “Gangs of New } ›› “Star Trek Generations” (1994, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, William } ››› “Star Trek: First Contact” (1996) PatYork” (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio. Shatner, Malcolm McDowell. Premiere. The Enterprise crew encounters a deranged rick Stewart. Premiere. Half-robot Borg tries to ‘R’ (CC) 390760 scientist. ‘PG’ 615183 sabotage a rocket flight. ‘PG-13’ 356928 NCIS “UnSEALed” 261102 NCIS “Escaped” 712251 NCIS “Faking It” 738299 ◊In Plain Sight (CC) 741763 Law & Order: SVU 711522 (4:30) } ›› “Beowulf” } ›› “30 Days of Night” (2007, Horror) Josh Hartnett, Melissa George, Danny } ›› “30 Days of Night” (2007, Horror) Josh (2007) Voices of Ray Winstone. Huston. Hungry vampires descend on an Alaskan town. ‘R’ 3505251 Hartnett, Melissa George. Hungry vampires de‘PG-13’ 3522928 scend on an Alaskan town. ‘R’ 8035251 ’70s Show ’70s Show } ››› “Beetlejuice” (1988) Michael Keaton. ‘PG’ 338473 Funniest Home Videos 459305 The 700 Club (CC) 429164 Big 12 27183 Rangers Live ÊMLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Texas Rangers. (Live) 856909 Rangers Live Final 12947 Wizards-Place Han. Montana “Agent Cody Banks 2” 4584744 Phineas Ferb Phineas, Ferb Han. Montana Wizards-Place Deck 102928 Extreme Makeover 4027676 Extreme Makeover 1302247 } ››› “Lethal Weapon” (1987, Action) Mel Gibson. (In Stereo) ‘R’ 4075386 Lethal Wpn 2 Pregnant at 70 (CC) 270893 Strongest Toddler 491299 Hoarding: Buried Alive 400947 My Strange Addiction 480183 Hoarding: Buried Alive 483270 CSI: Crime Scn 285725 UFC Unleashed (CC) 499831 UFC Unleashed (CC) 475251 The Ultimate Fighter 495015 UFC Prime Ultimate Fight Tough Love Couples 445270 Undateable “Hour 1” 642096 Undateable “Hour 2” 651744 ◊Undateable “Hour 3” 631980 Beauty 724299 Beauty 733947 Cops 4208947 Cops 4299299 Southern Sting Southern Sting Most Daring 4861909 Most Daring 4874473 Forensic Files Forensic Files Ghost Hunters “Best of Stanley Ghost Hunters “Manson Mur- Ghost Hunters “Titanic Terror” Ghost Hunters “Hindenburg Ghost Hunters “Salem Witch” Hotel” TAPS investigates para- ders” Site near the Manson An exhibit of artifacts from the Crash Site” The Hindenburg TAPS investigates a bar in Sanormal activity. 2854638 murders. (CC) 4876831 Titanic. (CC) 4852251 crash site. (CC) 4872015 lem, Mass. (CC) 4875102 106 & Park: Top 10 179725 Trey 577183 Bling 200909 } ›› “Lockdown” (2000) Richard T. Jones. ‘R’ 716544 The Mo’Nique Show 766229 Best Pig Out 7420251 Man-Carnivore Food 9756247 Man v. Food Man v. Food Food 5937893 Man v. Food Best Pig Out 1829305 Total Drama Johnny Test Dude 8845229 Destroy Build Ed, Edd Ed, Edd King of Hill King of Hill Family Guy Family Guy Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Cosby Show Cosby Show Ray 1621386 Ray 1600893 Rich 7300183 Rich 3850102 Roseanne Roseanne Daily 5013638 Colbert Report Chappelle’s Chappelle’s Futurama Futurama South 8839164 Ugly 5013164 ◊Daily 8018305 ◊Colbert Report Challenge 2852270 Challenge 4881763 Flay 8179831 Bobby Flay Dinner: Impossible 4887947 Good Eats Unwrapped House Hunters House Hunters ◊Property Property Holmes on Homes 4077893 House Hunters House Hunters Ren. 8001015 ◊Nails 8010763 Untamed and Uncut 66218 ◊River Monsters 49454 River Monsters 58102 Monsters Inside Me 45638 River Monsters 48725 19th Hole (Live) 4027676 } ›› “The Greatest Game Ever Played” (2005) Shia LaBeouf. ‘PG’ 7544725 19th Hole Golf 6928299 Quest 6937947 Earth-Made 3857015 America the Story of Us The Civil War rages. (CC) 5000386 Sex in the Civil War 3949270 Sex Civil War 7637218 Seinfeld Seinfeld Meet-Browns Meet-Browns Meet, Browns Meet, Browns ◊Payne 301201 ◊Payne 275305 Lopez Tonight 713980 (5:00) } ››› “The Happy } ››› “The Picture of Dorian Gray” (1945, Horror) George } ››› “The Last Time I Saw Paris” (1954, Drama) Elizabeth Road” (1957) Gene Kelly, Barbara Sanders, Hurd Hatfield, Angela Lansbury. Oscar Wilde’s Londoner Taylor, Van Johnson, Walter Pidgeon. An American in postwar Laage. ‘NR’ (CC) 3045744 stays young, but his portrait ages. ‘NR’ (CC) 1927096 Paris recalls his tragic marriage. ‘NR’ (CC) 1892251 ◊E! News ◊The Daily 10 Too Young to Kill: 15 Shocking Crimes 248454 ◊Rich Kids Who Kill 668034 Chels 711725 E! News NASCAR Hub 6415265 Racing Chef NASCAR NASCAR Hall 7483744 Pass Time Pass Time Pass Time Hub 9237034 Top Chef Masters 812893 Top Chef Masters 477744 Top Chef Masters 453164 ◊Top Chef Masters 7979560 Top Chef Masters 83434788 The Golden The Golden Touched by an Angel “The Qual- } “Love Is a Four Letter Word” (2007, Romance) Teri Polo, Rob- The Golden The Golden Girls (CC) Girls (CC) ity of Mercy” (In Stereo) (CC) Girls (CC) ert Mailhouse, Barry Bostwick. Respective attorneys for a divorcing Girls (CC) 9545283 5840675 3956560 1197283 9197003 couple have an affair. (CC) 3943096 Snapped 3862947 Snapped 3965218 Snapped 3941638 Snapped 3954102 Snapped 3964589

