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Issue 1, August 2010

Avaunt-Grad Dark Beauty

Art Fashion Music Photography & More

DANCING DOLLS & TOYS Justin Monroe

Plastic Martyr The Man Behind the Pose

Underworld Creatures CASSIDY HALEY & The Sunshine Rebels

Album Release “The Fool”

Topher Adam


What’s the issue

COVER: JUSTIN MONROE

PAGE 07 - WHITE WITCH SPELLS PAGE 08 - XAVIER LOPEZ JR PAGE 18 - CLASSIC MONSTERS PAGE 20 - UGLY DOLLS PAGE 26 - BUNNY LEBOWSKI PAGE 34 - DIGITAL DECISIVENESS PAGE 40 - GOLDEN EMPIRE CLOTHING PAGE 46 - CASSIDY HALEY PAGE 52 - NIMA’S CLOSET TIPS PAGE 54 - KALLIOPE AMORPHUS PAGE 57 - CHI LUM PAGE 62 - ROBIN HOWLAND PAGE 68 - JUSTIN MONROE PAGE 80 - PLASTIC MARTYR PAGE 82 - ANNIE MCKELVE PAGE 90 - TOPHER ADAM PHOTOGRAPHY

Staff Topher Adam Busenburg - Editor-in-Chief, Artist, Photographer, Owner Carl Chen - Online Editor, Web Developer, Designer Nima Shiraz - Style Editor, Content Scout, Model

Contributors Michelle Gallagher - Resident Witch Steve Le Vine - The GrapeVine PR Agency Dark Beauty Magazine 3405 Helen Street, #3 Emeryville, CA 94608 415-350-5074 darkbeautymagazine@gmail.com www.darkbeautymag.com


From the Top Bitch For as long as I’ve considered myself a creative little shit, my attempts to get my artwork recognized and appreciated have been faced with countless obstacles. So I have finally decided: FUCK THIS! I am going to do this my way. That is how I have come up with the idea of this magazine; a self promoting magazine featuring several artist ads and articles. I mean, what better way to help unknown, but immensely talented artists get exposure? For that matter, I consider Dark Beauty essentially a peoples’ magazine. The primary goal of this adventure is to provide struggling talented artists out there in the world with the means through which they can promote their work. Artists who would have no idea how to get their voices heard otherwise. There is nothing better than being part of a likeminded artist community that not only shares a common interest, but also has a style that causes onlookers to think about what it is that they are looking at. I may be the founding editor and owner of this magazine; however, I am offering photographers, fashion designers, musicians, tattoo artists, models, dancers and many other forms of artists a platform to promote themselves, and the opportunity to draw an audience to their galleries, online studios, and Facebook pages. Art is and has always been subjective. Who is to say that a certain style is better than others? That while some have that extra edge needed to get noticed or hung in a gallery, while others don’t? Fuck that shit! I don’t play that game. I think we are all the same. We do this for the love of expressing who we are; and the output is art unlike anybody else’s. For as many styles of art that are out there, there are as many faces that make them happen. Dark Beauty isn’t your stereotypical magazine offering content that we see in most readily available periodicals out there oh so many times that we no longer even care to notice. It’s a magazine about real people, real stories, real clothes and real art for the people who love dark glamour, gore and wicked fashion. If Elle magazine or Marie Clare don’t like our shit, then I say that we need to stand up for ourselves and put something out there that recognizes talented artists that any of the common masses would. We just do it differently and nothing can stop us from living the dream of being published artists that are seen, heard and/or watched. What one does for another is what makes the world go around. This is not only about taking; it is also about giving equally. Here is how we do it: We feature your work in our magazine and ask you to join forces with us to help us get as many copies sold as possible. We offer available space to photographers, fashion designers and all other forms of artists to feature their work on a first comes, first serves basis. In return, we ask you (the artist) to place a link to our magazine‘s website on your own websites, fan pages and social networking profiles such as MySpace, Facebook and other known platforms through which you can help

promote us and also many other deserving talented artists that are featured in the same magazine. They will do the same for you. We are constantly discovering amazing talents, interviewing them and featuring their work and thoughts, monitoring their progress and accomplishments and at times, featuring full pages spreads of them. So, who knows? Any of you contributors may have the opportunity to feature even more of your talent in our upcoming issues. Our largest, most highly anticipated and celebrated issue will be Halloween. Dark Glamour Gore all the way baby! Following that will be our second largest issue: The Twisted Xmas. We plan to featuring the real twisted views on the holiday season. That surely promises to make some t r a d i t i o n a l h o l i d a y b e l i e v e r s o u t t h e re s l i g h t l y uncomfortable. Again, we thank you for buying our magazine. If you are an artist, or have many friends who are; please tell them about us. Let them know that we hear them and understand that it takes a community to make something like this happen. I am highly optimistic that Dark Beauty has the potential to become one of the largest resource centric and social magazines out there. Yours wickedly, Topher Adam Editor-in-Chief


