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Cultural Hospitality

Creating a Place for Immigrant Communities to Host, Share, and Teach

Thesis Proposal Cultural Hospitality: Creating a Place for Immigrant Communities to Host, Share, and Teach

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason Anticipated Start Date: Fall 2012

Corner of Massachusetts Ave and Washington St. Boston, MA


Boston Architectural College Thesis Proposal Cultural Hospitality: Creating a Place for Immigrant Communities to Host, Share, and Teach Darian Mason May 2, 2012 2

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Summary

Boston Architectural College Thesis Proposal

Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Summary

Darian Mason darian.mason@gmail.com 202.957.5026 Cultural Hospitality: Creating a Place for Immigrant Communities to Host, Share, and Teach Abstract Many elements of architecture infer important relationships and roles. These relationships have formal and cultural origins that are analyzed and redeveloped for every application. When a new guest culture meets an existing, host context, architecture can assist in the adjustment and integration of the “new” into the “existing” through inverting the host/ guest relationships. Inversion of roles allows for people to unlearn preconceptions and interact in new ways. A new cultural group can be introduced or incorporated into an existing context through inverting the relationship between perceived host and guest. Methods of Inquiry This study will pursue a rigorous study of the emergent community and the surrounding location. The analysis will include interviews and research of means of welcoming and inclusion for both the cultures and contexts. Research will then be developed into spatial models of procession, hospitality, and inclusion from the perspective of “host” and “guest”. The study will also include research of both physical and conceptual assimilation in buildings with two different parties or elements. This study will inform how two elements can be integrated. The methods of assimilation will be tested through the lens of precession, hospitality, and inclusion and the means by which to integrate the perspective of the “host” with the perspective of the “guest.”

Terms of Criticism This project will be judged upon the rigor with which investigations were done, the clarity of spatial studies of host and guest environments, and finally the success of inverting and then resolving spaces within the one building. General Building Information Building Type: Cultural Trade School Approximate Size: Lot Size 8,025 sf, 5 stories, total of 40,125 sf Site The site for this project is an urban edge condition at the intersection of two major thoroughfares. Boundary between the South End and Lower Roxbury, in Boston, is the site for this project. 631 Massachusetts Ave. 1769 Washington St. Boston Massachusetts

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Table of Contents

Table of Contents Thesis Proposal Document

Thesis Proposal Programming Document

Summary p. 3 Table of Contents p. 5

Table of Contents

p. 3

Section One: Existing State

p. 5

Section One: Theory

p. 6

Abstract p. 7 Thesis Statement p. 9 Methods of Inquiry p. 13 Terms of Criticism p. 15

Site Description p. 6 Site Analysis p. 7 Codes p. 10 Cultural Context p. 12 Informational Context p. 15

Section Two: Project Requirements

Section Two: Precedent Study

p. 16

p. 17

Site p. 16 Program p. 18 Building System Integration p. 21

Carpenters Center of New England p. 18 Jean Marie Tjibaou Cultural Center p. 19 Performing Arts Center: Isabelle Stuart Gardener Museum p. 20

Section Three: Case Study Analysis p. 22

Section Three: Future State

Carpenters Center of New England Isabelle Stuart Gardener Museum Boston Public Library

p. 22 p. 24 p. 26

Mission and Goals p. 24 Cost Evaluation p. 25

Section Four: Sketch Problem

p. 28

Additional Material Schedule of Reviews and Requirements Annotative Bibliography

p. 23

Appendices p. 27 Annotated Bibliography Codes Interviews Community Study M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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Working Definitions

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Assimilate:

Take in (information, ideas, or culture) and understand fully

Culture

The arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively.

Community:

A group of people living together in one place, especially one practicing common ownership.

Context:

The circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood and assessed.

Emergent:

In the process of coming into being or becoming prominent.

Hospitality:

The friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers.

Nexus:

Connection, Link, a causal link

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Section One: Theory Abstract

How can architecture help assimilate an immigrant group into an existing context? Architecture has the ability to solidify a culture’s identity in space and time. Civilizations’ monuments, including Greek, Roman, and Egyptians stand today as a testament of the cultures that existed. In Egypt, people “sought immortality through the construction of pyramids and massive temple complexes.”1 The physical intervention of building, that these culture perform, can signify an intrusion of a guest into a host context. This act can be constructive or subversive. When settlers landed on the shores of North America in the 17th Century, the process of building according to the culture of the settlers was comforting for the Europeans. Of course, the native residents might have been alarmed. Contemporary society faces immigration and the influx of cultures into an existing context that is comparable to any migration in history. Architecture once again has the ability to present and solidify a immigrant cultures’ identities in places where they live. The question this thesis attempts to answer is: How can architecture help an immigrant group to assimilate into an existing culture? Assimilation in this context refers to the process of “taking in” or “understanding fully.” In order to accomplish this integration, this thesis asserts architecture must use its ability to negotiate power structures in society. The creation of “immortal” civilizations through architecture is dependent upon influence and power. Architecture that can manipulate the existing power structures around an immigrant community, can enable the host community to “take in” and to “understand fully” the new guest community. This process will start with the inversion, or reversal of the roles of “host” and “guest.”