Discovery 32 182 278 120 MythBusters (CC) 616638 AMC

33 130 254 -

USA

34 105 242 124

FX

35 137 248 128

Family FSN Disney CMT TLC SPIKE VH1 TruTV

36 37 38 39 40 45 46 48

SYFY

49 122 244 151

BET Travel Cartoon TVLand Comedy Food HGTV ANPL Golf History TBS

50 51 52 54 56 57 58 59 60 61 62

TCM

63 132 256 790

E! Speed Bravo

64 114 236 134 65 150 607 652 67 129 273 181

180 416 172 166 178 168 162 204

124 215 176 106 107 110 112 184 401 120 139

311 679 290 327 280 241 335 246

329 277 296 301 249 231 229 282 605 269 247

178 764 302 525 250 145 518 165

155 254 325 138 140 452 450 252 641 270 112

Hallmark 165 185 312 176 Oxygen

7 P.M.

TODAY’S TOP TV PICKS

166 127 251 368

SHORT TAKES TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

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Composer Burt Bacharach, 82. Country singer Billy Swan, 68. Actress Linda Dano (“Another World”), 67. Keyboardist Ian McLagen (Small Faces and The Faces), 65. Singer Steve Winwood, 62. Actress LindLinda Dano say Crouse, 62. Actor Bruce Boxleitner, 60. Singer Billy Squier, 60. Actor Gabriel Byrne, 60. Country singer Kix Brooks (Brooks and Dunn), 55. Actor Ving Rhames, 51. Guitarist Billy Duffy (The Cult), 49. Actor Emilio Estevez, 48. Actress Vanessa Williams (“Soul Food,” “Melrose Place”), 47. Keyboardist Eddie Kilgallon (Ricochet), 45. Actor Stephen Baldwin, 44. Actress Kim Fields, 41. Actress Jamie Luner (“Melrose Place,” “Profiler”), 39. Actor Mackenzie Astin, 37. Actor Jason Biggs (“American Pie”), 32. Actor Malcolm David Kelley (“Lost”), 18. Actors Sullivan and Sawyer Sweeten (“Everybody Loves Raymond”), both 15.

