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INSIDE

Country couple plan to wed

Switzer assembles the old gang

Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert are engaged.

Barry Switzer and his 1975 recruiting class shared tales of the glory days.

NEWS, 7A

SPORTS, 1C

ELECTIONS

MAYOR TO KEEP HIS JOB

THE OKLAHOMAN WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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COVERING OKLAHOMA SINCE 1907

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TWISTERS’ TOLL BECOMES CLEARER Casualties: Fatal storms Tornadoes: More than Damage: More than injured more than 100 dozen hit in Oklahoma 100 homes destroyed

After squeaking past a recall effort by just four votes, Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates, above, will get to hold on to his job. Elsewhere, voters decided on bond and other issues. STATE, INSIDE

MORTGAGES

STATE FARES WELL At 5.9 percent of homeowners with negative equity on their homes, Oklahoma has the lowest percentage in the country, according to a survey. BUSINESS, 1B

WEATHER

STRONG STORMS



Breezy High: 84 Tonight’s low: 52

BUSINESS, 6B

IN BRIEF

CARRIE GETS AWARD NODS

A worker surveys damage to an AT&T cell phone tower Tuesday in Little Axe. FROM STAFF REPORTS

PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

MORE COVERAGE

A day after a tornado outbreak spawned a dozen or more twisters across Oklahoma, survivors picked through the rubble and officials identified the dead. The number of fatalities dropped Tuesday evening. The state Department of Emergency Management said three children the department had previously reported dead are alive and being treated at an Oklahoma City hospital. Two people, including the children’s mother, were killed in the tornado, according to the state medical examiner’s office. A third, a woman whose name has not been released, suffered a fatal heart attack while trying to get to a storm shelter. Tammy Rider, 29, of Newalla, was killed and her three children injured Monday when a tornado destroyed their mobile home near the intersection of Rock Creek Road and Harrah-Newalla Road. Rider’s two sons, Jason Smith, 8, and Ethan Rider, 3, were in critical condition,

NEWS, 7A

HEALTH LAW TO COST MORE?

INSIDE

Picking up the pieces in Seminole

Congressional budget referees said President Barack Obama’s health care law could add at least $115 billion more to government health care spending over the next decade.

NEWS, 4A

› ›

Lake Thunderbird marina is a total loss How to help, get help NEWS, 6A

twisters’ paths › The › 911 calls reveal fears

NATION, 8A

STATE, 13A

› Scammers pose threat BUSINESS, 1B

ONLINE View videos, photos, interactive maps and more NEWSOK.COM/WEATHER

SEE STORMS, PAGE 3A

PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Friends of Christa and John French stand Tuesday in the driveway of the Frenches’ home in the Deerfield Estates addition south of Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road. A tornado Monday damaged or destroyed numerous homes in the neighborhood. Gov. Brad Henry toured the area Tuesday and spoke with several residents and surveyed the damage. Michael Baker reports on Page 5A.

Guard unit to deploy to Afghanistan next year BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

All 3,400 soldiers of the Oklahoma National Guard’s 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team will deploy to Afghanistan next year in what will be its

largest deployment since the Korean War, commanders announced Tuesday. By comparison, about 2,600 soldiers from the 45th deployed to Iraq in 2008 and some also deployed to Afghanistan in 2004. Col. Joe Ward, com-

Dear Lord, let us show patience as we try to love others. Amen. 4D 1B 1E 8E

mander of the brigade, said the mission will include everything from defending bases and moving troops and equipment with U.S. Army helicopters to conducting security operations with the Afghan National Security Forces. “We’ve done that both

in Afghanistan and Iraq,” Ward said. “One thing I’ve discovered since I took command of the brigade is that there is an incredible store of knowledge in the soldiers from the last two deployments. I think we will continue to build on that and utilize the les-

sons learned from previous deployments.” Brig. Gen. Robbie Asher, director of joint staff for the Oklahoma National Guard’s Joint Force Headquarters, said even with the large deployment, the SEE GUARD, PAGE 2A

DOCTOR WINS IN BOTOX CASE An Oklahoma County jury has awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the anti-wrinkle drug Botox. STATE, INSIDE

EATERY HAS COOL CONCEPT Before you dismiss Coolgreens as a health-food restaurant, know that its first commitment is to deliciousness, Food Dude Dave Cathey writes. FOOD, 1D

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

TODAY’S PRAYER

Advice Business Classified Comics

Checotah native Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean and Lady Antebellum lead in CMT Music Awards nominations with three each.

Crossword Opinion Sports TV

8E 10A 1C 4D

Volume 119, 127 Six sections Copyright 2010 The Oklahoma Publishing Co., Oklahoma City All rights reserved

Teams, players take home state titles Idabel’s Zach Myers reads the green on No. 18 on Tuesday during the Class 4A boys state golf championship at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Find out which teams and individuals took home state championships. SPORTS, 4C

PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NEWS, TOO

ONLINE AT NEWSOK.COM

A closer look at today’s stories

BEST OF THE BLOGS

SHOES WEDGE THEIR WAY INTO LIFE I really want a pair of milehigh wedges. Never mind that I twisted my ankle a couple of weeks ago, and it’s still a little tender. Summer shoes are OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO so tempting this season. I love all the wedges, embellishments, cork and platforms. I tend not to wear super-high heels because, well, they hurt my feet and, honestly, the older I get, the more I worry about following in the footsteps of all those models who trip up on the runway. And they’re young. If they can’t walk in those killer stilettos, what makes me think I can? But I want new shoes and I want something with a higher power. I found two styles that I really like, but I’m hoping to find something similar and a little closer to the ground. Not flat, but not five inches in the air either. Be sure to check out Mood online at mood.NewsOK.com for my story on summer sandals and in Thursday’s Mood.

In this image from video, soldiers from the 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team listen Tuesday as commanders announce that the unit will be deployed to Afghanistan next year.

Guard: 80% have combat experience FROM PAGE 1A

VIDEO ON DEMAND MAKING THE MOST OF THINGS Oklahoman Editor Ed Kelley says maximizing one of Oklahoma’s biggest assets keeps getting more difficult.

There is an incredible store of knowledge in the soldiers from the last two deployments. I think we will continue to build on that and utilize the lessons learned from previous deployments.” COL. JOE WARD

ONLINE Video To watch a video from the announcement, go to NewsOK.com and search for “45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team.”

ployment and to serving again with their fellow soldiers in the 45th. “Knowing what you are going into and knowing that the guys around you know what we are going into is great,” Steelman said.

Recent additions to our “know it” topics.

Where Oklahomans help Oklahomans.

Getting help: Do you know someone with suicidal tendencies? Are you battling them yourself? There is hope and help available. Restoring order: Learn how you can bring organization to your home and to your life by using tips from the experts.

Good guys: “ ... Parents should be glad to have two role models such as (Zac) Robinson and (Sam) Bradford for kids to look to as examples of how a person can exhibit both athleticism and values.” — aprendido

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SETTING IT STRAIGHT Tuesday The Tulsa law firms of Seymour and Graham, LLP, and the David Garrett Law Office will split $5 million from the $10 million settlement in the federal lawsuit with Custer County. Seymour and Graham, the lead firm in the case, was omitted from the story on Page 1A of The Oklahoman.

WHAT YOU’RE READING 1. Oklahoma tornado: Fatalities confirmed 2. Oklahoma tornadoes: Medical Examiner IDs two dead in tornado aftermath 3. Deadly tornadoes move through central Oklahoma 4. Oklahoma City-area twisters leave path of destruction 5. Tornado watch issued for western Oklahoma 6. Oklahoma tornadoes: Another tornado fatality reported 7. Oklahoma City council OKs final plans for upgrades at Ford Center 8. Film Row’s developer sees Oklahoma City district coming into focus 9. Oklahoma Gov. Brad Henry declares state of emergency in 56 counties 10. Man accused of trying to push girlfriend from Penn Square Mall balcony

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Breaking News Editor: Kimberly Burk 475-3361, kburk@ opubco.com

Mayor Mick Cornett talks about a new promotion for the Oklahoma City Weight Loss Challenge.

Top stories on NewsOK.com for the last 24 hours:

“Oh man, I’m going to miss the whole toddler time, when the baby starts walking and starts talking a little bit,” Houston said. Both Houston and Steelman said they are looking forward to the de-

LET’S TALK

Vice President, News, Info. Ctr.: Kelly Dyer Fry 475-3979, kfry@ opubco.com

MAYOR TOUTS WEIGHT LOSS

In this image from a video shot Tuesday, Col. Joe Ward, commander of the 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, announces Tuesday the 2011 deployment of the unit’s 3,400 soldiers. PHOTOS BY TIM MONEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

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Results for the question: Do you like “Barons” for the Oklahoma City AHL team’s name? Today’s question: Do you have a tornado shelter in your home? Vote at NewsOK.com.

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NEWSOK POLL

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Guard will have thousands of soldiers capable of responding to state emergencies. Asher also said 80 percent of the soldiers in the 45th are combat veterans. One of those veterans is Sgt. Josh Houston, 26, of Oklahoma City. He was one of 2,600 members of the unit who were activated in October 2007 and deployed to Iraq in January of 2008 following training at Fort Bliss, Texas. Houston said he takes comfort that he’s been in a war zone with his men before. “I know the people from the last deployment have my back,” Houston said. “I don’t have to worry if these guys stayed awake in training. I know they have experience. A lot of these guys have seen actual trigger time. They know how to think on the run.” Spc. Ryan Steelman, 32, of Mustang, also has a deployment to Iraq under his belt. He said the experience will also help his wife and his three kids deal with his absence. “They’ve been through this. They know what to expect,” Steelman said. “We try to keep the kids busy, get them involved in extra activities like soccer and dance so the time kind of flies for them.” Houston said he is moving up his wedding because of the deployment. His fiancee, Dorothea Pruiett, is also in the military. She is eight months pregnant. Houston said having a fiancee in the military has its advantages and disadvantages. Pruiett knows where to go if she needs help and knows what to expect while he is gone. But she also knows how dangerous his job will be. Being away from his new baby will be the toughest part of the deployment, he said.

Editor, The Oklahoman: Ed Kelley 475-4090, ekelley@ opubco.com

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STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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BY THE NUMBERS TWISTERS’ TOLL Deaths: At least three died, including a woman who died of a heart attack while trying to get to a storm shelter. State emergency management workers have said there were six deaths, including the heart attack victim, but the state medical examiner’s office has confirmed only three.

Shelley Heston Bolles, left, and Gidget Miller react Tuesday as they celebrate finding a 4-weekold puppy that belongs to Heston Bolles in Little Axe.

Little Axe Fire Department Capt. David Spector walks across the Country Boy grocery store parking lot Tuesday in Little Axe. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

PHOTO BY BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Storms: More warnings were issued FROM PAGE 1A

and her daughter, Reagan, 1, was in serious condition Tuesday at The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, a hospital spokeswoman said. “I know she was an excellent mother,” said Ashley Christofferson, Tammy Rider’s niece. “She was loved by her mom. She was her only daughter.” Rider died of blunt force trauma, medical examiner spokeswoman Cherokee Ballard said. Her death was accidental. Wilbern Patterson, 55, of Oregon, died after he stepped out of his recreational vehicle near SE 59 and Peebly Road, Ballard said. High winds blew the vehicle over on top of him. Patterson, who apparently was visiting relatives in Oklahoma, died of traumatic asphyxia, Ballard said. His death was accidental. More than 100 people were treated at hospitals for storm-related injuries. At least five — including Rider’s sons — were admitted in critical condition, hospitals reported.

Near Little Axe John Treadway, 78, owner of BJ’s Bar and Grill, east of the destroyed Country Boy grocery store on State Highway 9 near Little Axe, asked all of his customers to leave and go home when the storms started getting bad. He watched from his driveway as the storm worsened overhead. “I saw it getting together right up yonder,” he said, pointing to the west of his business. “Then I said the heck with it, went inside, grabbed a Coke and crouched behind the bar.” He heard the loud rush of the storm as it broke apart the grocery store just across the parking lot. When he emerged from the building, he saw several overturned vehicles and the remains of the store. Yellow and pink insulation hung on the branches of the trees around his bar, and hundreds of paper towel rolls were strewn behind it. What appeared to be a section of the grocery store roof had been pitched across the highway. Another piece had smashed into his old Ford pickup. “It was awful, but I guess I’m lucky,” he said. Only the roof to Treadway’s business was damaged.

CONTRIBUTING Staff Writers Ken Raymond, Johnny Johnson, Michael McNutt, Chris Casteel, Randy Ellis, Michael Baker, Bryan Painter, John Estus, Vallery Brown, Matt Dinger, James Tyree and Michael Kimball

er ran into a bathroom for cover. When she closed the bathroom door, she was thrown back against the wall and onto the floor. “I was just looking down and praying,” she said. “I thought if I looked up the worst would happen.” Starkey and her family worked Tuesday to remove belongings they could salvage from the destroyed home. “It was so fast,” Starkey said. “Thirty seconds took everything.” About five houses to the west of Starkey’s on Highland Street, 75-year-old Mary Clark looked around counting her blessings. A large tree, more than two feet in diameter, was uprooted and split in half, crushing her neighbor’s car. “It was like the famous freight train they always talk about,” she said. “That’s exactly what it sounded like.” Clark’s home was only slightly damaged by a tree limb that had fallen on the roof of her garage. “I don’t know how all of this happened around us,” she said, surveying her neighborhood. Decimated homes like Starkey’s were steps away from homes that appeared to have little damage.

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City’s main water treatment plant remained without power Tuesday, leaving many across the southern metro area with low water pressure or no water at all. The water shortage prompted most metroarea cities to enact outdoor watering bans. Residents were ordered to cease outdoor watering and turn off sprinkler systems. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. spokesman Brian Alford said he expected power to be restored by late Tuesday to the Lake Stanley Draper water treatment plant,

ONLINE

Holly Starkey gathers her belongings Tuesday from her home in Tecumseh. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

which supplies half the city’s water. However, city officials were unsure how long it would take to restart the water filtering processes that were halted by the power outage. The filtering makes water safe to drink. “I can’t remember a time when it (the plant) just shut down like this,” Oklahoma City utilities spokeswoman Debbie Ragan said. “There will have to be a process of restarting pumps.” Oklahoma City water utility crews rerouted water from the city’s Lake Hefner and Lake Overholser plants to the southern metro area, but many customers were still without water Tuesday, Ragan said.

Tuesday’s weather While crews were still out assessing Monday’s damage, a tornado watch was issued by the Norman forecast office for counties in central, northwest, southwest and western Oklahoma. Severe weather is likely in Oklahoma again today. Rick Smith, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Norman, said there may be more warnings today, but the intensity of the storms will not be as great. Oklahoma County has now had at least 100 tornadoes since 1950, according to the weather service. Before Monday, there had been only three tornadoes in the state this year. That’s the slowest start in terms of tornadoes since officials began keeping statistics in 1950, said Gary McManus of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. Oklahoma averages 53 tornadoes a year. The average for May is about 20.

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In Tecumseh, a tornado ripped through a residential area near U.S. 177 and Highland Road. Tecumseh police, emergency management workers and members of the Pontotoc County Fire Department went from home to home in the neighborhood surveying the damage. They marked each house they checked with a neon orange X with a circle around it. By afternoon, Emergency Manager Melvin Potter said the men had identified more than 100 homes that were destroyed and more than 200 that were damaged. Holly Starkey, 29, was at her home near Highland Road when she heard television reports of a tornado headed her way. Starkey and her 61-year-old moth-

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Injuries: More than 100 people were treated at Oklahoma hospitals for storm-related injuries. At least five were hospitalized in critical condition, according to hospital officials. Tornadoes: There were more than a dozen tornadoes in Oklahoma during Monday’s outbreak, according to the National Weather Service in Norman. They occurred along a path stretching from the Red River to the Kansas-Oklahoma state line. Warnings: The weather service in Norman issued 31 tornado warnings and 19 severe thunderstorm warnings Monday. Damage: The state Department of Emergency Management reported more than 100 homes and 40 businesses were destroyed and more than 130 homes were damaged. State of emergency: Gov. Brad Henry declared a state of emergency for 56 Oklahoma counties: Alfalfa, Atoka, Beaver, Blaine, Bryan, Caddo, Canadian, Carter, Cleveland, Coal, Comanche, Cotton, Craig, Creek, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Garfield, Garvin, Grady, Grant, Harper, Haskell, Hughes, Jefferson, Johnston, Kay, Kingfisher, Kiowa, Lincoln, Logan, Love, Marshall, Mayes, McIntosh, McClain, Murray, Muskogee, Noble, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Seminole, Sequoyah, Stephens, Tillman, Tulsa, Washita and Woodward.

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Last year, Oklahoma had only four confirmed tornadoes in May.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

McLoud woman survives wild ride BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

Yolanda Suarez talks on her cell phone in what is left of the bedroom of her mobile home Tuesday in Seminole. Several tornadoes swept through Oklahoma on Monday, leaving a path of destruction, including Suarez’s home. AP PHOTO

Seminole residents begin recovering after tornado BY ANN KELLEY Staff Writer akelley@opubco.com

SEMINOLE — Larry Jernigen, 62, spent much of Tuesday retelling his neardeath experience of riding out a tornado inside his pickup. Jernigen is already a celebrity of sorts in Seminole for having lived to tell about two other brushes with death. He survived an airplane crash in 1985 and a car accident with a tractor-trailer rig in 1995. Jernigen was about to leave his cabinet shop on State Highway 99 when a tornado hit Monday. He took cover on the floorboard of his 1999 Chevy pickup while debris battered its metal body and shattered the windows. “It sounded like a demolition derby,” he said. “And then the truck started to move, and I thought I was going airborne.” There were many stories of survival and property loss along the one-mile stretch of SH 99 where the tornado delivered the brunt of its force. City Manager Steve Saxon said the damage path was about 11⁄2 miles wide and 17 miles long, leaving 30 families homeless and damaging as many as 300 roofs. Power lines Tuesday hung off broken wood poles like limp spaghetti. Twisted metal lay on greenbelts. Glass and debris littered the highway. The tornado left Yolanda Suarez’s mobile home in pieces. Suarez tried Tuesday to salvage a few belongings. Little was left. She had been alone in the mobile home when the tornado carried threefourths of it to a neighboring business. Suarez escaped by taking cover in a bedroom that was anchored by a fallen tree. She climbed out a window and was rescued by a volunteer firefighter. “I felt like I was going die,” Suarez said. At the Seminole airport, the tornado ripped off hangar doors and tossed planes several feet. The airport runway appears to be in good shape, but there is at least $2 million in damage to hangars and the terminal, the Seminole city manager said. The tornado destroyed a classroom at nearby Varnum Schools. It also caused roof damage in several school buildings, dislodged a concrete baseball dugout and left acres of trees uprooted. Superintendent John Sheridan said classes for the 268 students will likely

ONLINE To watch video from Seminole, go to NewsOK.com/ weather.

A small airplane rests on its top Tuesday afternoon after being blown out of a hangar at the Jimmie Austin Airport when a tornado touched down on the north side of Seminole on Monday night. PHOTO BY ANN KELLEY, THE OKLAHOMAN.

be canceled until the end of the week, and possibly next week. All field trips and graduation ceremonies have been put on hold. Prekindergarten teacher Leigh Ann Azlin on Tuesday hauled a few plastic containers of teaching ma-

terials, left untouched by Monday’s storm, out of her classroom. “I was warned before I got here that it was bad,” Azlin said. “I thought I was prepared, but the sight of it brought me to my knees.”

Doresa Byus gripped her steering wheel, closed her eyes and prayed Monday night when a tornado lifted her sport utility vehicle off the road west of McLoud. The thick, brown swirl of dust and debris was the last thing she saw before closing her eyes. “It’s a hard feeling to describe,” she said. “You just feel helpless. There’s nothing you can do. There’s nowhere you can go.” Byus was driving home to McLoud from Midwest City. She had been watching the sky and listening for news from her husband’s calls and the radio, but the signal kept cutting out. She said she didn’t see the tornado until it was right beside her on SE 29 Street, east of Peebly Road. The next thing she knew, her Isuzu Rodeo was being enveloped. The rear window shattered and the front windshield cracked like a spider’s web, Byus said. She felt a whoosh of air and she thought her roof had blown away, but Byus kept her eyes closed. In a matter of minutes, the tornado released her car and moved away, leveling several houses in its path. “It was like being in a ride,” Byus said. “It just twisted and dropped.” She expected to find her car on top of someone’s roof. To her surprise, the car was mostly intact and resting in the road near where it had been. The tornado had spun the SUV in a circle, Byus said. She pulled shingles out from under her windshield wipers and looked around. Houses on both sides of the road were destroyed,

Doresa Byus

ONLINE To watch a video of Doresa Byus telling her story, go to NewsOK.com/ weather.

but Byus was unhurt. Several other drivers who were in the tornado’s path also were OK, she said. Power lines were down in front of them and emergency workers blocked the road behind. Byus’ husband, Claude, who is a layout manager for the pressroom at The Oklahoman, feared the worst. He had been trying to call his wife since he heard about a tornado that touched down near Choctaw Road — not far from where she was driving. Claude Byus said he was going to tell his wife to get off the road, but the signal wouldn’t go through. He set out to look for her as soon as the storms passed. He reached the point where the road was blocked, just over the hill from his wife. He was turning around to find another way when she called. She managed to tell him she was OK before the signal cut out, he said. “I know that God just kind of had his hand on her right then,” Byus said. “That’s our belief. All I can say is thank you.”


STORMS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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Devastation stuns victims of storm BY MICHAEL BAKER Staff Writer mbaker@opubco.com

Within moments of a tornado whipping through and destroying most of the homes on the corner of Valley Creek Drive and SE 75, Steven Blair exited his laundry room and sprinted next door to check on his neighbor. Most of the homes on this street corner in Deerfield Estates just west of Choctaw Road and south of Interstate 40 were destroyed. Among the homes destroyed was that of Blair’s neighbor. “There was an issue where they could have been trapped,” Blair said. “I smelled natural gas.” Blair’s neighbors — Air Force Sgt. Scott Thiels, his wife, Lisa, their twin 11year-old boys and the dog — rode out the tornado in their bathroom. “We all laid down in the bathtub and after about 10 seconds the house exploded,” Scott Thiels, 35, said. Thiels emerged from his bathroom and was a bit stunned to see daylight and his neighbor. “It’s a little hard to ex-

ALSO ... DAMAGE NEAR I-40 Several neighborhoods south of Interstate 40 near Choctaw and Hiwassee roads in Oklahoma County showed on Tuesday the swath of damage caused by a tornado rushing through. Families spent the muggy day cleaning the rubble that once was home. “But the kids are alive and well. That’s my blessing in the whole thing,” said Dava Hight, who was at her son’s home at 8801 S Hiwassee Road to help clean up. Miles Maynor has lived at the home he and his wife built for about a year. “We love this piece of property,” he said. “I have my life, and my wife has hers, and the dogs are OK, so we’re good to go.” A similar refrain was repeated by homeowners in the area as they sifted through rubble and tried to find their belongings. Steven Blair, who lives in a neighborhood just south of I-40 and west of Choctaw Road, said he found his child’s high chair suspended in what was an attic and still can’t find his barbecue grill or porch swing. “I’d like to know how my tractor made it over there.” FROM STAFF REPORTS

Friends remove items from Scott and Lisa Thiels’ home Tuesday, a day after a tornado damaged homes in the Deerfield Estates and Deerfield Estates West additions south of Interstate 40 and Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

plain,” he said of the sensation. “Today (Tuesday), I’m really not upset,” he said as he looked over the debris that was once home. “Everything that was in that house and breathing is still breathing.”

Tornado’s path The tornado crashed through about 5:40 p.m., leaving more than a dozen homes damaged and at

least six destroyed. Some residents in Deerfield Estates — a relatively new neighborhood filled with several young families — watched the twister run over homes in Deerfield West before jumping a creek and heading for their houses. Another neighbor, David Reid, said he watched the tornado as it came over a hill to the west. “We saw it coming and

Governor takes step to secure federal aid FROM STAFF REPORTS

Gov. Brad Henry declared a state of emergency Tuesday in 56 counties across Oklahoma. The executive order is the first step toward seeking federal assistance. State Emergency Management Department officials are making preliminary assessments to determine the damage caused by Monday’s storms. Henry also issued a second executive order, which exempts trucks that are providing direct assistance for the restoration of essential services from weight and permit requirements. That executive order will aid utility companies and municipalities as they attempt to repair infrastructure and restore services. Henry flew over some of the hardest hit areas Tuesday and toured areas in Oklahoma, Cleveland, Pottowatomie and Seminole counties. “Our hearts and our prayers simply go out to these families who have lost a loved one or lost their home,” Henry said during a news conference.

“There’s damage everywhere. I think it’s about as bad as I’ve seen.” During the news conference, he answered a call from President Barack Obama. “Right now they are focused on the devastation we have in Oklahoma,” Henry said about the president and his staff. “The president stressed that he will see to it that any request for disaster aid would be processed quickly.” Henry was flanked by his wife, Kim, and U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Oklahoma City, in front of a destroyed Love’s Travel Stop at Choctaw Road and Interstate 40. Dozens of motorists and staff survived the tornado in the travel stop by crowding into a cooler. Full statewide damage totals were not available Tuesday, but emergency officials reported more than 100 homes and more than 40 businesses had been destroyed. More than 130 homes were damaged. The Seminole Municipal Airport and the Little River Marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park incurred millions of dollars in estimated damage.

then it looked like it had dissipated, so we were thinking we were OK, but then all of a sudden debris started flying and we got to

the closet,” Reid, 38, said on Tuesday. Reid and his wife, Robyn, could barely fit in the small closet near the center of their home. “We couldn’t get the door shut and we saw the roof go off,” he said. “We heard louder and louder crashes and then all of a sudden we saw light.” Wall board is all that remained between the Reids and the destruction. A couple of houses around the corner, Christa French, 35, rushed her 11year-old and 9-year-old daughters into a closet. “We just heard the windows start shattering,” French said. “I just threw the girls in the closet. I saw my closet door fly off and I just dove on my girls.” On Tuesday, French was cleaning up and hoping her husband, John, who is in the Air Force and in South America, could catch a

plane home to be with their family. A print of dogs playing poker survived the storm, but the two family cars did not survive as well. “I just can’t get over the garage door wrapped around the truck,” French said. Residents recounted several incidents of damage from the storm. Blair couldn’t find his barbecue grill or porch swing. His shed was shredded and littered across several different yards. A tree had been blown into the middle of what was once the Reid home and a trailer chained to a tree had blown into another tree. Scott Thiels looked for his grandfather’s World War II U.S. Marine Corps dress cap. It had hung on the wall in the home before the tornado.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Ducks swim Tuesday by the boats damaged by the tornado at the marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park in Norman.

PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Tornado’s direct hit closes state park BY JAMES S. TYREE Staff Writer jtyree@opubco.com

NORMAN — Bob Davis

has owned the Little River Marina at Lake Thunderbird State Park for 20 years, but he hardly recognizes it following Monday’s tornado. Davis said the marina, worth about $2 million — not including the 275 or so boats that were docked there — is a total loss. “It was a direct hit,” he

ONLINE To watch a video of the marina damage, go to NewsOK.com/weather.

said Tuesday morning. “The whole marina is wrapped tight into a cluster. I can’t even identify one dock from another.” Leslie Blair, public information officer at Lake Thunderbird, said the state park was closed Tuesday out of safety con-

cerns and to assess the park’s extensive damage. The Little Axe and Fisherman’s Point campgrounds and Little River Marina are closed indefinitely, Blair said. The lake’s north side will be closed at least until Monday, she said, and the

Clear Bay Point and South Dam areas will be closed only until power and water can be restored. “Right now we’re assessing the damage so we’re urging people to stay away from the park,” Blair said. Less than a mile west is the Central Oklahoma Master Conservancy District, which pumps water from Lake Thunderbird to Norman, Midwest City and Del City. The tornado turned the

facility’s workshop into a twisted pile of metal rubble, damaged the plant, and knocked out its electricity. The facility operated Tuesday on backup generators. “We can’t run on full capacity, in fact we’re on minimum capacity,” said Randy Worden, the facility’s manager. He estimated minimum capacity to be about 20 percent of maximum, though he said Norman al-

AT A GLANCE: WHAT THE TORNADOES LEFT BEHIND

In Little Axe Left: Standing on a fallen tree, Caden Bolles looks over damage to his family’s home on Tuesday. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, THE OKLAHOMAN

Below, left: Linemen work to restore power Monday at 156th Avenue and Little Axe Drive. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Below: Students, teachers and administrators form a line to pass paperwork out of the debris of the Little Axe School central office on Tuesday. The school was hit by a tornado Monday. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

so has ground wells and a water agreement with Oklahoma City and the other cities could as well. Still, Worden urged people to be patient and to use as little water as possible. Meanwhile, he has no idea how long it will take to get power restored, or to get his workplace back to normal. “It got the shop,” he said of the tornado. “We’ve got all our hand tools and power tools out there in the lake.”

HOW TO HELP Here is information about how to help tornado victims and how victims can find help:

DONATIONS Oklahoma County crews are working to assess the damage, but volunteers are needed, County Commissioner Brian Maughan said. To help, go to the District 2 barn, 7501 S Anderson Road, 8 a.m. through 5 p.m. Friday. “We have jobs for young and old,” he said. The American Red Cross of Central Oklahoma is accepting cash donations for the disaster relief fund. Text “redcross” to 90999 to make an automatic $10 donation billed to your cell phone. People can also donate by phone at 228-9500. The Salvation Army is accepting financial donations at www.salvationarmyusa.org and (800) 725-2769. Donations should be designated for Oklahoma tornado assistance. No in-kind donations are needed.

FOOD A mobile feeding unit at Interstate 240 and Anderson Road is run by the Central Oklahoma Area Command of the Salvation Army. Mobile feeding units are traveling throughout Little Axe, Moore, Norman, Seminole, Shawnee and surrounding areas. The Salvation Army workers are from Ardmore, Enid, Shawnee, McAlester and Tulsa. Emotional and spiritual care is available from Salvation Army crews throughout the area.The American Red Cross of Central Oklahoma also has feeding sites in affected areas. All sites serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Feeding locations Harrah: Harrah Church, 101 S Dobbs Road. Norman: CrossPointe Church, 24th Avenue SE and State Highway 9. Seminole: Seminole State College Haney Center, 2701 Boren Blvd. Tecumseh: City Hall, 309 E Chicago Blvd.

› › › ›

ONLINE More coverage To see video and more photos from the storms that hit the state on Monday, go to NewsOK.com/weather. For more on severe weather, go to knowit.NewsOK.com/severeweather.

HEALTH Medical workers from the Oklahoma City-County Health Department and area fire departments will continue giving free tetanus vaccinations today to residents and volunteers cleaning up rubble in tornado damaged areas. The nurses and paramedics will travel to affected neighborhoods to administer the tetanus shots. Free shots are also available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oklahoma County District 2 barn, 7501 S Anderson Road. Shots are also given at the health department, 921 NE 23.

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In Seminole Larry Jernigan, 62, of Shawnee, laughs while recalling events of Monday night when he rode out a tornado inside his 1999 pickup on State Highway 99 in Seminole. He hunkered down in the front seat as the twister moved his truck about 10 feet. All of the truck’s windows Downed power lines block East Highland Street on were blown out, and the body received heavy damage. He escaped Monday. without injury. PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

In Tecumseh

U-Haul is offering 30 days of free storage to residents whose homes or businesses were damaged by tornados. Residents also can participate in a box swap. Those with empty boxes are encouraged to drop them off at U-Haul locations so tornado victims can use them for free. For more information, call (800) 522-4236 or 737-6505.


ENTERTAINMENT

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

MUSICIANS WITH OKLAHOMA TIES ARE AMONG THE FAVORITES FOR THE SHOW

CMT award nominations announced BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Checotah native Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean and Lady Antebellum each hold a leading three nominations in the final round of competition for the CMT Music Awards. Miranda Lambert, Toby Keith, Reba McEntire, Brooks & Dunn, Blake Shelton and Rascal Flatts also were among the stars with Oklahoma ties to earn nominations when Country Music Television announced Tuesday the last round of nominees for its fan-voted awards show. The 2010 CMT Music Awards will air June 9, live from Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn., on CMT and www.cmt.com. Detroit-based rocker/ rapper Kid Rock, a 2009 CMT Music Award winner, will host the show, which will feature performances by Underwood, Lambert, Keith, Lady Antebellum and Keith Urban.

Fan voting to determine the CMT Music Award winners is open through June 8 at www.cmt.com. The final nominees for the top award, video of the year, will be announced at the beginning of the awards show, and fans will be able to cast their ballots online and via text message throughout the live broadcast. Underwood’s sassy hit “Cowboy Casanova” is nominated for video of the year and female video of the year, while her “CMT Invitation Only” rendition of “Temporary Home” will compete for CMT performance of the year. Lambert, who lives in Tishomingo, also garnered a video of the year nomination for the mini-movie to her first No. 1 song, “White Liar.” “White Liar” is up for female video, as well. Norman resident Keith earned video and male video of the year nods for his rowdy chart-topper “American Ride.” McEntire, who grew up

Carrie Underwood arrives at an annual pre-Grammy Gala on Jan. 30 in Beverly Hills, Calif. AP PHOTO

in Chockie, received nods for her ballad “Consider Me Gone,” nominated for female video of the year and performance of the year from “Invitation Only” performance. Brooks & Dunn, which includes former Tulsan Ronnie Dunn, is nominated in the duo video of the year category for the ballad “Indian Summer.” Since Dunn and Kix Brooks plan to split up after their summer “The Last Rodeo Tour,” this will be their last CMT Music Awards nomination as a duo. Ada native and Tishomingo resident Shelton shares a nomination with

BY BRANDY MCDONNELL Entertainment Writer bmcdonnell@opubco.com

Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton

An Ada native, Shelton married his high school sweetheart, Kaynette Williams, in 2003 but they divorced in 2006. Much of his 2007 album “Pure BS” dealt with the breakdown of his marriage. This will be the first union for Lambert, 26, a Lindale, Texas, native who bought a Tishomingo farm near her beau’s spread about three years ago. They enjoy hunting and fishing together when they are home. No word has been given on when the wedding will take place, but it will cap a big year for both stars. Lambert recently notched her first No. 1 hit with “White Liar” and won three Academy of Country Music Awards, including album of the year for “Revolution.” Shelton won his first ACM award for “Hillbilly Bone,” his chart-topping duet with Trace Adkins. On Tuesday, Lambert earned two nominations and Shelton garnered one

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Legendary entertainer, Norman resident dies FROM STAFF REPORTS

Country singers planning to wed Oklahoma country music stars Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert are officially engaged after five years of romance. Lambert told www. people.com that Shelton popped the question Sunday in the woods near her Tishomingo farm. The proposal mixed formality and casualness. “He called my dad and got his blessing first,” Lambert told the publication about Shelton’s surprise proposal. “That was so Southern and oldschool and perfect.” She also praised Shelton, 33, for the diamondand-platinum ring he picked out on his own. “I was so proud of him,” Lambert told People. “We’ve been together five years, so he knew exactly what I wanted but it’s so much more perfect than I could have picked out myself.” The couple celebrated Lambert’s “yes” answer rather informally: “We had a couple of Bacardi and Diet Sprites — in a Solo cup!” Lambert told the magazine, which will have more on the pair’s engagement in Friday’s issue.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

nod in the final round of the fan-voted CMT Music Awards, which will air live June 9 from Nashville, Tenn. CONTRIBUTING:

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buddy Trace Adkins for collaborative video of the year for their raucous chart-topping duet “Hillbilly Bone.” Rascal Flatts, which includes Joe Don Rooney of Picher, is nominated in the group video of the year category for “Here Comes Goodbye.”

NORMAN — Doris Eaton Travis, the last surviving member of the legendary Ziegfeld Follies, died Tuesday at age 106. Travis performed with the famous dance troupe from 1918 to 1920 and went on to star in musical revues, Broadway comedies and silent films. Travis made her final public appearance in April. In a statement released to BroadwayWorld.com, Tom Viola, executive director of Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights AIDS, said, “Since first meeting her at the very young age of 94 in 1998 when she appeared at the 12th Annual Easter Bonnet Competition at the New Amsterdam Theatre, through the 24th annual competition two weeks ago at the Minskoff. ... Doris was simply a delight. She taught us all a little bit about how to celebrate the past and live for today. We will miss her forever.” In 1936, Travis joined Arthur Murray’s New York dance studio as a tap in-

Doris Eaton Travis

structor. She later moved to Detroit where she opened an Arthur Murray studio. Under Travis’ leadership, the franchise grew to include 18 dance studios throughout Michigan. She met her husband Paul Travis in Detroit. They were married 50 years. Doris and Paul Travis moved to Norman in 1970 to begin a horse breeding operation. She operated their 880-acre ranch until her death. Travis earned her college degree from the University of Oklahoma at age 88. She wrote about her life and family in a 2003 book titled “The Days We Danced: The Story of My Theatrical Family.”


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NATION | WORLD BUDGET OFFICE RELEASES NEW ESTIMATE THAT INCLUDES DISCRETIONARY FUNDING

Health care overhaul bill could cost $115B more BACKGROUND LAW EXPANDS COVERAGE The health care law provides coverage to more than 30 million now uninsured. When Congress passed the bill in March, the Congressional Budget Office estimated the coverage expansion would cost $938 billion over 10 years, while reducing the federal deficit by $143 billion.

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s new health care law could potentially add at least $115 billion more to government health care spending over the next 10 years, congressional budget referees said Tuesday. If Congress approves all the additional spending called for in the legislation, it would push the ten-year cost of the overhaul above $1 trillion — an unofficial limit the Obama administration set early on. The Congressional Budget Office said the added spending includes $10 bil-

lion to $20 billion in administrative costs to federal agencies carrying out the law, as well as $34 billion for community health centers and $39 billion for Indian health care. The costs were not reflected in earlier estimates, although Republican lawmakers argued that they should have been. Part of the reason is technical: the additional spending is not mandatory, leaving Congress with discretion to provide the funds in followon legislation — or not. “Congress does not always act on authorizations that are put into legislation by drafters,” said Kenneth

Coburn wants pork online BY CHRIS CASTEEL Washington Bureau ccasteel@opubco.com

WASHINGTON — Sen. Tom Coburn, who helped create an online government database of federal spending, now wants Congress to make it easy for people to search for lawmakers’ pet projects on the Web. Coburn, R-Muskogee, introduced bipartisan legislation on Tuesday to establish an earmark database showing projects requested by lawmakers and how much money was approved for them. “While Congress has taken some steps to make the earmark process more transparent, some members and special interest

groups still prefer to keep the process a secret,” Coburn said. “The American people should not have to obtain search warrants to understand how Congress is spending their money. I’m pleased my colleagues on both sides of the aisle have come together to answer President (Barack) Obama’s call to establish a single, searchable database of all congressional earmark requests.” Because of recent reforms, lawmakers now post their earmark requests — typically projects ranging from road improvements to medical research — on their websites with explanations. The House Appropriations Committee website has a

link to House requests. Some outside groups like Taxpayers for Common Sense dig through spending bills after they’ve been approved and then post the funding amounts for earmarks. Coburn, who doesn’t request earmarks and refers to them as “the gateway drug to spending addiction in Congress,” coauthored legislation with Obama in 2006 that created the federal website www.usaspending.gov, which includes a database of federal contracts and assistance payments. Lawmakers joining Coburn on the earmarks bill are Sens. John McCain, RAriz.; Russ Feingold, DWis.; and Kristen Gillibrand, D-N.Y.

VIOLENCE MAY LEAD TO EXTENDING WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE

IN BRIEF SUSPECT CALLED ‘HOMEGROWN’ NEW YORK — The

A man grieves as the coffin of a relative killed in a bombing is taken for burial Tuesday in the Shiite city of Najaf. south of Baghdad. AP PHOTO

Military considers delaying pullout of troops in Iraq BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — American commanders, worried about increased violence in the wake of Iraq’s inconclusive elections, are now reconsidering the pace of a major troop pullout this summer, U.S. officials said Tuesday. The withdrawal of the first major wave of troops is expected to be delayed by about a month, the officials said. Waiting much longer could endanger President Barack Obama’s goal of reducing the force level from 92,000 to 50,000 troops by Aug. 31. More than two months after parliamentary elections, the Iraqis have still not formed a new government, and militants aiming to exploit the void have carried out attacks like Monday’s bombings and shootings that killed at least 119 people — the country’s bloodiest day of 2010. The threat has prompted military officials to look at keeping as many troops on the ground, for as long as possible, without missing the Aug. 31 deadline. A se-

curity agreement between the two nations requires American troops to be out of Iraq by the end of 2011. In Baghdad and Washington, U.S. officials say they remain committed to the deadline, which Obama has said he would extend only if Iraq’s security deteriorates. Getting out of Iraq quickly and responsibly was among Obama’s top campaign promises in 2008. Extending the deadline could be politically risky back home — but so could anarchy and a bloodbath following a hasty retreat. Two senior administration officials said the White House is closely watching to see if the Aug. 31 date needs to be pushed back. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the internal discussions. Shortly before the election, there were 96,000 U.S. troops in the country. As of last week, there were about 92,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, meaning an average of 10,500 a month would have to be pulled out.

suspected driver in a failed car bombing of Times Square fits the profile of a recent wave of “homegrown” terrorists threatening America, New York police officials warned Tuesday. The officials said Faisal Shahzadhad roots in working- or middleclass society, some college education and no previous criminal record, but became radicalized in part by traveling to overseas terrorist hotbeds. The Times Square threat was “a classic case of homegrown terrorism,” Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said at a briefing for private security executives.

GROUP MAY GO ON BLACKLIST WASHINGTON — The

government may add the Pakistani Taliban to a terrorism blacklist that would impose travel and financial sanctions on members of the group, which officials believe is linked to the failed Times Square car bombing. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said Tuesday the U.S. already was considering designating Tehrik-eTaliban Pakistan a “foreign terrorist organization,” before the incident in New York, but the process accelerated since the failed attack.

Baer, a spokesman for the White House budget agency. Congressional estimators also said they had not had enough time to run the numbers. “If Congress were to approve all of this new discretionary funding authorized in the health care bill, almost all of the administration’s highly touted savings would be made null and void,” said Jennifer Hing, spokeswoman for Republicans on the House Appropriations Committee. But Baer said Obama would demand that added spending be offset with cuts in other domestic programs.

IN BRIEF NATION

WAR MEMORIAL CROSS STOLEN LOS ANGELES — A cross erected on a remote Mojave Desert outcropping to honor American war dead has been stolen less than two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed it to remain standing while a legal battle continued over its presence on federal land. Versions of the memorial have been vandalized repeatedly in the last 75 years, but the theft was condemned Tuesday by veterans groups that support the cross and by civil libertarians that saw it as a violation of the constitutional separation of church and state.

WORLD

CAMERON BECOMES PRIME MINISTER LONDON — David Cameron, the youthful leader

who modernized the party of right-wing icon Margaret Thatcher, became prime minister Tuesday after the resignation of Gordon Brown — capping a gripping election saga that returns the Tories to government after 13 years of Labour Party rule. Following tradition, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Cameron at Buckingham Palace after a behindthe-scenes dogfight between Cameron and Brown for the cooperation of Britain’s third-place party, after an election that left no party with a majority.

FOURTH SCHOOL ATTACK REPORTED BEIJING — A Chinese news agency says seven

children were hacked to death and at least 20 others injured in a violent rampage early today at a kindergarten in northwest Shaanxi province, in the lastest in a string of attacks on schools. It comes after three attacks at schools and kindergartens late last month left dozens of children injured and raised questions on security. FROM WIRE SERVICES


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MONOLOGUE

OPINION OUR VIEWS | STATE KNOWS HOW TO COPE WITH DISASTERS

Nature’s wrath, residents’ resolve put on display CIENCE and technology can only go so far in explaining what we see after tornadoes like those that swept across the state Monday. Why do they level one home and leave the house next door standing? Why do they leapfrog entire neighborhoods and ravish others? Why can we see some coming for miles while others drop down and disappear in almost invisible fashion except for the obvious destruction left behind? What we know for sure in Oklahoma is this: We have survived worse. And together, we’ll survive the chaos of this week and whatever else Mother Nature has in store this spring. The scenes from Monday’s series of tornadoes are nothing short of devastating. Twisters reduced homes to rubble, uprooted trees and sucked grass from the earth. That’s what they do, with no regard for life or memories or history. And we’re helpless to stop it. Yes, we can prepare. Evidence of that was widespread as video showed neighbors rescuing nearby families from their shelters. Some people died. But how much worse could it have been? Mobile home parks were flattened. The twisters hit in afternoon rush hour and blew vehicles off the road, flipping some of them in the process. And despite wall-to-wall television coverage, not

S

every tornado that touched down had much specific advance warning. Mother Nature still rules over technology. Now we’re left with the aftermath. Families wonder what will become of their blown-away homes and scattered keepsakes. Officials of damaged schools must figure out whether they can finish the school year. And those families who lost the most — their precious loved ones — mourn for those they can’t bring back. Yet the aftermath is when Oklahoma is at its best. Neighbors checked on one another. First responders weren’t far behind. Makeshift emergency shelters went up almost immediately. And help to restore power and begin the massive work of cleanup began pouring in, slowed only by the need to check for injured and other dangers like downed power lines and potential gas leaks. It took only seconds for the tornadoes to wrap Oklahoma in destruction. But Oklahomans will be there for each other for the long haul, making sure families are fed and housed even as we mourn alongside them. The long list of tragedies that preceded Monday has taught us how to do that. Oklahomans know how to care for one another. It’s what we do.

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

Utah alarm: Politicians should note Bennett’s loss

Speak up: Abuse suspicions must be reported

Some observers are missing key points in U.S. Sen. Robert Bennett’s failure last weekend to win the Republican nomination in Utah, ousted from the state’s primary by a pair of tea party-endorsed candidates who’ve never held political office. One view is that Bennett’s loss means all incumbents, not just Democrats, could be in jeopardy come November. Another is that if a staunch conservative like Bennett can’t win re-nomination in bright-red Utah, the tea party members largely responsible for his ouster are way out of the political mainstream. We’ll buy the first — with an important footnote — but not the second. Yes, incumbents of both parties have good reason to run scared this fall, especially if they’ve been part of the recent Sen. Bob Bennett Washington spending spree. Bennett was an Appropriations Committee member and a TARP supporter. In his state he was seen as part of the spending machinery that’s the object of national frustration reflected in the tea party movement. As for using Bennett as proof the tea party crowd is a collection of conservative nuts that can be marginalized, careful. By Washington standards Bennett was conservative. But maybe not in Utah, at least not as conservative as he needed to be — the teaching point being that members of Congress who don’t match their constituents’ interests could be in trouble this fall. This year voter energy is focused on spending, the deficit and Washington’s dismissal of public opposition to Obamacare. Politicians on the wrong side of those issues face a tough road ahead.

The case of a Tulsa school administrator accused of inappropriately touching a student should serve as a warning and reminder: reporting potential child abuse isn’t optional. A counselor at Tulsa’s Skelly Elementary told the school principal in October that she had witnessed Assistant Principal Robert Yerton inappropriately touching a student. It wasn’t until last month that police officials searched the school and Yerton’s home. He was arrested last week on three sex offenses, including two that authorities said involved a male relative. Police are concerned there might be more victims. Yerton is a longtime educator and former children’s minister at a Tulsa church. State law requires anyone who suspects child abuse to report it to the state Department of Human Services. It’s not enough for teachers or other educators to report it to a supervisor and hope it gets passed on. Oklahoma, like other states, has an unfortunate history of teachers who’ve been proven guilty of inappropriate touching or sexual relationships with students. In many of those cases, the teachers had no criminal history so routine background checks didn’t turn up potential problems. Some, though, had been the subject of suspicion and rumors. Child abuse allegations are serious and can ruin lives and careers even if proven untrue. But that doesn’t change the obligation we all have — especially those entrusted daily with children’s safety — to protect them. Now’s a good time to make sure those in positions of trust — including teachers, child care workers and church leaders — are clear on their reporting responsibilities.

Oprah did her show from New York to celebrate the 10th anniversary of O magazine. Dr. Phil allowed them to shave his moustache, which is currently being used to sop up oil in the Gulf.” JIMMY KIMMEL

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!”

Expansive silence of Elena Kagan WASHINGTON — From the supporters of Elena Kagan’s nomination to the Supreme Court, we have learned that as Harvard Law School’s dean she provided free bagels and coffee to students, improved the gymnasium and added a multipurpose ice rink. Her detractors have reported on liberal columns she wrote — as a college student in the Daily Princetonian. Profiles have informed us that during Kagan’s Supreme Court clerkship, Justice Thurgood Marshall dubbed her “Shorty.” The chattering class is focused on such trivia because there is not much else to say. The single most prominent thing about Kagan is her extraordinary ability, while holding high-profile jobs in the legal profession, to say nothing about the major issues of the day. It is the one judgment that Kagan observers of all ideological backgrounds seem to share. Tom Goldstein, a Kagan supporter, admits, “I don’t know anyone who has had a conversation with her in which she Michael expressed a personal Gerson conviction on a question of constitutional law in the past decade.” Carrie Severino, a Kagan critic from COMMENTARY the right, concludes, “She’s been so careful for so long that no one seems to know exactly what she does think.” Kagan has been a leader in the field of law without having a distinctive legal voice. She has been a leader in academia without having left a discernible academic mark. This has become the path of least resistance to the Supreme Court — being eminent without being conspicuous. But no public life is without a trace. In her story we can discern at least a few things. First, we know that she is connected to just about everyone in the legal establishment, and most seem to like her. She was a classmate of former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and legal commentator Jeffrey Toobin, and was a protege of historian Sean Wilentz and Judge Abner Mikva. As dean of Harvard Law School, she hired conservative scholars and treated them decently. On a personal level, she is not a vicious partisan. Second, we know from friends and colleagues that Kagan is a social liberal. Kagan hails from a very small ideological neighborhood — Manhattan, Princeton University, the University of Chicago and Harvard Law School. To paraphrase President Obama, she shows a keen understanding of how the law affects the daily lives of people on the Upper West Side and in the Ivy League. Third, we know, or at least suspect, that Kagan is favorable to strong executive authority. Her writings endorse presidential control of federal agencies on domestic issues. During her confirmation hearings for solicitor general, Kagan also seemed to approve the detention of enemy combatants without trial during a time of war.

