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PHOTG)

1995 ,I I

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GALLERY

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JOA.N

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. T ANJ A ALEX I A HOLLANDER " A R NOLD K ESS LER "T ATANA KELLNER C AR L MARTIN PAUL M_ ROMEJKO J A C I< S HEFF LE R" J. SHIMON AND J. LIN"DEMANN D O NNA STAN TO N _~/ SHARDN TANI ____ HAJ , ME VV A -T ANA.-BE 足 "

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THE FORUM GALLERY AT JAMESTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE


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hotoN ominal '95 is an exciting exhibition that challenges our preconceptions about the possibilities and limits of photographically based artwork. Responding to a "Call for Artists" issued last spring to local, regional, and national artists, galleries, museums, and publications, over 300 artists living throughout the U.S. and Canada submitted a total of more than 2,700 images to be considered for this year's show. ChristopherScoates, director of the Atlanta College of Art Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia, had the daunting task of reviewing the submissions and narrowing the mam­ moth field to a small group of artists whose work seemed to resonate and blend into a cohesive whole . As in years past, PhotoNominal '95 provides a glimpse into the ex­ traordinary diversity of form and content currently being explored by serious working artists who view photography as an important and often highly malleable ingredient in their creative process.

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s is The FORUM Gallery's standard policy, artists were not charged an entry fee to submit work to this exhibition; and as always, the show was open to any and all artists producing photographically based pieces (although an atti­ tude of innovation toward form and content has always been stressed as a salient feature of the exhibition). Christopher Scoates, who selected this year's show, is currently invigorating the art community in Atlanta, Georgia, with powerful shows that reach beyond the boundaries of the traditional gallery space into some of the most distressing and troubled aspects of the community at large. Prior to his appoint­ ment in Atlanta, Mr Seoates was curator of contemporary art at Washington University Gallery of Art in St. Louis (1990-93), and curatorial aSSOCiate of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (1989-90). Mr Scoates joins a very distinguished group of past PhotoNominal jurors that includes Charles A. Wright, Jr (1994), Carlos Guiterrez-Solana (1 993), Susan Krane (1992), and Sandy Skoglund (1991). Each year, the invited juror has brought a unique perspective to the selection process generating a series of shows unmatched in our offerings for their innovative power and clarity of artistic vision.

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ndoubtedly, some viewer.s will find the exploratory and revelatory aspects of this show disturbing; others win find them provocative and perhaps alluring . It is our hope that you· will ultimately. find the exhibition to be engaging and inteJlec­ tually challenging. The images presented here are but a small sampling of the themes and forms that comprise photographic practice in the mid-1 990s - they are but a small reflection of the realities that constitute the world that we live in.

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eare indebted to Christopher Scoates for the time, thought, and expertise that he brought to this project. We are especially grateful to the exhibitors for the courage of their artistic vision and for the dedication of their creative pursuit.


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ince the 1970s, university class rooms have been influenced by a variety of theoretical writings on art, film, popular culture, literature, femi­ nism and politics. The authors of these influential writings, including Walter Ben­ jamin, Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan, Michel Foucault, and Jean Baudrillard, are quite familiar to us now. Their theories ori semiotics, Marxism, feminism, struc­ turalism, psychoanalysis, and postcstruc­ turalism have appeared in the specialized art and theory journals on which many artists cut their teeth. Those who studied photography were influenced by a small number of authors whose writings dealt specifically with photographic practices. Many of these new artists sought a complex view on photographic discourse from such writers as Rosalind Krauss, Martha Rosier, Victor Burgin,Allan Sekula, Douglas Crimp and later the writings of Abigail Solomon-Godeau, Christopher Phillips, Silvia Kolbowski, Rosalyn Deutsche, and John Tagg.