1. William T. Baker, Architectural Excellence in a Diverse World Culture (Mulgrave: Images Publishing Group, 2008), 3.

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a boundary might form the separation between host and guest

HOST/GUEST

What, in architecture, establishes the role of the inhabitant? the crossing of thresholds the form of sacred places the open or closed space

GUEST/HOST

How can architecture invert host roles to place the guest “within” the and the host “outside” of the space? How can architecture connect host and guest?

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Thesis Statement Understanding and Manipulation Place is created through the manipulation of space. Intelligent place making can only occur through intelligent manipulation of spaces. Spaces need to be created with an identity of place in order to create spaces with a sense of ownership. Ownership of Space and Identity of Place Perception of power and ownership of space is central to the assimilation a new culture into an existing context. On a small scale, immigrants have attempted to use buildings to their advantage with the corner store or the homey feel of a restaurant. However, these attempts fail in that they do not contend with the existing “pecking order� within the context. The creation of places that exclude a sense of ownership will not create familiarity or identity of place. The personal or social familiarity of place can only be established once the identity of place is established. Understanding existing paradigms of power structures include the ownership of place by the current occupants of a space. In order to assimilate new cultures into an existing space, the space must be designed to around the identity of the emergent culture. The cultural identity of the group and the identity of place are closely tied together. If the community can relate to the existing space the space becomes familiar. As the space becomes a familiar place, the immigrant community feels more at home. If the immigrant community feels more at home they have come to identify themselves with the identity of place. Architectural Devices and Power Structures The identity of place can be established through the use of all of architecture’s devices. Light and shadow, boundary and threshold, views and circulation all can be used to in the identity of place. If these qualities are to be associated with ownership of place, the identity of place, as defined by its architecture, must be designed around the owner.

Section One: Theory Boundaries, entries, thresholds, and zones can allow for subtle or sublime shifts between the power structures inherent in buildings. A guard desk or an open courtyard can allow an inhabitant of the building to feel alienated or welcomed. The program of a guard desk or courtyard does not, by itself, create the feeling of welcome or of alienation. The manner in which a guard desk is designed to establish a boundary or a courtyard is designed creating thresholds produces the perception of alienation or welcoming. The opposing feelings are a result of the manner of application of architectural devices. The feeling of alienation or welcoming continues from the entry into the building. The use of architectural devices relies on the sense of ownership within the space that implies whether the occupant should feel out of place or at home. The architecture that make one feel out of place would not create a sense of ownership, while the place that makes the occupant feel at home would create a sense of ownership. This creation of place, with specific architectural qualities, is the foundation of creating a place for a specific group. New and Existing This is the scenario that is understood through out multi-cultural communities. It is the type of connection between people and architecture that creates ethnic enclaves. However, this interaction does not necessarily assimilate one culture to its neighbors. The identity of place is normally seen as a zero-sum game where one culture becomes associated with a place and the other culture or community then becomes alienated. Architecture of one group becomes co-opted by another and the incoming community thus alienates the former occupants. Is this process of alienation or welcoming the limitation of architecture? This thesis asserts that it is not. Architecture can be applied to individual cultural groups but it can also include multiple cultures. M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Section One: Theory The ability of the architecture to include multiple cultures is based on the premise that architecture can hold multiple identities of place at the same time. Architecture is malleable and able to negotiate between cultural influences, identities, and power structures. This theory of architecture approaches the discussions or Chris Abel in his book Architecture and Identity. In in, Able argues for a shift away from dualistic thinking in his lecture titled “The Essential Tension.”1 Architecture is able to balance the needs and desires of both the guest culture and the host community, without cause harm or alienation to either. In fact, resultant synthesis may result in a richer and more complex community.2 The reality of perception is still the obstacle. While architecture has the capacity to address and integrate two distinct cultures and communities, the cultures and communities often reject the change. Again, history is our teacher. From the bussing riots of Boston, to the Trail of Tears in American History, people revolt against integration or intrusion of cultural groups into the existing context. Therefore, architecture must tread carefully. The manner in which emergent communities are introduced into a neighborhood matters. The process must be subtle and powerfully effective.

This thesis will include the use of an existing site with an existing building in order to inform the place making and the manner in which architecture can mediate between two identities. There is an existing identity that is inherent in all architectural work, whether social or physical. At times this identity is not valued and therefore not protected. However, thoughtful architecture can make a place for both the introduced element and the existing element. When architecture is performed in this manner, the nexus of one identity and the other is a careful place for consideration. The simple inversion of roles and relationships carries important weight and has many effects. There are many opportunities when this process is applied socially and architecturally. For a context that is experiencing drastic changes, there is a necessity for design but also the obligation for that design to be thoughtful. The process of introducing or establishing a community into an existing context needs to be addressed in architecture. This proposal introduces a method for this process based upon theory, research, analysis, and thoughtful design.