Knowing views would be helpful So: Kagan is a fair-minded social liberal who favors a strong executive. Sound like anyone you know? It would seem that Obama has chosen a version of himself. Wouldn’t it be helpful to know Kagan’s political, legal and constitutional views? The political culture surrounding judicial nominations — driven by attack ads and advocacy groups — undermines this possibility. “The Framers intended the Senate to take the broadest view of its constitutional responsibility,” a senator once explained, including the scrutiny of a nominee’s “political, legal and constitutional views.” That was Joe Biden announcing his opposition to Judge Robert Bork in 1987. Bork’s vivid opinions were used by opponents to sink his nomination. Kagan’s confirmation strategy, implemented over a lifetime of blandness, is likely to be more effective. Yet Kagan’s expansive silence leaves a broad range of plausible interpretations. Is she a temperamental moderate who doesn’t like comprehensive pronouncements or judicial activism of any kind? Is she a consensus-oriented liberal who will be able to pull Justice Anthony Kennedy to the left on key votes? Is it possible Kagan lacks any wellformed constitutional perspective at all? Who knows? Who could possibly know? WASHINGTON POST WRITERS GROUP


OPINION

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Free-market system: Pro-rich or pro-poor? Listening to America’s liberals, who the open, highly competitive and more now prefer to call themselves progresfree market end of our economy. sives, one would think that free markets Restricted, regulated and monopolized benefit the rich and harm the poor, but markets are especially handicapping to little can be further from the truth. people who are seen as less preferred, First, let’s first say what free markets latecomers and people with little politiare. Free markets, or laissez-faire capcal clout. For example, owning and opitalism, refer to an economic system erating a taxi is one way out of poverty. where there is no government interfeIt takes little skills and capital. But in rence except to outlaw and prosecute most cities, one has to purchase a lifraud and coercion. It ought to be apcense costing tens of thousands of dolparent that our economy cannot be lars. New York City’s taxicab licensing described as free market because there is law is particularly egregious, requiring a extensive government interference. We person, as of May 2007, to pay have what might be called a mixed $600,000 for a license to own and opereconomy, one with both free market and ate one cab. Business licensing laws are socialistic attributes. If one is poor or of not racially discriminatory as such, but modest means, where does he fare betthey have a racially discriminatory efter: in the freer and more open sector of fect. our economy or in the controlled and The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931, still on highly regulated sector? Let’s look at it. the books today, had a racially discrimiDid Carnegie, Mellon, natory intent and has a Rockefeller and Guggenracially discriminatory heim start out rich? Aneffect. It is a federal law Walter drew Carnegie worked as a Williams that mandates “prevailing bobbin boy, changing wages” be paid on all fedspools of thread in a coterally financed or assisted ton mill 12 hours a day, six construction projects and days a week, earning $1.20 as such discriminates a week. A young John D. against non-unionized COMMENTARY Rockefeller worked as a black construction conclerk. Meyer Guggenheim tractors and black workers. started out as a peddler. Andrew Mellon During the 1931 legislative debate, quite a did have a leg up; his father was a lawyer few congressmen expressed racist moand banker. Sam Walton milked the tives in their testimony in support of the family’s cows, bottled the milk and delaw, such as Rep. Clayton Allgood, Dlivered it and newspapers to customers. Ala., who said, “Reference has been Richard Sears was a railroad station made to a contractor from Alabama who agent. Alvah Roebuck began work as a went to New York with bootleg labor. watchmaker. Together, they founded This is a fact. That contractor has cheap Sears, Roebuck and Co. in 1893. John colored labor that he transports, and he Cash Penney (founder of JC Penney puts them in cabins, and it is labor of department stores) worked for a local that sort that is in competition with dry goods merchant. white labor throughout the country.” It wasn’t just whites who went from Today’s supporters of the Davis-Bacon rags to riches through open markets; Act use different rhetoric, but its racially there were a few blacks. Madam C.J. discriminatory effects are the same. Walker, born Sarah Breedlove just two The market is a friend in another years after the end of slavery, managed unappreciated way. In poor black neighto build an empire from developing and borhoods, one might see some nice selling hair products. John H. Johnson clothing, some nice food, some nice cars founded Johnson Publishing Co., which but no nice schools. Why not at least became an international media and cos- some nice schools? Clothing, food and metics empire. There are many modern- cars are distributed by the market mechday black millionaires who, like other anism while schools are distributed by millionaires, black and white, found the the political mechanism. route to their fortunes mostly through CREATORS.COM

STEVE BREEN/SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

JOHN DEERING/ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE

YOUR VIEWS

Economic suicide

Former President Bill Clinton tours the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum with executive director Kari Watkins. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

POINT OF VIEW | OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL

Museum speaks to us BY FORD W. BELL

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, which I had the honor to visit for the first time on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of the bombing, occupies a singular place in the array of American museums. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is the nature of its collection. Most Americans think of museums as collecting institutions, the civic pillars in society that collect, preserve and interpret our national heritages — cultural, natural, historic. Museums protect for us the artifacts and objects that define America, and in so doing tell us where we’ve been and, perhaps, provide a glimpse of where we Ford W. Bell might be headed. Here in Washington, D.C., one can sample the greatest such collections in our country, at the various museums that comprise the Smithsonian Institution. But at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, the collection is composed of something seemingly more ephemeral but perhaps even more enduring: memory. There are other museums also at the task of collecting and preserving memory, honoring and passing that memory down to our children, and to their children. Museums are stewards of the spirit and of the conscience of what has come before us and, too often, of what has passed from us forever. The collections of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum — 1

million documents, artifacts and photographs — ensure that we will not lose the memory or the lessons of that horrible day, April 19, 1995. Not far from the myriad exhibits of the Smithsonian are two institutions that share the distinct status of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. One is the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, where a moving exhibit of shoes collected from doomed concentration camp prisoners has moved visitors to tears. Like the stunning memorial in Oklahoma City, it transcends time to convey the souls of the millions of innocents whose loss made such a museum necessary. Just down the National Mall is yet another memorial occupying the unique place of the Oklahoma City National Memorial. In the self-generating ethos of our times, visitors to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial have created their own museum, leaving precious items that invoke the essence of those individuals whose names are there etched in black granite. Dutifully collected and stored by the National Park Service, these objects have significance to but a few, yet they hold meaning for us all. And so it is with the moving collection of the Oklahoma City Memorial and Museum. What greater good can a museum offer us than this act, of watching over the memory and the spirit of those who died in Oklahoma City — who they were and what they meant to us, and what their absence means now to those of us still here? Eventually, something must fill the silence that comes with loss. The Oklahoma City National Memorial fills that silence. And it speaks to us, every day. Bell is president and CEO of the American Association of Museums.

The cap-and-trade bill seems to be warming up again in Congress. Before we get carried away with this program, some key issues must be faced. First, is the science really settled? None of the heating that was predicted by the computer models has occurred in the last dozen years. Second, to fully implement the program (an 80 percent reduction in CO2) will require reducing per capita energy consumption to 1875 levels, thus destroying our industrial society. The cost of doing this has been estimated at $35 trillion. Have alternatives, such as learning to cope with higher temperatures, been fully evaluated? Third, the proponents of this program hope that some viable alternative energy scheme will emerge. Biofuels, wind and solar are only workable on a small scale, due to limited land area for growth of corn or cellulose, and the fact that wind and sunshine are intermittent and need backup. Fourth, such a scheme will only work if the whole world joins the program. If we destroy our economy, China, India and others will be the beneficiaries. Our industries will simply move there. The world has survived this long. It can surely survive until the science has indeed been fully verified or disproved, and if verified, we have viable alternative energy plans, and everyone else is on board. Further, it must be demonstrated that it’s a better plan than learning to live in a warmer world. Otherwise, we will simply be committing economic suicide. Ted Rado, Oklahoma City

NO EASY FIX “Shameful: Kids lose when bad teachers win” (Our Views, May 5) offered the example of charter schools as a fix for the nation’s education woes. Specifically, the article cited the importance of being able to remove bad teachers from the classroom. A New York Times article on May 4 offered a contrasting view of charter schools. Test scores at charter schools differed little from those of public schools. The author, Charles Murray, makes an observation that I believe is key. Murray writes, “What happens in the classroom can have some effect, but smart and motivated children will tend to learn to read and do math even with poor instruction, while not-so-smart or unmotivated children will often have trouble with those subjects despite excellent instruction.” As an educator and the

husband of an elementary school teacher, I could not agree more. I don’t disagree with the notion of removing bad teachers from the classroom, but other factors including parental involvement, family structure and socioeconomic status may play more important roles than what happens in the classroom. Charter schools certainly offer some students an avenue for success, but standardized testing may not demonstrate the gains that proponents hope to see. Perhaps our efforts would be better concentrated on building more cohesive families and a social system that raises expectations. Jeremy Dunn, Oklahoma City

PROUD OF THUNDER We just wanted to let the Oklahoma City Thunder know how much we enjoyed the season. Knowing there were sell-out Thunder coach Scott crowds at Brooks was voted most of the NBA Coach of the home games, Year. we want you to know you were surrounded by fans all around the state via broadcasting of all the games. We never missed one and were always part of the crowd, cheering you on. The team has been so well coached, which was shown through the attitudes of the players. We are so proud of our Thunder. We can’t say enough about the team and the vision you have had by bringing an NBA team to Oklahoma. Gary and Loretta Hall, Elk City

WHAT ABOUT ‘PATRIOT’? Since the illegal alien debate has resumed, I’ve heard the labels “racist,” “Nazi” plus unprintable words directed at the citizens of Arizona and other segments of U.S. society. One word I haven’t heard labeling them is “patriot.” Wake up America! We citizens have to obey our laws, why shouldn’t non-citizens be expected to respect our laws? This applies to all illegal immigrants, regardless of their point of entry into this country or their place of origin. Henry Benton, Shawnee


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO

Bank helps children get on financial path BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children To Save Day. The annual, nationwide event teaches children their financial ABCs. The National Teach Children to Save Day was April 27, when bankers made presentations in schools across the country to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Legacy Bank took part in the event for its fifth consecutive year, but spread the lessons out over the past several weeks. Employees presented to more than 1,000 secondgrade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. The presentation incorporated the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain. The program, The Bear Basics of Savings, covered the personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, the importance of saving, and how interest makes money grow. Students had an opportunity to apply concepts and practices through discussion of the story and

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are planned at a Metropolitan Library System branch. Go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

FRIDAY What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

TODAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 7407374. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509. McLoud Board of Trustees, 7 p.m., city hall, 107 N Main. McLoud School Board, 7 p.m., administration building, 117 N Main.

FRIDAY Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 6033576.

SATURDAY Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 9427355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave. Mid-Del Farmers Market, 8 a.m., Charles J. Johnson Central Park, SE 29 and Air Depot, Midwest City. Edmond Farmers Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Place, Second and Broadway, 359-4630.

MONDAY A Legacy Bank employee reads to students at Ida Freeman Elementary in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JULIE NOAKES, LEGACY BANK

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

adults. This book is somewhat harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides.

Del City Council, 6 p.m., city hall, 3701 SE 15, 677-5741.

Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 6033576. McEvoy Toastmasters, 6:30 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa Ave., 787-1598. Oklahoma City School Board, 5:30 p.m., school administration building, 900 N Klein. Putnam City School Board, 6 p.m., school administration building, 5401 NW 40, Warr Acres.

TUESDAY Bethany City Council, 7:30 p.m., city hall, 6700 NW 36. El Reno City Council, 7:25 p.m., city council chambers, 101 N Choctaw. Jones City Council, 7 p.m., city hall, 110 E Main St. Mustang City Council, 7 p.m., 224 State Highway 152. Oklahoma City Council, 8:30 a.m., city hall, 200 N Walker Ave. The Village City Council, 7:30 p.m., city hall, 2304 Manchester Drive. Yukon City Council, 7:30 p.m., Centennial Building, 125 S Fifth. Warr Acres City Council, 7 p.m., city hall, 5930 NW 49. Oklahoma City Stamp Club, 7 p.m., Asbury United Methodist Church, 1320 SW 38, 632-3378. Advanced E-mail, 10 a.m., Moore Public Library, 225 S Howard, 793-5100.

ONLINE

other activities. For more tips and ideas about saving, go to www.legacybank.com/ bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day for parents and teachers, go to www.aba.com/ abaef/tcts.htm.

Make sure all your school or nonprofit events are entered into wimgo.com, the Web site for all activities in Oklahoma. IT’S EASY TO DO Go to wimgo.com and log in using your NewsOK.com log-in and password. Click on “Add Event.” Enter all the information about your event, and wimgo will help you with each step.

› › ›

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

CALENDAR

The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

SPRING’S BOUNTY BLOOMS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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UCO theater series to close with musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

Wildflowers grow in the Centennial Grove at Interstate 35 and Covell Road in Edmond. PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Signs of spring throw a splash of color.

A truck drives by a patch of wildflowers in Edmond.

Camp Fire USA honors four students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a term which is short for work, health and love. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is

also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information about Camp Fire USA, call the council office at 4785646.

‘24 Works on Paper’ has Norman exhibit FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking.

Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to

“Summer of ’42” stars UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro as Dorothy and Pete. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

fight the war in the Pacific. “The musical begins as an older Hermie returns to the island and reflects back on that time in his life,” White said. “The story plays on dualities — the coming of age, a husband killed, the American sense of World War II. It is the moment before innocence lost and is as much about America as it is about Hermie,” he said. For tickets, call the Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Bike to Work Day activities planned BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

At least seven metroarea cities plan to participate in Bike to Work day May 21, and Edmond is scheduled to launch a Bike to School Day. The Association of Central Oklahoma Governments is coordinating activities for Oklahoma City, Guthrie, Midwest City, Moore, Norman, Yukon and Edmond. For the first time, Edmond is having a Bike to School Day in conjunction with the Bike to Work Day activities, said Tim Tillman, chairman of the Edmond Bicycle Committee. Students will gather at Stephenson, Hafer or Bickman-Rudkin parks at 7 a.m., and all the student riders will end up at Edmond Memorial High School. “This is the first one since you and I were kids riding bikes to school,” Tillman said. Each of the seven metroarea communities have activities planned that focus on a group ride which intends to show the motoring public the number of active cyclists and participants. Each community also has a specific route and end-of-

SAFETY TIPS BICYCLE COMMUTING 1. Always wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. 2. Wear appropriate shoes and comfortable clothes in bright colors that enhance your visibility. 3. Before riding, inspect your bike for safety and mechanical concerns. 4. Plan and know your route by walking or driving it first. Select a route that uses less-traveled streets and avoids busy roads and intersections. 5. Share the commute with a co-worker or friend. 6. Obey all traffic laws — stop signs, traffic lights and other posted signs. Signal turns, lane changes and stops. 7. Continuously scan for traffic, look for road hazards and ride in a predictable manner with the flow of traffic. 8. Ride with the flow of traffic as far to the right as practical unless passing or turning. 9. Be aware of turning automobiles, buses making frequent stops, passengers exiting parked vehicles, vehicles exiting driveways and pedestrians. 10. Carry water, emergency maintenance tools and a mobile phone. SOURCE: ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA GOVERNMENTS

ride ceremony. Bike to Work Day 2010 is part of a national campaign to promote bicycling as a healthy and efficient transportation alternative. The League of American Bicyclists has recognized the month of May as National Bike to Work Month since 1956. National Bike to Work Day, the third Friday in

May, annually offers metropolitan areas the opportunity to call attention to the benefits of bicycling and to increase safety awareness among bicyclists and motorists. Complete details for Central Oklahoma Bike to Work Day 2010, can be found at bikedayok.com or call Ryan Billings or Jerry Church at 234-2264.

Campaign collects quarters to help kids with diabetes BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City. The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent

childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches inside retail stores are excluded. On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and N Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of

$

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day baby-sitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17 and 18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants are asked to bring a lunch. They will earn a certificate. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration is $15 and classes are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22 and 23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating class for age 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. Preregistration is $5. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. The morning session is from 9 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session is from 1to 4 p.m. Five-day sewing camps will be offered July 12-16 and July 26-30. Registration is $50. Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information, call 713-1125.

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Bud Hightree levels a pot Saturday that will become a fountain at the Cleveland County Master Gardeners’ demonstration garden at the fairgrounds. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs have raised more than $500,000 for sick and injured children receiving care through The Children’s Hospital and OU Medical Center. The funds recently created a metabolic lab for children with diabetes. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

Store Summer The Mattress Special Purchase Pillow Top Set workshops Full Queen King 179 199 299 available Latex Eurotop Set for youth Full Queen King $

A watering spot in the garden

$

$

369

$

$

499

NW 10th & Portland, Oklahoma City

405-943-4771

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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17A

COWBOYS, COWGIRLS GET READY TO RODEO Contestants wait for their turn to compete during the rodeo. Kids 4 and under can participate in goat undercoating, by foot only.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo at the Carl Benne Arena. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer. Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Poet to read in Norman FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. The reading is free.

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo. The rodeo has events for children of all ages.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

II

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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20A

II

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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ELECTIONS

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State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NORTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

INDEX Deaths Records

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14A

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO GROWING THE GARDEN TAKES SOME WATER

Linda Garms with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners waters plants in a demonstration garden Saturday at the fairgrounds. PHOTO BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is somewhat harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, al-

lowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel

in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

SATURDAY What: Main Street’s Rockin’ Reunion When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: All ages What: Craft Club: Create a kite When: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 5 and older

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Oklahoma State UniversityOklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576.

Del City Council, 6 p.m., city hall, 3701 SE 15, 677-5741. Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576. McEvoy Toastmasters, 6:30 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, 6316 N Tulsa Ave., 787-1598. Oklahoma City School Board, 5:30 p.m., school administration building, 900 N Klein. Putnam City School Board, 6 p.m., school administration building, 5401 NW 40, Warr Acres.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 740-7374. Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509.

SATURDAY Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 942-7355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m., 400 N Portland Ave. Edmond Farmers Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Place, Second and Broadway, 359-4630.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Award given to 4 students from metro FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a term which is short for work, health and love. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is

also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information about Camp Fire USA, call the council office at 4785646.

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Poet to read Sunday at Santa Fe Depot FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday

Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other poems.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

‘HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?’

Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck.

Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane during the Touch-a-Truck event Saturday in Norman. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Above: Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter. Right: Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while OEC journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

Firehouse to exhibit ‘24 Works on Paper’

Civil

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, with stops in both large and small communities, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Spring Planting Time Is Here! Come See Our Selection of Homegrown Bedding Plants, Hanging Baskets, Shrubs, Rosebushes, Groundcover, Pottery and Much, Much More!

330 W. Memorial • 748-6983 Monday - Saturday 9-6, Sunday 12-5

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Other Legal Notices

772

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

COWBOYS, COWGIRLS GET READY TO RODEO

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo at the Carl Benne Arena. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

III

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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III

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

SOUTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

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The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

INDEX Deaths Records

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IV

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO, TOO

Bank helps children get on financial path BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children To Save Day. The annual, nationwide event teaches children their financial ABCs. The National Teach Children to Save Day was April 27, when bankers made presentations in schools across the country to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Legacy Bank took part in the event for its fifth consecutive year, but spread the lessons out over the past several weeks. Employees presented to more than 1,000 second-grade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. The presentation incorporated the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain. The program, The Bear Basics of Savings, covered the personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, the importance of saving, and how interest makes money grow.

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students at Ida Freeman Elementary in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY JULIE NOAKES, LEGACY BANK

A Legacy Bank employee reads to students.

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

INFORMATION For more about saving, go to www.legacy bank.com/bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day, go to www.aba. com/abaef/tcts.htm.

Legacy Bank employee Kim Cherry discusses the importance of savings with second-graders.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is some-

what harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

FRIDAY

TODAY

SATURDAY

What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

What: Main Street’s Rockin’ Reunion When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: All ages

THURSDAY

What: Craft Club: Create a kite When: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Where: Warr Acres Ages: 5 and older

What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17 What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

SUNDAY What: I can’t believe I shot that: Teen film When: 2 to 4 p.m. Where: Downtown Ages: All ages

IN BRIEF POET TO READ AT DEPOT ON SUNDAY NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Studio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other original poems. The reading is free and open to everyone. FROM STAFF REPORTS

CALENDAR TODAY

SATURDAY

Single Again, 8 a.m., Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 Agnew Ave., 942-7355. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Farmers’ THURSDAY Market, 8 a.m., 400 West Women’s ConnecN Portland Ave. tion, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Mid-Del Farmers Country Club, 4001 NW 39, Market, 8 a.m., 740-7374. Charles J. Johnson Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Central Park, SE 29 Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, and Air Depot, Mid691-0509. west City. Edmond Farmers FRIDAY Market, 9 a.m., Festival Market Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Place, Second and Broadway, 359Drive, 603-3576. 4630. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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A GARDEN WATERING SPOT

Linda Garms with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners waters plants in a demonstration garden Saturday at the Cleveland County fairgrounds. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Collecting coins to help children BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City. The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches

inside retail stores are excluded. On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs have raised more than $500,000 for sick and injured children receiving care through The Children’s Hospital and OU Medical Center. The funds recently created a metabolic lab for children with diabetes. They also have partnered with Children’s Hospital Foundation and community donors to create a $15 million childhood diabetes program. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

Summer workshops available for youth FROM STAFF REPORTS

Cake decorating, sewing, baby-sitting certification and cooking classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day babysitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17-18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants are asked to bring a sack lunch. They will earn a baby-sitting certificate. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration for the workshop is $15 and classes will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22-23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating

INFORMATION Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information about enrollment, call 713-1125.

class for ages 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. Pre-registration is $5. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. The morning session is from 9 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session is from 1 to 4 p.m. Five-day sewing camp sessions will be offered in the mornings July 12-16 and in the mornings and afternoons July 26-30. Registration is $50. Sewing camps are limited to 10 participants.

Bud Hightree levels a pot Saturday that will become a fountain in the demonstration garden.


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

GETTIN’ READY TO RODEO Left: Contestants wait for their turn Friday to compete during the Edmond Junior Rodeo. Kids 4 and younger can participate in goat undercoating, by foot only. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready to rodeo. The next rodeo will be May 21-22.

Ryan Fatzer, 6, competes in a Mutton Bustin’ event.

Seasonal Allergies? Don’t let a runny nose and itchy eyes keep you from having fun this spring!

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry.

Let Dr. Molina evaluate your allergies and prescribe some relief. Marco Molina, MD Board Certified Family Medicine

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Call Today To Schedule An Appointment!

((405) 405)) 636 636-7407 36 6 7407

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

4221 S. Western, Ste. 3030 | Oklahoma City, OK 73109 Mon-Fri, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Wed, 8:30 a.m. - Noon

Camp Fire honors 4 students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the honor of the WoHeLo Award. For a member to earn the WoHeLo Award, he or she chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. WoHeLo is a Camp Fire USA term, which is short for work, health and love. The WoHeLo Award is the organization’s highest achievement. This year there are four WoHeLo Award recipients in the metro area. Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Howard is involved in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. She is the daughter of Scott and Sonya Howard. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High School and is involved in softball and soccer. She is also a member of Teens in Action, serves on the Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. She is the daughter of Paul and Cheryl Mengwasser. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High School and is in band and color guard. She also spends time volunteering at local horse rescue missions. She is the daughter of Stephen and Melissa Miracle. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High School. He is involved in Teens in Action, has worked as a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church. He is the son of Steven and Angela Dyer. For more information, call the Heart of Oklahoma Council office at 4785646.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?

Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter.

Above: Parents, kids and trucks are reflected in a fire truck’s mirror Saturday during the Touch a Truck event in Norman.

Left: Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck.

Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while Oklahoma Electrical Cooperative journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Above left: Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother, Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane.

Firehouse Art Center to exhibit ‘24 Works’ FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years and specializes in drawings, painting and printmaking. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Day has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s of fine arts degree from Arizona State University, Tempe. In 2007, she organized the Suite Oklahoma Exchange Portfolio, which included 18 Oklahoma printmakers. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a full year, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Artists participating in “24 Works on Paper” are MJ Alexander, Oklahoma City; Narciso Arguelles, Edmond; Sarah Atlee, Oklahoma City; Nick Bayer, Oklahoma City; Eleanor Davy Carmack, Tulsa; Marty Coleman, Glenpool; Bryan Dahlvang, Tuttle; Leslie Waugh Dallam, Norman; Don Emrick, Claremore; Dixie Er-

ickson, Norman; Michelle Himes-McCrory, Stillwater; Bradley Jessop, Sulphur; Trent Lawson, Oklahoma City; Katherine Liontas-Warren, Lawton; Regina Murphy, Oklahoma City; Romy Owens, Oklahoma City;

Christopher M. Owens, Tulsa; Cindy Pauchey, Walters; Liz Roth, Stillwater; Clarissa Sharp, Oklahoma City; Rob Smith, Cushing; Tom Wester, Oklahoma City; George Wilson, Oklahoma City, and Betty Wood, Norman. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

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TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

IV

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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IV

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 13

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EAST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perry

Ardmore

NORMAN

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Librarians suggest adding diversity in reading May is Latino Books Month, so I asked for reading advice from the best readers around: librarians. I challenged

librarians from the Metropolitan Library System to share with you their favorite books by Hispanic authors or about His-

panic issues. Here are some of their responses. I’ll share more in an upcoming column. Taryn Kingery, associ-

Carrie Coppernoll ccoppernoll @opubco.com

ate librarian at Ralph Ellison Library: “ ‘I am Latino: The

SEE CARRIE, PAGE 14A

MUSKOGEE

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

CALENDAR

METRO, TOO

OU clock tower gets a ‘face-lift’

An Allied Steel crane operator lifts a clock face toward its new home on the west side of the University of Oklahoma clock tower. PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN

BY JAMES S. TYREE Staff Writer jtyree@opubco.com

NORMAN — John Snellings of the University of Oklahoma Facilities Management department looked up at a new clock face as it was lifted atop the 110-foot-tall OU Clock Tower. “My how time flies,” he said. Amanda Toohey of OU

Facilities Management said the acrylic clock face installed on the tower’s west side replaces one that blew down and smashed to the ground during the Christmas Eve winter storm that produced high winds and record snowfall. The clock tower is an OU landmark just outside Bizzell Memorial Library. The Verdin Company office in Dallas made the $18,000 custom-built

clock and its staff helped install it in the tower. Once the clock was in place, the workers installed its motor, put the clock hands on its face, and then reinforced clocks on the tower’s other three sides to prevent future mishaps. OU hired Allied Steel of Oklahoma City to lift the clock face on Thursday and help with installation. University employees also were there to assist.

Carrie: Poignant issues FROM PAGE 13A

Beauty in Me’ by Sandra L. Pinkney. This book uses the senses to describe how beautiful it is to be Latino. It incorporates some Spanish words and has pictures of Latinos throughout.” “ ‘What Can You Do with a Rebozo?’ by Carmen Talfolla and illustrated by Amy Cordova, for children. This book is about the traditional Mexican shawl, called a rebozo. Throughout the book, you learn about the daily life of Latinos and about this simple piece of clothing that can be used in their daily lives in a number of ways. The illustrations are vibrant and beautiful.” Charla R. Aucone, librarian at the Downtown Library: “ ‘Tortilla Curtain’ by T. Coraghessan Boyle, for adults. This book is some-

what harsh but realistic and engaging in its story telling of illegal aliens in California. It would appeal to anyone interested in the human relationships involved in the immigration issue. The novel tells the story from the Mexican illegal alien perspective, as well as the white American citizen perspective, allowing the reader to experience and feel the emotions from both sides. The book was published in 1995 and is very poignant to the issues of illegal immigration today, especially in light of Arizona’s new legislation. Boyle presents the novel in a nonjudgmental fashion, depicting social and political issues of illegal immigration. “It makes you think about human nature, social issues and to get a realistic feel for two sides of one tragic immigration story.”

LIBRARY EVENTS These programs are scheduled at a Metropolitan Library System branch. For a list of all programs and events, go to metrolibrary.org.

TODAY What: After School Club When: 4 to 5 p.m. Where: Capitol Hill Ages: 5 to 11

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

What: Edmond Manga and Anime Club When: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Where: Edmond Ages: 13 to 17

What: Boost your child’s brain power When: 10:30 a.m. to noon Where: Warr Acres Ages: Adults

What: Eric Humphries artist reception When: 7 to 8 p.m. Where: Midwest City Ages: All ages

TODAY Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Summer Farmers Market, 2:30 p.m., Glenbrook Centre East, 1120 NW 63.

THURSDAY West Women’s Connection, 11:15 a.m., Sportsman’s Country Club, 4001 NW 39, 740-7374.

A Verdin employee inside the clock tower reaches for the clock face.

Scrabble Club, 3 p.m., Game HQ, 1620 SW 89, 691-0509. McLoud Board of Trustees, 7 p.m., city hall, 107 N Main. McLoud School Board, 7 p.m., administration building, 117 N Main.

FRIDAY Tai Chi, 2 p.m., Yukon Senior Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 603-3576.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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Other Legal Notices

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UCO theater series to end with musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman

University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro star as Dorothy and Pete. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to fight the war in the Pacific. “The musical begins as an older Hermie returns to the island and reflects back on that time in his life,” White said. “The story plays on dualities — the coming of age, a husband killed, the American sense of World War II. It is the moment

before innocence lost and is as much about America as it is about Hermie,” he said. For tickets, call the Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/ broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.