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ountless photography students have been challenged by influential photographic. criticism: Allan Sekula's groundbreaking essay "On the Invention of Photographic Meaning"; Rosalind Krauss's essays on photographic "originality"; Victor Burgin's writings on psychoanalytic theo­ riesand feminism; and Rosalyn Deutsche's insights into the photographic works of Krystof Wodiczko. All of these works explore the numerous roles photography plays in contemporary culture and politics including the politics of gender and sexuality Such ideas clearly influenced many of the artists who submitted works for the PhotoNominal juried photo­ graphyexhibition. A number of artists who were selected for the exhibition raise a plethora of questions, ideas, and concerns regarding sexual difference, the body, political choice, the city, community, identity, and gender

I

was excited as the juror to evaluate the entire speCtrum of photographic practice. Submis­ sions included an examination of all institutional-productions of photography- . from newspa­ per and magazine photojournalism to images taken for purposes of surveillance to commer-­ cial photography and amateur snap shooting. When selecting works for the exhibition, I was looking for bodies of work where the artists had taken time to work through different aesthetic, formal, and political concerns as well as critical issues of photographic representation. number of works stDod out from·the rest: Hajfme Watanabe's pictures of transves­ tites with breast implants raise questions about the boundaries of appropriate inter­ ...- - . personal behavior Watanabe comments on the growing sense that we should take control over our bodies and our social circumstance rather than accept what we are born with. Carl Martin's Men of Georgia is reminiscent of William Eggelston's color portraits of the early seventies. Like Eggelston, Martin's approach combines a romantic realism which engages the emotions of the sitter Sharon Tani's Specimens echoes the photography and language strategies of eighties artist Barbara Kruger With words and images Tani explores political statement, propaganda, and document. Joan Barker's photographs are a perfect, beautiful hybrid of Diane Arbus's portraits of the disenfranchised and of Bill Owens' Suburbia, which pictures the interior views of impersonal tract homes. Barker's portraits of couples proudly displaying their guns clearly show the seamier side of the American underbelly

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WOUld like to thank all of the artists for submitting work and for making my job of selecting this exhibition interesting, challenging, and rewarding.

~~ BY 1 9 8 3 , PLUNDERING THE PAGES OF GLOSSY MAGAZINES, S H 0 0T ­ ING ADVERTISEMENTS FROM THE TELEVISION SET, OR 'SIMU -, L ATING' PHOTOGRAPHIC TABLEAUX THAT MIGHT HAVE COME FROM tiTHER OF THESE MEDIA HAD BECOME AS ROUTINE AN ACTIVITY IN THE MORE SOPHISTICATED ART SCHOOLS AS SLOPPING PAINT ON CANVAS" -ABIGAIL SOLOMON - GODEAU

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esponsibility for the int~rpretation and mean­ ing of the image does not belong to the pho­ tographer alone nor is a final image necessarily self-explanatory The viewer is a collaborator in the act of seeing and perceiving.

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he position, presentation , and placement of the photograph further enliven the viewing ex­ perience. What associations does each viewer bring to his or her individual interpretation? How do the photographer's own associations shape the subject and the image?

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or me, the 8 x 10 view camera forinat, used in making these photographs of gun owners, represents a reverence for the act of photographing . First, the subjeCts appear etched on the frosted glass grid before my eyes . This process evolves into what is almost a ritual, as their light impressions follow their steady gazes toward and onto the sheet film.

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ach of us - photographer and subject - is quiet in his or her role. The guns in the photo­ graphs are also quiet , inert, resting but seemingly ready . But, interestingly, the guns and the subjects are seldom interpreted as inert by the viewer.

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ilence prevails during this singular, solitary, quiet act of viewing. Control shifts suddenly to the spectator

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h, e presence of the gun then shatters the silence and asks the audience to reconsider the exploration of the gun as concept, icon and symbol. The pictures speak of paradoxes, simultaneo'usly symbolizing the malevolent anc:J the mundane.

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he photographic image represents the rich, multi-layered exchange between photographer and subject. But the success of the image is in its ability to transcend the medium and communicate directly with the vjewer '

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: Gun Show, Silver Eye Center for Photography, Pittsburgh, PA, 1993.

Gun Show, Silver Image Gallery, Seattle, WA, 1993.

The American Dream, Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock, NY 1992.

Emerging Artists, Helio Galleries, New York, NY, "989.