The process must be one of addition, not subtraction. Paul Spencer Byard writes concerning the very practical design of additions for existing structures. His book is insightful as to the nature or identity, preservation, and “protected identity.”3 The discussion proceeds and follows the work of many designers and how they address the existing. A test of the use of architecture to assimilate a new culture should follow the same method or protecting identity. 1. Chris Abel, Architecture & Identity: Responses to Cultural and Technological Change (Woburn: Architectural Press, 2000), 129-130. 2. Ibid, 162. 3. Paul Spencer Byard, The Architecture of Additions: Design and Regulation (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1998), 85.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Methods of Inquiry

Section One: Theory

How will this thesis be tested? Cultural Place-Making This thesis will be tested through a progression of studies that move from the general question of “how is identity of place created?�

community. To address this, the thesis must develop a rigorous study of the nexus or connection between the two groups.

This study will include study models and precedent analysis of spaces that hold an identity of place.

I will study this nexus by developing a progression of spaces that apply placemaking techniques for the respective groups. I will then design the manner in which these places overlap, intersect, and mold into one another.

Identity of place will be studied in terms of the use of architectural devices including: - Light and Shadow - Boundaries and Thresholds - Views and Circulations

Ultimately, the focus of the project will be the inversion of roles between host and guest. This inversion will take place through the connection of a place for the host and a place for the guest.

After the general study of the architectural devices used to create an identity of place, the study will apply the cultural context of the two communities and study culturally specific place making.

I will study how these two groups come together in a building through a series of models, sketches and perspectives that illustrates the progression from separate places to communal spaces.

For studying the immigrant culture, this will include in-depth consultation with the client and a historian who is familiar with the immigrant group. For the host community and site I will study case studies of successful place making within a half-mile radius of the site as well as similar precedents. These techniques of place-making will be formulated and tested through the use of study models, sketches, and collage. Nexus Making This study will progress from the analysis of singular place-making to a study of how these places then address the host/ guest relationship. The main focus of this project is the assimilation of an immigrant population into an existing M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Terms of Criticism

Section One: Theory

How will this process and the effectiveness of the thesis be judged? - The thesis will be judged based upon rigorous study. - The architectural devices of place making must be a thorough exploration of the methods and means with which to manipulate space. - The cultural context must be adequately mapped out for both immigrant and existing cultures in order to provide a measured response to both groups. - The manner of connecting the two groups will be tested on multiple grounds. - Were places for the two groups designed for separately? - Does the architecture establish the role for who is the host and who is the guest? - Does the architecture reverse the natural roles of the host and guest?

- Did the project effectively resolve the distinct and separate place-making for the two groups into a design that marks the progression from host /guest relationship to an integrated and equal exchange?

This project will be judged based upon the effect to which it:

- establishes the diametric relationship, - inverts the socially understood host/ guest relationship, - integrates the two groups, - and resolves to accommodate cross-cultural exchange. M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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631 Massachusetts Ave. + 1769 Washington St.

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Site Selection

What site will provide the best test of the architectural thesis? The site must be within the dense city environment where there is an influx of a new immigrant community meeting and existing neighborhood. The site setting must be on the intersection and edge of the two communities. The site will be constructed to be a nexus or meeting place for the two communities. The site must be large enough to house the new immigrant community and the existing neighborhood for daily use and operations. The site must be small enough for the architectural devices used for the connection and mediation between hosts and guests to be intentional. The site must be in close proximity to the programs that support community: housing, schools, public transportation, shops, and restaurants. The site must include and existing building that can be modified and manipulated to house the design Finally, the site must allow the exchange and interaction of two communities to be visible to the wider community. The site chosen for this project is within the urban fabric of Boston. The site is located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Washington Street. The intersection is at the nexus of the Roxbury community and the South End community. Massachusetts Avenue has proven to be a major barrier for the two communities. The site is the existing location of the Alexandria Hotel. This building and the adjacent site will be used to test the architectural thesis.

Section Two: Project Requirements Site Challenges The site chosen is the current location of an existing building that would be carved into for this project. The building need to be historically preserved in a realistic project. For that reason, the important facades of the building will be analyzed and included into the design. This will be considered as an existing condition and a limitation to the design. However, the tieing into the existing context, directly relates to the thesis problem and will provide a design opportunity. The site has very little access to parking while being adjacent to a minor public transportation line. The site must contend with or relate to the existing fabric of the South End and the public housing that is in close proximity. Site Opportunities: Approximate Size: Lot Size 8,025 sf, 5 stories, total of 40,125 sf The site is situated on a prominent corner and is facing Washington Street providing for good views of and into the building. The Massachusetts Avenue face of the building includes a blank wall that could provide opportunities to cut into the existing building face. The building receives pleasant morning and evening sunlight and is taller than the adjacent buildings.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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Program Space Requirements Kitchen: 1,000 SF

offi ces wo rks ho p ga lle r y en try

o i d u st

Cafe: 1,675 SF Gallery: 8,025 SF Workshop: 12,025

c t i k

n e h

c

e f a

Offices: 4,000 SF Studio: 4,025 SF

Schematic Program Layout

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Schematic Program Layout on site

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Section Two: Project Requirements

Program

What program will provide the best test of the architectural thesis? As a test of how architecture can invert the relationship between host and guest, the program will need to provide an area of expertise to allow for the guest group to become the host. The program for this project will allow the immigrant population to plug into the neighborhood and apply its skills and knowledge. A trade school can fulfill this purpose. A trade school will allow the immigrant culture to teach culturally specific trades such as ornamental tile working, looming, music, and culinary arts. The surrounding neighborhood can visit the trade school for classes or to purchase or train in various crafts and arts. These classes can begin associations between the immigrant and local cultures and people. The association can develop into relationships and a deeper understanding of the other culture.