Quarters collected to help children who have diabetes BY JILL SMITH NewsOK.com Contributor

Children’s Hospital Foundation and Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs kicked off the first monthlong Miracle Mile of Quarters campaign last week, with the goal of collecting at least 63,000 quarters, or $17,000 dollars. Mile of Quarters is a nationwide fundraising project of Kiwanis International, and this year Oklahoma Kiwanis Clubs are establishing this event for Children’s Hospital Foundation in Oklahoma City.

Summer workshops available for youth FROM STAFF REPORTS

Classes will be offered to youth this summer through the Oklahoma County Extension Service. A two-day baby-sitting workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 17 and 18. The workshop is open to ages 11 to 19 and a $10 pre-registration fee is required. Participants should bring a sack lunch. Ages 9 to 14 can participate in a two-day cooking school. Pre-registration is $15 and classes are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22 and 23. A cake decorating class for ages 12 to 19 will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20. Pre-registration is $20. A mini-cake decorating class for age 11 and younger will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21. A three-day sewing camp will be June 28-30 for $30. Five-day sewing camp sessions are July 1216 and July 26-30. Registration is $50.

INFORMATION Classes will be at Oklahoma County Extension Service, 930 N Portland Ave. For more information about enrollment, call 713-1125.

The campaign benefits Oklahoma children with diabetes — one of the state’s more prevalent childhood diseases. “Oklahoma is in the unenviable position of being among the national leaders in childhood diabetes and its complications,” said Dr. Ken Copeland, director of the Childhood Diabetes Program at OU Health Sciences Center. Quarters may be deposited at any of the 21 freestanding Arvest Bank locations in the metro area and Stillwater. Branches in retail stores are excluded.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

On June 6, donated quarters will be displayed at the Presbyterian Health Foundation Research Park, at NE 8 and Lincoln. Quarters may be dropped off in the parking lot of the pavilion, building 825, on the day of the event. Everyone is invited to attend the festivities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., which will include free ice cream and horse and buggy rides. A few of Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2010 Miracle Children will be attending. JILL SMITH IS THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

772

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

777

[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

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personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

17A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

V

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

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www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF NORMAN

EDMOND | STATE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

A look at storm’s path Ponca City

Medford

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show the location and movement of Choctaw Monday’s Stella Yukon tornadoes. The Norman Seminole tornadoes may Tecumseh Noble Tecumseh Seminole not have actually been on the ground the entire track. Each track my represent Sulphur Duncan more than one tornado. Tishomingo

Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Perry

Ardmore

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

SOURCE: NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store at Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday night along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon. Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms or other news events by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

911 calls reveal range of fears BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metroarea. They tried to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family members, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handi-

capped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” Some 911 callers were juggling family tasks while describing damage and locations. “Cameron, give Daddy the cat,” said a woman calling from her damaged home. At least one caller made a proactive attempt for emergency help from 911. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Grads will soon join the real world Do you fear the future, as it will soon be in the hands of this class of graduating seniors? You’re not alone.

Consider what a wise man once said: “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for

authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the ser-

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

John A. Williams jwilliams@ opubco.com

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND, TOO CLEGERN ELEMENTARY KIDS GET A DAY TO PLAY IN THE PARK

IN BRIEF ASSOCIATION PLANS COFFEE The Downtown Edmond Business Association will have its monthly morning coffee at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Barry Rice Building, 16 S Broadway. For more information about the association, call 2499391 or go to www.downtownedmondok.com.

SCHOOLS TO BE RECOGNIZED The University of Central Oklahoma-based Oklahoma A+ Schools will recognize its five new member schools at the annual Oklahoma A+ Schools celebration at 4 p.m. today at the state Capitol. The new schools include Deer Creek Elementary in Edmond, Darnaby Elementary in Tulsa, Hinton Middle School in Hinton, Kaiser Elementary in Oklahoma City and Locust Grove Upper Elementary in Locust Grove. For more information about Oklahoma A+ Schools, go to www.aplusok.org.

WINE STORE PLANS EVENTS Vintner’s Cellar of Oklahoma and Holland America Cruise Line have teamed up to offer a Cruise of Wines & the Caribbean. These events will be from 6 to 8 p.m. May 17 and 18. The wine tastings include wines and hors d’ouvres of the Caribbean region. The Vintner’s Cellar of Oklahoma also is offering special pricing on a trip to the Eastern Caribbean April 8-15. Reservations to these events are required as availability is limited. Vintner’s Cellar Custom Winery of Oklahoma is at 1389 E 15th St. Call 359-9463 to make reservations. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Third- and fourth-graders play soccer Monday during a Play in the Park program at Clegern Elementary School. Play in the Park is sponsored by the city of Edmond Parks and Recreation Department. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Edgar Anzaldo with the Edmond Parks Department plays soccer with the students.

John: Step into the future FROM PAGE 13A

They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” This quote is attributed to the Greek philosopher Socrates who lived from 469-399 B.C. I used this same quote when I delivered a class address during my high school graduation ceremony in 1973. I’m sure many adults feared the future as it was being entrusted into our hands.

HAVE GOOD ADVICE? What is the best piece of advice you would offer to graduating high school seniors? Send your comments to jwilliams@opubco.com.

Things haven’t changed much at all, have they? These seniors who are completing their education from Edmond, Deer Creek, private schools and home schools will be let loose among us and soon will face tough decisions on their own. They are continuing their education by facing the responsibilities, opportuni-

ties and challenges ahead. These students are going through a commencement — a beginning, not an ending. As they step away from their formal secondary education and take the first step into an uncertain future they will need our hearts and prayers and guidance more than ever.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

Site plan extension put on 2-week hold EDMOND | FOX LAKE PLAZA DEVELOPER DUE IN COURT MONDAY BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — The fate of

Fox Lake Plaza remains on hold for two more weeks after city council members delayed taking action Monday to extend the site plan. Expressway Development, the developers of Fox Lake Plaza, a proposed shopping center just north of Walmart Supercenter along Interstate 35 at 15th Street in Edmond, has filed a bankruptcy petition. Frank Battle, manager of Expressway Development, is attempting to get an extension on the site plan so the property will continue to be of interest for any

Camp Fire USA honors 4 students FROM STAFF REPORTS

Each year, about 200 of Camp Fire USA’s 630,000 members attain the WoHeLo Award. To earn the award, the member chooses a topic of interest and develops projects and advocates on behalf of that topic. This year, four are from the metro: Madison Howard is a student at Edmond Santa Fe. Howard is in marching band, color guard, Key Club and Art Club. Gina Mengwasser attends Deer Creek High and plays softball and soccer. She is a member of Teens in Action, is on Camp Fire USA Board of Directors and is a camp counselor. Kathryn Miracle attends Deer Creek High and is in band and color guard. She volunteers at local horse rescue missions. Steven Dyer attends Oklahoma Centennial High. He is in Teens in Action, was a camp counselor and is a member of Real Life Fellowship Church.

› ›

BACKGROUND Residents in the adjacent Fox Lake housing addition have been at odds with the developer since the project was approved by Edmond City Council in June 2004.

possible buyers or investors, attorney Randel Shadid said. The bankruptcy stay does not allow the council to take any action, Shadid said. Battle is scheduled to be in court Monday to review a plan for Chapter 11 reorganization bankruptcy. Council members will consider the extension May 24. City Attorney Steve Murdock wasn’t at the meeting because of a

death in his family. The bankruptcy petition was filed after two bank mortgages, totaling more than $8.4 million plus interest, were not repaid. Union Bank and Spiritbank held mortgages on the property where a shopping center was planned before the economy took a downturn. The bankruptcy action is expected to delay the project even longer.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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ACHIEVERS EDUCATION

Edward Khiwa, associate professor and director of Health Administration and Gerontology at Langston University, was named president of the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society, a national organization with more than 150 chapters worldwide that recognizes scholarly achievement in international education. Khiwa is president of the local chapter of Phi Beta Delta, Langston University’s Epsilon Epsilon, and has been a member of Langston’s faculty for 21 years. IF YOU KNOW OF SOMEONE IN THE EDMOND COMMUNITY WHO DESERVES TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR ACHIEVEMENTS, CALL JOHN A. WILLIAMS AT 475-3940 OR E-MAIL JWILLIAMS@OPUBCO.COM.

Sequoyah Middle School Orchestra members pose with trophies from the Arbuckle Wilderness Contest. The band earned a "Superior" rating, "Group of the Day" and "Group of the Week." Pictured left to right: Erin Lupardus, Joe Geatches, Riley Choquette, Libby Caldwell and Sung Choi. PHOTO BY HOLLY RANDALL AND SHANNA ROLFS, SEQUOYAH MIDDLE SCHOOL

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

UCO theater series presents musical BY SUSAN CLARK NewsOK.com Contributor

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the musical “Summer of ’42.” Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. May 20-22, and 2 p.m. May 23 at UCO’s Mitchell Hall. Broadway Tonight producer Greg White said he looks forward to working with four UCO alumni who have worked in theaters and playhouses all over the country. “We are so excited to have professional guest artists who used to go to school here,” White said. Returning alumni include Jessica Chesbro, Matthew Bergman, Jay Krottinger and Jon Haque. Chesbro, who now lives in New York, plays the lead female role of Dorothy, and Bergman plays the lead male role of Hermie. The rest of the cast are current UCO musical theater students. Based on the memoirs of screenwriter Herman Raucher, “Summer of ’42” centers on the lives of Hermie and his buddies who

University of Central Oklahoma’s Broadway Tonight series ends its season with the “Summer of ’42.” UCO alumni Jay Krottinger, left, and Jessica Chesbro star as Pete and Dorothy. PHOTO PROVIDED BY UCO

are vacationing on the coast of Maine in 1942. Hermie becomes infatuated with Dorothy, a beautiful older woman whose husband, played by Krottinger, leaves home to fight the war in the Pacific. For tickets, call the

Mitchell Hall box office at 974-3375. For more information and to read White’s blog about the production, go to www.uco.edu/ broadway. SUSAN CLARK IS IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY WITH BROADWAY TONIGHT AT UCO.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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17A

Sidewalk plans get students excited

Wellston Elementary students walk from their school to downtown Wellston in honor of a new sidewalk grant. PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

FROM STAFF REPORTS

WELLSTON — Almost 300 elementary school students walked Monday from their school into downtown Wellston to celebrate soon-to-be-

built sidewalks. Wellston Elementary School Principal Scott Roper said the town recently received a $200,000 grant from the state Transportation Department through a federal

program that will allow about a mile of sidewalks to be built near the school this summer. To celebrate, he took his kindergartners through fifth-graders on a “walk to town,” about six blocks

UCO academy offers music workshop series BY ADRIENNE NOBLES NewsOK.com Contributor

SIGN UP NOW

The Academy of Contemporary Music at University of Central Oklahoma will offer a series of summer workshops, open to teenagers and adults, starting May 22 at its Bricktown campus. The first workshop is “Music Production for Beginners Using Garage Band” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 22. The one-day workshop is open to age 16 and older and costs $75. Participants will learn the basics of music production using the Garage Band program. “Beatles Band Camp” is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays June 5-26. Participants will take a musical journey through some of The Beatles’ most legendary songs. Individuals will

To register for any of the workshops, e-mail get.info@ acm.uco.edu.

work in instrumental groups and perform together June 26. This workshop is for age 18 and older and costs $190. “Apple Logic for Beginners” will teach participants how to create music using the Apple Logic Express 9 digital audio program, and will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays June 7-30. Participants will learn to record audio via computer, as well as mixing, editing, bouncing and more. This workshop costs $190. “Rock Camp for Kids” is

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

ADRIENNE NOBLES IS THE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING AT UCO.

INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall Fire Sprinkler System, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00 pm CST on May 26, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of fire sprinkler system per architectural plans, to serve basement and first floor with pipes capped and in place for further expansion to second and third floors. Contractor is required to provide a complete set of shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on May 27, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

BY JULIE NOAKES NewsOK.com Contributor

JULIE NOAKES IS PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTIONS LEADER FOR LEGACY BANK.

Alcoholic Beverage License 770

Brayden Bailey, 9, rallies his classmates during the walk.

a weeklong program for students ages 12 to 17, and will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 28-July 2. The camp is taught in groups by instrument and will teach participants various rock tunes. Participants will work in instrumental groups in the morning and in a band setting in the afternoon with a focus on rehearsal and performance techniques. The course ends in a performance July 2. This camp costs $190. “Pro Tools for Beginners” will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays July 7 to Aug. 2. Open to age 16 and older, the workshop will teach the basics of the Pro Tools LE system recording software. Cost is $190.

Bankers help teach savings to students During April and May, employees of Legacy Bank started children in several Oklahoma communities on the path to a positive financial future by participating in the American Bankers Association’s National Teach Children to Save Day. Although the National Teach Children to Save Day was observed on April 27, Legacy Bank spread the lessons out over several weeks to more than 1,000 second-grade students at 15 elementary schools in central and western Oklahoma. Incorporating the Berenstain Bears’ “Trouble With Money” book by Jan and Stan Berenstain, the program, “The Bear Basics of Savings,” covered personal finance concepts of spending, the difference between goods and services, income, and how interest makes savings grow. For more tips and ideas about saving, go to www.legacybank.com/ bearclub and for more information about National Teach Children to Save Day for parents and teachers, go to www.aba.com/ abaef/tcts.htm.

from the school. Town officials provided the students with a hot dog lunch before they headed back to school for fun and games during their annual field day, Roper said.

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Native American Housing Services, Inc. Owner 8005 S. I-35 Service Road, Suite 103 Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Address 405-605-1725 Telephone SEALED BIDS for the rehabilitation/remodeling of a single family dwelling, located on Vick Circle, Del City, OK, will be received by: Native American Housing Services, Inc. at their office until 10:00a.m., CDT, on the 26th day of May, 2010 and then at said office, publicly opened and read aloud. This advertisement was financed in whole or in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as administered by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Qualifying Section 3 Business Concerns are encouraged to bid and will be given priority in the awarding of this contract. Each bid must be accompanied by a bid bond payable to the Owner for five percent of the total amount of the bid. All bids must include assurances that the following provisions will be complied with: 1. Federal Labor Standards Provisions, US Department of Labor, 29

CFR 5; 2. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974, as amended; 12 U.S.C. 1701U; 3. Section 109 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; 4. Certification of NonSegregated Facilities; 5. Equal Opportunity Provisions – Executive Order 11246, as amended; 6. Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise provisions; 7. Assurances that surety companies executing bonds appear on the Treasury Department's certified list and are authorized to transact business in the State of OK. Qualified and interested bidders may obtain bid packets by contacting Native American Housing Services, Inc. INVITATION TO BID Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, Oklahoma, is accepting sealed proposals for the SWOSU Parker Hall HVAC, North Wing First Floor Project, until 5:00pm CST on June 2, 2010, for furnishing all labor and materials for complete installation of HVAC system, including equipment, piping, duct (supply, return, exhaust) insulation and controls, per architectural plans to serve basement and first floor and for further expansion to second and third floors. Bids must be submitted to, and will be publicly opened and read aloud, in Room 111 of the Administration Building, 100 Campus Drive, Weatherford, OK at 10:00 am CST on June 3, 2010. Any bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. To view the location, contact James Skinner, Physical Plant Director, 580-774-3101. To receive a bid package contact Brenda Burgess at 580774-3021. Obtain architectural plans at MA+ Architecture, 4000 N. Classen, Oklahoma City, OK. SWOSU reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

Civil

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA ) CORRINE GARCIA, ) et al., ) Plaintiffs, ) vs. ) STEVEN L. WILSON, ) Defendant, ) ) Case No. CJ-2009-8786 SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE State of Oklahoma To: STEVEN L. WILSON TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the District Court Okla-

Civil

Other Legal Notices

772

homa County, State of Oklahoma, Case No. CJ2009-8786 styled "Corrine Garcia, et al., Plaintiffs vs. Steven L. Wilson, Defendant". The Petition alleges that on May 5, 2009, a motor vehicle accident occurred between Plaintiffs and Defendant resulting from Defendant's negligence and that Plaintiffs sustained bodily injuries, pain and suffering, medical expenses, past and future, and further that Plaintiffs are entitled to damages against Defendant in excess of $10,000.00 and the costs of the action. You are notified that you must file a written Answer to the Plaintiffs Petition on or before June 15, 2010 or the allegations contained in the Petition will be taken as true and judgment will be entered against you, the Defendant, and in favor of the Plaintiffs, as prayed for in Plaintiffs' Petition. Given under my hand and seal on April 22, 2010. PATRICIA PRESLEY, COURT CLERK By /s/ Nathan Keys Clay R. Hillis OBA #15558 Hillis Law Firm, P.L.L.C. 602 SW D Avenue Lawton, Oklahoma 73501 Telephone (580) 2481100 Fax (580) 248-1191 Attorney for Plaintiffs

NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Davis Operating Company, 2800 Mid-Continent Tower, Tulsa, OK 74103 that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165:10-5-5 and RP 165:5-7-27 authorize the approval of the following disposal well: APPLICATION NO: 1007340014 WELL: Mary #1-25 LOCATION: NW NE NE NE 25-7N-16E Pittsburg County FORMATION: Hartshorne 2754-2836 ft. RATE & PRESSURE: 3,000 BPD @ 1100 PSI Objections if any may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, within 15 days of this notice. Saleem Nizami - Regulatory Petroleum Geologist American Petroleum & Envir. Cons. APEC, Inc. 2236 NW 164th Street Edmond, OK 73013 PH: 405-513-6055

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, natural father of LATASHA C. TILLMAN; DOB: 12/4/00; Cause No. 10-7-00317-1; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 2. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of ERIC CHARLES BRANCH; DOB: 7/10/97; Cause No. 10-7-00314-6; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 3. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of IRA L. BRANCH; DOB: 6/22/99; Cause No. 10-700316-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. 4. ERIC CHARLES TILLMAN, alleged father of MONIQUE TILLMAN; DOB: 6/22/98; Cause No. 10-7-00315-4; A Dependency Petition was filed on 2/18/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 3rd, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BE-

GINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.as px. DATED this 26th day April, 2010 by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk.

Will sell at public sale to highest bidder on May 19, 2010 at 9:00 am. CASH ONLY at 2430 12th Ave. NE, Norman, OK 73071: 555 Michael Newberg, 1428 Princeton Circle, Norman, OK 73071 Poster Bed, Chest, Lamps, Chairs , 4 boxes Notice of public sale Pursuant to Title 42, Section 197 of the Oklahoma Statutes, the abandoned goods stored under the listed names at A Storage for U located at 4416 SW 3rd St. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73108 will be sold to satisfy a landlord’s lien. Sales will begin at 10am on May 21, 2010 and sold for cash to the highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid and or withdraw any item or items from the sale. Their names, unit numbers and last know address are as follows: Unit #16 Aaron Hammon 6100 MacCarthur Parklane #1701 OKC OK 73120 Unit #77 Mike Chavez 5526 WoodBriar Dr Warr Acres OK 73122 Will sell at public sale to highest bidder MAY 19, 2010 11:00AM, CASH ONLY at 1001 S.W. 19th Street Moore, OK: Unit#H33: John Hodges, 1002 SW 89th OKC 73139, metal bunk bed frame, stroller, H/P monitor, misc items. Notice of Sale: Security Self Storage 1606 24th Ave. S.W. Norman, Ok will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage unit(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00pm on 05/27/10 no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit# 1825 Rasheed Mustafa 2342 Riverside Dr. Norman, Ok 73072 Unit# 1608 Wayne McKinley 7903 211th Ave E Bonney Lake, Wa. 98390 Unit# 1735 Jeani Olson 709 Ash Ln. Norman, Ok. 70372

Other Legal Notices

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[published 5/5/2010, 5/12/2010, & 5/19/2010] STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, MILWAUKEE COUNTY In Re: The marriage of Petitioner: Twinkle C. Thompson and Respondent: Johnnie D. Thompson Publication Summons X Divorce-40101 Legal Separation-40201 Case No. 10FA002512 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court,

777

Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Twinkle Thompson 2327 N. Grant Blvd. Milwaukee, WI 53210 It is recommended, but not required, that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of ss 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under ss49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under ss767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in ss767.105, Wis. Stats. ss767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability, in order to participate in the court process, please call: ________ at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. /s/ Twinkle Thompson Signature Twinkle Thompson Print or Type Name 4-19-2010 Date

Anyone claiming ownership or financial interest contact Chris @ Puckett’s, 314 SW 29, OKC: Bobcat S185, motor number 03C0451, no VIN. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1999 Chevrolet VIN 2GCEK19T5X1225760 call Sandra 350-2087. 4E3AK44Y5SE072932 95 Eagle Talon Red Brandon 405-820-2580


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Little cowboys, cowgirls ready to rodeo

Contestants wait for their turn to compete during the Edmond Junior Rodeo at Carl Benne Arena on Friday. Kids 4 and younger can participate in goat undecorating, by foot only. The next rodeo will be May 21-22. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Brandin Mitchell wears pink boots in support of his mother, Victoria, who has breast cancer.

Brandin Mitchell, 8, gets ready for the rodeo.

Brothers Wyatt, 4, and Sutton Cargill, 2, wait for the start of the rodeo.

Montana Simpson watches the start of the rodeo.

Chantz Whitehead takes photos of the grand entry at the start of the rodeo.


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

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19A

Edmond chamber has golfers teeing off

Rick Metheny, with Intrust Bank, putts as team members Scott Overstreet, Mike Scheitzach and Billy Harris watch.

Drew McGowen, with Mercy Health Center, tees off Monday at the Edmond Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual golf tournament at Coffee Creek Golf Course. The tournament is one of the chamber’s biggest fundraisers. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Dr. Michael Olay, with Mercy Health Center, tees off.

Sam Curtis chips onto the green.

my edmond classified ___________________________________ Place your ad today, call 475-3000. www.newsok.com/edmond

Community ads powered by you, published by The Oklahoman

Data Entry/ Customer Service Hiring full & part time. Busy tag office. Apply at 7527 N. May Ave, MF, 2-4. No phone calls. RECEPTIONIST Okla based company in the healthcare industry is seeking entry level Receptionist for busy office. Duties include answering the telephone, greeting clients & other secretarial duties as assigned. Must be organized, dependable, possess excellent people skills, good communication & grammar skills. Mon-Fri, 9AM-5PM $7.50-$9.00. Fax resume to 405-917-5527

700 R4 OD trans Chev complete, works good $200. 405-615-5712

1953 Dodge 2 door, Coronet v8 hemi, 99% complete, $3500. 222-5567

'95 Buick Roadmaster, 109K, Good Cond, grey & silver, fully loaded. Selling due to health $4250 OBO. ¡ 405-830-1501

'95 Chevy Caprice classic 4.3, a/c, 145K mi, $2300, » 826-4899 »

2006 Civic LX, 40K mi, 1 owner, like new, $12,900 848-1699 or 844-3141.

'04 H2, 70K mi, red, Jesse James chrome, $23,000 obo, 919-2211

'92 Lexus SC400, white, all power, sunroof, great cond., $3300, 822-2748

2008 Mini Cooper, pepper white, premium pkg, 27,200 miles, auto, $16,500. 405-312-9579

RECEPTIONIST Aerospace Company looking for Full time receptionist with customer service, excellent communication and computer skills Available shift 5:30AM-2PM. Great benefits. EOE Submit resumes to airplanejobs@gmail.com or Fax 405-709-0124 before May 21, 2010 Receptionist, exp., Self-starter, multi-tasker, punctual, positive attitude, dependable, no tobacco on property, 943-2191 BKD, LLP, a regional CPA firm, seeks full-time Word Processor/Admin. Asst. Excellent MS Word, Excel, grammar and number skills required in this fast-paced, multiproject, team environment. Detail oriented, multitask, strong work ethic. Word processing experience preferred, Pleasant professional environment. Competitive benefits. BKD is an EEOC. Send resume and salary history to squinn@bkd.com or fax to 918-584-2931.

DANCERS WANTED

Day & Night shifts. Lucky's Bar, 4007 NW 10th Call 601-0229 MANAGER experienced for large Night Club in OKC. Should be familiar with promoting, scheduling, & inventory control. Send resume to PO Box 12713, OKC, OK 73157

1993 Nissan Altima, 5spd, tagged, $1250. 209-0817

'00 Solara convertible, loaded, great car, $5750, 650-4072

1980 Datsun long bed, 4 cylinder, runs great, looks great, school/work, $900, 778-8896. 1998 Chev 1/2 ton ext cab, 5.0 v8 auto, new tires brakes air comp exc cond, $5800. 222-5567 '90 Chevy O long bed, 4x4, 2 owner, $2800, 570-5284 Guthrie '07 Ford F-250 Crew Cab, 4x4, dsl, LB, pwr, warr. 77K $21,500 922-7236

Field Technician for POS, PC, Printer repair. OKC area. Must pass background check. Email resume to: sherron.thompson@ ncr.com

ATTN: Class A&B Drivers We need you now! HAZMAT or no HAZMAT, 943-3304

DRIVER WANTED M-F 8:30-4:00 $10 hr + gas. Must have own car. Nothing heavy. 410-2490 leave message

DRIVER needed for busy electrical contractor. Pickup and deliver parts to job sites. Warehouse knowledge helpful. CDL license recommended but not required. Apply in person at 1524 S May, OKC. 405-634-8844 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS seniors & grads ages 17-38. Call 800-492-4841.

HOUSEKEEPER

w/experience. Apply in person @ Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St-OKC 691-9221

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128

Computerist/Graphic Designer needed part-in OKC for small business Must be responsible & energetic, must speak some Spanish, fax resume to (405)-528-0285

FT Shipping/Recieving M-F, 8-4:30. »»»»»»»»»»»» PT Painter 20 hours/week, must be self starter, able to work on own. Apply at 940 NE 13th B300, Garrison Tower Crothall Healthcare Call 271-2255

Front Desk Position for dynamic personality. Experience preferred. 32-40 hours. APPLY IN PERSON Comfort Inn & Suites Quail Springs, 13501 N Highland Park Blvd. OKC

Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office Hiring Clericals. Starting salary $1785.00 monthly 401K Plan, Deferred Comp. Plans, Benefits: Health, Dental, Vision. 201 N. Shartel OKC, OK 73102

Certified Medical Assistant Full or Part Time. Apply in person, 5500 NW Expressway, Suite A 722-8100 Come join our team! Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, LLC is searching for an energetic Front Office Patient Representative for our busy Edmond office. The ideal candidate will have strong customer service skills, be familiar with Microsoft computer applications, and be able to work effectively in a team environment in a fast paced office. Prior experience in a medical/dental front office setting is preferred but not required. Excellent pay and benefits. Qualified applicants should fax their resume to 848-8020 or by mail to Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, Attn: Steve Dodge, Administrator, 3727 NW 63 Street, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73116. LIC PHYSICAL THERAPIST FT M-F at outpt ortho clinic in Norman. Exp/ interest in orthopedics. Fax/e-mail resume to: OSC Attn: D Mason (405)310-6894 dmason@ orthonorman.com MEDICAL ASSISTANT needed with pediatric experience for FT position. Fax resume to 405-945-4959. Patient Account Rep and duties to include verify insurance, enter data into computer and contact patients for payments. NW OKC, M-F 8:30-5 pm. Fax resumes to 608-4269 RN/LPN/CHHA Looking for the best job you ever had? Then our hospice is looking for you! Call 948-4357

Visual Display Coordinator We are a furniture retail store looking for an exp. Visual Display Coordinator. This position will be resp. for creating & maintaining a compelling presentation of merchandise that will engage customers and help stimulate sales. Change and/or rotate displays & signage to reflect changes in inventory or promotion; develop ideas or plans for merchandise displays or window decorations; arrange properties, furniture, merchandise, backdrops and other accessories. We offer a competitive salary & benefit package. Please Fax resumes to 405.671.2758.