Joan Barker Photographs, Photohozos, Athens, Greece, 1986.

Joan Barker Photographs, Yuen Lui Gallery, 3eattle, WA, 1986.

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS "Gun Show," Village Voice, New York , NY, Volume 39, Number 13, March 19, 1994. " 1992 Competition - Photo Review Winners," The Photo Review, Langhorne, PA, Volume 15, Number 3, Summer 1992 . "Photographs," by Plato Rivellis, Photography Circle, Athens, Greece, 1990. "Exhibitions - Climbing Picture Mountains;" by Owen Edwards, American Photographer, Volume 16, Number 2, February 1986.

EDUCATION : M.F.A., SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, NY

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST: ;, American Gothic, 1992, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches. o Father, Son-in-Law, Son, Black Powder Competition, NY, 1992, silver contact print, 20 x i 6 inches. 9 Ginger anr Tess, 1992, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches. o Peaceable Kingdom, 1992, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches.

e Raffle Winner and Daughter, 1991, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches.

Q Instructor, 199 1, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches . • Remember Honey, Shoot to Kill, 1993, silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches. • Easter Sunday, 1993 , silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches . • The Pacifier, 1992 , silver contact print, 20 x 16 inches. • Baptism, 19 92, silver contact print , 20 x 16 inches.


JOAN BARKER BAPTISM 1992

SILVER CONTACT PRINT 10 X8 INCHES

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I

began this project photographing in my parents' home in an attempt to make sense of my childhood and value system. What was it that happened there that may have attributed to the point I am at in my life right now, who was I then, am I still the same person? I approached this idea from a sociological standpoint, look­ ing for evidence of beliefs in the interiors of the house I was raised in. The act of photographing an environment like that is a valuable one. It creates a distance from the subject that allows further analysis and study of the photographs at a later time. In that sense, these images become statistical information, evidence to support my per­ ception of that place. I have presented these images to various sociology classes here at the University of Nebraska. The results are always interesting. There is a surprising amount of overlap in interests between myself as a visual artist and these sociologists who are looking at these images from a different, but comparable standpoint. The students voice their surprise at seeing sociological concerns dealing with family struc­ ture, different kinds of families and their values, expressed visually

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he photographs have a somber tone, at times tinged with dry humor Some of the images contain references to the Dutch Vanitas paintings with the still life form and the objects they contain. In Interior '#4 the top of the dresse,r has several traditional Vanitas elements, a flower in a vase, in this case a modern silk flower (the kind that never die), a ring, a picture of a loved one in her wedding dress and a death announce­ ment of another These elements bring to mind ideas about life's brevity, the things we cherish, and the fleetingness and inevitability of death .

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: NewDirections '94"Barrett House, Poughkeepsie, NY, ,1 994.

40th Annual National Juried Exhibition, San Diego Art Institute, San Diego, CA, 1994,

Consuming Passions: Food, Art, and Culture, Hallwalls, Buffalo, NY, 1994.

LaGrange National Biennial XVIII, Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange, GA, 1994.

Women's Art Works 4, Shoestring Gallery, Rochester, NY 1994.

National Exposure II, ARC Gallery, Chicago, IL, 1993.

HBACH o N RASKA

EDUCATION: M.F.A., University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 1995. B.F.A., University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI, 1992.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST: Interior # 7, 1994, chromogenic print, 1 5 liz X 23 Interior #2, 1994, chromogenic print, 151/2 x 23 Interior #3, 1994, chromogenic print, 15 liz x 23 Interior #4, 1994, chromogenic print, 15 liz x 23 Interior #5, 1994, chromogenic print, 1 5 liz x 23 Interior #8, 1994, chromogenic print, 15 liz x 23

• Home • Home • Home • Home • Home • Home

114 inches. 1/4

1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4

inches. inches. inches. inches. inches.