Dark Beauty Magazine Dark Beauty is a magazine dedicated to artists, fashion designers, photographers, musicians, and actors who crave dark glamour. We provide a new avenue for promoting new and exciting talents who dares to push the envelope and bring such fantasies to life.  Our focus is to highlight and bring awareness to bold talents from the darker side of the arts community. Featured talents can share their latest projects and audience can gain insight into their creative minds.   Advertisements are free for those who also promote Dark Beauty on related websites, public functions, and online social networks.   We believe such partnerships will increase magazine readership and media exposure for the talents. Audience Our core audience is artists, music lovers, fashionistas, and art enthusiasts who are ages 18 and above.  We also place emphasis on peer-to-peer interactivity through easy references case studies, tutorials, and DIY projects. Forecast We envision Dark Beauty becoming an industry-influencing magazine, with an emphasis for the unconventional at its core.   Our magazine seeks novel methods to bring broader visibility to all, especially emerging talents.   Dark Beauty strives to provide full-page imagery, engaging stories, and comprehensive references to the dark arts community. Dark Beauty will publish 12 issues and a limited edition book each year.   The two special issues are the frightfully fun and exuberant “Dark Gore” Halloween issue, and the phantasmagoric “Dark ‘Holla’-Daze,” Christmas issue. Throughout the year, we will be continuously acquiring, cataloging, and selecting fresh and compelling contributions to feature in our annual limited edition, hardcover book.   The book will be a celebration of Dark Beauty talents and their exquisite work.   We hope the book will award the talents with the recognition they deserve. Proceeds from magazine sales will be invested into the growth of Dark Beauty.   We hope to see a gradual growth of readership and contributors alike in the coming months.   We also believe Dark Beauty will prosper and soar with each successive issue.

Topher Adam Photography Model Carl Chen Stylist Skull ‘n Crossbows MUA Miss Makeup


Setting Intentions By Krafty Kitty the Resident White Witch Six days a week, my job doesn’t let me escape people’s woes, mishaps, misfortunes or miseries – whether it’s my coworkers or customers. By far, the economy has made this daily event even more poignant. Sure I can smile back and offer kind words perhaps a bit of advice in hopes that someone hears me when

they are washing their pain down with whatever cocktail they ordered. But the verdict is out: people are in pain. As of late, life has also pelted with me with both lemons and grapefruits. Sure I could saddle up to the other side of the bar and drown my reality with Grey Goose but I choose and continue to remain grounded by holding on to my spirituality. However, that being said, I don’t give my pain or troubles up to the universe and wish that it ultimately will be taken care

of for me or that karma will soon find it’s way back to my doorstep in a prettier, more palatable package either. I am a firm believer that if you believe in yourself and you make it happen then you ultimately will be blessed. You can’t sit on the couch and pray your pain away. You have to have a strong hand along with your God or Goddess in your heart in making your destiny. To keep my head above chaos unfolding around me, I sat down beneath the light of the new moon and thought about what it is that could change in my life – ultimately, what I could change. I made a list and then narrowed it down some. Next I browsed through the pages of magazines for pictures of what most resonates with what it is that I want from this life, cut out some images and creatively placed them on the page with my desires. While this may sound familiar – like doing a vision board, I kept the images in my notebook and focused on the language that I used to hone in on my objective. An intention is not a wish. It has way more meat and weight than that. It’s an aim, a plan of purpose. Sure your world may be falling apart around you or things could seem completely out of your control, but if you intend for it to be better than the ball is rolling. I know it’s easier said than done, but forget a second about what’s happening around you. Get really clear about what you want to happen. See it and then call on the Gods, the Goddess to seal it with their blessing as you feel the joy and excitement of the outcome setting in. If you’d like to deepen the experience, inscribe your intention on a white candle. Safely burn the wax until it’s out. Focus on the flame and how it represents your purpose.


By: Mckenna Rose The streets of Seattle at midnight are an amazing place, teeming with artists roaming the urban landscape. In Seattle, every artist worth paying any attention to is born with wheatpaste, spray paint and a brush in hand. Home to such artistic luminaries as Ego, Ryan Henry Ward and Weirdo—Seattle has an incredible art scene that has been growing exponentially over the past several years. In the thick of it is Xavier Lopez Jr. “Cool,” “Urban,” “Goth,” “Kawaii,” “Pop Surrealist” or whatever definition you might want to come up with, Lopez’ artistic style crosses over many boundaries and unsettles them all. Most recently, Lopez’ work has been described as “gleefully disturbing,” a cross between very old Fleischer cartoons and their animated nightmares, giving us a glimpse into the disquieting world that we all invent for ourselves before we have a chance to make sense of the universe and its vast contradictions. Lopez’ paintings are a foray into this other world. As if tumbling through a wormhole, the viewer is disoriented and while seeking to make sense of the i m a g e s b e f o re h i m , emotions quickly override any single interpretation. When I came upon Mr. Lopez, he was setting up an exhibition as part of a group show at the Greenwood Collective. Mr. Lopez’ work is very haunting, but at the same time very playful, even disarming. He actually began as a conceptualist, m i n i m a l i s t s c u l p t o r. Graduating from the University of California, Davis, which is well known for such artists as Bruce Nauman, Lynn Herschmann and Robert Arneson, as well as a lot of the Funk artists like Jim Nutt and Bill T. Wiley. Lopez is an affable, almost shy, man, but with a quick smile and a devious gleam in his eyes which speaks to the creative world that he carries within him. “I think I got a lot of my sense of the absurd and playfulness from not only their spirit,” he says, speaking of the Northern California artists, “but also from meeting and getting to know a few of them. I can tell you that Wayne Theibaud has a very, very wicked, naughty sense of humor—which is surprising, because he looks like such an innocent, like your grandfather and then he comes out with the dirtiest jokes you’ve ever heard. You really can never judge a book by its cover.”