A&P Technician positions available with local company. Send resume to PO Box 23749, OKC, OK 73123 » » AUTO TECH» » $3000 sign-on onus for the right tech! Business is booming! Call 513-2431 today.

Field Oiler/Lube Service Person Paving contractor looking for experienced heavy equipment Oiler/Lube Service person w/HAZMAT. Benefits available. Apply at: 10200 NW 10th St. OKC, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm

Journeyman Electrician Full time for local established Co. Competitive pay & benefits. Apply at lecrecruiting@yahoo.com

3 bed 2 bath, 2 car garage, storm shelter, 1302sf, gas & electric, 3514 Liberty Dr, $115,000, 405-642-7783

Sat/Sun, 2-4 PM, FSBO, 20 acre ranch, 4 bed home, barn, paddocks, shop, 5821 N Douglas Blvd, Arcadia, 844-4004.

Lake Murray State Park K ac, well, new roof & a/c, 3/2, storage, trees, golf $129.9K 972-416-6303

Snapper Rear Eng, 20 hrs use, Exc Cond, 5 spd $1500 Call 789-6334 Simplicity hydro tractor, 38" cut, like new, $550. 625-4894

Plumber, Service & Remodel Top $/per hour + sales comm., vacation, holidays, hlth ins, 401K & co truck. Must have plumbing license & good driving record. 524-3737

HEPA-filtered shop vac's and dust-extracted sanders for lead-based paint operations. Festool Plunge Guiderail Saws, 10% discount. SNYDER TOOL, 405-844-1044.

PLUMBERS Licensed Journeyman & Experienced Apprentice. Experienced in new construction. Pay DOE. Call 350-0879.

7x12, 76"x16' util, 6x10, 7x18 enclosed, 7x12 vending trlr, never used, ac/elec $1250-$8500 922-7236

SAND PLANT OPERATOR with Dredge experience. Must have Mining Card. Apply @ R&M Resources, 405-354-7577.

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128 TIRE & LUBE TECH $1000 sign on Bonus for the right person. Call 513-2431 for more info. (Edmond) Western Lawns a leading landscape management company, has an immediate opening for a full-time Irrigation Technician. Irrigation system experience, good driving record, and customer skills required. Email resume to jobs@Western Lawns.com, or apply in person at 14900 N Sara Road, Yukon, OK 73099. EOE.

Antiques, Art, Collectibles 501

Christopher Place Apartments in Edmond, has apartments available for move in this week. Rates from $427. Call 341-2517 or stop by 101 N. Boulevard.

412 NW 25TH 2bd ch&a all elec $400 /$200dep 314-9606 3815 NW 23rd, 2/1K , w/d hkup, cov. park, $495+ $200dep 550-8066

307 Greengate Dr., 3bd, 2ba, 1car, $750/m + $700/d sec 8 ok 936-9058

1 bd furnished, utilities paid, Moore area, appls $550/mo $250/dep, 405-641-8452

3 bed, 1ba, 1c, ch&a, 3620 Woodside Dr. $550, $350 dep. 642-3806, 6406260 1328 McDonald 4bd 1K ba ch&a fncd, sec 8. $670 mo 354-7413, 642-3847.

CLERK POSITIONS Immediate, full time. Cash register & phones with good customer service skills. Schedule includes weekends. Salary DOE + bonus. Apply in person Wholesale Recreation Warehouse. 525 W. Memorial

Mr Cash

is handing out cash to the right people. If you are able to start today call 405.600.8098 Secretary needed also.

Nice 3/1/1, FP, ch&a, new paint. Ready Now. 645 N Janeway. No pets. $750+ $500 dep 426-0028

Homes For Sale

309.9

4 bed, 3 bath, with upstairs Game Room, 3150sqft, gated neighborhood, built in 2007, 405-990-4821

Lse Purch 3/1/1, brick, ch&a, Carl Albert Sch, low dn $650mo 630-0649

Historic 5 bed, 2 bath, new carpet, refinished wood floor, ch&a, 2917 NW 27th, $950 month, Large 2 bed, $645 month, ch&a, 3108 NW 28th; no sec 8; 470-1700.

Large 2 bd, corner lot, lg. carport/patio, no pets, $650mo+dep. 232-9704

4/2/2 newer home, pool, Mustang schools, no pets, $1150, $1150 sec. 905 Exter Cir. 265-0205

German Shepherd puppies, AKC, pop, large, 6wks $350 405-420-1297 Golden Retriever pup, 8 weeks, female, AKC, all shots current, $425, Blanchard 706-6164 Lab Mix 7 mos, spayed, housebroke, shots, very loving, $25. 722-9384

Lab, AKC Pups, 1M, 14 weeks, vet ckd pop, s/w $250 405-323-0020 Lab AKC, black, 6 weeks 5 Female, 4 Male, $100 each. 405-740-1315

Morkies, 2 females, 6 weeks old, $200 each, 204-4036.

Sheet Metal 10x3, screws & trim, Mon-Sat, Call (405)-390-2077 American Bulldog, UKC/NKC, Champ. bldlns All colors w/ health & hip guarantee $500-$800 580-318-4105 goodtimesbullies.com American Bulldog Pups, Reg. $200, 580-4814239, 580-471-8212. Aus Shep, reg, $200, 3 sizes, stnd-mini-toy, blue merles, 317-2763 Aussie Toy, Female 13 weeks old, s/w, reg. Moving must sell. $200 602-349-5580 cell Beagle Puppies, 2 M, 2 F, cutest cuddliest babies, wrm $80 cash. 412-2786 Beagles & Mini Dachshunds, ACA, S/W, M & F, $100-$125 918-385-2090 8630 JD 4WD Tractor, 3 point, PTO, very good condition and 24' JD chisel, both for $19,900. 350-0265

'03 Neuholland TN65, 2422 hours w/scoop, $12,000, 386-5140

Couch & loveseat, king & queen bedroom sets, bunk bed, dining set, king size mattress & box spring, $125-$450, 397-1801 Moving Sale: Roll-a-way bed $50; Futon $80; both almost new, 741-0976 or 778-9219 Matt sets, full $90, twin $75; Lift chair $250; Frig $350; 606-2450.

Pekingese, AKC, 3 M, 3 F 6 weeks, POP, S/W $500-$600 580-816-0314

2 Registered horses $5000 -$10,000 thehorseteacher.net 580-277-0146

PIZZA & BBQ Restaurant NW OKC for sale/lease , 640-8206

300 chicks, $1-$3 sell 100 mixed chicks for $80. 405-356-4162. LAYING HENS, 60 AT $12 EACH, 282-2927

Service Directory

Executive Htg. & Air $69 svc call, free est & 2nd opinion 626-4210 lic 75705

Carport, Patio, Awning All steel carports 20x20 $1595 patio covers, Free Est. 799-4026, 694-6109

Do it your way! 30 years exp. Edmond & NW OKC. Guar. 602-4844,282-5177 Sunshine Cleaning Service ins/bond 793-1630, 625-3930

Boston Terrier AKC, b/w F, 6 mos, vet chkd, s/w, $300. 405-323-0020 Boston Terrier AKC/ACA 8 F, 2 M, 1-4yrs old. $2000/all 580-318-4105

Pekingese 1M, very small, playful, guaranteed, $275. 405-380-8469

07 Yamaha mdnt Royal Star Venture 8700 miles NEW cond. drive shaft water cooled many upgrades email pics $11.500. 405 4108664

Pitbull (American) 4 females, 4 males, black & white, 8 weeks, $50 each 819-0671

1976 Honda GL1000 $1200 MUST SELL! N OKC. 405-206-7469

Poodles AKC Toy, M&F pair, must go together 3 years. $200. 761-8423 Schanuers Mini AKC, blk, dob 2/12, e/t/dc/1st shot $275, 580-497-7206 Schnauzers, teacup & toys, CKC, 6F, 4M, chocolate, white, e/t, 5-8 wks, $350-$550, 580-540-6354 Schnoodle Puppies, 2 white M, dob 1/24/10. T/DC/S/W $125 ea. 405527-9004 or 613-7122

Boxer puppies, AKC, 8 weeks, flashy brindle and fawn, s/w/dc, $200, »»» 549-2715 »»»

Shih Tzu, AKC registered, 6 weeks old, 4M, 1st shots, dewormed, $250 each, great Mother's Day gifts, 405-5772108 or 405-706-6012.

Chihuahua Pups, 8 wks, 2 Male, bi & tri colored, $75 each. 405-680-9463

Pronghorn Antelope Bow Hunt N.W. Oklahoma $500. Call Rick 254-855-1701

2006 Honda ST1300 Professionally maintained, serviced last week. 21,600 miles. Black color. Heated Corbin seat, oversized winshield. $8500 OBO 405-208-2915

Shih Tzu, 2 females, 6 weeks old, $200 each, 204-4036.

Chi-Poo, Shi-Poo, 6 weeks, M & F, black $50-$150. 761-8423, carmen1234@aol.com

Hunting/Fishing Leases 607.0

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppies Puppies are utd on shots and are started on heartworm preventative. They are AKC registered and ready to go. Sables and Black Tris $400 580829-4537 580-748-1216

BOXER PUPPIES 13wks old. 1M-Fawn w/black mask, 1FBrindle w/black mask, $200ea »» 708-3170

BOXERS, AKC, 6 weeks, 2 brindle F, 2 black w/ white M. Large sire. Championship pedigree. $250-$500 Stillwater »» 405-377-4386 »»

Pool Table, 8 foot, Like New! w/slate & green felt, $795, Call 615-4980.

Retired Contractor Repairs, remodels, paints, 25 yr exp free est, 314-3621

Lawn Service, trees, clean up & removal, install and repair fences. 365-2600 Cleanup, mow, bushes, trees, f-beds, Free Est, Lopez, 524-0506 Brshhog, boxblade, roto, $38/hr, 3hr min 227-3517

Pomeranian AKC 1 White 2 males 1 female s/w $300. 405-382-2304

4010 John Deere Tractor, Excellent Condition $3500 580-678-7838

Like new oak TV armoire w/pullout doors, $200. 32" Sony Trinitron TV, works great, $50, buy both together for $225. 691-5930 or 823-2083

Drink & Snack Route Great Loc Guaranty Must Sell now Financing avail. 800-648-2124

Excellent service, detail, $13/hr, 3hr min 625-0210

Min Pin Pups, 2 b/t, $50 & 7 Min Pin Mix, $25, 405-680-9463

Misc. metal building trim, pipe, post & rods, 6 ft brush hog, round bale hay cart. Pipe & steel. $5-$400, 405-476-3161.

Albino Baby Racoons, 4 weeks old, $300 each 405-222-2228 or 405320-8975 leave msg

Labs, AKC, 10wks, cream & white, blocky. champ pedigree, sire OFA'd, s/w/dc, $200, 818-4182

Mastiff Pups (Italian) full blood, not registered, $300. 405-535-3633

HP Computer, almost new, desk included, $450 obo, 741-0976 or 778-9219

Yorkie w/papers, 1 tiny male, w/t/dc, 1st shots, parents are 4-5 lbs., 12 weeks old, $300 405-229-2298.

LAB puppies, AKC reg, 2blk, 1 yel F. Chmp/hunt bldln $250 408-1426

W & D $79 & up. Refrig $99 & up. Stoves $99. warranties 405-420-6137

Dell Pentium 4, 2.8 Ghz, 1 gig DDR, 80 gb, complete system w/ mon., high speed ready $120 819-8691

YORKIES, AKC, POP, $200/M, $350/F, will be 5-6 lbs. t/dc, 265-0205

Distributorship for sale Earn $1,500 weekly 888-561-8983

Maltese 1M 1F, small cute, guaranteed, $250$375. 405-380-5859

AP Snack Machine $1500 Dixie Narco Drink Machine $750 obo; 326-9500

Brick 3bd 2ba 1car ch&a w/d hkups. Fncd $550mo $400dep 996-6271

5x8, 5x10, 6x12 w/gates, like new; 16 ft tandem; $550-$850 cash 670-1850

Yorkies, AKC, 2 Male, beautiful, must see, s/w, 13 weeks, $400 485-2869

G. Shep Pups, reg. 6 wks, POP, $225, 3F, 5M, 921-8439 or 454-6859

Clocks: German made Westminister Clock with bevel glass on door $400. French FUSEE school clock, time only, very accurate, $250. Steeple clock striker spring needs repair $100. Call 340-6678

Furn 1BD most bills Paid + EMSA, no sec 8 and no pets, 524-2730

TH, PC schools, 2/1K /1, appls, w/d, fp, sec sys, $600 + dep 210-3903

WEBSITE/ TECHNOLOGY OSSAA position opening see website posting at www.ossaa.com

BUILDING MATERIAL SALES Established full line wholesaler seeks experienced inside sales person. Full benefit package. Send resume to PO BOX 76269, OKC, OK 73147

John Deere LA145, 22HP Briggs, twin cylinder, 48" cut, electric pto, automatic, excellent condition, $1550 405-778-9229

LABORER/OPERATOR Underground const co seeks operator, laborers & meter readers, will train good pay and benefits. Apply in person at 315 NW 59th St. OKC

Sprinkler Technician with experience. Must have Oklahoma Driver's License with clean MVR Landscape Enterprises 11101 N. Western.

English Bulldog, F, reg., 5 years old, brindle & white, $600 obo. 405428-0666, 405-428-0667

German Shep, White Pups XXL, 1M, 1F, POP $300-$400 740-7804

Houses for rent

18 year old company expanding. Need 9 people who need cash. FT/PT from home. Call today. »» 405-613-1810 »»

AC units, all sizes, never used, still in box, $500-$1000 405-417-8244

Dob/G. Shep, 6 weeks, only $50, both POP/reg, exc protect/fam pet, Lori 921-8439 or 454-6859

Shih Tzu, AKC, 7 weeks, s/w, home raised, will be small, very playful, $225 each. 580-572-8446

2001 Keystone Sprinter, 5th wheel, 29K feet, 2 slides, $9500, 627-1947. Carrilite 35 ft 5th wheel, great shape, $3750, 650-4072

Remington model 4 single shot, 22 cal. breech load, hex, rifled barrel $450. Winchester pre 64 model 94, 3030 cal. lever action $500. Miroku 12 gauge over & under shotgun, nice engraving $900. 340-6678 Two 12 gage A-5 (light twelve) Browning shotguns, $750 each, both guns in EC, 306-6566 .38 special pistol and 12 ga double barrel shotgun, $700 both, 203-0590 AR15 CMMG w/extras, $1800 obo, 405-473-9810

Shih Tzu, AKC, 7 weeks, s/w, home raised, will be small, very playful, $225 each. 580-572-8446 Siberian Huskies, 7 wks, agoti & white, w/papers, $250-$400, 706-5888

Chihuahua Puppies, 6 weeks, 2 F, 2 M, $125, ea also Dad, $80. 822-0974

Wolf/Husky Mix, 6 weeks, 4 males, 3 females, wormed, $200. 495-7272, 308-7501

Jazzy Jet 7 powered chair, 250 lbs, new batteries-8 mos old, chair is like new, $400, 830-1501

Dachshund, beautiful small male 2 yrs, red, very sweet, $50, to good home, 879-2241

Yorkie Mix, 1 M $250, 1 F, $300, 8 weeks, s/w/hlth guar. look like fullblood. 405-919-2575

Electric Wheelchair & Electric Scooter, $450 each 753-4928

DACHSHUND Minis Mom's Day M/F, S/W, $75-$100. 580-892-3294

Yorkiepoo, 9wks, extra small, black, 1F, 1M, $300, 527-6132

Above Ground Pool, With liner $995, 405-615-4980.

LICENSED 405-476-2534

Garay's Roofing, re-roofing specialist-all types of roofs, free est, 370-3572

D&D TILE & REMODEL Afford. & Prof. 971-4492 25yrs exp. No job too small!

Blackhawk Top Soil, del sand/gravel, 255-0275

Trees-shrubs-brush-trim or remove/stump grind, clean ups & hauling. Ins. 921-8970 or 681-3705. Wood Chucks Tree Svc Removal, Trimming & more! Insured. Call 881-6559 Tree service: lowest reasonable price guar, total satisfactaction 600-0577


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

21A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

I

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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Family Owned & Operated Since 1957 www.vondelsmithmortuary.com • 634-1439 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com (2) Adjoining Lots at Chapel Hill, $1000 each. Garden of Devotion - very close to entrance 918-408-6836 John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel Large assortment of Urns starting as low as $49.95 405-799-1200 5 cemetery plots at Rose Hill off NW Grand Blvd in OKC, asking $3000 each, will negotiate, Call Chip 580-320-0489 (4) Rose Hill cemetery plots, retail $2295 each, (or make offer), Must Sell!! »»» 946-4371 »»» BAGPIPER FOR HIRE. 405-603-5306 www.jessebillspiper.com ¡¡¡¡ SUNNY LANE - 1 Lot, ¡¡¡¡ Cement Vault, Marker $2975 ¡¡¡¡¡ 405-672-1060 RESTHAVEN MEMORY GARDENS 5 PLOTS RETAIL: $2900ea, SELL FOR $1500ea. 337-477-3405, 337-274-9911


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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


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CAPITOL

ELECTIONS

Treasurer sees hope

Young mayor keeps his post

State Treasurer Scott Meacham says Oklahoma is continuing to make a slow recovery from the recession based on improving revenue collections.

Elections were held Tuesday throughout the state, including a recall election for Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates.

PAGE 18A

PAGE 20A

www.firstmedok.com

IN BRIEF NORMAN

NORMAN | STATE

13

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

A look at storm’s path

DIVERS SEEK STOLEN GUNS Oklahoma Highway Patrol divers on Tuesday were searching Lake Thunderbird in Norman for guns stolen from a pawn shop in Purcell. Cleveland County Undersheriff Rhett Burnett said James Anderson, 32, of Purcell, is charged with second-degree burglary. Twelve of about 30 guns have been recovered.

Ponca City

Medford

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PRELIMINARY TORNADO TRACKS

Perry

WOODWARD

SCHOOL CHIEF RESIGNS POST

These tracks provided by the National Weather Service show Choctaw the location and Stella Yukon movement of Monday’s Norman Tecumseh Seminole tornadoes. The Tecumseh Noble Seminole tornadoes may not have actually been on the ground the Sulphur entire track. Duncan Ardmore

The Woodward School Board voted to accept the resignation of Superintendent Vickie Williams during Monday’s school board meeting. Williams is leaving to become the associate executive director of Oklahoma Association of Secondary School Principals. Board members voted to take applications for the superintendent position until May 24.

Tishomingo

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

A tornado’s damage is shown Monday on a sign above the Love’s store south of Interstate 40 at Choctaw Road. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

This image submitted by Howard Schneider shows tornadoes he chased heading into the Wakita area.

(The tornado) just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw. My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking.” MAN DURING CALL TO 911

Share your stories: Help tell the story of the storms by submitting images at NewsOK.com.

This photo submitted by Angie Kouba was taken Monday along State Highway 66 between El Reno and Yukon.

911 calls reveal range of fears after storm BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

Oklahoma City emergency dispatchers spoke to at least 42 callers in 17 minutes Monday as tornadoes barreled through the metro, trying to make sense of a flurry of reports from callers with varying degrees of calm and togetherness. The first tornado-related call came in at 5:37 p.m. from a man in a sport utility vehicle reporting downed power lines near SE 89 and Anderson Road. More calls poured in as a tornado zeroed in on Interstate 40 near Choctaw Road. “It just went across Hiwassee Road heading northeast toward Choctaw,” a male caller said. “My truck just got blown off the road. Winds are kicking, trees are down. We got power lines down. No injuries that I could tell.” Some callers phoned in on behalf of family mem-

home residents, said Ashley Olivo, head of the Senior Olympics Committee. The Senior Olympics are at 9 a.m. outside McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church at University Boulevard and Webster Avenue. Besides arm wrestling, games include basketball, football, golf, volleyball, a

domino tournament, shot put, bowling, bottle ring toss, horseshoes, fishing and wheelchair races. The games are sponsored by Heartland Hospice in honor of National Nursing Home Week, which is this week. Not to be outdone by the regular Olympics, the Senior Olympics will

include an opening ceremony, complete with a torch run. Cathy Ozeroglu’s second-grade class at All Saints Catholic School has been invited to sing the national anthem. A closing ceremony will include the awarding of medals. Olivo is urging members of the community to

OFFICERS FACE LAWSUIT

bers, such as a Yukon woman whose mother called her in terror. “Her husband is handicapped,” the woman said. “They’ve had tornado damage. She was on the cell phone ... screaming and she said the house was falling down.” The driver of a tractortrailer rig called from Interstate 40 after the tornado passed over Choctaw Road. “I’ve got blood all over my shirt and my mouth is bleeding,” the man said. “Something flew through my truck window and hit me in the face. I don’t think I’m dying or anything.” Calls flooded in from the Love’s Travel Stop that was obliterated. “I think it (the tornado) is coming back,” said one woman between sobs. “It’s so windy. It’s still really windy.” At least one caller made a proactive attempt for help. “We’re in Newalla,” the woman said. “Do we need to take cover?”

Seniors gear up for annual gameday NORMAN — You’re never too old to arm wrestle. Just ask one of the octogenarians who plans to participate in Thursday’s second annual Senior Olympics. Arm wrestling — sometimes from a wheelchair — is one of the most popular events of the Olympic competition held especially for nursing

MUSKOGEE

Jane Glenn Cannon

JCannon@ opubco.com

Muskogee Police Chief Rex Eskridge, two identified officers and nine unidentified officers have until May 20 to answer a federal lawsuit filed in April by Richard Councilman Jr. The suit alleges police attacked Councilman with batons, flashlights, Tasers, pepper spray and their fists. The suit alleges the department has a pattern of not disciplining officers for such conduct. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

GRANT TO AID SHELTER SITE A $14,495 check from the Cherokee Nation is coming just in time to help the Women in Safe Homes shelter make needed kitchen renovations and survive budget cuts. The agency operates a 60-bed shelter for women affected by sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking, as well as their children. Shelter director Gwyn LaCrone said the money will help the shelter renovate its kitchen.

NORMAN

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

volunteer or just turn out to watch the fun. Last year, about 80 seniors participated in the games. To volunteer, call Olivo at 923-8799.

INDEX Deaths Records

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

CALENDAR

NORMAN, TOO

TODAY

BASEBALL SKILLS PUT TO TEST

Jaycob Willis, 9, watches another hitter. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

ONLINE Noah Loffer, 9, connects with the ball Saturday during the Aquafina Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit & Run competition at Griffin Park for kids age 7 to 14. The Norman event was a local qualifier for a national skills tournament that culminates in July at the Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Youth sports Looking for a team, a coach, or other help? Join our “know it” message board, “Let’s Talk,” and get in the game. KNOWIT.NEWSOK .COM/YOUTHSPORTS

Caeden Guthary, 8, winds up to throw.

Norman Farm Market, 8 a.m. to noon, Cleveland County Fairgrounds, 615 E Robinson, 360-4721. Cleveland County Gardens tours, 9 a.m., demonstration garden, 601 E Robinson, 3214774. Microsoft Word 2007 Part 3: Shortcuts and Special Features, 9:30 a.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620. York International Toastmasters, noon, York International UPG Headquarters, 5005 York Drive, 4196403. Internet 1, 1 p.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 701-2620.

Second Wednesday Book Discussion Group, 4 p.m., Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., 7012620. Zumba fitness class, 6 p.m., Whittier Recreation Center, 2000 W Brooks St., 292-9703. Andy Frasco , 9 p.m., Coach’s Brewhouse, 110 W Main, 321-2739.

ONLINE

Submit for free Go to wimgo.com. Use your News OK.com log-in and password, or choose to create one. Click on “Add Event.”


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

VI

15A

GARDEN FOUNTAIN Left: Bud Hightree levels a pot that will become a fountain at the Cleveland County Master Gardeners’ demonstration garden at the fairgrounds.

Art gallery to display ‘24 Works on Paper’ FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — “24 Works on Paper,” the only traveling exhibition of work by living Oklahoma artists, will open Monday at Firehouse Art Center, 444 S Flood Ave. The exhibit continues through June 28 with an opening reception at 7 p.m. May 21. “24 Works on Paper” features 24 artists from 12 Oklahoma cities. All artworks are created on paper and include media such as printmaking, drawing and photography. The guest juror for the show is Norman artist Adrienne Day. Day has been working as an artist for more than 20 years. Her work has been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. “24 Works on Paper” is a collaboration between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. The exhibit is traveling the state for a year, with stops in large and small communities, organizers said. Firehouse Art Center’s gallery hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Artists participating in “24 Works on Paper” are MJ Alexander, Oklahoma City; Narciso Arguelles, Edmond; Sarah Atlee, Oklahoma City; Nick Bayer, Oklahoma City; Eleanor Davy Carmack, Tulsa; Marty Coleman, Glenpool; Bryan Dahlvang, Tuttle; Leslie Waugh Dallam, Norman; Don Emrick, Claremore; Dixie Erickson, Norman; Michelle Himes-McCrory, Stillwater; Bradley Jessop, Sulphur; Trent Lawson, Oklahoma City; Katherine LiontasWarren, Lawton; Regina Murphy, Oklahoma City; Romy Owens, Oklahoma City; Christopher M. Owens, Tulsa; Cindy Pauchey, Walters; Liz Roth, Stillwater; Clarissa Sharp,

Oklahoma City; Rob Smith, Cushing; Tom Wester, Oklahoma City; George Wilson, Oklahoma City, and Betty Wood, Norman.