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TV BRIEF CELEBRITIES SIGN ON FOR ‘CURB: THE DISCUSSION’ Jerry Seinfeld (“Seinfeld”), Taraji P. Henson (“The Division”) and Jon Hamm (“Mad Men”) are among the first celebrity panelists to join TV Guide Network’s “Curb: The Discussion.” “Discussion” will air immediately following each episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” the HBO show that will premiere on basic cable June 2. TV Guide Network is not cutting the “Curb” episodes to fit a traditional half-hour format, thereby allowing the show to play as originally intended by series creator and star Larry David. The episodes will be edited only for language and nudity. FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS


ADVICE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Abby’s Famous Pecan Pie takes the cake DEAR ABBY: Years ago you contest. “To the delight of my wife published your recipe for Abby’s and friends,” he wrote, “and the Famous Pecan Pie. I cut it out and chagrin of other contestants — all made it often because it was the women — I took first prize.” The best pecan pie I evrecipe he used was er tasted. one my mother, I have misplaced Pauline Phillips, my recipe. I have had printed in this Jeanne come across other column. Phillips ones, but not My mother had yours. Would you a notorious sweet be so kind as to retooth and had disprint it in your cocovered the pie DEAR ABBY lumn? I have comwhile a guest at the mitted to bringing a Phoenix Hotel in couple of pies to an upcoming Lexington, Ky. (The hotel has event. It would mean a lot to me to since been demolished.) The recibe able to use it again. I know ev- pe had been created by the hotel’s eryone who tastes it will agree that pastry chef, who kindly shared it it’s the best they have ever eaten. with her. Because one good turn Ruby, Lakewood, Wash. deserves another, here it is: DEAR RUBY: I have no doubt ABBY’S FAMOUS that they will. Years ago, a male reader informed me that a festival PECAN PIE had been held in his community, 9-inch unbaked pie crust part of which was a pie baking 1 cup light corn syrup

1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 3 eggs, slightly beaten 1 ⁄3 cup butter, melted ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 heaping cup pecan halves Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, combine corn syrup, sugar, eggs, butter, salt and vanilla; mix well. Pour into unbaked pie crust; sprinkle with pecan halves. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 to 50 minutes or until center is set. (Toothpick inserted in center will come out clean when pie is done.) If the crust or pie appears to be getting too brown, cover with foil for remaining baking time. Cool. You can top with a bit of whipped cream, but even plain, nothing tops this! TIP: The original recipe stated that the pie should be baked 45

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to 50 minutes in a preheated 350-degree gas oven. If an electric oven is used, it may be necessary to add 15 to 20 minutes to the baking time. (Begin testing the pie with a toothpick after 45 minutes.) Enjoy! Readers, this recipe is included in my set of cookbooklets, which contains more than 100 mouthwatering recipes for soups, salads, appetizers, main courses and desserts. Some readers have told me they used them to host Dear Abby-themed dinner parties. The set can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $12 to Dear Abby — Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. UNIVERSAL UCLICK

BILLY GRAHAM DEAR DR. GRAHAM: How big is God? Is He bigger than the moon? I’m in first grade, and my mother said to ask you. A.F. DEAR A.F.: I know it’s hard to imagine, but God isn’t just bigger than the moon, He is bigger than the whole universe. God is bigger than all the stars you can see at night, and even the ones you can’t see. We know this because God created the whole universe. He couldn’t make something that is bigger than Himself, could He? No, of course not. The Bible says of God, “The heavens, even the highest heavens, cannot contain You” (2 Chronicles 6:18). The stars and everything else that God has created remind us of His power and greatness. They also remind us that God is everywhere. Can we see God, like we can see the moon or the stars? No, we can’t. The reason is that God doesn’t have a physical

