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Page Title

micro ďŹ lter system


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Introduction

Contents

Compact System Cameras have a high specification packed into a small, portable body. Their design makes them the perfect tool for both everyday and more creative photography. The Seven5 filter system from LEE Filters follows the same principles and helps photographers fully realise the potential of their camera.

For many photographers, filters are the mainstay of the image-making process. Versatile and easy to use, they open up a world of creativity – be that balancing the exposure between sky and foreground, increasing the saturation of a blue sky, ramping up the contrast of a black-andwhite image or lengthening an exposure to introduce a sense of movement and the passing of time.

Filters also aid the photographer in capturing an image that reflects what they saw when they released the shutter – this means less time spent in front of a computer during postproduction and more time shooting.

4

How to use the Seven5 system

10

Neutral density filters

12 14

The polarising filter The Big Stopper

16 26

Getting creative Resin sets

29 32

Single graduated filters Inspiring Professionals books


4

5

How to use the Seven5

The Starter Kit

Lens Hood

The Seven5 Starter Kit comprises one filter holder (which features two slots) and one 0.6ND hard grad. The adaptor ring needs to be purchased separately.

The Seven5 system also features a lightweight clip-on lens hood, to help control the effects of flare.

Lightweight, simple and precision engineered, the Seven5 is extremely easy to set up and use. Adaptor rings You need only three things: an adaptor ring, which screws onto the camera’s lens; a filter holder, which snaps onto the adaptor ring; and a filter, which simply slides into the filter holder. Because the Seven5 filter holder features two slots, you can also combine filters - for example, a warm-up and an ND grad. In addition, the polarising filter can be clipped onto the front of the holder and rotated independently, leaving the area covered by the slot-in filters unaffected.

Adaptor rings are available for the following lens thread sizes:

Closed

Middle

Open

The rubber hood has been designed with three positive stop positions, allowing for shading on lenses of many focal lengths.

37mm, 37.5mm, 39mm, 40mm, 40.5mm, 43mm, 46mm, 49mm, 52mm, 55mm, 58mm, 60mm, 62mm, 67mm, 72mm and Fuji X100 / X100S.

The Seven5 polariser will fit easily inside the hood when needed.


6

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A quick way to use an ND graduated filter

A quick way to use an ND standard filter

07

/12

1

2

Without a filter, the sky in this image is burnt out and lacks detail.

3

Screw the adaptor ring onto the front of your lens.

LEE

4

Clip the filter holder onto the adaptor ring by releasing the silver lug at the side.

.6N

DG

H

Slide the filter into the holder – in this case, a 0.6ND hard grad. Place it in the guide rails nearest to your lens.

1

2

Without a filter, the shutter speed is too short to evoke a sense of movement in this waterfall.

3

If light levels are low, fit your camera to a tripod to avoid camera shake. Screw the adaptor ring onto the front of your lens.

4

Clip the filter holder onto the adaptor ring by releasing the silver lug at the side.

Slide the filter into the holder – in this case, an ND standard. Place it in the guide rails nearest to your lens.

07

/12

-2

-1

T

4

-2

0 -1

4

8

30 15

-1

A SCN

20 00 10 00 50 0 0 25

0

20 00 10 00 50 0 0 25

B 8

-1

30 15

12 5 60

30 15

-2

-2

The final picture. The 0.6ND hard grad has balanced the exposure, so the sky now has depth and colour.

60

+1

9

If you are shooting in Automatic mode, there is no need to adjust your exposure, as the camera will do this automatically.

50 0 250 125

+2

If you do not have an exposure compensation dial on your camera, you can adjust it via the menu settings. The camera’s screen will display that you have set your exposure to +2/3.

0

Fn A

If you are shooting in Manual mode, you should adjust your shutter speed to compensate for the filter. Simply increase the length of the shutter speed in increments until the reading on your camera’s screen is at ‘0’.