Program Challenges The proximity and combination of light industrial work, food, and office space on a relatively small site may require thoughtful separations and connections of program.

Immigrant Community Surrounded by foreign city

Inroads created between the cultures

Cultural Exchange

Program Opportunities The program will include culturally specific applications and allow for movement from general to specific and public to private interactions. One -on -One cross cultural exchange

Schematic Purpose of the program is to move the social and crosscultural interaction from general and public to specific and private. M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Building Systems Integration

Section Two: Project Requirements

How will the building systems be effected by the thesis, site, or program? Exterior and Interior walls: Permeability of thresholds to see or hear what is happening inside to draw interest or provide privacy. The spaces might need to expand or contract to adjust to program changes. There is an opportunity to display the interaction and intersection of cultures and groups from the exterior. Communications/ Acoustics: This design will house theater productions, art installations, construction workshops, and even culinary arts. The thresholds between these various crafts need to be acoustical and need to include hookups for lighting and stage production as well as construction workshops. Technology The building will need a core that houses IT support for gallery installations and production as well as office and studio work. This work may be displayed through the exterior skin of the building. Structural: This design will need to be open and yet convey a sense of security. This could mean the structural elements are highly visible and create thresholds that dictate zones or program areas. The design will integrate the new design with the existing facade of the old hotel. This condition will be an illustration of keying in to the old with the new and need to be thoughtful and visually pleasing.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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New England Carpenter’s Center, 2010 Dorchester, MA ADD Inc.

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

750 DORCHESTER

Section Three: Case Studies

Carpenter’s Center of New England

NEW ENGLAND REGIO 750 OF DORCHESTER CARPENT

NEW ENGLAND REGIO OF CARPENT

750 DORCHESTER

NEW ENGLAND REGIO OF CARPENT

WOMEN'S JAN

ELEC

STAIR 01

The Carpenters Center of New England by Add Inc is a trade school for carpenters. It is sited alongside the 93 South Highway in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

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CODE REPORT

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STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE

24,950 SF 250 OCCUPANTS

TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,888 SF

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

NOTES :

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LEVEL 3 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

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LEVEL 3 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

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LEVEL 3 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

2-HO OVER AREA PERI

1-HO EGR AREA

STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE

24,950 SF 250 OCCUPANTS

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20,650 SF 207 OCCUPANTS

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THESE USES = 567 PERSONS

AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 5,088 SF TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,888 SFOCCUPANTS OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON) 360 USE AND OCCUPANCY AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON) OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

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AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON)

EXIT TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THIS USE = C 81 PERSONS

16,150 SF 20,650 SF 81 OCCUPANTS 207 OCCUPANTS

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR C THESE USES = 567 PERSONS

5,088 SF 360 OCCUPANTS

TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,888 SF AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON) USE AND OCCUPANCY

16,150 SF 81 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

20,650 SF 207 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON)

AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON)

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THESE USES = 567 PERSONS

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THIS USE = 81 PERSONS

16,150 SF 81 OCCUPANTS EXIT

OFFICE 120 SF

11' - 0" CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 2,280 SF EXIT

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CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 2,280 SF MECHANICAL ROOM 230 SF OCCUPANCY = 1P

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TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,164 SF USE AND OCCUPANCY

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AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

22,944 SF 230 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 2,070 SF OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON) 139 OCCUPANTS TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,164 SF USE AND OCCUPANCY AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON) OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

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AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON)

16,150 SF 22,944 SF 78 OCCUPANTS 230 OCCUPANTS 2,070 SF 139 OCCUPANTS

TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,164 SF AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON) USE AND OCCUPANCY

16,150 SF 78 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

22,944 SF 230 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE S-2 (PARKING) OCCUPANCY (200SF GROSS / PERSON)

16,150 SF 78 OCCUPANTS

AREA FOR USE GROUP A-3 OCCUPANCY (15 SF / PERSON)

2,070 SF 139 OCCUPANTS

© 2008 ADD Inc

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CARPENTERS AREA

MACHINE INSTRUCTION RM TEL/DATA ELEV OPEN AREA MACHINE 720 SF RM 720 SF

RM

ELEV MACHINE RM

LEVEL 2 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

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LEVEL 2 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

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LEVEL 2 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

LOADING AREA 350 SF

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,480 SF

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,660 SF

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,480 SF

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,660 SF

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CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,660 SF CLASSROOM 700 SF USE GROUP A-3