body. You and I do, but He doesn’t. God is a spiritual being. That means He isn’t limited to one place or one time. No matter where we are, God is already there. That is one reason why you can pray to Him and can know that He hears you. The most important facts I can tell you about God are these: God loves you. God made you. God knows all about you, and God loves you. He loves you so much that He came down to Earth and became a man, and that man was Jesus Christ. Why not thank God right now for His love for you? Then ask Jesus to come into your heart, so you can begin to follow Him and live for Him the rest of your life. Send questions to “My Answer,” c/o Billy Graham, Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, 1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, NC 28201, call (877) 247-2426 or go online to www.billygraham.org. TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

CATHY

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5D

HOROSCOPE

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Because you have been through every step of a project, you are a true craftsman. Those who seek your counsel are in for a treat. You will immediately see how things could be better and know exactly what to do to make it so. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are more alert in the morning and should schedule any important written correspondence, planning or managing of funds during those peak performance hours before noon. GEMINI (May 21-June 21): The deeper side of life can be accessed through the shallow things. Every river runs to the sea. You still can learn what you want to know from someone who talks superficially — if you listen well. CANCER (June 22-July 22): The welcome wagon will figure into today’s events. Either it’s you being welcomed or you doing the welcoming. It will be important to make newcomers feel accepted. LEO (July 23Aug. 22): Why is it that when someone says “we need to talk,” it’s usually about something serious, ugly or unpleasant? Today is different. You need to talk so you can laugh and heal. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You believe that talk should be meaningful. But there is still value in lighthearted chitchat and banter so frivolous you couldn’t possibly remember what it was all about an hour later. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23): Know what is valuable. If you have money but not time, you are not rich. If you have time but not money, you can still be wealthy. With a little creativity, you can find a way to have both. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21): You will hear words that confirm your expectations. This makes you feel momentarily relieved, but you should consider whether these words are true or you are being led into a liar’s trap. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Even though your integrity and reputation go before you, in order to get what you want today, you still will need to win someone over. Make appropriate eye contact and dress the part. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Everything is working in your favor, so stop stressing out. Tense behavior starts a downward spiral. Concentrate on feeling good and thinking the best. Believe it’s happening as it needs to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The political mess may seem to involve you, but upon closer inspection, you will find that there are many ways to remove yourself from it. These unsavory goings on have as much to do with you as passing clouds. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you find someone who could benefit from your guidance, help or knowledge, then impart what you know. Otherwise, the opportunity for growth and development is wasted.

“Miki Mae Maluso: Patron Saint of Multitasking” is by Sarah Atlee. PHOTO PROVIDED

Art in ‘Heavens to Betsy ...’ has unusual appeal EXHIBIT | ‘AMUSINGLY SATIRIC AND INTRIGUINGLY WEIRD’ DEFINES SHOW “Heavens to Betsy and Other Saints for Everyday Living” is the oddly appealing title of a show of often amusingly satiric and intriguingly weird acrylic paintings by Sarah Atlee at a.k.a. gallery. The Oklahoma City artist described the works as “a collection of totems, saints and other icons for reaching toward small corners of the divine.” A tiny third eye captures our attention in the show’s title “Heavens to Betsy” painting of a gray-haired, smiling woman wearing a floral, pyramid-shape gown that overflows onto its decorated panel frame. Flanking this work are four small mottled, multicolor paintings on paper of what look like men’s heads from her “Noncommittal” series, including one with the verbal text, “I’ll give you a call” and “so on.” A serpent entwines with the flowing red hair of a wild-eyed woman wearing a white headdress and green robe in “Margaret VIII: Blow, Wind, Blow.” Adding to the impact is a dragon menacing her from the bottom of the painting’s miniature surfboardlike wooden support. Other vertical format works include a jaundiced and overwhelmed-looking “Our Lady of Leftovers,” and a stern-faced, rigidly posed “Bettina Oblongata,” with arms folded, clad in black. A bizarre, Orien-

ART REVIEW

“Heavens to Betsy and Other Saints for Everyday Living”

When: Noon to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, through May 27. Where: a.k.a. gallery, 3001 Paseo. Information: 606-2522 or www.akagallery. net.