JILL BIRSCHBACH

HOME INTERIOR # 4 1994

CHROMEGENIC PRINT 15 1/ 4 X23 INCHES

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At~~~~~iNITIONS

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his project began almost three years ago when I received a frantic phone call from my mother exclaiming that Sherri, Brent's on again/off again girlfriend of three years was pregnant (Sherri was only sixteen, and Brent was eighteen). When the pregnancy was confirmed they had been apart for four months . In her seventh month , Sherriand Brent recon­ ciled and she moved in with our family .

I

had been photographing Brent for six years, when Sherri moved in. My work grew from por­ traits of my brother to the study of a tense relationship awaiting an unexpected child. The inclusion of a second, often hostile person, added a new dimension to the work. Together, we ex­ plored how two people can exist together in such separate spaces. All relationships include a cer­ tain amount of distance, but it is particularly com­ pelling (disturbing) in such a young family. Brent and Sherri became familiar with my methods and ignored the shadow of my camera, which was never far away in our lives . They both took inter­ est in the final product, gave me feedback on what photos they liked, and shared what they were thinking when the photos were taken. We worked together for eighteen months. The project stalled for eight months when Brent was not allowed to see Hadyn. This past summer (1994), Sherri and Brent reconciled (not as a couple, but as parents), providing me an opportu­ nity to continue photographing them .

C0rb,~EEN CASEY d'l~~~IA

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

Local Sex, Love and Death, Nexus Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, GA, 1994.

November Show, Hasting Seed Building, Atlanta, GA, 1994.

Chair, Broward Comm'urity College, Davie, FL, 1994.

Solo exhibition, Silver House Co-operative, Savannah, GA, 1992.

Once Upon a Time Recent Pinhole Work, Bergan Hall, Savannah, GA, 1992.

Through the Eye of a Needle, Atlanta Photography Gallery, Atlanta, GA, 1991

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS "American Photo Contest Issue," Photojournalism, New York, NY, Volume V, Number 6, November/December 1994. Contributing and featured artist, Contents Magazine, Savannah, GA, Volumes 1,2,3,4,6, 1992-1993. "Silver House," by Susanne Matty, Georgia Guardien, Savannah, GA, February 7, 1992. Featured photographer, "News," Atlanta Photography Group Newsletter, Atlanta, GA, Winter 1992. . . Featured artist, Georgia Guardien, Savannah, GA, June 1992. • Pinhole Journal, Volume 2, August 1991

EDUCATION: Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA, 1992. E XHIBI T ION C HECKLIST : • Together Apart I, 1992, selenium toned gelatin silver print, 30 x 35 inches . • Flower Petals, 1992, selenium toned gelatin silver print, 30 x 35 inches. • After Bath, 1993, selenium toned gelatin silver print, 33 x 31 inches. • Laundry, 1993 , selenium toned gelatin silver print, 33 x 30 inches . • Laces, 1992, selenium toned gelatin silver print, 30 x 35 inches. • First Birthday II, 1993 , selenium toned gelatin silver print, 33 x 30 inches. • Bath, 1993, selenium toned gelatin silver print, 33 x 30 inches. • Waiting/Hospital, 1992, selenium tonedgelatin silver prir:t, 30 x 35 inches .


COLLEENM. CASEY FLOINERPETALS 1992

SELENIUM TONED SILVER GELATIN PRINT 30 X 35 INCHES

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I

cannot claim to be an expert on the process of dying or even very knowledgeable on the subject . I only have my continuing personal experience with my father, informa­ tion obtained from books and my experience with the people I have come to know at a nursing home.

A

ging and the threat of death has been a large part of my life. When I was born, my father was 53-years-old, my mother, 46. While I was growing up, my par­ ents were growing old. My father's decline began with a stro~e when I was 12­ years-old and has steadily worsened. Now, after numerous strokes and an on-going battle with heart disease, he is completely dependent upon my mother for care .

fter moving from near my hometown in upstate New York to IJlinois, I began volun­ teering and photographing at a nursing home. I work with the people at the nursing home because it helps me to deal with the issues that are so large in·my life . It has also helped me to see those issues in a larger context.