00

4000 0 20 0 0 0 10

0

40

+1

+1

60

+2

50 0 250 125

A

Fn

+2

A

4000 0 20 0 0 0 10

Fn

If you want to use your camera in Automatic mode, set it to A. As a starting point, dial in +2/3 exposure compensation. This will be sufficient for most situations, but may vary depending on the brightness of the scene and how much the filter covers it. You may want to bracket to be sure.

B

8

With the graduated filter in place, you are ready to take your meter reading.

+2

Use the viewfinder or Live View to position the filter so that the graduated area is over the horizon.

6 T

B

00

+1

5 8 4

T

40

8 4

A

S A P

Fn

12 5 60

7a

H

T

DG

C2

7

.6N

30 15

LEE

B

6

C1 M

5

If you are shooting in Manual mode, you should adjust your shutter speed to compensate for the filter. Simply increase the length of the shutter speed in increments until the reading on your camera’s screen is at ‘0’.

7

The final picture. The ND standard filter has slowed down the shutter speed, so the image imparts a sense of movement and softness.


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A quick way to use a polariser

00

10

A

2000

4000

-1

00

10

A

2000

4000

-1

A

-1

-2

-2

40 00 20 00 00 10

500

-1

60

125 250

+1

Depending on the shutter speed, you will probably have to set your camera to bulb (B).

+2

0

-2

T

4

+1

4

T B

Slide the filter into the holder. Place it in the guide rails nearest to your lens and make sure the filter’s foam seal is facing the camera.

Release the shutter using a remote or cable release. Because the camera is in ‘B’ mode, you will need to count your exposure either in your head, or with a watch or the timer on a smartphone. Cover the viewfinder with your hand to prevent light leaks, being careful not to knock the camera.

9 The ultra-slow shutter speed has resulted in the water appearing misty and ethereal.

+2

0

0

8

8

4

B

30

30 15

8

30

T

15

B

8

15

-2

-1

Fit your camera to a tripod and set it to manual focus. Take a light reading, then set your aperture and make a note of the shutter speed.

Fn

+1

30 15

12 5 60

20 00 10 00 50 0 0 25

Clip the filter holder onto the adaptor ring by releasing the silver lug at the side.

+2

The Big Stopper increases the exposure by ten stops, so you will need to extend your shutter speed accordingly. To calculate it, use the card supplied with the filter. For example, a reading of 1/125sec at f/8 becomes eight seconds at f/8. The filter has a blue cast, which can be corrected by increasing the colour temperature of your camera to 8,000-9,000K. As each filter varies slightly, you should take some test images to determine the ideal colour temperature setting for your filter.

4

If you are shooting in Manual mode, you should adjust your shutter speed to compensate for the filter. Simply increase the length of the shutter speed in increments until the reading on your camera’s screen is at ‘0’.

8

0

T

30 15

7 The final picture. The polariser has cut out the reflections and contrast, making a far more evenly toned, pleasing image.

+1

If you are shooting in Automatic mode, there is no need to adjust your exposure, as the camera will do this automatically.

+2

+1

+2

0

250 125 60

sto pp er

Shu 1,0 tter 00 Ex Spe th ed po 50 0th su with re 25 Big 0th 1 se Stoppe Gui 12 cond r de 5th 2 se 60 cond Nor th 4 se mal 30 Shu cond s 15 th tter 8 se th Spe ed cond s 8th 15 with seco s ¼ Big 30 nd 1 mi Stoppe s seco ½ r nu nd te 2 mi s 1 se nu tes 4 mi cond 2 se nu tes 8 mi cond nu s tes 16 minu 32 minu tes tes

4

7

th

e BIG Nor

mal

50 0

Screw the adaptor ring onto the front of your lens.

6

Fn A

B

View the scene through your camera’s viewfinder and rotate the polariser until you achieve the desired effect.

4

0 00

5 4000 0 20 0 0 0 10

T

Clip the filter holder onto the adaptor ring by releasing the silver lug at the side.