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tal-looking woman, with masklike features, dances wildly in a striped robe, holding the rein of a toy horse’s head, under Asian calligraphy, in “Miki Mae Maluso: Patron Saint of Multitasking.” Smaller works include the cloudy sky face of “Totem 12” and the pyramidlike face of “Totem 7,” with its round, robotic eyes and triangular nose and mouth. “I feel that there must be spiritual forces shepherding the small aspects of my daily life, and I take comfort and enjoyment in imagining faces and personalities to guide them,” Atlee said of her work. “Over the past year, these new paintings have been a place for me to experiment with color, pattern and acrylic painting technique.” — John Brandenburg

TODD THE DINOSAUR

Prom date switch provides early lesson in graciousness DEAR MISS MANNERS: I am a high school junior looking forward to my first prom. One of my good friends told his good friend, who was organizing a prom group, to set me up with a blind date so I would be in their group. My good friend confirmed which girl the guy would set me up with for prom and told me that he was going to be in the prom group, but had not yet found a date. That night, I called the girl, asked her out to prom, and she said yes. The next day, my friend who had been hanging out with me the night before told me he had met my prom date and said she was very nice. The next Saturday, I called up my prom date and asked her what color her dress would be, so I could find a tuxedo and cummerbund to complement her outfit. That night, my friend took my prom date out to a movie and made out with her. My friend has now asked me if I would be willing to allow him to take my prom date and have the guy who is organizing the prom set me up with another girl he knows. I am angry with my friend for making me make this choice, and I am angry that he made out with my prom date. At the same

Judith Martin MISS MANNERS time, I am unsure how angry I should be because I have never met my date, and I have only talked with her three times on the phone. I have asked my friend if he would take another girl and remain in our group, but he has said that if he does not take my prom date, he will join another group. I have become really good friends with this guy over the past few weeks, and I really want him to be in my group. He is also one of the few guys I would know if I went with this group. I have talked with my prom date and my good friend, and they have both stated that they would like to go together. They, however, feel really bad about the whole situation. I know I have done nothing wrong, and I feel like I have no obligation to accommodate my friend and my prom date’s wishes. If I accommodate them, I will feel like a complete pushover. At the same time, I do

not want to weaken my friendship with my friend, and I really want him to be in my prom group. He is a really nice guy, but I am very frustrated with him right now. What should I do? GENTLE READER: Hold out until you get what you want — a prom date and a good friend who are pining for each other but are stuck on principle with you and his still-tobe-chosen date? Is that your idea of a good time? Miss Manners understands that you believe there is a principle at stake here. She just can’t figure out what it is. Romantic fidelity? Well, not really, when it concerns someone you never met. Fidelity to social engagements is, however, a serious matter. But the young lady has not ditched you; she and her new beau are apologetically asking your permission to change the arrangements. Miss Manners would like you to consider this experience part of your education. The lesson is graciousness, and you are fortunate enough to be able to learn it at little sacrifice to yourself. Visit Miss Manners at her website, www.missmanners.com, where you can send her your questions. UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

CREATORS SYNDICATE


6D

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

NEWS

2 men charged in Lady Gaga concert scam MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Two men face charges of scamming fans of Lady Gaga and Adam Lambert by selling tickets for a bogus concert in West Virginia. Martinsburg police say Sherman Luke Loy and Dean R. DeSana, both 45, turned themselves in Friday and were released on bond. Each was charged with one count of obtaining money by false pretenses. Loy’s lawyer says the tickets started at $100. According to a criminal complaint, the men claimed the concert Lady Gaga performs would be April 24 at a April 20 at an AIDSpark near Harpers Ferawareness event in ry. The concert never Tokyo, Japan. AP PHOTO happened. Court records show 11 people filed police reports saying they paid for tickets but never received them. Police say ticket sales totaled more than $17,800. Loy and DeSana have denied the charges. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MUSICIAN JACK WHITE LENDS SUPPORT FOR FLOOD RELIEF

Cracker is, from left, Sal Maida, David Lowery, Johnny Hickman and Frank Funaro.