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STAIR 04 - WIDTH 44" TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE STAIR CAPACITY THIS USE = 81 PERSONS STAIR 05 - WIDTH 44" MECHANICAL ROOM STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR 400 SF CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE THESE USES = 369 PERSONS STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THIS USE = 81 PERSONS

STAIR 04 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE STAIR 05 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE STAIR CAPACITY

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THESE USES = 369 PERSONS

STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THIS USE = 81 PERSONS

STAIR 04 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE STAIR 05 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE

EXIT OSED ENCL E ED GRAD TED KLER ON HAUS GE Y EX RKIN CARPENTERS Y SP G GARACALL FULL RKIN HANI 0 SF INSTRUCTION AREA PA - MEC 5,40 2 2,350 SF SUSE OSED ENCL E ED GRAD TED KLER ON HAUS GE Y EX RKIN Y SP G GARACALL FULL RKIN HANI 0 SF PA - MEC 5,40 S-2 E US

OSED ENCL E ED GRAD TED KLER ON HAUS GE Y EX RKIN Y SP G GARACALL FULL RKIN HANI 0 SF PA - MEC 5,40 2 SUSE

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,510 SF

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311 SUMMER STREET BOSTON, M

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311 SUMMER STREET BOSTON, M

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STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE ELECTRICAL CARPENTERS ROOM STAIR 02 - WIDTH INSTRUCTION AREA 44" 440 SF CAPACITY 720 SF = 220 PEOPLE

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CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 2,350 SF INSTRUCTORS LOUNGE AREA USE GROUP A-3 600 SF

LOADING AREA 350 SF

CLASSROOM 700 SF USE GROUP A-3

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

INSTRUCTORS LOUNGE AREA USE GROUP A-3 600 SF

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA INSTRUCTORS 1,480 SF LOUNGE AREA WOMEN'S USE GROUP A-3 600 SF JAN

EXIT MECHANICAL ROOM STAIR CAPACITY 400 SF TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THESE USES = 369 PERSONS

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MECHANICAL WOMEN'S ROOM MECHANICAL ROOM 540 SF JAN 400 SF ELECTRICAL CARPENTERS ROOM INSTRUCTION AREA ELEV 440 SF MACHINE 720 SF MEN'S ELEV TEL/DATA

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TEL/DATA 120 SF

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OFFICE CLASSROOM 120 SF 770 SF OPEN AREAUSE GROUP A-3 720 SF OCCUPANCY = 52 P

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CLASSROOM 570 SF OCCUPANCY = 38 P

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OPEN DECK ING ER PARKE SKY HEST RETE TO TH DORC ITH UE) CONC LW LEVE AVEN (AT

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MECHANICAL ROOM 230 SF OCCUPANCY = 1P

CLASSROOM 570 SF OCCUPANCY = 38 P

WOMEN'S

CLASSROOM CLASSROOM CLASSROOM 550 SF 550 270SF SF OCCUPANCY = 38 P OCCUPANCY =P 38 P OCCUP = 18 MEN'S

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason 11' - 0"

CLASSROOM 1470 SF FE OCCUPANCY = 98 P

FE

THIS LEVEL IS OPEN TO THE EXIT CAPACITY SKY AND DIRECTLY CONNECTED TO STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" DORCHESTER AVENUE. CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE

TOTAL OCCUPANTS FOR THIS USE = 81 PERSONS

5,088 SF 360 OCCUPANTS

STAIR 04

CLASSROOM 600 SF OCCUPANCY = 40 P

FE

NOTES :

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

FE CLASSROOM 270 SF OCCUP = 18 P CLASSROOM 570 SF FE OCCUP = 38 P

CLASSROOM OPEN 1470 SF EXIT CAPACITY DECK STAIR 04 DW OCCUPANCY = 98 P ING ER STAIR 01 - WIDTH 48" PARKE SKY HEST RETE TO TH DORC CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE H CONC CLASSROOM LOUNGE CLASSROOM CLASSROOM WIT UE) STAIR 02 - WIDTH 44" VEL SF STAIR 02 AVEN 778PEOPLE SF 550 SF 550 SF LE570 T CAPACITY = 220 (A OCCUPANCY = 52 P OCCUPANCY = 38 P OCCUPANCY = 38 P OCCUPANCY = 38 P DIRECT EGRESS DOOR - WIDTH 36" IT EX CAPACITY = 180 PEOPLE OPEN EXIT CAPACITY DECK ING ER THIS IS OPEN STAIRLEVEL 01 - WIDTH 48"TO THE PARKE SKY HEST SKY AND DIRECTLY RETE TO TH DORC STAIR 04 CAPACITY = 240 PEOPLE ITH UE) CONC CONNECTED TO 44" LW STAIR 02 - WIDTH DORCHESTER AVENUE. LEVE AVEN CAPACITY = 220 PEOPLE (AT DIRECT EGRESS DOOR - WIDTH 36" IT X E CAPACITY = 180 PEOPLE