A

8 4

or

6

Fn

B

5

Without a filter, there is no sense of movement in this scene.

3

50 0 250 125 60

4b

Holding the polariser up to your eye, rotate the filter until you achieve the desired effect.

2

60

4a

Clip the polariser onto the front of your filter holder.

1

500

Screw the adaptor ring onto the front of your lens.

4

125

Without a filter, the reflections are distracting and the image has too much contrast.

3

250

2

-2

1

How to use the Big Stopper


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0.9 ND Standard

Neutral density filters

ND filters for the Seven5 system are available in 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 strengths. The 0.3ND reduces the amount of light hitting the sensor by one stop, the 0.6ND by two stops and the 0.9ND by three stops.

0.3 ND Hard Grad

0.9

0.6

0.3

Graduated ND filters A graduated ND filter has the neutral density tone covering just part of the filter. Half way down the filter, the tone begins to ‘dissolve’, until it leaves clear resin. In most situations, the sky is brighter than the foreground of a scene, so the graduated ND helps to balance your exposure. The result is an evenly lit scene, as opposed to one where either the sky is burned out and white, or the foreground is underexposed. ND grads come in two types: hard and soft. The hard grad has a much more defined transition between neutral density and clear, and is ideal when the area of transition in the composition is defined – a wall, or the sea’s horizon, for example. A soft grad, as its name suggests, features a more gradual transition, and is the filter type of choice when the line between sky and foreground is less defined, such as an undulating landscape.

0.9

0.6

In a standard ND filter, the neutral density tone covers the entire filter. It can be used either to slow down the shutter speed or to widen the aperture. For example, if a meter reading suggests 1/60 sec at f/8, fitting a 0.9ND (three-stop) standard filter would allow you to slow your shutter speed to 1/8 sec at f/8, to impart a sense of movement to the scene.

Alternatively, using the same reading of 1/60 sec at f/8, fitting a 0.9ND standard filter would allow you to open up your aperture to f/2.8. This gives you the opportunity to focus more selectively and – if shooting a portrait, for example – throw the background out of focus for a more flattering and less distracting result.

ProGlass filters For photographers who prefer glass filters, LEE has introduced the ProGlass range. Manufactured from the highest-quality glass, the ProGlass standard neutral density filters are available in 0.6 and 0.9 strengths. Optimised for use with digital cameras, the ProGlass filters absorb more infrared and ultraviolet light than their resin ND counterparts, and can cope effectively with adverse lighting conditions.

0.9 ND ProGlass (Standard) Filter

0.6 ND ProGlass (Standard) Filter

0.9 ND ProGlass

Their purpose is to reduce the amount of light hitting the camera’s sensor without – and this is crucial – altering the colour of the scene. They come in two types: graduated and standard. Both standard and graduated

Standard ND filters 0.3

Neutral density (ND) filters form an invaluable part of any creative photographer’s armoury.


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The polarising filter

The polarising filter is an extremely versatile tool that can bring depth and dimension to an image.

A polariser works by cutting out certain waves of light from reflective surfaces, making colours appear more saturated. But there is more to this filter than simply ramping up the colour of a blue sky. It can be used more subtly, too.

LEE Filters has introduced a circular polariser specifically for the Seven5 system.

Circular Polariser

While rotating the polariser fully will result in the aforementioned deep blue sky with clouds that appear to leap out of the image, rotating it by just two thirds or three quarters will give a slightly more delicate – and potentially more realistic – result, with less contrast between cloud and sky, and an image that is more believable to the human eye.

And it’s far from being a filter only for the landscape photographer. Those with an interest in architectural pictures also find it invaluable, as it cuts reflections – which can render an image confusing and muddled – from glass and metallic surfaces.

This means it can be used in conjunction with, for example, a warm-up filter or a neutral density grad. One point to remember is that you will have to increase your exposure by 1 3/4 stops when using a polariser. If you are combining it with other filters, the increase may be even greater.