A

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spend time with people who are dying . Many of the people I deal with are treated like they are already dead. Their belongings have been sold off by family members. The house they have lived in fo r many years is gone to somebody else. The momentos they have gathered throughout the path of thei r lives are distributed among family members or sold at garage sales. any of the residents of the home feel a huge sense of loss and displacement. The bed they sleep in is not theirs. The smell is not the familiar scent of their home . The momentos they keep are the most speciai but they sit on cheap .simulated wood grain furniture that is not theirs, The drapes and bed spread in their room are identical to all the other rooms. The sense of a temporary space is overwhelming .

W

hen the person dies, their clothes are given to the Salvation Army The last bits of their belongings, their history, are boxed up and left for the [lext of kin. Within a day another person will occupy the same space and attempt to make it their own.

T

he American way of dying has become institutional, out of sight. We give tempo­ rary shelter to the 'dying where they cannot make a permanent mark on our lives.

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hese are photographs of bodily decay and spiritual survival in an institution meant for dying. They are about what we do to our sick and dying while they are stili with us. •

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: Site of Crisis, Works/San Jose, San Jose, CA, 1994.

Solo exhibition, Earlville Opera House Gallery, Earlville, NY, 1994.

Solo exhibition, Delaware Valley Arts Alliance , Narrowsburg, NY, 1993

The Human Element Invitational, Kirkland Art Center, Clinton , NY, 1992 .

EDUCATION: M.F,A. candidate, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign,IL, 1996. B.F.A., SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, NY, 1990.

EXHIB ITION CHECKLlS T· • John Flake and Maudie Edward; 1994 , gelatin silver print, 30 x 38 inches, • Leland and Iva Moody, 1994, gelatin silver print, 30 x 38 inches. .


DANIEL COONEY

JOHN FLAKE AND MAUDIE EDWARD 1994

GELATIN SILVER PRINT 30 X38 INCHES

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DAVI AN

DA V

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IS

M

uch has been said about the impossibility of romantic love in modern life. The threat of AIDS, the world economic cri­ sis and the societal changes wrought by the sexual revolution leave little room for romance as experienced by previous gen­ erations.

I

n the series, Modern Romance, we use humor and implied narrative to investigate such issues as identity, dependence, power and trust as they impact the contemporary relationship between the sexes.

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he images are of staged performances put on for the camera with the artists playing the roles of Everyman and Everywoman. Photographed in a quasi-com­ mercial style, they suggest that something has gone awry within the context of a cliched situation and often mock the way mass media define men's and women's roles.

SELECTED

EXHIBITIONS :

Modern Romance, Pittsburgh Filmmakers Gallery, The Media Arts Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 1995 Modern Romance, Stevenson Union Gallery, Southern Oregon State College, Ashland, OR; 1994. Modern Romance, South Bay Contemporary Museum of Art II, Long Beach, CA, 1994. California, Downey Museum of Art, Downey, CA, 1994. Modern Romance, Photography Gallery, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, 1993 Regional Selections, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 1988.

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, AND CATALOGS: "Shows mix photos, painting," by Peter Frank, Press Telegram, Long Beach, CA, September 18, 1994. "1993 Competition Winners," by Stephen Perloff, PhotoReview, Langhorne, PA, Volume 16, Number 3, 1993 "Darkroom Discoveries," by Thom Harrop, Darkroom Photography, Beverly Hills, CA, October 1990. "Regional Selections 1988," exhibition catalog, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, July 1988. "Cultural Indicators," by,Ruth Askey, Artweek, San Jose, CA, June 15, 1985.

EDUCATION: Denise Cara Davis, B.A., California State University, Northridge, CA, 1982. Scott Davis, B.A., University of l\lewHampshire, Durham, NH, 1976.

EXHIBITION CHECK,LlST' • Blue Whisper, 1994, C-print, 20 x 24 inches. • Idealist and Pragmatist, 1993, C-print, 20 x 24 inches. • Meat Tenderizer, 1993, C-print, 20 x 24 inches. • Pretty Young Thing, 1992, C-print, 24 x 20 inches.