Lopez considered himself to be primarily a sculptor until he spent several years living in Europe, where he would often take canvases to the Bordeaux Art Museum and study the painterly styles of the mannerists. He adds, “I hated painters, it seemed to me in grad school that they were trained monkeys and that the real creation was happening from the sculptors—everything else was just craft. Then I moved to Europe and I saw what could actually be done with paint! I saw my first true Rubens, not in a book, but right in front of me and not just one—but many, and constantly, and then more and more artists, Fragonard, Raphael, Tintoretto, all of the artists that had left me cold in art classes, suddenly came alive and I began to paint and paint and paint—again, for the first time since I used to draw my superheroes as a kid—and nothing was ever the same from there.” Within Lopez’ world there are m a n y landscapes: caves, a vast o c e a n , snowscapes, living trees, and always the sense that one has crossed over into the deep end. “I want viewers of my work to feel as they do just before going over the cliff at S p l a s h Mountain, or to feel the way they did as a child when they found out that Bambi’s mother was about to die. That moment of e x t r e m e consciousness, when everything is so precious and one realizes something very important—which is different for everybody, and which according to Kierkegaard you cannot realize fully and take with you, because to do so would lead to madness.” It is this madness that one can see in the wild-eyed stare that is such a part of Xavier Lopez’ work and permeates the insane smile that sets it apart and draws so many to it, while scaring the hell out of many others. “That smile,” he adds, “that is the void, that is the power-punch that tells the viewer that there is something else going on here.” It is the smile of the Muse and the multi-armed skeleton and it is the darkness behind the Kawaii. Xavier Lopez’ work is not just cute, there is a darkness to it that is as vast as this thing called life and as complex as its obverse. His dreamscapes are filled with pain and wonder, innocence


http://xavierlopezjr.blogspot.com/

A Bigger Splash (Muse in the Deep End)


Inconsolable, and perversity, but mostly a sense of fun that keeps drawing more and more viewers to play in the “Deep End” of his imagination. Continually, growing and evolving, fans of his work never know what to expect from the artist. “I love testing myself, teasing and trying new things, most recently I have been doing a lot of Murals in the Seattle Area with a group of very talented, young artists and I have begun plans to work on a not-so children’s book and even a cartoon based on the Muse and her adventures. This is an amazing time in which it feels as though anything is possible and an artist just needs to put his mind and his imagination into motion to see it through.” Xavier Lopez’ work can be found at various art galleries in the Seattle area, including the Twilight Collective, as well as on many murals, posters and prints. He is also the author of a blog that covers the Alternative to Alternative Art Scene in Seattle for the online “zombie newspaper,” the Seattle Post Intelligencer.

The Birth of the Sorceress

The Ubiquitous Mr. Lovegrove


His Royal Majesty


I am actively seeking magic within the mundane. I am rededicating myself to following my passions. I am Venus as a boy. Freedom, Beauty, Truth and Love... Is a very strange, enchanted boy!

Atomic


Skeleton In the Caves


Ferdinand


Happiest Girl

His Royal Majesty


Classic Monsters

Vicula


Art by: TOPHER ADAM I consider myself a simple artist who loves the darker side of stories. I have always found classic artists and their ability to portray stories using light to be a major source of inspiration for me. When I start working on a new piece, I first think about the direction of light in the room. I consider how classic artists use environment and/or candle lighting. Light is the first element I consider besides the subject of my painting. The difference between my painting and photography is not significant. In either scenario, I seek to capture subject matters that are shadowed and lit by amazing sources of directional lighting as such effect creates depth and gives the outcome a hidden truth. I have only begun creating my new collection and the premise of it is based on classical heroes or foes from the past such as Queen Victoria, Napoleon and King Henry. The unique and exciting aspect of this collection however is the fact that I am taking the form of these individuals and portraying a darker version of what they are typically depicted as based on their actions in their lifetimes. The series is titled “Classic Monsters� which celebrates the wicked sides of these noteworthy individuals and depicts their evil and

The Saint

wicked qualities. Vicula for instance is about Queen Victoria and her positive influence as a very strong figure while sucking so much happiness out of many; hence the vampire reference. Her hands are the intriguing part. She looks lovely, soft and innocent until you notice her hands and the fact that they look as if they could rip you apart. Some of the other pieces in this collection are inspired by the wickedness of the Catholic Church. For instance, one of the paintings titled The Saint is of a nun holding an upside down bat rosary and seemingly proud of her skull trophy. Kripnick is about a royal Russian Czar hiding behind the button eye and then Post Monk Punk. I first started painting button eyes in 1995. I love the notion that even though we may see through our eyes, there could be a doorway to another side of what we are seeing or looking at. My style may be dark and wicked, but it always tells a story. The story of how I perceive each of these characters and interpret the lives that they lived; or the story of how I understand these individuals based on my knowledge of history.

Kripnick

In the end, my style is dark. As it is inspired by and similar to the style of old classics such as Rembrandt, Da Vinci and other classical painters. To view more of my work, please visit my site at www.topheradam.com. For inquires to view my pieces, please send an e-mail to: topheradamphotography@gmail.com

Post Monk Punk


Shyla Uglyshyla Doll An ugly chat about making ugly dolls is so magical.