The beauty of the Seven5 polariser lies not only in its simplicity (it snaps onto the filter holder and is ready to use), but also in the fact that it can be rotated independently of any other filters.

Circular Polariser

In use

There are two types of polariser: circular and linear. These terms do not describe the shape of the polariser, but the way in which it works. In general terms, modern cameras require circular polarisers, because the linear type interferes with complex electronics.


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The Big Stopper

The Big Stopper In the past, creating a long exposure meant a fiddly process of setting the lowest ISO possible, stopping down to the smallest aperture and then fitting a standard ND filter – or sometimes stacking one on top of the other. Of course, shooting film meant taking reciprocity failure into account, which further increased the exposure.

Combining filters For even more precise control of the image, the Big Stopper can be used in conjunction with other filters – for example, an ND grad or polarising filter.

Big Stopper

Big Stopper

In recent years, photographers such as Jonathan Chritchley, Michael Kenna and Rolfe Horn have created a trend for ultra-long exposures. The result is a very particular style of image that conveys a sense of movement and the passing of time.

However, LEE Filters chose to respond to the trend in the simplest way possible, by introducing the Big Stopper – a filter that lengthens the exposure by a full ten stops. This means that a reading of 1/30 sec at f/8 would extend to an exposure of 30 seconds at f/8. If you are shooting in low light, and have a reading of, say, one second at f/8, your shutter speed would become an impressive 16 minutes. Adjusting the aperture and ISO settings would allow it to be lengthened even further.

It is a technique that is well suited to seascapes or landscape images that feature water, with sometimes fast-moving elements of a composition being rendered apparently still and milky white.

Remember to take the filter factor of any other filters into account when setting your exposure.

Exposure Guide Your Big Stopper will have a density of somewhere between 9 ⅓ and 10 ⅔ stops. Before first use, please take a test image to ensure correct exposure compensation when in use. Normal Shutter Speed

with Big Stopper

1,000th

1 second

500th

2 seconds

250th

4 seconds

125th

8 seconds

60th

15 seconds

30th

30 seconds

15th

1 minute

8th

2 minutes

¼

4 minutes

½

8 minutes

1 second

16 minutes

2 seconds

32 minutes


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17

One of the most enjoyable aspects of shooting in cities is choosing which lens to work with. A telephoto lens, or shooting at the long end of a zoom, allows the photographer to compress the perspective of a scene, making structures appear closer to each other than they actually are.

0.6 ND Hard Grad

Getting creative

This is great for conveying the bustle of a cityscape. A wider lens puts the building into context and can convey drama when shooting from a low angle pointing upwards.

Choosing your filter

Vibrant, colourful and often gritty, it’s not surprising so many photographers find their inspiration in our cities. From studies of architectural details, to quirky juxtapositions of buildings, or playing with the scale differences between people and structures, the creative possibilities are almost infinite.

Compact System Cameras are ideally suited to this type of environment, where a photographer, often working handheld, needs to respond quickly to a fastunfolding scene. It’s this kind of photography that LEE Filters bore in mind when developing the Seven5 system – making it inconspicuous and light enough to remain attached to the lens at all times. All the photographer needs to do is slide in or snap on the appropriate filter and shoot.

Circular Polariser

Urban landscapes

Almost any filter goes in an urban environment. A polariser reduces the reflection from glass windows, while increasing the saturation of a blue sky. The polariser can be used alone or in conjunction with other filters. More often than not, the sky will give a brighter meter reading than the foreground, so fitting an ND grad will overcome this and balance out the exposure. You might even like to slide a sunset filter or a coral grad into the holder, to introduce an element of warmth to the scene. It’s also possible to create unusual and arresting images in cities using the Big Stopper filter – although it does, of course, require a sturdy tripod if camera shake is to be avoided.

The movement of clouds against a steadyas-a-rock building is often an attractive juxtaposition, while extremely long exposures in low light can render moving figures invisible, resulting in an intriguing scene that might appear to be devoid of human presence.