Linda Garms, with the Cleveland County Master Gardeners, waters plants Saturday in the demonstration garden. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN


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NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Preschool Picassos to have artwork displayed at Depot FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Paintings by some of Norman’s youngest talents will be featured in a special exhibit at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave., May 17 through 23. The young artists are enrolled in St. Joseph’s Early Childhood Development Center, 425 E Tonkawa St. This is the third year the center has sponsored an art show at the depot. “This show involves so many aspects of school life. Parents, grandparents and teachers make the frames, stretch and paint the canvases in preparation for the children. With the younger babies, teachers dip tiny feet and hands into paint to create woodland scenes

Grant Rieger, 4, paints a canvas for an art show at the Santa Fe Depot. PHOTO PROVIDED BY DEBRA MARTINELLI

and abstracts,” Director Maureen Dolan said. Works will be on display from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 17 through May 21. A reception and silent

OU TEAM CHEERS FOR OLYMPIANS

auction will be from 5 to 8 p.m. May 23. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to everyone. All proceeds benefit the center.

Left: Special Olympics coach Melissa Welsh and athlete Hannah Bailey get high fives from OU women’s basketball players Jasmine Hartman and Lyndsey Cloman and assistant basketball coach Chad Thrailkill.

Poet to read at Depot on Sunday FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — Oklahoma City poet Richard Dixon will be the featured poet at The Performing Arts Stu-

dio’s Second Sunday Poetry Reading, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Dixon is a former Norman resident and retired

Above: University of Oklahoma women’s basketball players, from left, Lauren Willis, Whitney Hand, Carlee Roethlisberger, Danielle Robinson and Joanna McFarland cheer Monday with Special Olympics athletes at a pep rally at Longfellow Middle School.

public school teacher. He will read “Monday Melody” and other original poems. The reading is free and open to everyone.

PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

my norman classified ____________________________________ Place your ad today, call 475-3000. www.newsok.com/norman

Community ads powered by you, published by The Oklahoman

'07 Altima 2.5S, CVT CD, navy blue, $12,500 obo, 405 364-1905

1977 Chev 1/2 ton 350 auto, runs great, needs paint, $1450, 830-0197 1996 Ford F-150, 6 cylinder, automatic, 100K 1 owner miles, runs good, $3000, 794-7387. 1987 Jeep 2WD, auto, new tires, very nice, consider trade, 3321 S Shartel, 209-2421.

Factory stock race car, 112'' wheel base, Chev, no engine or trans, $400. 615-5712

'01 Chev Suburban XLT, absolutely perfect, loaded, $6650, 209-5297

'90 F-150 motor or trans, $300, runs good, $300. 794-9157 '98 Sebring, 4 cylinder, runs good, $900. Title-42, 794-9157

Field Technician for POS, PC, Printer repair. OKC area. Must pass background check. Email resume to: sherron.thompson@ ncr.com

ATTN: Class A&B Drivers We need you now! HAZMAT or no HAZMAT, 943-3304

DRIVER WANTED M-F 8:30-4:00 $10 hr + gas. Must have own car. Nothing heavy. 410-2490 leave message

DRIVER needed for busy electrical contractor. Pickup and deliver parts to job sites. Warehouse knowledge helpful. CDL license recommended but not required. Apply in person at 1524 S May, OKC. 405-634-8844 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS seniors & grads ages 17-38. Call 800-492-4841.

Save $50ea - $200 Store Gift Cert. $150 ea. Tires/ Auto Repairs, 431-9588

Norman Public Schools • Hearing Impaired Teacher • Elem Library Media • Hd Girls Tennis Coach EOE. For questions call 405-366-5873. Applications online www.norman.k12.ok.us

1+2 beds $425 & $385 Sec 8 + everyone welcome, 427-7566

WEBSITE/ TECHNOLOGY OSSAA position opening see website posting at www.ossaa.com

2bd liv appls ch&a $460, No Sec 8/pets 2343 NW 15, 557-1288, 301-5979

Houses for rent

CLERK POSITIONS Immediate, full time. Cash register & phones with good customer service skills. Schedule includes weekends. Salary DOE + bonus. Apply in person Wholesale Recreation Warehouse. 525 W. Memorial

w/experience. Apply in person @ Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St-OKC 691-9221

TECHNICIAN

for geotech engineering firm. Exp preferred but will train right candidate. Exc benefits. Must have clean background & driving record. Apply in person @ METCO 2025 S. Nicklas Ave, Ste 101, OKC 73128

Classics Wanted $$$$ 946-4371 $$$$

1976 Triumph TR6 w/32k original miles on very nice 3rd owner Mimosa Yellow California Car with overdrive feature in Norman, Ok. $11,500 405-650-7732

FT Shipping/Recieving M-F, 8-4:30. »»»»»»»»»»»» PT Painter 20 hours/week, must be self starter, able to work on own. Apply at 940 NE 13th B300, Garrison Tower Crothall Healthcare Call 271-2255

2006 Z4 Convertible. Black, low miles $21,000 329-2886 co '01 Z3, 5 sp, runs great, loaded, like new, a real looker, silver w/black top, $10,350. 209-5297

'96 Riviera, VGC, all extra's, $1700. 625-4894 '95 Buick Roadmaster, 109K, Good Cond, grey & silver, fully loaded. Selling due to health $4250 OBO. ¡ 405-830-1501

2002 Chevy Malibu, good cond. hwy miles, 4 dr. dependable $2700 405-227-7531 '01 Camaro 121k, loaded, t-tops, runs great, red, $3750, 209-5297

'04 Sebring Convertible, fun in sun, like new, runs great, $4650. 209-5297

'08 Dodge Charger, 2.7L, dual exhaust, hood scoop low miles, $14,000 obo 405-324-2776, 209-0524

1997 Mustang V6, auto, bright red, mags, runs/drives gd, nice car, $2150 OBO » 799-1802

1987 Jeep 2WD pickup, auto, new tires, very nice, consider trade, 3321 S Shartel, 209-2421

2007 Range Rover black. Low miles $41,900 329-2886 CO.

'94 Towncar, white 125k, loaded, leather, exc. cond & body, $3,000, 405-946-7955

Computerist/Graphic Designer needed part-in OKC for small business Must be responsible & energetic, must speak some Spanish, fax resume to (405)-528-0285 RECEPTIONIST Okla based company in the healthcare industry is seeking entry level Receptionist for busy office. Duties include answering the telephone, greeting clients & other secretarial duties as assigned. Must be organized, dependable, possess excellent people skills, good communication & grammar skills. Mon-Fri, 9AM-5PM $7.50-$9.00. Fax resume to 405-917-5527 RECEPTIONIST Aerospace Company looking for Full time receptionist with customer service, excellent communication and computer skills Available shift 5:30AM-2PM. Great benefits. EOE Submit resumes to airplanejobs@gmail.com or Fax 405-709-0124 before May 21, 2010 Receptionist, exp., Self-starter, multi-tasker, punctual, positive attitude, dependable, no tobacco on property, 943-2191 BKD, LLP, a regional CPA firm, seeks full-time Word Processor/Admin. Asst. Excellent MS Word, Excel, grammar and number skills required in this fast-paced, multiproject, team environment. Detail oriented, multitask, strong work ethic. Word processing experience preferred, Pleasant professional environment. Competitive benefits. BKD is an EEOC. Send resume and salary history to squinn@bkd.com or fax to 918-584-2931.

'02 Mini Cooper, 5 sp, silver w/black racing stripe, loaded, all power $6750, 209-5297

2000 Miti Mirage, $850 obo, '98 Mit Montara $1850, 844-6694

DANCERS WANTED

Day & Night shifts. Lucky's Bar, 4007 NW 10th Call 601-0229

Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office Hiring Clericals. Starting salary $1785.00 monthly 401K Plan, Deferred Comp. Plans, Benefits: Health, Dental, Vision. 201 N. Shartel OKC, OK 73102

Certified Medical Assistant Full or Part Time. Apply in person, 5500 NW Expressway, Suite A 722-8100 Come join our team! Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, LLC is searching for an energetic Front Office Patient Representative for our busy Edmond office. The ideal candidate will have strong customer service skills, be familiar with Microsoft computer applications, and be able to work effectively in a team environment in a fast paced office. Prior experience in a medical/dental front office setting is preferred but not required. Excellent pay and benefits. Qualified applicants should fax their resume to 848-8020 or by mail to Oral and Maxillofacial Associates, Attn: Steve Dodge, Administrator, 3727 NW 63 Street, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73116.

4010 John Deere Tractor, Excellent Condition $3500 580-678-7838

4 bd 2 ba 2 car, Lake Front, gated, pool, convenient location, Blt. in '99, 2,000sf hdwd flrs, $1350 mo, 990-0488

Moving Sale: Roll-a-way bed $50; Futon $80; both almost new, 741-0976 or 778-9219

746 NW 5th, 3bd, 1ba, CH&A, 3 car det. gar, $700 + $500dep 631-8220 A&P Technician positions available with local company. Send resume to PO Box 23749, OKC, OK 73123

Field Oiler/Lube Service Person Paving contractor looking for experienced heavy equipment Oiler/Lube Service person w/HAZMAT. Benefits available. Apply at: 10200 NW 10th St. OKC, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm Framers/Concrete & General Labor. Experience preferred. Bilingual a plus. Building wood frame bldgs with Steel Siding 412-7665 HVAC Journeyman & Apprentice Installers Must have experience. We offer health, life insurance, paid vacation & retirement. Apply in person, Randall's Temperature Control, 131 SE 4th St in Moore Journeyman Electrician Full time for local established Co. Competitive pay & benefits. Apply at lecrecruiting@yahoo.com LABORER/OPERATOR Underground const co seeks operator, laborers & meter readers, will train good pay and benefits. Apply in person at 315 NW 59th St. OKC PLUMBERS Licensed Journeyman & Experienced Apprentice. Experienced in new construction. Pay DOE. Call 350-0879. SAND PLANT OPERATOR with Dredge experience. Must have Mining Card. Apply @ R&M Resources, 405-354-7577.

TECHNICIAN

HP Computer, almost new, desk included, $450 obo, 741-0976 or 778-9219

3 bed 1 bath, ch&a, hdwd flrs, 2012 Vickie Dr. $675 mo, $500 dep. 692-0042

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HOUSEKEEPER

Save $50ea - $200 Store Gift Cert. $150 ea. Tires/ Auto Repairs, 431-9588

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3 bed 2 bath 2 car gar. blt. 2001, 1600 sf, $1,000 mo, 990-0488

BUILDING MATERIAL SALES Established full line wholesaler seeks experienced inside sales person. Full benefit package. Send resume to PO BOX 76269, OKC, OK 73147

Best Acreage + Home in OKC! 7.3 acres + 3 bed home, $47,500 cash. HURRY HURRY HURRY! 301-6495

Homes For Sale

309.9

4 bed, 3 bath, with upstairs Game Room, 3150sqft, gated neighborhood, built in 2007, 405-990-4821

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3 bed 2 bath, 2 car garage, storm shelter, 1302sf, gas & electric, 3514 Liberty Dr, $115,000, 405-642-7783

AC units, all sizes, never used, still in box, $500-$1000 405-417-8244

2 Ninco 1/32nd Master Digital Slot Car Set, $1500 invested, $1,000 obo, 245-2938

Several 2 bed homes, Sec 8 ok, $450-$525 mo. Call 843-6693 310 NW 118st, section 8 approved, 3 bedroom, $700/month. 706-8669 Sec. 8 OK, 3 bd, 336 NW 85th 942-3552

5 bed, 2 bath, $950 month, 508 SW 46th; 2 bed, $500 month, 2512 SW 38th; 882-1054. 3 bd, 1 ba, carport, appls, fenced, storage bldg, $600+$200 dep, 682-3297

Snapper Rear Eng, 20 hrs use, Exc Cond, 5 spd $1500 Call 789-6334

2 Never used Furniture quality Bath Vanities distressed/ornate w/granite tops & sinks. $250 ea. Never used Jetta Garden Tub w/pump, 72x42, Cost $1500, asking $450, Lg. Klaussner Ent. Ctr w/strg $375, 408-2502

3 Boat Trailers, exc. cond $200-$350 Cash 670-1850

Blue Heeler & Red Heeler Pups, 6 weeks, working parents, ranch raised, $100, 224-6903 Boston Terriers, 8 weeks 2 males-$200 each, 1 female-$250, shots/wormed, 405-2475207, 580-450-3832 Bull Mastiff Puppies, AKC, 2 Pretty Girls, $800 ea OBO.. Call 405-245-3691 or email tgbmast@yahoo.com Cairn Terriers, 8 weeks, 3 females, 3 males, registered, s/w, $250. 405-684-1855 jbay21@yahoo.com

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1992 HR Aluma Lt. 33' great shape, ready! $12,500, 405-397-4871 WANTED TO BUY: 2000 or up Rialta RV, good cond, 918-465-3916

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Shih Tzu, Imp., 2F, 5M, paper trained, reg, POP, s/w, $225-$300 370-8223 puppylovefarms.com Siberian Husky Puppies, 2M's, 2F's, 7 wks, 3 blk & wht, 1 red & wht, blue eyes, S/W, POP, $200 each-Cash Only. 405-997-8902 405-997-8810 Earlsboro, OK Yorkie adorable AKC Pups, 2 M 2 F, s/w, $250-$500, 570-9134 Yorkie AKC Male, 3K lbs, born Oct. 2008, proven stud, has tiny toy puppies, beautiful, loving & sweet, home raised, $700 Cash, 405-224-8584 Yorkie K , Chihuahua K , 7 wks, Xtra Xtra Cute! $125 Cash ’ 224-6903 Yorkie Puppies Reg., 9 wks F, crate tr'd, s/w, $400 ea, 580-660-1000 Yorkies, 9 wks AKC, 2 F 1 M s/w, $300-$700 405-623-8771 Yorkie w/papers, 1 tiny male, w/t/dc, 1st shots, parents are 4-5 lbs., 12 weeks old, $300 405-229-2298.

6'x6' Pallets to haul & store small square bales of hay, $22 ea 350-0781

Drink & Snack Route Great Loc Guaranty Must Sell now Financing avail. 800-648-2124 Distributorship for sale Earn $1,500 weekly 888-561-8983

Service Directory

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MEDICAL ASSISTANT needed with pediatric experience for FT position. Fax resume to 405-945-4959.

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NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

VI

17A

Goldsby festival pays tribute to armed forces, veterans FROM STAFF REPORTS

GOLDSBY — The fourth annual Goldsby May Festival started with a tribute to veterans and the armed forces at the town’s veterans’ plaza. The tribute was soon followed by children’s activities, car and tractor shows, concerts and a free community picnic. EvinceAble, the Justin Fox Band and the Kylie Morgan Band performed at the park’s gazebo. “I have enjoyed watching people talking to people, visiting with each other,” Goldsby Mayor Cindy Scott said near the children’s inflatable slide. “We just want people to have a good time.” The May Festival took

Above: Betty Dowdle, and her husband, Dale Dowdle, a World War II Army veteran, looks down to read names of veterans on bricks that encircle the Goldsby Veterans’ Memorial Plaza. Elly Allison, 5, of Goldsby, thanks Blanchard clown “Top Hat” for making her a pink balloon rabbit Saturday during the fourth annual Goldsby May Festival.

place at the park next to the town center. The park is undergoing improve-

ments that include a walking trail, playground equipment and the veter-

HEY, CAN I TAKE THIS THING FOR A DRIVE?

Above: Parents, kids and trucks are reflected in a fire truck’s mirror Saturday during the Touch a Truck event in Norman. Above left: Nicholas Barczak, 7, right, and his brother, Maxwell, 5, climb into the cab of a crane. Below left: Dakota Navrath, 12, of Prague, looks out of the trailer of a FedEx truck. PHOTOS BY STEVE SISNEY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Abigail Boice, 5, exits a helicopter.

Theo Mauer, 5, plays with the controls of a lift bucket while Oklahoma Electrical Cooperative journeyman lineman Randy White watches.

ans’ plaza that was dedicated at last year’s May Festival.

Left: “Top Hat,” makes a balloon monkey. PHOTO BY JAMES S. TYREE, THE OKLAHOMAN


18A

VI

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

IN BRIEF

CAPITOL TAX COLLECTIONS NARROWLY MISS MARK

April revenue offers hope of recovery BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Oklahoma tax collections April ’10 April ’09

Net income tax

$249.6M $281.9M

We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy.” GLENN COFFEE

SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEM

were 12.3 percent above the previous year. Legislative leaders, who had been cautiously optimistic about signs the state’s economy may be recovering, seemed more upbeat Tuesday. House Speaker Chris Benge, R-Tulsa, said the numbers “make me hopeful that we have in fact seen the bottom of this economic downturn.” “We are beginning to see positive signs within Oklahoma’s economy,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “Our revenue numbers are slowly turning around, indicating an increasing consumer confidence, which is encouraging.” Meacham said the state’s economic recovery will be slow and won’t be fully rebounding until natural gas prices reach and stay at about $6 per 1,000 cubic feet. Prices now are in the range of about $4 per 1,000 cubic feet.

April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09 April ’10 April ’09

$53.9M $32.5M

Sales tax

65.8% $133.3M $125.3M

6.4%

Motor vehicle tax $16.2M $13.7

18.6%

Other sources $59.3M $60M

Capitol Bureau jbisbee@opubco.com

A bill to require women seeking an abortion to fill out a questionnaire passed the Senate on Tuesday. House Bill 3284 passed the Senate after nearly 45 minutes of debate in a vote of 32-11. An identical bill was passed last session and signed by Gov. Brad Henry but the state Supreme Court threw it out because it was part of a bill that violated the state’s requirement that legislation stick to one subject. The measure is being held in a parliamentary procedure by the author, Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond. If no action is taken, the bill will go to the governor by the end of the week. The bill requires a wom-

an seeking an abortion to provide marital status, reasons for ending the pregnancy, whether she currently is receiving public assistance and whether the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest. The questionnaire must be signed by the physician. Physicians who treat women who have complications after an abortion are also required to fill out a form, according to the bill. Opponents of the measure called the bill an “affront to women,” and “unreasonable.” Sen. Debbe Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City, objected to the bill because women seeking abortions after rape or incest are not exempt from the reporting requirement. “This bill goes too far,” Leftwich said. “We have a

-1.2%

BUDGET CUTS TAKE TOLL ON OETA

Total

$513M $513.4M

-0.2%

Numbers are rounded: Percent change based on unrounded numbers.

Source: Office of State Treasurer

Lawmakers struggle to close budget gap

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

The author of a measure that would prohibit radio frequency chips in driver’s licenses says he may make another attempt to override the governor’s veto of the bill. The House failed Tuesday to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 2569. Rep. Paul Wesselhoft, author of HB 2569, said he may try another override attempt before the session is scheduled to adjourn May 28. There is no limit on how many override attempts can be made. The House voted 69-19 to override the veto. It would have been enough if

the bill had not required a three-fourths majority, or 76 votes, because of an emergency clause. The House earlier passed the bill 76-13. Wesselhoft said he filed the legislation because the U.S. Senate has a bill that would enhance driver’s licenses, which could include putting chips in them that would allow the federal government to keep track of individuals. His bill would be a way for the state to reject federal legislation or an executive order issued by the president; if his bill would become law and a federal regulation was passed, the courts likely would have to settle the matter. “It’s a violation of our

Further state cuts could affect the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s ability to continue its “Oklahoma News Report” and its “Stateline” documentary series, representatives of the network said Tuesday. Just as with many other state agencies, state funds have been cut about 14 percent since July 1 for the network, said John McCarroll, OETA’s executive director. If OETA were to receive another 10 percent cut, it would mean the network would have to operate with $1.2 million less than two years ago, he said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Budget negotiators continuing to work while tornado warning sirens wailed could be an indicator they are making progress, and an agreement for the state’s 2011 fiscal year budget could be hammered out this week. Long discussions “almost around the clock” have been held concerning the budget the past few days, with Democratic Gov. Brad Henry and Republican legislative leaders exchanging proposals and counterproposals, said state Treasurer Scott Meacham, the governor’s chief budget adviser. Meacham said Tuesday that Henry, House Speaker Chris Benge and Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee continued to meet late in the day Monday despite tornado warnings being sounded outside the state Capitol. Budget talks resumed Tuesday evening. “We are getting very close but what typically

statistical website already. Why do we need this? Do we keep on wanting to make national news? This affects our image as a state and affects how women feel about living in this state.” Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, said better access to contraception would eliminate the need for abortion. “Nobody is in favor of abortions,” Johnson said. “We are in favor of giving women choices, so they can avoid ever having to make a choice whether to have an abortion or not.” Sen. Steve Russell, ROklahoma City, said the bill is not about women. “It’s about the children in the womb and the life God created,” Russell said. “If it’s immoral to stand in defense of the life of the

happens in a budget negotiation is that last little gap is always the hardest to close,” Meacham said. “We’re trying to figure out ways to close the last little gap.” Meacham said discussions have occurred on whether to suspend tax credit programs and other ways to increase revenue flow to the state coffers. Legislators have about $1.2 billion less to spend this year. Cash in reserves has reduced the deficit to about $600 million. Talks now are focused on different budget priorities and cuts to agencies. “Education certainly would be one of those areas,” Meacham said, adding the governor is trying to keep cuts to education at a minimum. Higher and common education make up about 53 percent of the current 2010 fiscal year budget. Spokespersons for Benge and Coffee said they agreed with Meacham’s assessment concerning state budget discussions. The legislative session is to end May 28.

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more news from the Capitol.

personal privacy,” Wesselhoft said. “Your driver’s license is your personal papers and effects, that’s what the Fourth Amendment says and that should not be violated with unreasonable searches.” Paul Sund, a spokesman for Gov. Brad Henry, said the governor appreciates the House members who took the time to review the measure and sustain the veto. “It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Maj. Rusty Rhoades said earlier the state Public Safety Department has no

STATE CHAMBER SEEKS OVERRIDE The State Chamber is asking lawmakers to override Gov. Brad Henry’s veto of House Bill 2575. The measure is intended to better track expenditures of Oklahoma school districts. It would have created more openness in common education accounting procedures by establishing reporting codes and procedures before each fiscal year. The Legislature unanimously passed HB 2575. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

GROUP SEEKS VOTE ON HEALTH CARE The American Legislative Exchange Council called on Oklahoma lawmakers Tuesday to pass Senate Joint Resolution 59, which would ask voters to change the state constitution to prohibit a federal health care mandate requiring Oklahomans to buy health insurance. Lawmakers have passed and sent to the governor House Joint Resolution 1054, which is a measure that would accomplish that through a change in state law, but the group said a constitutional amendment is needed to make it part of the constitution. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

LEGISLATORS TO HONOR OILMAN T. Boone Pickens will be recognized today during a joint session of the Legislature. The oilman will be presented with a resolution expressing appreciation for his contributions to build a better and stronger Oklahoma. He also will be recognized for his leadership in trying to get the country to establish a national energy policy. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

TAX EXEMPTION FOCUS OF BILL Retailers could be fined and shut down for seven days if they deny a sales tax exemption to a 100 percent disabled veteran under a bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Bill 1321 by Sen. Jay Paul Gumm, D-Durant, passed 45-0. The measure makes it a $500 fine and misdemeanor for retailers that knowingly refuse to honor the sales tax exemption to veterans who provide proper identification. Gumm said there is a national retailer in the state who refuses to comply with the 2005 law. Gumm would not name the retailer.

NEWSOK.COM/ POLITICS

unborn children, then I stand so accused.” Under the legislation, the information would be available on a secure website by March 2012. The Health Department would be in charge of compiling the information. The department already has a website that includes information about women who have received abortions. That information is self-reported by the three facilities in Oklahoma that are licensed to provide abortions. Jolley said collecting the information allows policymakers to figure out what services are needed to help reduce the number of women seeking abortions.

Driver’s license chip bill could see new try BY MICHAEL MCNUTT

Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation Tuesday that could aid the state in its bid to land a multi-million dollar federal education grant. Senate Bill 509, which takes effect immediately, gives school administrators greater flexibility to overhaul schools that have repeatedly fallen short of academic standards. Among other things, the measure will allow authorities to make significant personnel changes in an effort to improve a school’s academic performance. Oklahoma and many other states are competing for federal dollars in the second round of the Race to the Top competition. “This legislation will help us in the Race to the Top competition, but more importantly, it will lend a helping hand to students and their families who are not getting the education they deserve in low-performing schools,” Henry said. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

Abortion proposal clears state Senate after debate BY JULIE BISBEE

-11.5%

Gross production tax April ’10 April ’09

April ’10 April ’09

Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

Oklahoma continues to make a slow recovery from its worst recession in modern times based on improving revenue collections, state Treasurer Scott Meacham said Tuesday. April revenue collections for the state failed to continue a two-month trend of coming in higher than estimates, but just barely, figures show. April’s figures are an improvement over collections earlier this fiscal year, when monthly collections were falling more than 30 percent below prior year collections and estimates. Meacham said he is especially heartened by sales tax collections coming in higher than the same time last year. It’s the first time that’s happened since April 2009. “Sales tax collections lag a few months,” Meacham said. “On the way down they lagged, and I expected them to do the same on the way up. We were feeling they would pick up anytime so that was a very positive number.” Gross production taxes on oil and natural gas were 66 percent higher than a year ago and motor vehicle taxes also were up. Personal income taxes fell below the amount brought in during the same time period last year, but corporate income tax collections

LAW TO AID STATE IN SEEKING FUNDS

intent of using chips or other methods to keep track of people. Gov. Brad Henry, in his veto message last month, said that in a time of constantly evolving and improving technology “it is not in the best interest of the state or its citizens to prospectively ban the use of a specific technology that could provide benefits in the future.” Wesselhoft said he hasn’t talked with anyone who likes the potential of having a radio frequency chip installed in state driver’s licenses. “I haven’t received one single e-mail saying that I’m violating technology advancement and I’m a Neanderthal,” he said.

JULIE BISBEE, CAPITOL BUREAU

BILL UPDATES HOME BREW

TAX CREDITS

AT STAKE: House Bill 2348 allows Oklahomans to brew their own beer at home. Home brewers will be required to have a permit from the Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

AT STAKE: Senate Bill 461 adds tax credits for the development of resorts, hotels and motels. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

ELEVATORS AT STAKE: House Bill 2530 exempts Spanish Cove, a retirement complex in Yukon, from being required to install elevators. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

SEX OFFENDERS AT STAKE: House Bill 2934 requires convicted sex offenders to register online identities. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1.

CRIME DETAILS AT STAKE: House Bill 3294 allows the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation to release details about ongoing cases if the information would be helpful in solving a crime. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

USE OF DNA AT STAKE: Senate Bill 1250 prohibits the DNA of an infant from being used for research without permission. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect immediately.

PET FUND AT STAKE: House Bill 1641 lets pet owners create trusts to pay for the care of their pets after the owners’ deaths. It limits a pet trust to $20,000. Any money left in the trust after the pet’s death would go to another person. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect 90 days after session adjourns.