How the hell did you start making your ugly dolls? I really wish I knew. I think it's just a vocation and I'm stuck with it, Like a calling or a burden. What inspired you? My Dreams, I consider myself a true surrealist in the fact that much of my work is inspired by dream imagery. I'm also inspired by religion and spiritual pursuits. Did you play with girly dolls when you were young? Was it by mistake or by chance that one of them got cracked or broken?   Like all girls I had Barbie and Jem dolls which were popular at the time. The strange thing is that I was never what I'd consider overtly obsessed with dolls. Did you attend an art school? Or is your craft all natural?   I have never had any formal training. I'm self-taught in all areas of sculpting, sewing, wig-making, etc. Who is your favorite artist from the past? Why?   Frida Kahlo. Not only as an artist but what she endured as a woman, and as a human being. Who do you want to be when you grow up? Hell, I don't ever think that far ahead. I'm surprised I have made it this long. I wouldn't mind being Carol Channing for a day! Where do you sell your work? Are they in stores? Do you get request or do your clients hit you up by happenstance?   I sell it through galleries, and in some indie stores when I have the time to make enough stuff to have someone else carry it. My  main source of sales is through my website, www.uglyart.net    I take commissions once in a while. Again it's an issue of if I have enough time to take on commissions and if I really like the idea of what the person wants me to make. I tend to be a selfish person, so the projects I want to do and my personal expression comes first. What dolls have you wanted to make but just haven't yet? What are you waiting on?   I'd love to do more religious artwork. Both catholic and voodoo based. The thing that keeps me from doing more is it's an issue of having the time and money to just drop everything and hole up for months to obsessively freak out over it. One of the things people don't realize about dollmaking is how time consuming it really is.

Do you have any favorite movies? Are they scary, love stories, or comedy? Do movies inspires you? God, I like everything from high art films to really cheesy horror. I try to not get "inspired" from any other artists’ work, be it film, visual art, etc. There are too many people, If you were given an unlimited amount of money, what especially nowadays that just copy other people's work and dreams. Nobody wants to forage their own way and would you do with it and why? I'd likely do what I do now. Spend some of it on living express themselves anymore. comfortably and blow the rest on stupidity and shiny Last question, if you could meet anyone in the world objects. LOL who would it be, and why?   Padre Pio. I'm obsessed with the idea of  stigmatics, and What is your favorite holiday?   for a saint he was a really no bullshit kind of guy. Easter, because I'm unnaturally obsessed with Jesus.


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Chloe Woodgate | +44 (0)7969027435 | www. BunnyLebowski .co .uk | myspace : bunnylebowski | twitter : pudding_baby


I've always had a strong interest in the classic portrait, the amazing detail and mysteriousness of the old masters. I started painting around 16. At the same time I started working at a comic book store, which I loved every minute of! I was so mesmerized by the images of zombies, doll-like girls and fantasy, and realized that there was a whole type of 'girl art' catered to my taste, discovering artists like Junko Mizuno and Tara McPherson. I went on to study Fine Art in Birmingham,

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where the portraits started to take on other dimensions, reflecting my interests in film and the macabre. I also experimented with film and sculpture, and although I enjoyed them, they didn't quite have the same feeling to me; so I went back to painting and experimenting more with the medium. My work today hints to all of these elements: horror, beauty, nostalgia and a contrast between realism and gestural painting.

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Digital Denise Denise Humphrey Humphrey Decisiveness?

Innocence Lost


Rokurokubi


Tied Up


Vampire Geisha


Born in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK in 1981, Denise Humphrey studied graphic design and printing along with computer aided art and design, and graduated in 2002. A lot of her digital work is inspired by Japanese art, both modern and traditional.  Her influences include ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) woodblock artists Hishikawa Moronobu and Kitagawa Utamaro  and more modern artists such as Chiho Aoshima, Makoto Muramatsu and Akira Toriyama. Most of these characters are inspired by the  lives, mystery, beauty and tradition of Japanese Geisha, Geiko and  Maiko and others who find themselves in surreal circumstances, which they gracefully endure. Denise tries to integrate the age-old tradition of Japanese scroll painting with the contemporary aesthetics of manga using Adobe Illustrator as a tool to create her art. Website: www.spankyspanglerdesign.co.uk E-mail: denihumphrey@gmail.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/DenisesDigital-Geisha-Art/132922606737876

Demon Geisha


Golden Empire Clothing Company was founded in 2009. The company is a fusion of couture by designer Eazy and art inspired by tattoo artist Calixto Pozo.


DJZAQ.COM DJ ZAQ is a San Francisco Bay Area based DJ with a passion for all that is music. Although his sets primarily centers on electro, house and indie dance, ZAQ mixes many genres of music from nu-disco to Top-40, to vintage jams and everything in between to form a seamless blend of dance friendly beats. When not in the clubs bringing heat to the masses, you can find DJ ZAQ hard at work in his studio, making remixes and edits of great dance-floor tunes.