DAVIS AND DAViS BLUE VVHISPER 1994

C-PRINT 20 X24 INCHES

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R

on DiRito utilizes both the medium of text and the medium of photographic re­ production with electrically charged toner to create Nests. This piece and other palimpsests from the series titled Text Blocks result from the stacking and condensing of layers of text taken from books and their transformation into new text­ objects by means of reproduction. These objects exist as primary and visually active surfaces that negate possibilities for a majority of literary content readings.

O

iRito's palimpsests point with the material to which they point, being text. Nests, through its condensation of textual information, points to contempo­ rary issues of. how text is stored,labeled, reproduced and interpreted through its physical form. As an object it is similar in visual texture to the Rosetta Stone, and'this is an important and deliberate part of the artwork.

O

N

IRITO

SWAMPSCOTT MASSACHUSETTS

ur culture has passed from a rather fluid oral tradition to what may possibly be seen as an interruption in the natural flow of language by its recorded and printed form that has accumulated as books and librar­ ies. We are now emerging a fluid vehicle of language within the electronic medium that does away with the need of books, and again marks the beginning of a new era of discur­ sive possibilities.

W

ithin the context of an art gallery, DiRito's work raises questions as to the place of the art object in this fluid electronically charged culture. Images have , been reproduced as lithographs, photographs and now as internet-accessible exhibitions. The art object itself exists freely as a pure reproduction in such an environ­ ment without the need of having ever been an original. Ithas always existed as repro­ duction. DiRito's artist-books, installations, photographs, and palimpsests address such issues ahd all examine the nest of language as it shifts from the home of books to the realm of electronic information. -BY ROBERT RAY CRADDI C I< .

SELECTED

EXHIBITIONS:

Print Work '94, The Barrett House Gallery, Poughkeepsie, NY, 1994.

Faculty Exhibition '94, Winfiski Gallery, Salem State College, Salem, MA, 1994.

Internal Difference, The Red Eye Gallery, Providence, RI, 1992.

Wealth, Coburn Gallery, Colorado Springs, CO, 1990.

Socially Speaking, The Emmanuel Gallery, Denver, CO, 1989.

Individual Artists Fellowship,Exhibition, Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO, 1987

EDUCATION : M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI, 1992. B.A., Metropolitan State College, Denver, CO, 1989.

EXH IB IT ION CHE CKLIST : • Nests, 1993, photographic reproduction with electrically charged toner, 60 x 36 inches.


RON D~RITO NESTS 1993

PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTION WITH ELECTRICALLY

CHARGED TONER 60 X 36 INCHES

lS


M

y work is comprised of a body of mixed media photo portrait sculptures that examine contemporary life through the means of visual metaphors. The juxtapo­ sition of photographs of people with objects that identify life's contemporary chal­ lenges, such as mason jars, rocks, hangers, ropes, pins, and other household items, moves us to consider the dilemmas of modern existence. I have developed a visual vocabulary that transcends the limitations of traditional portraiture. Traditional values are questioned and the symbolic meaning of all the elements presented must be con­ sidered.

T

he photographic transfer method allows me to explore the symbolism in me­ dia as diverse as fabric , wood, ceramics, stone, glass, and metal. My pillows and quilts invite tactile exploration of the themes while they distance the viewer from some of the more painful aspects of contemporary life. Issues that concern modern individuals are further challenged by my use of common everyday items as a support for photo portraits that are put into relationships with still other items. Furthermore, the celebration of fine hand crafting is an essential element of much of this work and is my tribute to the merging of fine arts and crafts.

SELECTED

EXHIBITIONS:

Love Poems, ARC Gallery, Chicago, Il, 1994. .

Current Works '94, Society for Contemporary Photography., Kansas City, MO, 1994.

Photo Portraits, ARC Gallery, Chicago, Il, 1993.

Dark Visions, Dark's Art Parlour, Santa Ana, CA, 1993

Chicago in New York, Amos Eno Gallery, New York, NY, 1993

Private Relations, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, Il, 1993.