PHOTO PROVIDED

CRACKER HEADS TO CITY SHOW WITH BATCH OF FRESH SONGS MUSIC | SONGWRITING ROUTINE INVOLVED CONTRIBUTIONS FROM WHOLE BAND

Gene Triplett

etriplett@ opubco.com

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

David Lowery wanted it to feel like the first time. So when he and guitarist partner Johnny Hickman set out to write the songs for Cracker’s eighth studio album, “Sunrise in the Land of Milk and Honey,” they set a strict regimen for themselves, getting up and going to work at 9:30 every morning for a week in a practice space. They didn’t allow themselves to go home at night until they’d written two songs, or at least the basic chord structures and melodies for them. They pulled these weeklong creative marathons every other month for a year, and this time they even included bassist (since 2006) Sal Maida and 12-year drummer Frank Funaro in the songwriting process. “You know the old joke in the music business, ‘What’s the last thing the drummer said before he got fired?’ ” Lowery asked in a recent phone interview from his Richmond, Va., home. “The punch line is: ‘Hey, guys, wanna do one of my songs?’ “So, on this record, we actually do one of the drummer’s songs. I just told him that joke, actually, but we actually do one of his songs on this record.” Since branching out from the more eccentric and exotic Camper Van Beethoven in 1992 to team up with longtime friend Hickman in some alternative pop and country explorations with Cracker, Lowery and his partner have written most of the band’s music as a composing duo, before bringing in the rest of the band to flesh out the instrumentation when it was time to record. This time, Lowery wanted a whole-band effort, like a new, hungry group just starting out, with everyone pitching in to build a repertoire of original songs they could take out on the road. Since Funaro’s resume includes work with punk rockers the Dictators and Joey Ramone, and Maida had done time with glam and new wave ventures such as Roxy Music and Sparks, some interesting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jack White and his staff at Third Man Records are lending a hand to Nashville’s flood victims. White, pictured, said Friday that profits from Saturday’s sales at his downtown record store would go to flood relief. White, a member of The White Stripes and The Dead Weather and a resident of nearby Franklin, and employees of Third Man said they planned to join Hands on Nashville on Monday to help with the cleanup. At least 31 people were killed in three states, including 20 in Tennessee, when storms dropped record amounts of rain. Thousands of volunteers are lending their time, including some of Music City’s biggest stars. A telethon hosted by Vince Gill raised more than $1.7 million, and another telethon is set for Sunday on the country music cable network GAC. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

We went back to what we would have done just as if it was our first record. We have all these experienced veterans, but we went back and just pretended like we were just a band that had just formed and played in our garage and essentially wrote this record to see what it would sound like.” DAVID LOWERY OF CRACKER

ROCK SHOW

Cracker Brother Gruesome. › With: 8 tonight. › When: Where: The Conservatory, › 8911 N Western. › Information: info@conser vatoryokc.com. new flavors were added to the latest Cracker assortment. And then Cracker took the songs on tour before ever stepping into a studio to record them. “And that’s something that typically isn’t done after a band’s first album,” Lowery said. “We went back to what we would have done just as if it was our first record. We have all these experienced veterans, but we went back and just pretended like we were just a band that had just formed and played in our garage and essentially wrote this record to see what it would sound like.” The sound they brought back to the studio echoed the power-pop, punk and early new wave era of ’78 to ’83 when all four had come of age as musicians, while still maintaining the distinctive alt-pop-country style Cracker has spent nearly two decades developing. With Athens, Ga.-based producer David Barbe (Son Volt, Drive-By Truckers) at the helm, the band cranks out straight-up guitar rockers such as “Yalla Yalla,” a lusty soldier’s rant against the rigors and pain of war; the frenetic punk of “Show Me How This Thing Works”; the breezy, funny acoustic-electric pop daydream of returning to a carefree hippie existence called “Turn On, Tune