10 Current Tracks Not On the Top-40 Charts Heating Up The Floors 1. I Got My Eye On You (Nari & Milani Club Mix) - Nari & Milani, Christian Marchi, Lucian

2. My Feelings For You - Avicii, Sebastien Drums 3. C'Mon - Diplo, Tiesto 4. Smart and Clever - Victor Ruiz, Bruno Barudi 5. Some Chords - Deadmau5 6. Waiting For Tonight (DJ's From Mars Remix) - Ekowraith 7. Over (Vanguards Remix) - Drake 8. Barbara Streisand (O-God Remix) - Duck Sauce 9. Blah Blah Blah (Skeet Skeet Remix) - Ke$ha 10. Everything Bad For You Is Good (TLGB Remix) - Kidda


Buy “The Fool” on www.cassidyhaley.com


Cassidy Haley and the Sunshine Rebels The Fool

By: Steve Le Vine Website: www.cassidyhaley.com Welcome to Dark Beauty, Cassidy! We are very excited to have you.    You were born and raised in California’s Bay Area. How much did this area impact whom you have become as a person? 100%. I’d like to think that I would have turned out open-minded and artistic no matter where I was raised, but having a lesbian midwife mother and going to liberal alternative schools gave me a huge platform to be myself and to think creatively about the world. My family was extremely supportive of my life choices, no matter how off the wall they appeared. I owe a lot to that openness.     You spent a few years doing things that many people would be afraid to even think of trying. For example, you hitchhiked barefoot across America, became a Hare Krishna, stripped in gay clubs and performed stilt walking in the circus. Is there anything that you haven't done yet and would like to try? Skydiving and performing my music in huge stadiums with moving stages, high-flying acrobatics and extreme pyrotechnics.       You released your first EP, “Little Boys and Dinosaurs,” last year. It became an instant hit and earned you a nod as a "Top Ten Album of 2009" by the Houston Chronicle, right next to U2, Green Day and Kelly Clarkson. Tell us about this EP. I think I merge worlds that people rarely blend. I've always had this sort of bipolar relationship with scenes. I would go from the pill-popping rave scene in San Francisco with Day-Glo everything and then take off for a few months to a ranch in Colorado in a purple VW bus with my hippie high school friends playing my guitar along the way. These contrasting inspirations really inform my music today. I sing about very real subject matters -- life and loss and struggle -- so it ends up

being sort of like melancholy dance music, which is a very odd combo and I think strikes people as very different.    One of the most interesting facets of your career is the fact that you have such a large team supporting you, which is very rare for an indie musical artist. How large is this team, and how did you find everyone? They found me! I started seeing fan sites popping up and people following me on Twitter, and when I engaged with them, some really dedicated people stepped up to the plate. I requested applications for people to join my street team and handpicked an all-star team from around the country. This team evolved over time to be the driving volunteer force behind my label. The street team, Cassidy Haley’s Army, which has also developed from coast to coast, is amazing and they have been working their butts off to promote my new album.     Do you feel that to be successful in today's world as a musical artist, you also have to have a business mindset as well? Absolutely. I have a fantasy nostalgia for those rock star days of the 80’s. I would love to get high all day and screw hot people and make a billion dollars, but unfortunately those days are over. The record labels are crumbling and the industry has gotten way more intelligent and savvy to the point where being a drugged out rock star is not an option. So I work on spreadsheets all day, instead of doing cocaine. Go figure.


Your newest album, "The Fool," was just released in July. What does this record symbolize to you? This is the culmination of my personal journey of self-discovery. The songs are very introspective and deep to start, and by the end of the record I have found enough of myself to tell a more inclusive tale of growth and transformation.    For "The Fool," you brought in some notable people, such as Chet McCracken, formerly of The Doobie Brothers, and Larry John McNally of The Eagles. Your album was also engineered by Matt Forger, the engineer of Michael Jackson's "Thriller." How did you assemble such a strong team? Who else plays on "The Fool?" This is all because of my producer, Anita Hyde. She found me on Facebook, brought me to her studio and said, "Let’s make a record, and the rest is history. She has strong connections in the industry and was really able to use those connections to the fullest for our album. Additionally, I have my dear friend and sometimes guitar player, Jason Arteaga; an amazing cello player, Ruslan Biryukov, and my roommate Blaise Delacroix sang on a few tracks.     What is the one track on the "The Fool" that epitomizes the whole album? What was its influence? The intro song really summarizes the album for me. What I love most about it is that even though the album is a personal album, the implication is that with overcoming that personal struggle, it creates the ability to make a global difference. Great leaders can't let the fear and pain of the past hinder the work of great change, and I hope that people hear my story and are inspired to delve inside themselves in a way that leaves them strong and more powerful and able to deal with the issues of the world with a clearer sense of self. Because what this world needs right now more than anything is great leaders.     What does the phrase "dark beauty" mean to you? It brings to mind a volcano. Deep and smoldering and painfully cracking through the surface to reveal the golden and vibrant center.