C

USE AND OCCUPANCY

JAN

STAIR 04

STAIR 04

FE

TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,888 SF

DW OFFICE SUITE LOUNGE 778 SF OCCUPANCY = 52 P FE DW

LOADING

C

STAIR 01

CLASSROOM 600 SF OCCUPANCY = 40 P

TRASH & REC

FE ELEC

EXIT

CLASSROOM 570 SF OCCUP = 38 P FE

WOMEN'S

LOADING

STAIR 01

EGRESS DOOR (36")

MEN'S

EXIT

OPEN TO BELOW EGRESS DOOR (36")

NOTES :

FE

JAN

FE

ELEC

CLASSROOM 600 SF OCCUPANCY = 40 P

WOMEN'S

OFFICE SUITE

LOADING

STAIR 01

TRASH & REC

EGRESS DOOR (36")

CLASSROOM 570 SF OCCUP = 38 P

FE

FE

OPEN TO BELOW

Core

LEGEN

STAIR 02

EXIT CAPACITY

USE AND OCCUPANCY

Secondly, the exposure or public space and private space presents the occupants and those passing by the building the opportunity to be included into the activity.

Private space

1-HO AREA EGR ACCE

EXIT CAPACITY

NOTES :

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

OPEN TO BELOW

Public face

EGR ACCE OVER PERI 2-HO AREA EGR

MEN'S

COPY

EXIT

USE AND OCCUPANCY

AREA FOR USE GROUP B OCCUPANCY (100 SF GROSS / PERSON)

CODE REPORT

LEGEN

EGR

JAN

CODE REPORT

10/31/2008 6:27:26 PM

OVER PERI

WOMEN'S

This building is a significant case study for two reasons. First, the program type and the layout of the program is similar. The main use of space is for training which includes shops and classrooms, as well as offices.

10/31/2008 6:27:26 PM

LEGEN

STAIR 02

MEN'S

COPY

EXIT

TOTAL BUILDING AREA AT LEVEL 1 = 41,888 SF

© 2008 ADD Inc

EXIT

WOMEN'S JAN

CARPENTERS INSTRUCTION AREA 1,510 SF

ISSUANCES

No.

CLASSROOM 700 SF USE GROUP A-3 STAIR 04 OCCSTAIR = 47 P02 (PROTECTED WITH SNOW-MELT SYSTEM) CARPENTERS FULLY SPRIKLERED OPEN INSTRUCTION PARKING GARAGE ON GRADE AREA USE S-2 1,510 SF 10,130 SF EXIT

Checked By:

STAIR 04 (PROTECTED WITH SNOW-MELT SYSTEM)

CODE RE Checked By: AND COMP DIAGRA

STAIR 02 FULLY SPRIKLERED OPEN PARKING GARAGE ON GRADE USE S-2 10,130 SF

EXIT

CODE RE AND Checked By:COMP Drawing Scale: DIAGRA

STAIR 04 (PROTECTED WITH SNOW-MELT SYSTEM) FULLY SPRIKLERED OPEN PARKING GARAGE ON GRADE USE S-2 10,130 SF

1

LEVEL 1 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason 1

LEVEL 1 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

1

LEVEL 1 - CODE COMPLIANCE DIAGRAM 1" = 20'-0"

Description SCHEMATIC DESIG DD COORDINATIO

Job No.

23

G-00

CODE RE Drawing Scale: AND COMP Job No. DIAGRA

G-00

Drawing Scale:


Isabelle Stuart Gardener Museum 2012 Fenway, MA Renzo Piano Studio.

24

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Isabelle Stuart Gardener Museum

Section Three: Case Studies

The Isabelle Stuart Gardener Museum is an important case study of addition to an existing building. The main connection between the existing building and the new addition is a glass hall that leads into the original museum. The materials are completely different and the addition barely touches the original physically and yet, the addition become the entryway into the original and thus exerts its character upon the original. The connection, the scale, proportion, material, and thresholds of the addition contain lessons on a manner in which an addition can be applied to an original.

Floor Plan (Second Floor) of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

In some ways, this is the anti-thesis and the support of this proposal. This proposal asserts that the addition must exert itself over the original and yet the purpose is to become fully integrated. Piano’s design encapsulates, surrounds, and touches the original but does not conform to it.

Renzo Piano Perspective Sketch, Elevation of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

Section through the Performance Hall, the Glass Connector, Exterior Gardens, and Historic Museum Palace © RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP, 2010

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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Boston Public Library, 1895 Boston, MA Charles Follen McKim; McKim, Mead and White

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Section Three: Case Studies

Boston Public Library

non-directional

This case study is significant for multiple reasons. The setting The program and circulation The addition

program space

Boston Public Library includes a public face that is self sufficient. The later addition keys into the building along a discrete axis. This building must be understood as two separate buildings before it can be analyzed as an original and addition.

city room natural light open to sky

The setting of the building in the city center is a case of the community growing around the complex. The library was on the outskirts of Boston with the construction of the Back Bay. However, the design still presents a face to the neighborhood that welcomes in with a grand entry. The addition if built in a certain style that respects the independent quality of the original and subverts its character by book-ending the building. It blends into the material choices and provides and alternative experience that is related but separate. This case study also provides a lesson on thoughtful assimilation.