BIBLE CLASSES AT STAKE: House Bill 2321 allows schools to offer elective classes on the Bible. WHAT HAPPENED: Signed by the governor. WHAT’S NEXT: Takes effect Nov. 1. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Assistant principal faces new sex count BY ANDREA EGER Tulsa World andrea.eger@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Prosecutors on Tuesday charged Skelly Elementary School Assistant Principal Robert Yerton Jr. with a fourth sex offense against children. The additional count of lewd molestation alleges Yerton inappropriately touched an 8-year-old boy at the school in November, court documents show. Yerton Jr., 41, was charged last week in Tulsa County District Court with the lewd molestation of a 6-year-old boy in a school office on Oct. 21 and two counts of sexual abuse involving a boy he is related to between 2003 and 2009. At a Tuesday hearing on Yerton’s bond status, prosecutors asked that Yerton be kept in jail without bond, while Yerton’s attorney, Richard O’Carroll, asked that his bond amount be reduced. Special District Judge David Youll denied both motions. Yerton’s bond is $150,000. Assistant District Attorney Jake Cain wrote that

prosecutors “believe that as this investigation progresses, it is probable that the state will file more charges relating to inappropriate behavior towards minors by the defendant.” Officer Jason Willingham said the boy at the center of the fourth charge, as well as some others, came forward since the police investigation was first reported. Willingham described the boy as a student without specifying which school he attends, but said the offense is alleged to have occurred at Skelly. “There were multiple encounters between the victim and the suspect,” Willingham said. Police said previously their investigation revealed a former student of Yerton’s from Disney Elementary School is a victim of sexual abuse, but no charges regarding that case could be filed because the allegations stem from a 1996 incident, which is outside the statute of limitations. Tulsa Superintendent Keith Ballard has initiated termination proceedings against Yerton, who has

worked for the school district for all but two years since 1993. He worked as a children’s minister at Garnett Church of Christ from 2002-04 and as a substitute teacher for a time in the Union School District during the 2004-05 academic year. Yerton was suspended from his duties April 27 after police served a search warrant at his home and at Skelly, 2940 S 90th Ave. E. In a court affidavit, police reported a forensic examination revealed “homosexual pornography” on Yerton’s school and home laptop computers. Tulsa Public Schools has released a statement saying an employee first reported to the Skelly principal in October allegations of “inappropriate touching of male students” by Yerton, although they “did not involve charges of criminal conduct or child abuse.” Tulsa Police detectives are urging people who believe they or their children had inappropriate contact with Yerton to contact the Child Crisis Unit at (918) 669-6504.

Principal says MAPS work was a learning experience BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

The principal of Mark Twain Elementary School has some words of advice for Oklahoma City schools that are next in line for MAPS for Kids renovations: “Hang on, sit down, and get ready.” After more than 18 months of dealing with construction crews and shuffling classrooms, students at Mark Twain celebrated their new school facilities on Tuesday with song, dance and a balloon release. “It was really a learning experience,” Principal Sandra Phillips said. “There were lots of rewarding times and lots of frustrating times, but it was worth it.” Worth it for the 8,000square-foot expansion that added an airy library with huge windows and

new book cases and a media center complete with 30 new computers and 48 laptops, Phillips said. While other schools in the district undergoing renovations have had substantial unused space or additions to make ongoing education easy, Jim Burkey, the district’s chief operating officer, described the renovations at Mark Twain as a “complex ballet.” “Of all the MAPS projects I’ve been associated with, this is one of my favorites,” Burkey said. For him the challenge was keeping education going while speeding along construction and the architectural work that seamlessly transitioned the old building into the new. The project cost $2.8 million and took more than a year and a half to complete. The MAPS renovations were funded with a voter-

approved sales tax that raised $512 million over seven years, as well as a $180 million voterapproved bond issue. The MAPS Trust still has work cut out for it with $54.5 million in construction costs for 2010. Several other schools undergoing MAPS renovations are awaiting final approval or nearing completion, including Bodine, Heronville, Gatewood, Adams, Wilson and Nichols Hills elementary schools. Tuesday was the ground breaking for the $4.1 million expansion and renovation at Linwood Elementary School, and later this week the district will break ground for work at Fillmore Elementary School. “It already has made a difference,” Phillips said of the new school feel. “We have higher enrollment, more parent involvement and fewer referrals. They are proud to be here learning.”

Deaths Arles, Shelia, 44, homemaker, died Sunday. Services noon Thursday (Criswell, Ada). West, Trenna Larue, 73, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada).

ALTUS

Goforth, Jonathon R., 26, music business owner, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Glad Tidings Assembly of God (Kincannon, Altus). Gracey, Kenneth, 62, retail meat operations supervisor, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, (Kincannon, Altus).

ASHER

Norbury, Sheila, 67, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Avoca Church of Christ (Knight-Swearingen, Maud) Yazzie, Freda, 47, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today (NeekampLuginbuel, Bartlesville).

BINGER

Castillo, Martha Ann “Marty,” 50, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Sickles Community Church, Sickles (Ray & Martha’s, Carnegie).

CHOCTAW

Dufresne, Alice C., 69, homemaker, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City) Jackson, George Hillsman, 90, academic director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Smith-Parks, Harrah).

COALGATE

Ott, Virgil, 71, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. today (Brown’s, Coalgate).

COOPERTON

Riley, Verdis, 96, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Cooperton Community Center (Ray & Martha’s, Hobart).

DAVIS

Vannoy, Anna Estelle, 72, retired telephone company employee, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Hale’s, Davis).

DUNCAN

Lockwood, Joyce Ann (Medlock), 80, retired teacher, died Friday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church (Don Grantham, Duncan). Smith, Della, 95, retired beautician, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens, Oklahoma City (Resthaven, Oklahoma City).

EDMOND

Hansen, Madell “Robbie,” 98, registered nurse, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Edmond Trinity Christian Church (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

ELK CITY

Rejino, Joanna, 37, died Monday. Prayer vigil 7 p.m. Thursday, Mass 10 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

EL RENO

Griesel, Ida J., 89, homemaker, died May 5. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Wesley United Methodist Church (Wilson, El Reno). Powell, Clara, 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Trinity Lutheran Church (Wilson, El Reno).

ENID

Burnham-Walker, Brandy, 34, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. today (Anderson-Burris, Enid).

EUFAULA

Dixon, Max, 80, truck driver, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Oak Ridge Baptist Church (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Loch, Janet, 64, housekeeper, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Hunn, Black & Merritt, Eufaula). Walker, Gary Sullivan, 54, printer, died Saturday. Wake 7 p.m. Thursday, services 2 p.m. Friday (Shurden, Henryetta).

Wetumka clinic looks to expand BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

GAGE

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

WETUMKA — Plans for a new community health center in Wetumka, more than double the size of its current incarnation, could mean more doctors, additional programs and healthier lives for thousands of needy medical patients in Oklahoma. The new $2.2 million, 11,280-square-foot clinic will increase the number of examination rooms from five to 13, add more space for dental work and more staff offices, said Donna

Records

DEACONESS Ryan Lopez and Lisa Bixon, a boy. Phillip Belt and Delmesha Ridley, a girl.

Maricruz Cruz, 22. Guerra Salinas, Juan Pablo, 19, and Lopez, Li Yang, 17. Wall Jr., Troy Lee, 25, and Wells, Shea Lynn, 27. Nimz, Kaleb Christian, 24, and Grimaud, Marilyn E., 23. Vu, Minh Van, 35, and Spender, Shannon Christine, 23. Attardi, Cory Ryan, 25, and Attardi, Jenna Nicole, 25. Riley, Kasey Ryan, 30, and Ward, Andrea Michelle, 30. Jones, Charles D., 63, and Anderson, Britainy Shar, 25. Pilaski, Alan B., 60, and Hall, Teresa Ann, 56. Jamison, Brent Lee, 36, and Crossley, Sherri Diane, 48. Messin, Sebastien, 20, and Demyanova, Olesya Vadimovna, 18. Dee, Troy Gene, 27, and Pinson, Jessica Marie, 23. Brunton, Matthew James, 35, and Hawkins, Jenny Laetitia, 25.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

DIVORCES ASKED

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include child’s name, sex, birth date, hospital or county of adoption. You can send us the information online at www.newsok. com/life/births or contact us at 475-3539 or mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from hospitals that do not provide full names of parents.

BIRTHS

Moore Jr., Marcus Lewis, 65, and Davenport, Marie L., 60. Baer, Jason Scott, 28, and Reil, Candace Dawn, 28. Snead, Joseph Michael, 33, and Suenram, Amanda Gail, 29. Prudhom, Dustin Tyler, 24, and Reilly, Amy Luann, 23. Ponce, Artemio, 42, and Salazar,

Ali, Khaled H.H. v. Trudy Laree Borges-Allen, Daniela E. v. Allen, Roger K Bradley, Delores Kay v. Scott Bryan Gaines, Kenneth v. Teresa Gallagher, Jean Suncha v. Hogard, John Dee Gonzalez Marroquin, Claudia M. v. Marroquin, Craig A.

Hall, Guadalupe v. Hall Jr., Bradford Joe Henry, Karen Lee v. Ceballos, Sergio M. Killman, Amy Lee v. Kevin Kirkland Niroumand, Navid v. Anzani, Sanaz Poweshiek-Naifeh, Rinah v. Robert Rice-Garcia, Sheena J. v. Hartley, Matthew B. Shannon, Trina L. v. Lincoln D. Titsworth, Camisa v. Willie Watkins, Annette v. Charles Wood, David E. v. Scott, Jennifer M. Yeager, Christina Marie v. Yeager III, Gerald Dee

DIVORCES GRANTED

Cooper, Brett D. v. Michelle E. Delozier, Wendy Renae v. Joshua Mark El Mesnaoui, Mehdi v. Melissa Fuentes-Torres, Luis Armando v. Rios-Hernandez, Maria Guadalupe Kanady, Catherine Coon v. Michael Christian Kanoff-Moore, Georgina L. v. Moore, Terry D. Kiser, Matthew Issac v. Rice-Kiser, Wanda Kay Magee, Sandra v. Terry Norman, Joshua v. Tara Spencer, Deborah v. Gene Vorheis, Roger C. v. Judy A. White, Jennifer Ann v. Neal Matthew Zapata, Emiliano v. Medina, Amy Zimmerman, James L. v. Victoria M.

19A

TRAFFIC GAGE MAN DIES IN CRASH CRAWFORD — A Gage man died after he was thrown out in a one-vehicle rollover in Roger Mills County Monday, the Oklahoma County Highway Patrol reported. Tracy Floyd, 49, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident about 11:35 p.m., at the intersection of U.S. Highway 283 and State Highway 33, according to the report. Investigators said William Robert Davis Broadbent of Gage was driving west on SH 33 at an unsafe speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle slid into a drainage ditch and rolled, throwing Floyd from the vehicle. Both the driver and a second passenger were taken to local hospitals. None of the three occupants were wearing seat belts. FROM STAFF REPORTS

BARTLESVILLE

Campbell, Mildred M., 92, housing authority director, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday, Christian Church of Fort Gibson (Bradley, Fort Gibson).

add federally subsidized family planning and prescription drug programs. “We can get them (prescription drugs) for maybe 60 to 70 percent cheaper than a retail pharmacy, so we’ll be able to pass those savings on to our patients,” Dyer said. The number of patients served by the clinic has grown from about 1,500 to more than 2,000 in the first part of 2010, Dyer said. Patients come from more than 80 area communities. A construction date has not been set while clinic officials work to clear a final set of regulatory hurdles.

VI

ADA

FORT GIBSON

Dyer, chief executive officer of the East Central Oklahoma Family Health Center. Funding for the new facility is being provided by First United Bank, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma and New Markets Investment. “This will help us serve more uninsured and underinsured clients, which is what a community health center tries to do,” Dyer said. With the extra room, Dyer said she also hopes to add more staff and more programs to the primary care facility. Plans are also in place to

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Broadbent, Tracy Floyd, 49, oil-field worker, died Monday, Services 2 p.m. Friday, Arnett First Baptist Church, Arnett (Shaw, Shattuck).

KINGFISHER

Murray, Velma, 88, died May 5. Services 1 p.m. today, Wannamaker Baptist Church, Dover (Russworm, Watonga).

LAVERNE

Foote, Veda Nadine, 82, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 11 am. Friday, First Baptist Church (Myatt, Laverne).

LAWTON

Zimmerman, Roy Lee, 87, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Cameron Baptist Church (Becker, Lawton).

LUTHER

Dutton, Sylburn Lloyd “Bud,” 72, carpet installer, died May 7. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Luther).

OKMULGEE

Timothy Baptist Church (Bradley, Muskogee).

Choate, Hazel Pauline, 84, teacher, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (McClendon-Winters, Okmulgee).

NEWKIRK

Hardesty, Retha, 88, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today (Miller-Stahl, Newkirk).

PAWNEE

NORMAN

Beals, Dorothy Maxine, 83, died May 3. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Fairlawn Cemetery, Elk City (Havenbrook, Norman). Carter, Roger Allen, 58, Realtor, died Monday. Services 11 am. Friday, CrossPointe Church (John M. Ireland, Moore). Hammond, Alice Marie, 98, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, University Christian Church (Havenbrook, Norman). Rider, Tammy Lee, 29, homemaker, died Monday. Private services (John M. Ireland, Moore). Ward, Edwin K., 89, died Sunday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Calvin, L. Ray, 27, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m., Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Cordell, Betty W., 79, died Saturday. Private family services (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Crawford, Helen Grace, 80, died May 10. Services 2 p.m. Monday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Daughtery, Sammy Ray, 67, firefighter, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Southwest Baptist Church, Oklahoma City (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dunbar, John Carroll Jr., 57, cab driver, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Portland Avenue Baptist Church (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City). Fuller, Coy D., 89, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Draper Park Christian Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Gardenhire, Lavell Eugene “Val,” 87, electrician, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Gonzalez, Balkis Esther, 65, social worker, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, St. Andrew Catholic Church, Moore (John M. Ireland, Moore). Johnson, Shirley, 54, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Saturday, Greater First Deliverance Temple (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Nichols, William, 87, retired steel fabricator, died May 6. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, First Baptist Church of Green Pastures, Spencer (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Rodden, Anita L., 62, died Monday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Emmaus Baptist Church (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Rogers, Betty Jane, 88, died April 30. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Resthaven Memory Gardens (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Simmons, Robert “Bobby,” 51, electrician, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. today, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel (Mercer-Adams, Bethany). Spaulding, George William, 58, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. today, Sunny Lane Cemetery, Del City (Vondel L. Smith & Son South, Oklahoma City). Stone, W.C. “Dub,” 76, home builder, died Friday. Services 11 a.m. today, Emmaus Baptist Church (Vondel L. Smith & Son South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Sutton, Sam, 91, died Sunday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Tillis, Leroy, 69, retired carpenter, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Douglass Gymnasium, Chandler (Pollard, Oklahoma City). Trammell, Madelon Ann, 72, registered nurse, died Monday. Rosary 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Mass 10 a.m. Friday, Christ the King Catholic Church (Smith & Kernke, NW 23, Oklahoma City). Turner, Charley Ray, 85, mechanic, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Asbury United Methodist Church (Advantage South, Oklahoma City). Wilkinson, Leroy, 64, sanitation engineer, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Capitol Hill Church of the Nazarene (Advantage South , Oklahoma City). Wilson, Elnora S., 75, died May 7. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Tabitha Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City).

Gates, Helen Virginia Warren, 85, retired waitress, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Poteet, Pawnee).

PERKINS

Hopkins, Willard Lee “Hoppy,” 85, die cast worker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Palmer Marler, Perkins). Schneider, Walter A., 79, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Strode, Stillwater).

PONCA CITY

Goddard, Gerald, 63, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Word of Life Christian Center (Trout, Ponca City). Gonzales, Maria M., 52, homemaker, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Central Baptist Church (Trout, Ponca City).

POND CREEK

Junghanns, Nellyne, 78, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Christian Church (Hills-Ely, Medford).

ROOSEVELT

Raasch, James Kenneth, 87, farmer and rancher, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Church of Christ (People’s Co-Operative, Lone Wolf).

SEILING

Buffalomeat, Norma J., 75, school custodian, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Seiling Indian Baptist Church (Redinger, Seiling).

SEMINOLE

Hickman, Jean Patricia, 93, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour SE, Del City). Johnston, Charles W. Jr., 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today (Swearingen, Seminole).

SHADY GROVE

Alred, Helen Lucille, 88, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. today, Shady Grove School Gymnasium (Hart, Tahlequah).

SHAWNEE

Dimery, Alberta, 91, died Tuesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Thursday, Vamoosa Cemetery (Swearingen, Konawa).

SPRINGER

Morris, Laqcretia “Pat”, 64, retired bank vice president, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. today, Springer Missionary Baptist Church (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

TALIHINA

Judkins-Dill, Ollie, 96, restaurant owner, died Sunday. Services were Tuesday (Talihina, Talihina).

TECUMSEH

McFarland-Holliday, Sara Rebecca, 91, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, Revive Church (Cooper, Tecumseh).

TONKAWA

Allen, Felix, 44, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. today, Tonkawa Tribal Gym, (Tonkawa, Tonkawa).

WANETTE

Royal, Melissa Jane, 67, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, McGuire Road Baptist Church, Noble (OK Cremation, Oklahoma City).

WAYNE

Willis, Winifred William, 88, died May 6. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Rosedale Baptist Church, Rosedale (Wadley’s, Purcell).

WILBURTON

Brook, Mary P., 86, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday (Waldrop, Wilburton).

WISTER

Thompson, Ronald Gene, 66, carpenter, died Thursday. Services were Tuesday. (Evans & Miller, Poteau).

WOODWARD

Hunter, Christopher Michael Dwayne, 18, student, died May 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday, First Baptist Church, Vici (Shaw, Vici).

YUKON

Bisbee, Bonnie Lou, 62, nurse, died May 7. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Cherokee Hills Baptist Church, Warr Acres (Corbett, Oklahoma City).

MCALESTER

Davis, Bobbie Ann, 77, truck driver, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Highlow Cemetery, Scipio (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MCLOUD

Kenyon, Dora Simpson, 86, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. today, First United Methodist Church, Grandfield (Gray, Grandfield).

MIDWEST CITY

Daves, Helen B., 88, homemaker, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Barnes & Friederich, Midwest City). Day, David G., 47, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Arlington Memory Gardens (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City).

MULDROW

Waters, Riley Jr., 87, farmer, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Calvary Missionary Baptist Church (Agent, Muldrow).

MUSKOGEE

James, Mary Belle, teacher, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday,

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20A

VI

NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City looks to increase fines, fees BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Council members on Tuesday discussed several potential fine and fee increases. Some of the fees that could be increased include permit and inspection fees, weed abatement administration fees, and subdivision, zoning and Board of Adjustment fees. But it was the fine for parking in residential yards that got council members talking. Development Services Director Bob Tener said current law calls for a $10 fine on a first offense. “We’ve determined that it’s not an effective deterrent,” Tener said. “There is a $50 second offense, but when our inspectors are in the field, they really don’t have the ability to determine

whether it is a second offense for that vehicle or not.” Tener recommended increasing the fine for each offense to $50. Ward 4 Councilman Pete White and Ward 7 Councilman Skip Kelly said $50 is lenient given the impact the issue has on city neighborhoods. “Next to people not fixing broken windows in their house and watching their neighborhood go down for that reason, front yard parking is the first sign, I think, that neighborhoods are getting ready to go down the toilet,” White said. “I think to only go to $50 is not enough.” White and Kelly said they would be happier with penalties set closer to those established in Moore, Midwest City and Edmond, which charge about $100 for parking in a residential yard.

“There is a total disrespect of the community by individuals who will park on the sidewalk, park on the yard,” Kelly said. “They have absolutely no respect for whatever ordinance we have now. If we are going to do something, let’s do something that has a real meaningful effect.” The fine for residential yard parking and possible fee increases will get a second hearing Tuesday. The fee increases are expected to raise about $1.2 million. A final vote is scheduled June 1. City Manager Jim Couch said the fee increases are part of an approach the city adopted in 2007 to make its fees more closely match the cost of services. “Obviously revenue is an issue, but it’s also an issue to keep our fees current and deal with them in more frequent, less drastic adjustments,” Couch said.

Stillwater mayor survives recall vote

ALSO ... STORM CLEANUP DELAYS TALKS Oklahoma City Council members postponed public safety budget talks Tuesday because police and fire chiefs were busy helping with tornado recovery efforts. City Manager Jim Couch said under the circumstances, it made sense to put off talks until later in the month. Both departments are facing job cuts unless the city and unions can negotiate salary concessions. The city’s budget staff has recommended cutting 100 jobs, including 22 police officers and 29 firefighters, in the coming budget unless unions make concessions.

Election results (x) = winner

CADDO COUNTY

Binger-Oney schools $1.2 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace a heating and cooling system. Yes 136 (86.1%); No 22 (13.9%). Passed.

CLEVELAND COUNTY

Robin Hill school $2.8 million bond issue for construction of a media center, cafeteria and kitchen. Yes 21 (70%); No 9 (30%). Passed.

Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is shown in July. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

BY JOHN ESTUS Staff Writer jestus@opubco.com

STILLWATER

— Stillwater Mayor Nathan Bates is still mayor after surviving a recall effort by just four votes. The young mayor kept his job Tuesday in a recall election that saw 2,226 people vote to remove him from office and 2,230 vote to keep him. “I like it. I’d rather it be close than spread out, because I can thank every single one of my volunteers and tell them they each personally made a difference,” Bates said. Bates, 28, was elected in April 2009. He said he’ll now focus on “getting Stillwater back on track.” A recall petition against Bates was submitted in January by City Councilor Darrell Dougherty, who had previously called on Bates to resign. Bates, a recent Oklahoma State University graduate, had been criticized by Dougherty and other political opponents

who claimed he used his mayoral seat to steer money to a company he owns and interfere with city business. Opponents also publicized an incident in which Bates was allegedly drunk in public and asked a woman to expose herself at a party. Bates has denied all allegations made against him. He said Tuesday’s election showed the public is on his side, and urged his opponents to not “be sour about it.”

Other elections Elsewhere, a $6.5 million bond issue for Arapaho-Butler schools passed in Custer County. Voters approved the package the day after it was announced that a $10 million settlement against the county related to sexual abuse at the county jail would be applied to property taxes. In Okfuskee County, voters approved a proposal for the Boley School District to be annexed into the nearby Okemah School District.

BRYAN DEAN, STAFF WRITER

COMANCHE COUNTY

Bishop school $1.1 million bond issue to install a metal roof and replace the school’s heating and cooling system. Yes 37 (90.2%); No 4 (9.8%). Passed.

CREEK COUNTY

Town of Depew Trustee (unexpired term): (x)Tommy Whiteley, 87 (65.9%); Jimmy D. Hightower 45 (34.1%) Milfay school $995,000 bond issue for renovation of the school building and new playground equipment. Yes 96 (59.6%); No 65 (40.4%). Failed.

CUSTER

Arapaho-Butler schools $6.5 million bond issue to build four classrooms/safe rooms, an athletic complex and entryways. Yes 451 (66.6%); No 226 (33.4%). Passed.

GARFIELD COUNTY Town of Covington A proposal to make permanent a one-cent sales tax that is set to expire June 30. The money would be used for buying vehicles and equipment and making improvements related to water, sewer, gas, streets and alleys. Yes 36 (100%); No 0 (0%). Passed.

GRADY COUNTY

Pioneer schools $305,000 bond issue to buy interactive white board devices, called Intelliboards, and software for 10 classrooms so every classroom in the school will have them, and to renovate the roof over four buildings. Yes 67 (91.8%); No 6 (8.2%). Passed.

MCCLAIN COUNTY

Wayne schools Proposition 1: $690,000 bond issue for a music and band room and repairing and remodeling school buildings. Yes 146 (78.5%); No 40 (21.5%). Passed. Proposition 2: $235,000 bond issue for three buses. Yes 148 (79.6%); No 38 (20.4%). Passed. Town of Goldsby Proposition 1: A 1-cent sales tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 48 (52.7%); No 43 (47.3%). Passed. Proposition 2: A 1-cent excise tax increase to repair roads and make water system improvements. Yes 43 (46.7%); No 49 (53.3%). Failed.

Sales tax collections bring officials hope BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

Oklahoma City Manager Jim Couch said Tuesday the city has received its first positive sales tax check in more than a year. Couch told city council members at Tuesday’s meeting that sales tax revenues are up for the first time in 15 months. “It was both over target and over last year’s collections,” Couch said. Low sales tax revenues have led to budget cuts and a staff recommendation the city cut 100 jobs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The full report on the May sales tax check, which includes collections for the last half of March and the first half of April, will be presented later this month. Couch said he is cautious but hopeful that the city’s revenue problems could be over. “Last year’s collections were down, and one month does not a trend make,” Couch said. “But that being said, it’s good to get a positive check and it will be interesting to see if it can be a trend.”

ONLINE Continuing coverage Read more election-related news on our politics page. NEWSOK.COM/POLITICS

OKLAHOMA COUNTY

City of Harrah City Council, Ward 2: Todd DeWolfe, 2 (0.9%); Carolyn Janette Allen, 25 (11.5%); (x) Tom Barron, 118 (54.1%); Jason O’Dell 73 (33.5%). Proposition: To extend terms for city council members and the mayor to four years from two years. Yes 72 (36%); No 128 (64%). Failed. City of Midwest City City Council, Ward 3 runoff: Espaniola Bowen, 133 (33.7%); (x) Rick Dawkins, 262 (66.3%).

OKFUSKEE COUNTY

Boley school Proposal to annex into the Okemah School District. Yes 87 (82.1%); No 19 (17.9%). Passed.

PAYNE COUNTY

City of Stillwater Proposal to recall Mayor Nathan Bates from office. Yes 2,226 (50.0%); No 2,230 (50.0%). Failed.

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY

North Rock Creek school $6.7 million bond issue to build a 12-room middle school and a gymnasium/activity center, and to resurface the elementary school parking lot. Yes 157 (80.9%); No 37 (19.1%). Passed.

STEPHENS COUNTY

Bray-Doyle schools Proposition 1: $295,000 bond issue to replace the multipurpose building roof; make heating and air conditioning improvements; install high school lockers and door locks throughout the district; and electrical work in the high school and junior high. Yes 122 (76.2%); No 38 (23.8%). Passed. Proposition 2: $140,000 bond issue for two school buses. Yes 129 (80.1%); No 32 (19.9%). Passed.