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To advertise, contact us at www.darkbeautymag.com or darkbeautymagazine@gmail.com

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Photo; Topher Adam Photography Model: Dane Caroggio MUA: Angela Boombox

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Photo Topher Adam Photography Models Jacob Giddens and Heather Hartel Stylist Nima Shiraz Makeup/Hair Moon Nuygen

Nima’s closet tipS How to Style a Ballerina Circus Doll


Circus Doll is a character that caters to a wide range of audience. We see them in children’s books, various types of fashion periodicals, dark fantasy blockbuster movies, etc. We love them! They are dark, surreal and beautiful. The notion of a doll becoming alive fascinates us. It scares us. It intrigues us. It makes us want to believe that dolls can become alive. Who knows? Maybe they can! One of the most fun characters that a stylist can ask for is a Circus Doll. What the model wears for such conceptual shoots defines what character he or she should portray and therefore, the overall theme of the shoot. In this article, I will teach you how to style a Circus Ballerina Doll at minimal cost and hassle. Okay, now let’s get started. ✤ Research: First, you must perform research to ensure that you fully understand your idea. Do a Google image search precisely on ‘Circus Doll’ and look for inspiration. Observe what others have done with this character and think of ways through which you can recreate your own version of it and add your unique twist to it. ✤ Sources for materials: There are numerous sources from which you can obtain styling materials. They can be borrowed from friends and/or your network of local designers. Consignment/vintage stores offer styling materials that belong to other eras, many of which could be appropriate for your idea. Avoid high-end boutiques. You would be surprised at what you may find at a discount thrift store such as Goodwill. Some stylists buy materials and return them after the shoot. If you decide to take that route, double-check the return policy, keep the tags on and ensure to maintain your wardrobe in returnable mint condition. ✤ Wardrobe choices: To portray the character of a ballerina in a music box, Circus Dolls are commonly seen is tutu dresses. Professional tutus however tend to be rare and costly finds. They are occasionally found at online auction sites such as eBay from $800 to $10,000. Local ballet centers may also offer rentals of their professional tutus. However, due to the high value of them, deposit requirements and rental rates may not be affordable for all stylists. The good news is that you can create a tutu dress yourself out of a simple miniskirt and a matching corset or top. Here is what you need to do: ✦ Buy or borrow a miniskirt and a matching corset/top. A beautiful contrast of color or

pattern can be very much considered a match. You can also use a one-piece dress with a fitted and shoulder-less top and an attached loose skirt. When collecting these materials, think of your idea and seek pieces that relate to ‘Circus’ and ‘Doll’ in color and/or pattern. Black & white stripes would be one apparent choice. Red is also a color often seen on circus performers. ✦ Buy or borrow a tulle tutu skirt, which can be bought from local dance stores or online sites such as eBay or Esty for as low as $10. ✦ Use the tulle tutu as padding underneath your miniskirt. If you are using a long skirt, place the tulle tutu underneath it and gently wrap your skirt around the top layer of the tulle tutu and pin the edges of it around the waist area from inside. This would make the final skirt stand up like a professional tutu. ✦ To make your wardrobe appear believable as a professional tutu, ensure that the transition between the top and the skirt is smooth. Using a one-piece dress would automatically eliminate this issue. ✦ Lastly, you must complete your look with accessories. Use leggings and slippers. White, nude, or black & white striped leggings could be appropriate choices. Ballet slippers sell for approximately $20 at dance stores and online. If you decide to use a necklace, use one that is fitted around the neck as your character is meant to be a performer. A tiara could be another fun addition. If your character belongs to a vintage era, consider vintage pieces such as gloves. Do not over-accessorize your model. Less is more. Now go get started. Do not forget one key part: Have fun! See you in October, xoxo, Nima Shiraz

Model Nima Shiraz Photo Wendy Whitesell Makeup Alejandro Manzon Style Seven Soji & Joe Louis Harris

Topher Adam Photography Model Heather Hartel Stylist Nima Shiraz MUA Moon Nuygen

‘How to style a Circus Ballerina Doll’


Resurrecting Ophelia Self-Portraits by Kalliope Amorphous Kalliope Amorphous is an artist working with self-portrait photography as a catalyst for exploring myth, archetype and identity. Resurrecting Ophelia is a series of self portraits which explore the archetype of the drowned woman. The effects for this series were created incamera using surfaces and textiles. I am not a photographer or a narcissist. I am an artist with a camera. I want to push the boundaries of what I define as self and other by playing with ideas of identity, gender, archetype and the myriad ways in which they can be represented. I am inspired and fascinated by all the subtle variations in mood and character that human beings are capable of. I can more deeply explore these moods and emotions by physically transforming into them for a moment. Self-portraiture became a natural extension of my artistic desire to work

with photography, coupled with my reclusive personality. This work is entirely self-contained. As the photographer, subject, costumer, makeup artist, and post-processor, I have complete control over the resulting imagery, and am also able to work alone at three in the morning if the spirit moves me. Ironically, I have a hard time identifying with my work as “self� portraiture, because all of these characters and personalities seem to be their own. I just try to give them life for a moment, acting as a screen for them to play on. In the same breath, they also represent loosely fragmented aspects of my own personality, inspirations and affinities. I work entirely with available and improvisational lighting. All costuming, styling, makeup, photography and postprocessing are self-created. I shoot digital, yet prefer a more traditional

photographic aesthetic over heavily digitized post processing. All effects are created in camera. I find a powerful link between the written word and the wordless image. The still image is without words, yet is capable of equally as much poetry. There is a paradox there that is quite beautiful, and I love being able to work with it. In a good session, that collaboration will be tangible in the finished work. In addition to conceptual self-portraits, I have also been working on an ongoing series of portraits of artist, musician, and composer Diamanda Galas, whom I believe to be one of the most important artists on the planet right now. These portraits are artistically manipulated, both physically and digitally, and represent an unexpected move toward non-self-portrait work and alternativeprocess imagery.