18

19

Choosing your filter

0.6 ND Soft Grad

Whether shooting family snaps as mementoes, or something more formal, photographing people is an endlessly fulfilling challenge.

Portraits Capturing the essence of someone’s personality while simultaneously placing them at their ease and staying alert to the split second when everything falls into place certainly keeps a photographer on their toes. The choice of filter when shooting portraits depends on many factors, including whether working indoors or outdoors, the subject’s skin tone and, of course, what the photographer hopes to achieve with the image. Like much of photography, it’s all about experimenting, but here are a few pointers to get started.

0.6 ND Standard

When shooting portraits outdoors in natural light, you may encounter the same disparity between sky and foreground, in terms of exposure, as you would with landscape photography. In cases such as these, an ND grad is invaluable and reduces the need for fiddly work at the computer in postproduction.

0.6 ND Soft Grad

Getting creative

One of the classic techniques of portrait photography is to use a wide aperture – around f/4 or even f/2.8 – in order to throw the background out of focus and concentrate the viewer’s attention on the subject, and render any potential distractions blurred. However, bright sunshine can often put paid to such an approach. In these situations, a standard ND filter reduces the amount of light hitting the sensor, permitting the photographer to open up the aperture.

For example, a reading of 1/500 sec at f/11 is an ideal shutter speed, but not such a great aperture. Fitting a standard 0.9ND filter would result in an aperture of f/4, which is preferable for portrait photography.


20

21

Getting creative

Big Stopper

A shutter speed of 1/2 sec on a busy street will capture a sense of movement and bustle, while a two-minute exposure when shooting a seascape will result in a smooth, still image almost devoid of detail in the moving areas of the frame.

Choosing your filter

One of the great joys of photography is that it gives us the chance to experiment – and nowhere is this more apparent than with long exposures. They can be something of a trial and error, but that’s a big part of the fun.

When it comes to long exposures, the standard ND is the filter you want to reach for. Depending on the extent to which you want to slow down your shutter speed, you can pick anything from the 0.3ND, for just one stop of compensation, through 0.6 (2 stops) and 0.9 (3 stops), right up to the ten stops of the Big Stopper. And because the Seven5 filter holder has two slots, you can even stack filters, so a combination of 0.6 and 0.9ND standards, would give an extended exposure of five stops.

Long exposures Success with long exposures relies on one key item: a decent tripod. This means the resulting photographs are blurred for the right reasons – and not because of camera shake. Because there’s no exact definition of what constitutes a long exposure, the extent of blur within an image is completely down to the photographer.

0.9 ND Standard

Trial and error Although one of the most enjoyable aspects of long-exposure photography is its unpredictability, if you want more controlled results, it’s important to experiment. By doing so, you will build up a mental ‘library’ of the effects of different shutter speeds on the scene in front of you.

For instance, a long exposure doesn’t have to mean the moving part of the composition is devoid of all detail. Many landscape photographers feel the movement of a waterfall, for instance, is best conveyed when a little detail is retained in the water. As such, they may use a shutter speed of around 1/4 sec or 1/2 sec as opposed to one of 30 seconds or more. Other photographers, however, may prefer the abstract results that arise from the longer exposures – there are no rules, after all!


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Getting creative

0.6 ND Hard Grad

Choosing your filter When it comes to filters for landscape photography, the choice is enormous and can be confusing. Start by asking yourself what you want a filter to add to your image. Do you want it to dramatise what is in front of you, adding a sense of the hyper real? Or would you prefer the use of filters to be imperceptible, their use simply helping to replicate what can be seen with the naked eye?

Landscapes Despite this, however, landscape photography can be tricky to master, and conveying a true sense of place, time and mood in an image is something that only comes with practice.

Nothing is more crucial to the success of a landscape image than the right light. This usually means shooting at the very beginning or end of the day, when the light can be anything from understated and subtle to dramatic and fiery, moulding the scene, giving it colour, depth and atmosphere.