private with closed views out

entry with clear view out and up

private with closed views out

threshold experience with grand steps directional M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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Program Narrative A bright day down to Massachusetts Avenue carries a couple along to Washington Street. Along the way they stop at a flower shop and smell the fresh cut flowers the purveyor has just put out. The traffic of Mass. Ave is horrendous, but just beyond the intersection is a crisp building. The form seems to stand on its toes, reaching out to the rest of the community. The cafe along the street is already bustling with alfresco dining. The aroma of spices hint of distant lands. The couple walks up to a shaded cafe table under the stone archway. Around the corner, on Washington Street, a father is taking his son to work. The son pulls on his dad’s hand and points to the airy building on the corner. The stone facade seems to pull away, allowing for a glimpse into the sunny arcade. There are tall pointed archways and a mesmerizing smell. The father remembers back to the days when he was his son’s age. A 10 year old running through neighbor’s lemon tree grove, tumbling through the grass. That smell is impossible to get in the city. But here is a living memory, a home away from home. The father turns the corner with the son and heads through the ever expanding arcade. The hallway opens to a great room, a city room with a full grown lemon tree in the center. The son runs up to the tree and runs his hands through the leaves. The father chats with his neighbor at the front desk while they discuss today’s activities. A crowd lingers through the arcade, looking closely through the ornate windows and the stone work. You don’t find these crafts in Boston very often unless you have a ticket to the Museum of Fine Arts. And you can’t touch the work there. Today, these visitors will get to hear a lecture from a Moroccan craftsman who will hold a workshop on mosaic tile working. And if the class has time after, there is an amazing cafe to grab a nice dinner and review the lesson of the day. The thought of the seafood dishes start to make their mouth water.

Initial sketches and final sketches 28

James sits at a work bench on the top floor peering out the window as the building comes alive. His mentor, Said, is reviewing the metal chandelier that James has been working on for a month. Said is the only metalworking artisan in Boston. He has come to this place because it gives him the opportunity to share his knowledge and life’s work with enthusiastic students like James. M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Sketch Problem

Section Four: Sketch Problem

How will the thesis concept be applied to the design of an entry? The sketch problem afforded the opportunity to examine the site of the project and how the existing community and the immigrant population could enter the site. How could the entry begin the journey of assimilating the two community groups to each other. The process began through loose sketching of entry devices and the manner of approaching a building. The design then assigns the role of guest and host to the user of the building based upon what would meet them as they approached and the architectural devices used to great them. The design is based upon the presentation of the entry given through the program narrative.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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The shape of space

Perspectives down the hall

30

The arcade

The openings and openness M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Sketch Problem

Section Four: Sketch Problem

The intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Washington Street presents the site with an opportunity to make a distinction based upon the direction the user is coming to enter the building. For this purpose, the face along Washington Street is seen as the porous entry designed for the host, or the immigrant Community. The Massachusetts Avenue face is used as a welcoming setting for the guests, or the existing neighborhood. The architecture device used for the host, is a directional hall, that is porous but leading to the entry hall. The device used for the quest is that of a plaza or a cafe seating area within the urban fabric. Archways are used for both as a means of leading or of receiving. The corner is an allusion to muqarnas of Islamic architecture but also a device used to open the corner.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

31


South and East elevations

32

Floor Plan

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Sketch Problem

Section Four: Sketch Problem

The final solution is meant to look into the interior of the building in two manners. There is a directional hall that opens to an interior courtyard for the host culture and an open arcade that acts as alfresco seating for the guest. This arcade still provides views into the space and draws the guest around the corner into the interior courtyard.

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Additional Material Schedule of Reviews and Requirements Thesis One Introdutory Review

September 28, 2012

Preliminary Review

October 19, 2012

Schematic Review

Novermber 30, 2012

Thesis Two Design Development

February 15, 2013

Final Design

April 5, 2013

Qualifications of the Review Panel Thesis Faculty TBD Client and Cultural Advisor Said Lahyani Historical Advisor Lana Sloutsky Design Critic Paul Herbert Research Critic TBD Structural Engineer TBD Environmental Engineer TBD M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

35


Darian G. Mason 33 Adam’s Street Dorchester, MA 02122 (202) 957-5026 darian.mason@gmail.com

EDUCATION:

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA M. Arch Candidate Cincinnati Christian University, Cincinnati, OH B.A. Biblical Studies/ Urban & Intercultural Studies

EXPERIENCE:

Sept. 2007-Present 2006

Watermark Environments, Lowell, MA Architectural Designer - Small Arms Range Navy SubBase, Groton, CT. - Multimodial Transportation Shelter Volpe, Lowell, MA - Mental Health Clinich Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, MA

December 2010 – Present

Cambridge Seven Associates, Cambridge, MA Part-Time Architectural Student Intern

March 2009 – Dec 2009

Moshe Safdie and Associates, Inc., Somerville, MA Senior Staff Assistant, Document Control Assistant