“All art is the memory of our dark origins, whose fragments live in the artist forever.� - Paul Klee I like to think of these images as semiotic dreamscapes, which offer more questions than answers. My visual interpretation of Ophelia is one of the confrontational ghost, the alienated soul and the avenging siren song. I wanted to give strength and voice to her character’s perceived madness and dispossession. While most interpretations of her archetype focus on her tragic death, mental state and victimization; I am focusing on her resurrection and her search for answers. For me, she is both the demanding and the contemplative ghost. On another level, I am also playing with the idea of water as both womb and tomb. That is, the element of water relates to birth, death and regression. I am working through personal ideas and feelings of isolation and alienation in these images.


These photographs were made with available light and without major post-processing or digital effects added. All the effects in this series were created in-camera using various surfaces.


C A U G H T

PHOTOGRAPHER

CHI LUM

Model: Ami Amnesia Makeup: Todd Hartman


CHI LUM Model: Maenad


Photographer Chi Lum Website: www.RUE99.com For half a decade, Chi Lum has been creating artistic photos ranging from the whimsically fantastic to the darkly erotic. His work has been exhibited nationally and in local galleries in San Francisco, the area where he lives. Along with his stills, Lum directs films, including a feature length movie currently in production scheduled for release in 2011.

CHI LUM Model: Shameka J.


Model: Trinette Williams

CHI LUM


CHI LUM Model: Raven Le Faye


DARK COUTURE PHOTOGRAPHER

ROBIN HOWLAND


ROBIN HOWLAND


ROBIN HOWLAND


ROBIN HOWLAND


Persona Studios offers a full range of photo and beauty services. From photo packages, model portfolios to makeovers, business head-shots and more. Photography, makeup, hair and styling at Persona Studios are all done by Robin Howland. Robin has been a photographer for approximately 4 and a half years, and a makeup artists and hair stylist for 12 years. Website: www.robinhowland.com

ROBIN HOWLAND


J U S T I N

&

M O N R O E

DANCING DOLLS TOYS

Private Dancers Stylist: Kendrick Osorio Hair: Kristin Ess Makeup: Melanie Manson


Private Dancers Stylist: Kendrick Osorio Hair: Kristin Ess Makeup: Melanie Manson


Toy Maker Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe


Toy Maker Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe


Toy Maker Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe

Justin Monroe The Artist Sometimes Justin Monroe seems to be the last artist left on Earth whose work looks as if its creator sincerely believes that human beings are more godlike than animal-like. During the age in when most art presents the body as a visual mode of objectification and suffering, it is not surprising to find that many viewers are completely perplexed about how to respond to Justin Monroe and his

work. "Is he being completely ironic?" one is often asked, or could his work be concealing more critical intensions? Perhaps it just adds up to high camp silliness with its relentless focus on surface beauty and decoration, or maybe he is the final holdout from some distant dream state, intent on capturing the sublime beauty and complexity of the human form and holding it up for the worlds inspection.

Like other artist whose work leaves an extremely appealing first impression, Justing Monroe sometimes appears to thrive on being misunderstood. With this sense of drama and astonishing subject matter, he leaves you with questioning everything you thought you knew. With the success of his debut book DOWN THE RABIIT HOLE, and the soon to be released new book BEAUTIFUL. His accomplishments seem to be unstoppable. Always sexually driven and never apologetic has become Monroe's trademark. At the thematic addition, voracious predation, compulsive pleasureseeking, and other forms of extreme behavior. He explores these timeless themes in his inimitably sardonic, dark-hued fashion, in vividly realized images that unsettle as they entertain. Ladies and gentlemen, Justing Monroe has arrived, with his Funhouse World of Human Horrors and Other Twisted Sights. Step right up, and see it with your own eyes.


Fuck Doll Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe


Fuck Doll Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe


Fuck Doll Stylist: Justin Monroe Makeup: Lisa Berczel Hair: Justin Monroe


13 QUESTIONS The Man Behind the Pose

Photos Topher Adam Photography Model Plastic Martyr MUA Miss Makeup


What was your inspiration to start modeling? In all honesty I never intended to pursue a life of modeling, I just sort of “fell into it.” When did you start modeling?   I started out as a young makeup artist and one day a photographer asked to shoot me because he liked my style and it just sort of progressed from there. After my first shoot I fell in love with modeling and over time fond who I was. What was your aaa-haaa moment when you knew that female modeling was suiting for you? Probably when I went through puberty and still was more feminine then the top female models. I was ALWAYS super androgynous and feminine, and I was lucky enough that it was natural for me. I don't really have to try very hard to look the way I do.   D o y o u r e m e m b e r y o u r fi r s t modeling shoot, were you nervous, were you beyond ready when you started?   I do remember it very well, I was very calm and prepared. The photographer I worked with was very calm and gave amazing direction, so that also helped me relax and enjoy the photo-shoot.  When modeling what is important to you and how many jobs do you shoot in a week? The most important thing for me while modeling is to find the light and work my best angles and poses that I know work best for me. As for how many shoots I do, it varies. Some months I shoot a lot and some months maybe one or none. It all depends on bookings and if the industry is slow or busy at that time. Are you signed? Who is the agency? How was that experience when you showed up and told them that you are a male who prefers to model female fashion? Did they judge you or reject you? I am currently NOT signed, I am looking to but most talent agencies in LA are surprisingly close minded and judgmental. With the lifestyle of fame and working in the entertainment industry it's expected to be rejected quite a bit, and I have not let it discourage me at all. I won't stop until my heart stops beating.