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS : "Exhibitions Wander Through 'Once-Taboo Territory," by Cathy Curtis, Los Angeles Times, los Angeles, CA, May 3, 1994. "Magical: The Biennial Evanston and Vicinity Exhibition," by William F Grisham, The Evanston Clarion, June 17, 1994. . "Feminist Art, 90's ,Style," by Michael Bonesteel, The Evanston Review, March 17, 1994. "love Follows Form Follows Function," by Nick Green, The Chicago Maroon, February 11,1994. A.R.C. 20th Anniversary Exhibition, catalog, September 1993.

Let the Work Speak for Itself, catalog, CWCA exhibition, Novemb.er 1990.

EDUCATION: Penland, Penland, NC, 1994.

University of Illinois, Chicago, Il, 1989.

B.A., DePauw University, Greencastle, ,IN, 1970.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST: • You Made Your bed... A Comforter, 1994, photo transfer on silk, stamping ink, thread, 80 x 60 inches.


NANCY NANIS GARGIULO YOU MADE YOUR BED~_ .

A COMFORTER 1994

PHOTO TRANSFER ON SILK STAMPING INK, THREAD 80 X 60 INCHES

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I

am very interested in the idea of lost and forgotten histories and how photographs have

functioned as evidence and artifact in the construction of history. My work points to the

process by which histories and concepts of gender are shaped from various surviving and

known fragments of information according to culturally dominant points of. view that influe­ nce our own understanding of the past and identity As part of an installation entitled

New Eden: The Life and Work of Isabelle Raymond, these photographs represent such

fragments when exhibited out of context, acknowledging the possibility that other such

photographs or information could have once existed but have been lost, forgotten, hidden,

altered or destroyed.

I

have invented the character of a nineteenth-century photographer, Isabelle Raymond, to sug­ gest the possibility of discovering such a lost history. One in which a female photographer

challenged gender roles through poses, costumes, and references to classical mythology What

if such a photographerexisted in the last century, but her body of work had been neglected and

forgotten because of her subject matter, because of her gender, her aesthetics, or because

those responsible for writing history considered it irrelevant? I am asking you to consider how

the discovery of such an individual and her work might affect your understanding of the past and

present. The photographs question the idea of history as an unchanging entity in order to

challenge its authority Ultimately, they remind us that we are active participants in the making

of history, and that we ar~ responsible for questioning the past and creating our own identities.

a

S t: L E CTE D EXH ·. B ITI N S :

New Eden: The Life and Work of Isabelle Raymond, Matrix Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI, 1994.

National Showcase Exhibition '94, Alternative Ml,Jseum, New York, NY, 1994.

The Visual Diary, The Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX, 1994.

States. of the Art, A.I.R. Gallery, New York, NY, 1993.

73th Michigan Biennial, Kresge Art Museum, East Lansing, MI, 1993.

Cynthia Greig and Carol Novak, Urban Institute for . Contemporary Arts, Grand Rapids, MI, 1992.

c. .

GR IG M ~~t~

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CA T ALOGS·

"New Eden: The Life and Work of Isabelle Raymond," by Whitley Setrakian, Ann Arbor· Observer, Ann Arbor, MI, October 1995. "Photographs Challenge Gender Stereotypes," by John Carlos Cantu, Spotlight, Ann Arbor, MI, September 29, 1994. "The Rite of Women's Autobiography," by Patricia Lee Yongue, SPOT, Houston, TX, Spring 1994. "Reclining in the Fields of Art," by Judith Reynolds, City Newspaper, Rochester, NY, March 10, 1994. Catalog, 73th Michigan Biennial Exhibition, by Phylis Floyd, E. Lansing, MI, 1993. "Female Artists Pack a Powerful Message," by Sara Albert, The GrandRapids Press, December 23, 1992.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST : ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE FROM THE LIF E AND WORK OF ISAB EL LE RAYMOND • Stereograph No. S, 1994, gelatin silver print, 3 liz X 7 inches. • Adam and Eve, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 liz X 4 1/4 inches. • Unidentified Woman with 7865 Godey's Fashion Book, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 liz X 4 1/4 inches. • Pygmalion, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 liz X 4 1f4 inches. • /VI. Claudet as. Pan, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 liz X 4 1/4 inches . .. Isabelle, 1994, tintype, 3 liz x 6 liz inches. • M. C/audet, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 liz X 4 1/4 inches. • Stereograph No.7, 1993, gelatin silver print, 3 liz X 7 inches. • Stereograph No.2, 1993, gelatin silver print, 3 liz X 7 inches.