In, Drop Out with Me”; the blistering, guitar-driven tantrum of an ejected lover that is “Hand Me My Inhaler”; the lazy, country-twang hilarity of “Friends,” wherein Lowery duets with Drive-By Trucker Patterson Hood in a pledge to always forgive even the worst of his harddrinking girlfriend’s indiscretions; the surf-guitar urgency of “We All Shine a Light,” featuring former X front man John Doe backing Lowery’s plea for intercultural tolerance, by way of a tribute to Pakistan’s cricket team, the Peshawar Panthers; and Lowery’s poignant duet with Counting Crows’ Adam Duritz on the melancholy “Darling One.” “There are not a lot of instruments on each track,” Lowery said. “You know, after our first record we had a hit with ‘Teen Angst (What the World Needs Now),’ and we immediately got kind of a bigger budget. And then you start going, ‘Well, hey, let’s put some B3 on there, or some strings on this song.’ Stuff like that. And we really didn’t do that this time.” Lowery said Cracker will probably use this back-to-basics approach again on its next album, but that’s not coming anytime soon, nor is a new Camper Van Beethoven project in his immediate future. After Cracker’s current tour (which brings the band to the Conservatory tonight for its first-ever Oklahoma City gig), Lowery is planning to release his solo debut. “It’s more in the vein of a Syd Barrett, early Kinks or Skip Spence kind of thing,” he said. “The idea of the solo record is like the songs that I’ve had over the last five or six years that don’t really fit either band. And it’s pretty raw and crazy.” And, he said, it’ll feel like the first time all over again.

SUSPECT CLEARED REGARDING BREAK-IN AT ACTRESS’S APARTMENT NEW YORK — A jury has cleared a man suspected

of breaking into actress Amanda Peet’s Manhattan apartment and taking her jewelry. Henry Santos was acquitted Monday of burglary. His lawyer said Santos, 27, was misidentified as the intruder a babysitter spotted in Peet’s loft Oct. 27. Peet’s husband, screenwriter David Benioff, testified that the then-pregnant Peet “was panicked” when she learned a thief had gotten into their home through a skylight. The couple wasn’t home when it happened. Peet, pictured, didn’t testify. Peet’s films include “2012” and “The Whole Nine Yards.” Benioff’s credits include “Troy” and “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.” The couple has two daughters. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PEOPLE STING SAYS TEACHERS SHOULD BE PAID MORE MEXICO CITY — School teacher-turned-rock star Sting, pictured, says teacher salaries must be raised to attract society’s best minds into classrooms. Sting spoke to reporters Saturday in Mexico City before a $550-aticket concert. The show is a part of the fundraising “Learning for Life” tour that supports education in developing countries. Sting, the former leader of the British rock band The Police, said, “One of the most important jobs in the planet is to teach children. Our entire future depends on children being educated.” THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NICK JONAS TAKES BATTING PRACTICE WITH RANGERS

BOOK REVIEW: GENEALOGY

TV series companion guide practical, entertaining resource “Who Do You Think You Are?: The Essential Guide to Tracing Your Family History, a Companion to the NBC Series” (Viking, $24.95) by Megan Smolenyak is a delightful book to read and ponder. Smolenyak, a professional genealogist, writes in a lively way that captures the interest of the reader and makes genealogy fun. This book is connected with the

NBC television series “Who Do You Think You Are?,” which features some celebrities searching for their family history. A centerfold area discusses connections to the TV series, but most of the book is devoted to helping the reader search for his or her ancestors. Smolenyak is thorough in her presentations. She presents several possible Internet sites that are free and

some that charge a fee. She shows high and low points of each site. She also presents non-Internet places to go for genealogical records but highly recommends using the Internet since there is so much available. Her presentations are enlivened by stories from her life, which make the book entertaining as well as practical. — Benet Exton

Nick Jonas, wearing a Texas Rangers uniform, is shown before the start of the May 8 game against the Kansas City Royals. AP PHOTO

ARLINGTON, Texas — Nick Jonas got game. The teenage pop star of the Jonas Brothers band put on a Texas Rangers uniform during batting practice Saturday. He took some swings in the cage and made several nice running catches while shagging fly balls in the outfield. Nick’s brother, Joe, was on the field before the game, too, but not in uniform. The Jonas Brothers live in North Texas. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


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