As a progressive model, what are your favorite types of shoots? I have a huge hard-on for anything high fashion, the more bizarre and beautiful the better! If you could rewind a bit of your life, where would you go and why? Is it to change something or is it to improve something? Why?   I would probably go back in time and say 'yes' to more opportunities I turned down, when at the time I thought I wasn't right or ready for them. For all the amazing men who model female fashion, or young inspired model wannabes, what would you tell them about the business? What would you encourage them to do? I always try to encourage my supporters or fans to be themselves and not to conform to other people's standards. I got to where I am today for being an individual and even though many people don't approve of me, I can sleep easier at night knowing I am happy with who I am. So just be yourselves and don't let rejection or discouragement alter your dreams or goals.   How do you handle judgement with what you do in this field?   I ignore it, and sometimes use it as inspiration. I am happy with my life and who I am so that's all that's important. No one else's opinion matters to me except my own. What is the most important value for you as a man who models and wears female clothing? What is important for the world to know about who you are and not what you are?   People often assume I consider myself a ‘tranny’ or ‘drag queen,’ but in all actuality I am so far from that. I do not 'dress-up' as a female. I am like this 100% of the time, all day, everyday. Like I said in a previous answer, I am VERY naturally feminine, I always have been. So I embrace my femininity and use it instead of trying to conform and change who I am to fit societies standards of what a boy should be. I do not want a sex change, I do not do this for sexual kicks and fetishes, I do

this because it's what is natural for me and what works best for me. Besides it creates quite a controversy and trail of shock value. Who are your favorite designers that fit you and your style? I am a HUGE Thierry Mugler fan and Betsey Johnson, as well as the late McQueen and classics like Chanel. I don't consider myself an alternative model, I have a love for classic couture like Dior and Chanel, and my current style is channeling many of the old 40’s and 50’s. I like to remain beautiful and elegant instead of trying to be over the top and outrageous, I do that enough by just being me. Any last words about THE MAN BEHIND THE POSE? Yes, in fact I do. I believe that gender and fashion should have no boundaries. I have worked very hard at breaking down walls and killing stereotypes, and I hope to continue to change the fashion and entertainment industry; to let other “freaks” and unique people like me know that it is MORE THAN OKAY to be different and that they should embrace it! Love yourselves and love your body! Because you’re all beautiful! Website: www.plasticmartyr.com


The Elevenorchids team are creators of chic, fun and avant-garde photography from the heart. They maintain a contemporary and unique client-base who allow them complete creative freedom. They shoot digital and film both on location and in studio. They take on a select amount of clients to be able to provide the utmost attention to detail. Constantly striving to stay fresh, they travel abroad to network and learn from the most innovative artisans in the world. Photography is their passion and they invite you to be a part of their art in the making. Website: www.elevenorchids.com E-mail: annie@elevenorchids.com Phone: 925-639-7767

Models: Kellen Hart & Nicole Moreno Makeup: Kekepania Vasquez-Tamali'i Stylist: Nima Shiraz Wardrobe Designers: Skull ‘n Crossbows & Nima Shiraz


Model: Nicole Moreno Makeup: Kekepania Vasquez-Tamali'i Stylist: Nima Shiraz Wardrobe Designer: Skull ‘n Crossbows


Model: Kellen Hart Makeup: Kekepania Vasquez-Tamali'i Stylist: Nima Shiraz Wardrobe Designer: Nima Shiraz


Model: Mirela Paraganlija Makeup: Julianne Chai Stylist: Lim Utairat Konberg Wardrobe Designer: Kate Cheung


Model: Andrea MJM Makeup: Julianne Chai


Model: Andrea MJM Makeup: Julianne Chai


Model: Alice Kung Makeup: Carlisle Hair: Interwine Hair Design Stylist: Nima Shiraz


TopherAdam.com

Slag Model: Kelly Harrison-Gunn Makeup: Miss Makeup Designer: Skull ‘n Crossbows


TopherAdam.com

Painter Model: Mirela Paraganlija Makeup: Miss Makeup Designer: Skull ‘n Crossbows


Corpse Model: AJ ChShaun MUA: Quiyanna

TopherAdam.com

Corpse Model: AJ Chauhan Makeup: Quiyanna Stylist: Karen Quesada


TopherAdam.com

Creature Model: Rayna Makeup: Kevin Nuygen Stylist: Skull ‘n Crossbows


TopherAdam.com

Devoted Model: Wonder Ant Makeup: Kevin Nuygen Stylist: Skull ‘n Crossbows


TopherAdam.com

Glamorous Model: Candie Walker Makeup: Kevin Nuygen Designer: Skull ‘n Crossbows


TopherAdam.com

Mislead Model: Andy Scahill Stylist: Skull ‘n Crossbows


TopherAdam.com

MA-Damn Model: Kelly Harrison-Gunn Makeup: Miss Makeup Designer: Skull ‘n Crossbows


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ISSUE 1 - Preview  

This was the birth of Dark Beauty Magazine. Our mission, to support the dark artist around the globe who have something to say. To bring the...

ISSUE 1 - Preview  

This was the birth of Dark Beauty Magazine. Our mission, to support the dark artist around the globe who have something to say. To bring the...