0.6 ND Hard Grad + Big Stopper

Landscape photography consistently comes up as the most popular subject among keen photographers. And it’s not surprising. Getting out into the fresh air of the countryside – armed with nothing but a camera and with nothing to think about other than making images – is one of the best ways to switch off from everyday pressures.

Whichever your preference, neutral density grads, warm-up filters and a polariser make a good starting point. For further enhancement, you might want to add sunset, coral and blue filters to your kit – all of which will enhance an otherwise dull sky, without appearing overdone.

Choosing colours that complement rather than clash with your composition is the key to success. The two-slot design of the Seven5 holder means that the photographer can combine filters, so a neutral density grad might balance the exposure between sky and foreground, for example, while a blue grad would introduce tone into what might be an otherwise featureless sky.


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Getting creative

As a result, they can be modified in the field, avoiding the need to spend as much time on the computer at the postproduction stage.

23A Light Red Filter

Choosing your filter

Black and white Stripped of its colour, a scene takes on a whole new mood and meaning, one that is completely different from how it might appear if shot in colour. Many Compact System Cameras give the photographer the option of capturing the image in black and white, with the rear monitor displaying it in monochrome.

This is an extremely useful aid in terms of visualising in black and white. When shooting in this mode, using filters can enhance the picture, and the monitor means the photographer can see the effect of the filter instantly, rather than waiting until the photographs are uploaded onto the computer at home.

Neutral-density filters – both standard and graduated – are also invaluable to the photographer who works in black and white. They should be used in the same way as with colour photography, namely, to balance exposure and to either slow down shutter speed or afford the use of a wider aperture. Last, but most definitely not least, the Big Stopper is perfect for monochrome photography, enhancing a picture’s mood and sense of the abstract.

The basic kit for the photographer who shoots in black and white would include yellow, orange and red filters. If shooting a blue sky with white, puffy clouds, the yellow filter would impart a slight increase in contrast between the two, while a red filter would have a far more dramatic effect. The effect of an orange filter falls in between. However, there are other factors to consider when using these filters, because they also brighten colours similar to their own. For example, fitting a red filter when photographing a typical red London bus would result in the vehicle appearing almost white in the final image.

0.6 ND Soft Grad

Recent years have seen a huge resurgence of interest in black and white photography. This is thanks in no small part to the introduction of digital technology and the ease with which it allows the photographer to convert colour images to monochrome. Black and white images have a quality all of their own.

This filter also absorbs green, so it should be used judiciously when shooting landscapes, as any lush greenery can block up, losing detail and contrast.


26

27

Resin sets

Neutral density grad set Filters

0.3 ND

The neutral density grad set comes in both hard and soft grad versions. Each set includes 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 strength filters, with the 0.3 grad equating to one stop of exposure compensation, the 0.6 grad equating to two, and the 0.9 grad giving three stops. So, for example, if the meter reading for the sky was 1/30 sec at f/8 and the foreground 1/125 sec at f/8, you would

Resin sets are a great – and economical – introduction to filters. Each LEE Filters set for the Seven5 system includes three graduated filters, which are presented in a wrap that is easily stored in a pocket or camera bag.

0.6 ND

0.9 ND

select a 0.6ND grad, which would even out the exposure to 1/125 sec at f/8 across the whole scene. Don’t forget, too, that the Seven5 system’s filter holder can be rotated, so grads of any type can be used at an angle – or even upside down. For a full explanation of how to use neutral density grads, see page 6.

Filtered

No filter Filter used 0.6 ND Hard Grad


28

29

Single graduated filters

Black and white set Filters

Filters are an essential part of any black and white photographer’s kit, and this set reflects that. Made up of Yellow, Red and Yellowish Green standard filters (not

No. 23A Light Red

No. 11 Yellowish Green

grads), the first two filters will enhance the contrast in a sky to varying degrees, while the Yellowish Green both imparts contrast and opens up the tones of green foliage.