September 2008- January 2009

DESIGN PROJECTS

Evolo Skyscraper Competition, Boston, MA Team Design Competition Field’s Corner Library, Boston, MA Team Conceptual Design Project Hale Reservation, Westwood, MA Team Conceptual Design Project

TRAVEL:

College Internship: Haikou, PRC English Teacher: Tokyo/ Nagano, Japan

36

November 2010 – Spring 2011 September 2010 - Spring 2011 October 2009 – July 2010

July 2005-January 2006 Summer 2004

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Paul Laurence Klock Herbert home: 5 Thorndike Street Unit #1 Arlington, Massachusetts 02474 - 617.733.6355 (cell)

education

Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Additional Material

Syracuse University School of Architecture International Study: Florence, Italy, Spring 2003 Bachelor of Architecture - May 2004 Boston Architectural College Certificate of Design Education - expected 2013

employment Summer of 1999 & 2000

Canandaigua Academy, Canandaigua, New York – May 1999 Mitchell Architecture and Construction, Pittsford NY Construction Laborer •

June 2004 - November 2005

• • • November 2005 - present

Crozier Lab - Harvard University Hoey Residence, Plymouth MA SUNY Delhi Student Union, Delhi NY

Cambridge Seven Associates, Cambridge MA Designer • Boston Children’s Museum • Museum of Science Boston - Master Plan • Acton Discovery Museums - Master Plan • Northeastern University Alumni Center • • • • •

August 2005 - present

Assisted Subcontractors as needed on small commercial projects

Douglas Okun & Associates, Cambridge MA Project Designer

Project Designer Northeastern University Advancement Offices Hard Rock Cafe, Las Vegas NV Museum of Discovery and Science, Ft. Lauderdale FL Westfield State University Dining Commons National Aquarium in Baltimore Renovation and Exhibits

Boston Architectural College, Boston MA Member of the Faculty • Instructor: Orthogonal Drafting (2005-2006) • Instructor: Perspective Drawing (2005-2006 • Instructor: Portfolio Design (2005-2006) • Discussion Section Leader: Design Principles (2007-present) • Instructor: A-1 Studio (2007-present) • Faculty CoHort: A-1 Studio Concurrent Undergraduate (2008-2012)

affiliations

awards and honors June 2011

American Institute of Architects - Associate Member Boston Society of Architects - Member Common Boston - volunteer 2009 - Co-chair of the committee for Boston’s Design Build Challenge 2010 and present - volunteer for Common Boston Common Build Common Boston Common Build - Grand Prize pherbert@c7a.com (work)

paul.herbert@the-bac.edu (school)

M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason


Thesis Proposal Document Cultural Hospitality

Annotative Bibliography

Additional Material

Abel, Chris. Architecture & Identity: Responses to Cultural and Technological Change.Woburn: Architectural Press, 2000. This work includes an important discussion of the advancement of architecture in a evermore complex world.

Darwish, Mahmoud. Journal of an Ordinary Grief. Brooklyn: Archipelago Books, 2010. Presents persons who have lost their sense of place in a narrative.

Adjaye, David, African Metropolitan Architecture: The Maghreb. New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2011. This book gives a survey of modern Morocco in pictures and statistical data.

Folker, Antoni. Modern Architecture in Africa. Amsterdam: Sun Architecture, 2010. A book that surveys work designed in Africa by outsiders and locals.

Alexander, Christopher et. al., A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1977. This work gives examples of architectural devices as well as the smaller characteristics of buildings.

Herzog, Lawrence A. Return to the Center: Culture, Public Space and City Building in a Global Era. Austin: Univeritys of Texas Press, 2006. Creation of a public square and a public space.

Baker, William T. Architectural Excellence in a Diverse World Culture. Mulgrave: Images Publishing Group, 2008. This book is a discussion of cultural works of significance. Byard, Paul Spencer. The Architecture of Additions: Design and Regulation. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1998. This book presents additions in a thoughtful manner, discussing the value and manner in which additions are designed. Caicco, Gregory, ed., Architecture, Ethics, and the Personhood of Place. Lebanon: University Press of New England, 2007. Presents architecture’s problem of lacking place and how to address that need. Cromley, Elizabeth Collins and Hudgins, Carter L. Gender, Class, and Shelter: Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, V. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1995. Presents the problem of power structures as it relates to local architecture.

Jager, Frank Peter, ed., Design Manual for Revitalizing Existing Buildings. Basel: Birkhauser, 2010. A how-to of designing within an existing building. Norberg-Schulz, Christian. Architecture: Presence, Language Place. Milano: Skira, 2000. Presenting a thoughtful discussion of how architecture holds meaning. Teyssot, Georges. “Aldo van Eyck’s Threshold: The Story of an Idea.” Log 11 (Winter 2008): 33–48. A discussion on the value of threshold as a part of Aldo van Eyck’s work. Robert, Philippe. Adaptations: New Uses for Old Buildings. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1989. A survey book of creative additions. Ypma, Herbert. Morocco Modern. New York: Thames & Hudson Inc., 2010. A survey of modern architecture within Morocco. M.Arch Candidate: Darian Mason

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Thesis Proposal