TULSA COUNTY

Sperry schools Proposition 1: $4.3 million bond issue for heating and air conditioning units; roof, wall and collapsed drain repairs at the middle school; replace textbooks, classroom computers and software; upgrade athletic facilities and equipment; replace band uniforms, instruments and other music supplies; and to upgrade the district’s computer network and security cameras. Yes 393 (83.4%); No 78 (16.6%). Passed. Proposition 2: $865,000 bond issue for eight school buses and other school vehicles. Yes 401 (85.9%); No 66 (14.1%). Passed.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

SCOGGINS Jean-Paul Scoggins was born November 8, 1926 in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Paul and Bess Scoggins. He passed away May 11, 2010. He attended Kentucky Military Academy and graduated from Old Classen High School in Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City University. He maintained a lifelong interest in sailing, travel and music and had so many friends that loved him dearly. He is preceded in death by his longtime friend, Jim Jackson and parents, Paul and Bess and step-mother, Ruby Butler Scoggins. Survivors include his sister, Catherine Butler Pendley of Edmond and brother, Virgil Butler of Oklahoma City and faithful caretaker, Joy Pendley of Norman and nieces/nephews and grandnieces/nephews. J.P. will be missed by all. A Memorial Graveside service will be held at Rose Hill Burial Park at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, 2010.

SEVERS Georgia Pauline Severs, 89, passed away on May 9, 2010. She was born October 8, 1920 in Konawa, Oklahoma, to Marvin and Beulah Harrell. She is survived by her daughters: Judy Talley and her husband, Lindell of OKC and Patty McCrabb of Edmond, OK. She is also survived by grandchildren: Jeff Bowman, Michael Talley, Jeremy Talley, Jamie Talley, Mindy Hobbs, Blake McCrabb, Kelly Van Meter and Matt Canfield; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barto Severs; and her daughter, Jerry Elizabeth Canfield. Pauline was a dedicated Mother and Grandmother and loved her family deeply. She will be remembered for her caring heart, a listening ear and unconditional love that brought comfort and encouragement to all her family. Services will be 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 12, 2010, at the Guardian-West Dignity Memorial Chapel; interment following at Rose Hill Burial Park.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

WEST Jackie Abel West made her transition from life on May 4, 2010. It was important to Jackie that this not be a “sad” moment, but one filled with memories of a life well spent. Now she’s gone We know not where. If we had to guess, She’s just up in the air! Jackie was born in Deadwood, South Dakota on July 2, 1935. In 1953 she moved with her family to Oklahoma City, where she lived the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three lovely daughters and made a rich and enduring contribution to Oklahoma City’s cultural community. Jackie’s life was filled with an appreciation of the theatre, art, good food, good books, her many friends, the New York Times Sunday Crossword, and much fun and laughter. Jackie’s house was always a gathering place, and every holiday, birthday and special occasion was celebrated with Jackie’s great cooking and touches only she could add. With Jackie’s birthday falling on July 2, the 4th of July was always an especially festive occasion, with friends and family from across the country celebrating around her backyard pool. Jackie was a rabid Democrat, an errant Episcopalian, and a lifelong cat lover. In the last two years of life she adopted Rose Louise, an elderly Dachshund, who gave her much joy. Jackie also was known for adopting human “strays”, as well. There are so many people whom Jackie considered a part of her “family”. Her generous soul inspired one family to name their daughter after her. In 1962 Jackie joined the volunteer force working to start a summer musical theatre company, which eventually became Lyric Theatre. In her 22 years with Lyric, Jackie was a major and guiding force in its success. She created the original box office set-up and procedures, staffing and supervising it for the next nine years. In her first 17 years as a volunteer and Board Member, she was President of the Lyric Guild for two years, and Vice President of the Board of Directors for two years. In 1980 Jackie became Executive Director of the organization, where she served until 1984, leading an enthusiastic, exciting and very successful period of Lyric Theatre history. Jackie also lent her energy and expertise to many other arts organizations in Oklahoma City. For 35 years she worked on the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s Festival of the Arts, chairing almost every volunteer committee available at one time or another. In the mid-70’s Jackie helped to create and build The Company, the volunteer arm of the Oklahoma Theatre Center (now Stage Center), serving as President for the first three years. She also served on the Board of Jewel Box Theatre for two terms, and on the Board of the Arthritis Foundation. In 2000, Jackie became a Founding Member and architect of the Board of Directors of Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, a fully-professional, Equity-affiliated theatre company, serving as the first President of the Board. She was particularly proud of the fact that CityRep ended each of their eight seasons to date in the black, an accomplishment that is a direct result of Jackie’s board development and leadership. Jackie’s professional career also included serving as Executive Director of the Oklahoma Cancer Information Service, State Director of Public Relations for Weight Watchers of Oklahoma, and Marketing Representative for INTEGRIS Health. She volunteered as a Water Safety Instructor for the American Red Cross for 35 years, and taught over 3,000 children to swim from her backyard pool. Jackie was preceded in death by her father and mother Albert Arthur Abel and Hazel Ruby (Kane) Abel, brother Robert Abel, nephew Craig Abel, niece Tamara (Abel) Hendrix, and the father of her daughters William H. West. She is survived by brother Richard Abel; sister-in-law Judy Abel; daughter Wendy West of New York City and Los Angeles; daughter Kim Sprouse Clements and husband Richard Clements of Oklahoma City; daughter Brooke West and Dave Cleasby of Elkhorn, Nebraska; grandchildren Benjamin Sprouse, Whitney Pentzien, Hayley Pentzien, Andrew Sprouse, Carlyn Pentzien, Taylor Pentzien, Jo Ann Smith, and Jennifer Beagle; two great-grandchildren; and longtime special friend Fred Minter. In the 1990’s Jackie underwent a series of surgeries and reconstructions to relieve oncoming symptoms of osteoarthritis. She would often share with her doctors that “that knee was shot on the concrete steps of Stage Center that shoulder went to hauling ice at the Arts Festival - I got that back injury because of a fall at Lyric”. The history of Oklahoma theatre was buried in the bones of this remarkable and truly amazing architect of Oklahoma City theatre. In lieu of flowers Jackie asked that memorials be made to: The Humane Society of Central Oklahoma or Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre, P.O. Box 1913, OKC, OK 73101. A celebration of Jackie’s life will be held in Kirkpatrick Auditorium on the campus of Oklahoma City University at 2:00 pm on June 5, 2010. ''When you feel your song is orchestrated wrong, Why should you prolong your stay? When the wind and weather blow your dreams sky-high, Sail away, sail away, sail away! - Noél Coward

DUNBAR John Carroll "Half Minnow Mushulatubbee" Dunbar, Jr., 57, of Oklahoma City, OK, passed away May 8, 2010. JC, the son of John Carroll Dunbar, Sr. and stepmother Penny Dunbar, was born November 26, 1952. He attended Capitol Hill H.S. and graduated in 1971. JC was a proud member of the Choctaw tribe. JC met Janet Purcell in 1978 and the two married in 1980. JC's greatest joy was being a father to his two sons. Outside of raising his boys, JC enjoyed OU football, riding motorcycles, camping, and fishing. JC is survived by his father, JC Dunbar Sr.; stepmother, Penny Dunbar; the mother of his sons, Janet Dunbar; his sons, Trey and Donovan Dunbar; daughtersin-law, Melissa Dunbar and Joni Davenport; sister, brother-in-law, and best friends, Kathy and Joe Adams. JC is preceded in death by his mother Cherry Lee and his granny Iva Lee Bond. Services will be held at 2pm, Friday May 14, 2010, at Portland Ave. Baptist Church.

RIDER Tammy Lee Rider born May 2, 1981 passed from us on May 10, 2010 during the tornado outbreak. She was a loving mother, devoted wife, caring sister and loyal daughter. She is survived by her husband, Ricky Rider; 3 children, Jason age 9, Ethan age 3, and Regan age 1; her parents, Cecil & Patricia Creech; 2 brothers, Michael Smith & wife Camrhea and Cecil Creech III; grandmothers, Mary Avery Creech & Voye Mae Smith; numerous family members. Private Family Services. Memorial donations can be made at any Chase Bank or The Bank of Chickasha in Memory of Tammy.

HONN Linda Sebring Honn went to be with the Lord on May 9, 2010. She was a wonderful Christian mother, wife, sister and grandmother whose love knew no bounds. She was a painter, knitter and potter. She was born on October 24, 1944 in Crescent, Oklahoma to Frank and Marian Sebring. She received an Associate's Degree in Nursing and practiced in Texas and Oklahoma for 35 years. Not only was she a loving and caring nurse to her patients but to her family as well. Married to Jack Honn for 43 years, she is survived by children, grandchildren, sister, mother, nieces and nephews. She will be missed more than words can say. Funeral Services will be held at Covenant Life Church on May 15, at 2 PM, 3106 North Utah in Oklahoma City. SMITH Della Fay Smith, 95, was born at Stoneburg, Montague County, Texas on January 6, 1915 to William and Frances Tennessee Brown. She grew up on the family farm by Bowie Lake. She was preceded in death by her husband, C. G. Smith; her parents and twelve siblings and two grandsons. She earned a cosmetology license in Wichita Falls, Texas and owned beauty shops in Davis, Wilburton and Oklahoma City, all in Oklahoma. Those left to cherish her memory are son and his wife, Harold and Tammy Clary of Duncan, Oklahoma; daughter and her husband, Sandra and Jerry Rock of Papillion, Nebraska. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, thirteen great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 10:00 A.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Resthaven Memory Gardens.

HESS Gabrielle Marie Hess 7-15-1959 - 5-9-2010 Daughter of William and Mary Louise Hess, Gabrielle passed away Sunday morning. She grew up in the city, graduated from Northwest Classen High School and attended local colleges. A devoted mother. Gabrielle took joy in creating beauty around herself, her home and her flower garden. With a smile and kind word our Gabby was a friend to all who knew her. A special thanks for the nurses at Medical Plaza Dialysis. She is survived by her mother and by her son Devon Garcia. Also surviving relatives are her uncle C.B. Self, her aunts Edna Drake, Dorothy Cowles and Doris Traub, and many beloved cousins. She was preceded in death by her son Stephen Hess, brother Charles Hess and her father. No immediate services are planned, but the family welcomes notes or cards of condolences at 3800 NW 60, OKC, OK 73112. STOWE Charles Stowe, 57, passed away May 9, 2010. He was born January 7, 1953, in Del City, OK to Raymond and Ida Stowe who preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Trena Stowe; son, Jonathan Smith; 2 brothers, Walter Stowe and Harry Stowe and wife Cathy of Del City; 2 sisters, Linda Neely and husband Steve and Katie Forester of Del City and husband Bob of Oklahoma City. Funeral Services will be 2:00 p.m. Thursday, May 13, 2010 at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home of Del City with interment to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisen hourfuneral.com

JAMES MARY BELLE JAMES 1922 - 2010 Mary Belle James, a longtime resident of Muskogee, OK, went to be with our dear Lord on Saturday, the 8th of May, 2010. For the past two years Mary was a beloved resident of the Assisted Living Center in the Baptist Retirement Village of Oklahoma City. She was known for her contagious humor, positive attitude, and self-propelled fast-wheeling walker! Born December 5, 1922 in Tahlequah (Pumpkin Hollow), Cherokee County, OK, to Theo and Minnie Martha Phillips. Mary was one of seven children. In 1940, she married her true love, General Aurdverl (GA) James of Tahlequah, and together the Lord blessed them with wonderful children: Barbara J. Giles of Oklahoma City, Jerry and the late Faye James of Muskogee, and Jeanette Morgan of Tulsa. Mary, a Pastor's wife and organizer of church events for many years, loved people and cherished the opportunity to help others. Longing for higher education and another way to serve others, especially children, Mary started back to school at the age of 40 and realized her dream receiving a BA and Master's Degree in Education from Northeastern State University. She taught Muskogee children at Pershing Elementary and Grant Foreman Elementary before retiring after 17 rewarding years. She is fondly remembered by many former students as well as church members, dear neighbors on Kershaw Drive, and many other friends. “Granny” will always be remembered by her family and friends as the container of never ending smiles and laughter and truly a gift God gave us all. Mary is survived by her husband, three children, eight grandchildren and spouses, seven great grandchildren and spouses, and one great-great grandchild. She was much loved by many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Mary was preceded in death by her parents, brother Ray Phillips, sisters Dorothy Daniels, Ruth Burnett, and Seletha Craig. Viewing will be held on Wednesday, the 12th from 6pm to 8pm at Bradley Funeral Service. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Baptist Church at 2:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, 2010. Burial will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muskogee. The family has entrusted Bradley Family Funeral Service of Muskogee with the arrangements. Friends may send condolences to the family on the web page www.bradleyfuner alservice.com

HOGAN Gwen Dene Hogan, 52, of Moore, OK passed away on May 9, 2010. She is survived by children, Chris Montgomery of Del City, OK, Rhada Smith & husband Mark of Moore, OK, Julie Collins & husband Jason of Wellington, TX, Tim Roberts & wife Trisha of Claude, TX, Holly Johnson & husband Vance of Amarillo, TX, B.J. Hogan of OKC, OK, Ashly Hogan of Norman, OK, Megan Hogan of Claude, TX and Tyler Hogan of Moore, OK; grandchildren Angelia, Jeffrey, Michael, Trinity, Haylee and Cayden; brother, Ronnie Kerr & wife Donna of Amarillo, TX; and many other loving relatives and friends. Gwen is preceded in death by her parents, Bill & Imogene Kerr and brother, Dale Kerr. Private family services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

TURNER Charley Ray Turner, 85, passed away Monday, May 10, 2010, in OKC, OK. He was born September 8, 1924 to John and Lula Terry Turner in Valliant, OK. Charley was a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church. He was employed by the Civilian Conservation Corp. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd. Class. He then worked as a heavy-duty equipment diesel mechanic. Charley is survived by his wife, Evelyn; three daughters, Mary Jenkins, Kathie Shock, Barbara Bang; three sons, Mark and wife Lisa Turner, Kevin Frost, Gary and Belinda Frost; two brothers, James Turner and Herbert and Lonnie Turner; 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, 2 great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, first wife Gene, several brothers, and sisters. Funeral services will be held 2:00 P.M. Thursday, May 13, 2010, at the Asbury United Methodist Church. Interment will follow at the Resthaven Memory Gardens Cemetery.

WELSH James Robert Welsh, 75, Noble, died Friday, May 7, 2010, in Norman. He graduated from OU with a BS in Physics. He did graduate work at OU, serving as a graduate assistant in physics, and completed graduate work at USC, resulting in an MS. He was chief of NASA’s X-15 Research Project Office and senior aerospace flight research engineer at Edwards AFB. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He later worked for the Air Force as an engineer at Kelly AFB, San Antonio, serving as: branch chief supervising engineers and technicians supporting the C-5 cargo aircraft worldwide; as chief of the price appraisal division; chief of the engineering division; chief of the C-5A wing modification branch: and C-5A project engineer. He attended the Air Force School of Logistics. He co-authored “Flight Test Experience with Adaptive Flight Control,” and “Experience with the X-15 Adaptive Flight Control.” Jim was listed in Who’s Who in Aviation 1973. He was a member of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Cleveland County and Oklahoma anthropological societies, SAR, OU Alumni Association, Mayes County Genealogical Society, Mayes County Historical Society, Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, Air Force Association, was a 32nd Mason, and he served in the US Army reserves. He formerly served as board member of the Alamo Area and Alamo Heights aquatics associations, San Antonio. He was a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Norman. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Frank and Francis Katherine Griffin Welsh; and daughter, Pamela Jeanne Welsh. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy D. Butler Welsh; son, James Michael; daughter, Julie M. Stratton; and brother, Dr. Thomas J. Welsh. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 15, at Bethel Baptist Church in Norman, 1717 West Lindsey. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a favorite charity.

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LOCKWOOD Joyce Ann Lockwood of Duncan, Oklahoma passed away in Boulder, Colorado on Friday, May 7, 2010. A retired school teacher, Joyce was a cherished grandmother, sister, friend and mother. She was born in Maud, Oklahoma on August 17, 1929 to Gilbert Rufus Medlock, a driller for the Magnolia Oil Company and Euvle Fay (LaFevers) Medlock. The first of four daughters, her sisters include Joan Bailey of Craig, Colorado, and twin sisters LaWanda Smith of Tishomingo, Oklahoma and LaNeta Dodd of Milburn, Oklahoma. After graduating from Milburn High School, Joyce enrolled in Murray State College in the business administration program where she met her future husband J.D. Lockwood of Ringling. Married in 1950 in Wichita Falls, Texas, the newlyweds moved to Stillwater where she worked for the agricultural extension service while he finished his undergraduate degree at Oklahoma A&M. After moving to Anadarko, Joyce worked in the Bureau of Indian Affairs office. They also had their first child, Jerry, while living there and moved to Norman the following year. A second son, Jon, was born in 1960 in Norman during their twelve years there. Next was a move to Hobart where they lived until 1967. The move to Duncan in 1967 led Joyce to a brief career as a special education teacher’s aide and a return to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts in Chickasha and the completion of her BS in Math Education. Joyce enjoyed a 19 year career as a math teacher in the Duncan, Oklahoma school system teaching primarily Algebra. Joyce is survived by her two sons and their wives, Jerry & Martha Lockwood of Boulder, Colorado and Jon and Alicia Lockwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma; grandchildren including, Jared Lockwood, Esq. of Denver, Colorado, Jocelyn Meyers and husband Dan Meyers of New Orleans, Louisiana, Lacey Lockwood of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Landra Lockwood of Tulsa. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband J.D., sister Joan Bailey, parents Doug and Cindy Medlock of Milburn, in-laws Cecil and Maude Lockwood of Ringling, brothers-in-law Pete Bailey of Craig, CO, Joe Lockwood of Spokane, WA, Robert J. Smith of Tishomingo, sistersin-law Betty Lockwood, Houston, TX and Mary Lou Lockwood of Spokane, WA. Funeral services will be held 1:30pm, Thursday, May 13, at First Baptist Church, Duncan, OK. Viewing and arrangements by Grantham Funeral Home, Duncan, OK. LYNN Robert Thomas Lynn Jan. 15, 1931 - May 2, 2010 Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, OK on Thursday, May 13, 2010, at 7pm. More information on Bob's life at realconometrics.com

Alice Ann (Hays) Melton June 2, 1949 - May 12, 2009 We promise to hold your memory and spirit alive in our hearts forever. "Everyday is a lifetime without you" Forever my love, Your husband Jack and family. 2, 4, 6 or 8 spaces at Memorial Park Cemetery. In section 11, Lot #102, spaces 5 & 6 and/or lot #101, spaces 1-6. The spaces normally sell for $2795 each but willing to sell for $1500 per space or obo. Seller anxious to sell, so please contact Jeff 405-612-7488

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VI

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

City doctor wins $15M in Botox case BY NOLAN CLAY Staff Writer nclay@opubco.com

A jury Tuesday awarded $15 million to an Oklahoma City doctor who said she suffered botulism poisoning after using the popular anti-wrinkle drug Botox. The Oklahoma County jury found 9-3 that Allergan Inc., the maker of Botox Cosmetic, was negligent. In civil cases, at least nine jurors must agree. Jurors voted 10-2 to give Dr. Sharla Helton $15 million in actual damages. They did not award punitive damages. “Hopefully, now people will wake up to the real dangers,” Helton, 48, said of the negligence verdict. “It’s a stepping stone for now for public awareness.” Her attorney, Ray Chester, of Austin, Texas, said, “I think there’s a lot of

Dr. Sharla Helton in 2006

people out there that have been hurt by the product and maybe now they’ll have the courage to come forward.” The California company plans to appeal. “The negligence verdict … is inconsistent with all credible scientific and medical evidence,” said a company spokeswoman, Caroline Van Hove. “Botox does not cause botulism.” Helton complained of severe side effects after getting injections of 50 units of

Botox Cosmetic on July 14, 2006. It was her fifth treatment for wrinkles. She eventually sold her medical practice and stepped down as medical director of Lakeside Women’s Hospital in Oklahoma City because of pain and weakness. Attorneys for Botox told jurors the drug does not cause botulism. They also told jurors the doctor never had botulism. They said the diagnosis of botulism came from her friends, who are not experts. The trial took three weeks. Jurors were deadlocked 8-4 at one point Monday night after hours of deliberations. They deliberated about three hours more Tuesday. The jury found Tuesday in Allergan’s favor on a second claim against it – that its product was somehow defective. A key issue in the trial

was whether Allergan gave sufficient warning in product labeling about possible problems from Botox Cosmetic use. The labeling in 2006 did not include botulism. “All they care about is sales,” Chester told jurors in closing arguments Monday. “They were intentionally concealing this evidence.” Allergan’s attorney, Vaughn Crawford of Arizona, argued that “every known and even remotely

possible side effect was in the labeling.” He said the warning in 2006 even included the possibility of death. He said Helton still was willing to use it. Jurors were instructed they could find negligence if they decided Allergan failed to act like “a reasonably careful pharmaceutical company would” under similar circumstances. One juror told The Oklahoman that the jury found negligence because Allergan’s

2006 product labeling did not have adequate information about side effects. The juror said the jury came to that conclusion after comparing a 2006 label with the 2009 label. Millions have used Botox since the Food and Drug Administration first approved it in 1989. Helton said Tuesday she is still debilitated by weakness but hopes to get back to practicing medicine again in some way.


STATE

TORNADO DAMAGE

Enough is enough

After the storm

Reports of public drunkenness during the daytime, assaults and other problems have Bricktown Association saying enough is enough to the annual Cancer Crawl.

Love’s says it will rebuild its store, which was demolished by a tornado Monday. Also damaged were another truck stop, a Sonic, a grocery story and construction company. PAGE 3B

PAGE 2B

CONSTRUCTION

BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT | FUNDS WILL GO TO 4 COMPANIES TO HELP EFFORT

OKLAHOMA HAS FEWER UPSIDE-DOWN MORTGAGES THAN ANY OTHER STATE

State remains afloat in underwater market BY ROBERT EVATT Tulsa World robert.evatt@tulsaworld.com

BY SUSAN SIMPSON Business Writer ssimpson@opubco.com

Four companies have joined the Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program and pledge to create 633 new jobs here within the next decade. Paycom Payroll plans to add 414 jobs in Oklahoma City. Paycom processes payroll by the Internet for small and midsize businesses across the country. The company is building a new headquarters near Memorial Road and Rockwell Avenue, said CEO Chad Richison. The company will qualify for rebates of $4.5 million from the state. Richison said he expects to add 400 jobs in the next three years. The company employs 380 now in offices along Northwest Expressway.

B THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010

Quality Jobs set to add 600 spots

TOPPING IT OUT

Although millions of people owe more on their homes than they’re worth, Oklahoma has the lowest percentage of upsidedown mortgages in the country. Just 5.9 percent of Oklahoma homeowners, or

23,724 mortgage holders out of a total of 402,187 recorded, have negative equity on their homes, according to a survey released Tuesday by business data company CoreLogic. The state’s number is well below the national average of 23.7 percent.

ALSO ... LOWEST NEGATIVE EQUITY 1. Oklahoma .................................................5.9 percent 2. New York ....................................................7 percent 3. Montana...................................................7.3 percent 4. Pennsylvania ...........................................7.4 percent 5. North Dakota .............................................8 percent SOURCE: CORELOGIC

IN BRIEF

MARKETS Coverage, 5B [ DOW JONES 36.88, 10,748.26 X NASDAQ 0.64, 2,375.31 [ OIL $0.43, $76.37 [ NATURAL GAS $0.039, $4.131 [ CATTLE $0.27, $96.52 X WHEAT $0.101⁄2, $5.39

MARKET DIVE UNDER REVIEW The head of the Securities and Exchange Commission told a congressional panel that regulators need more time to figure out what caused last week’s stock market plunge. SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro, shown above, said her agency has yet to pinpoint the exact reason for the selloff that sent the Dow Jones industrial average falling nearly 1,000 points in less than half an hour. The agency’s review found no evidence of terrorist activity or computer hacking. Jim Beres, right, and Allen Vollmer, middle, both with Good Guys Construction, on Tuesday show Eric Ingram, owner of Aegis Roofing, temporary roof repairs made to a home in Moore. The home was damaged in the severe weather Monday. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

LOCAL CONTRACTORS WARN OF THREAT FROM SCAMMERS BY PAULA BURKES Business Writer pburkes@opubco.com

$602M spent so far Borets-Weatherford US is a supplier of oil-field submersible and industrial pumping systems. The company is opening a research and development center in Tulsa and plans to add 50 jobs. And a new Tulsa company, Bearwood Concepts — which manufactures fixtures for retail stores — plans to employ 125 people. The company’s customers include Macy’s, Dillards and Saks Fifth Avenue. Bearwood will qualify for rebates of $1.35 million. The Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program provides quarterly cash payments of up to 5 percent of new taxable payroll directly to a qualifying company for up to 10 years. Since its debut in July 1993, the state has issued more than 555 contracts to locating, expanding and startup businesses, and paid out more than $602 million in performancebased wage rebates.

PAGE 4B

SEE MORTGAGE, BACK PAGE

Some jobs pay $100K Paycom is hiring 10 to 15 new employees each month. Jobs will include client specialists, software developers, managers, business developers and human resources employees. Pay ranges from about $35,000 annually to more than $100,000. “I think Quality Jobs makes it easier for us to expand,” Richison said. “We operate without debt and sometimes you have to hire ahead of revenue.” The other new Quality Jobs companies are from Tulsa. Road Science, a technology supplier to the road paving industry, plans to add 44 jobs, qualifying it for rebates of $1.29 million. Road Science helps other firms procure specified asphalt products and locate licensed contractors for construction.

Oklahoma Medical Research Fund has topped out its new tower with a piece of structural steel, signed by all of its employees.

Though it took only seconds for Monday’s storms to ravage hundreds of homes and businesses across central Oklahoma, property owners should take their time in hiring roofers and other contractors to repair the damage, say experts in the homebuilding industry. Consumers should be wary of potentially shady storm chasers who invariably will pour into the area, said Mike Curtis, owner of Crossroads Roofing Supply. “If they’re not from here, you run the risk of putting a roof on, something going wrong and their not being able to come back to fix it,” Curtis said.

Watch low bids Moreover, low bids, he said, could come from thieves who stole their materials from others’ driveways and roofs. Such robberies have occurred within the past several weeks in the metro area, Curtis said. “Say a reputable company offers to roof your house for $15,000, and a company you’ve never heard of says they’ll do it for $10,000. Just asking where they got their stuff could stop you from contracting thieves,” he said. Eric Ingram, co-owner of Aegis

Jim Beres, left, and Allen Vollmer, right, of Good Guys Construction, working with Aegis Roofing, on Tuesday look at temporary roof repairs done at a home in Moore.

Roofing, advises homeowners against signing anything they don’t understand or paying upfront for work. “A contractor may say, ‘Sign this so we can take a look at your roof,’ and the document could say they’re the sole contractor to do work on your roof,” Ingram said. Reputable contractors, he said, should have an ample credit line to cover materials and labor. Mark Dale, president of the CenSEE DAMAGE , PAGE 3B

AVOIDING SHADY CONTRACTORS

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