Sunset

1

2

3

2

3

For a sunset effect when shooting into a low sun.

The red portion of the Sunset grad.

Sunset Yellow The yellow portion of the Sunset grad.

Sunset Orange The orange portion of the Sunset grad.

Straw For a strong warm-up effect when shooting landscapes; accentuates foregrounds when inverted.

Filter used No. 23A Light Red

Yellow

Sunset Red

Red

Filtered

Orange

No filter

No. 8 Yellow

1


30

31

2

3

4

5

Real Blue

7

8

9

11

12

13

14

1

2

3

1

2

3

Enhances impression of dawn and evening light in skies; ‘red sky at night’ effect.

2

Accentuates brown tones, such as autumn leaves and stone.

Neutral Density 1

2

3

1

2

3

Darker and more red than Chocolate and Sepia filters, with a very strong effect.

For a brown-tinted monochrome appearance, which is less red than Chocolate.

1

A green-blue to bring realistic colour into flat skies.

Mahogany

Sepia

3

10

Sky Blue

Tobacco

2

Darker and more black than Sky Blue, for a stronger impact on skies. 6

Chocolate

1

0.9

1

Slightly pink warm-up filter, more red than 81 series.

0.6

Coral

0.3

Single graduated filters

Reduces exposure in selected areas without affecting colour balance.

4

5


32

33

Books

Index

Page

Adaptor Rings Big Stopper

Who better to learn from than the professional photographers who use LEE Filters products every day?

With contributions from Joe Cornish, Charlie Waite, David Ward, Mark Denton, John Gravett, David Noton, Jeremy Walker, Paul Gallagher and Tom Mackie, Inspiring Professionals and Inspiring Professionals 2 are packed full of world-class photography and invaluable hints on how to get the best out of your LEE Filters products.

Inspiring Professionals 1

Inspiring Professionals 2

Neutral Density Graduated Filter Set

27

9,14,21

Polariser

8,12,16

Black & White Filter Set

28

Portraits

18

Black & White Photography

24

Real Blue 1, 2, 3

31

Books

32

Resin Filter Sets

26

Chocolate 1, 2

30

Single Graduated Filters

29

Coral 1, 2 ,3 ,4 ,5 ,6 ,7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

30

Sepia 1, 2, 3

30

Sky Blue 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

31

Holder

Learn from the professionals

5

Page

4

Inspiring Professionals 1 & 2

32

Starter Kit

Landscape Photography

22

Straw 1, 2, 3

29

Sunset Orange

29

Lens Hood

5

5

Long Exposures

20

Sunset Red

29

Mahogany 1, 2, 3

31

Sunset Yellow

29

Neutral Density Filters

10

Sunset 1, 2, 3

29

Tobacco 1, 2, 3

30

Urban Photography

16

Neutral Density Graduated Filters

6,10,17,18 19,23,25,31

Neutral Density Standard Filters

7,11,19,20

Neutral Density ProGlass Filters

11


34

Contact details

LEE Filters, Central Way, Walworth Business Park, Andover, Hampshire, SP10 5AN UK T: + 44 (0) 1264 366245 F: + 44 (0) 1264 355058 sales@leefilters.com leefilters.com

LEE Filters USA, 2237 North Hollywood Way, Burbank, CA 91505 USA T: (800) 576 5055 F: (818) 238 1228 sales@leefiltersusa.com leefilters.com Contributing photographers: Jonathan Chritchley http://www.jonathanchritchley.net Joe Cornish http://www.joecornishgallery.co.uk Paul Gallagher http://www.paulgallagher.co.uk Damien Lovegrove http://www.lovegrovephotography.com Charlie Waite http://www.charliewaite.com Jeremy Walker http://www.jeremywalker.co.uk

Design and layout – Trampoline Graphic Design. www.trampolinedesign.net Tel: 01962 864911


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