/

C. S. GREIG STEREOGRAPH NO.7 FROM THE LIFE AND WORI< OF ISABELLE RAYMOND 1993 GELATIN SILVER 路PRINT 3 1/2 X7 INCHES

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TANJA

HtJ~r~NDER

P RTLAND

M ' INE

I

am am employing and exploiting the language of pornographic, photographic and art history. I am taking "the self" out of its socially con­ structed anonymous package and into my terms. The intention is to blur the boundaries and ride the edge of the defined self In tantalizing, hu­ moring , and directing the viewer through juxta­ positions of spatial language, lam putting my iden­ tity as artist, person, social and sexual being at stake.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

Dead Space Gallery, Portl~nd , ME, 1994.

Sexy American Self Portrait.lnstallation, Sexy American Self Portrait Installation, Main Gallery Hampshire College, Amherst, MA, 1994.

Girls! Girls! Girls!, Hampshire College Century Gallery, Amherst, MA, 1993.

Storme , portrait of a dyke stripper, Hampshire College Photo Gallery, Amherst, MA, 1993.

Just Fucking Smile, South Bend Museum of Art, South Bend, IN, 1992. . '

REVIEWS, PUBL ICATIONS, C ATALO q S : "Storme portrait of a dyke stripper," by Tanja Ale xia Hollander, On Our Backs Magazine, Blush Entertainment Corp., San Francisco, CA, Volume 9 , Number 6, July/ August 1993 . "Lofty Aspirations," by Wayne Curtis , Casco Bay Weekly, Portland, ME, Volume 6, Number 10, October 6, 1994. '

EDUCATIO N:

B.A., Hampshire CQllege, Amherst, MA, 1994.

EX HIBITION CHECKLIST • Nude #7, 1994, gelatin silver print, 30 x 23 liz inches . · ,Kitchen NYC, #7 , 1994, C-print, 16 liz x 16 liz inches. • Wedding Dress #2, 1994, gelatin silver print, 24 x 20 inches. • Cooter Close-Up #8, 1994, gelatin silver print, 24 x 20 inches . • Nude # 70, 1994, gelatin silver print, 24 x 20 inches. • My Window #8, 1994, C-print, 24 x 17 inches. • Glamour Shot # 2, 1994, C-print, lOx 8 inches. • My Window # 72, 1994, gelatin silver print, 17 l/4 x 14 3/4 inches. • Cooter Close-Up #9, gelatin silver print, 11 liz x 9 liz inches , • Family Frame Collage, 1994, gelatin silver and C-prints, 17 I/ Z x 2 1 1/z inches. • Leopard Skin Sheets #3, 1994, gelatin silver print, 8 liz X 8 liz inches. • Mirror Reflectio(1 #2, 1994, C-print, 20 x 16 inches. • Laundry Day #2, 1994, C-print, 24 x 20 inches. • Leopard Skin Sheets #2, 1994, gelatin silver print, 17 x 12 inches . • Bathroom Maine #6, 1994, gelatin silver print, 14 liz x 11 liz inches. • Dentist #7 , ,1 994, gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 inches. • My Window #9, 1994, gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 inches. • Beach Work Print, 1 994, gelatin silver print, 1 3/ 4 X 2 3f4 inches . • Beach #3, 1994, C-print,' 1 5 x 12 inches. • Sea Shell Face Chachka, 1994, gelatin silver print, 6 x 5 inches . • Instant Color Passport Photos Enclosed, 1994, gelatin silver prints, diptych book, 5 1/4 x 3 liz inches . • If I Were A Fairy . ., 1994, gelatin silver prints in book, 6 1/4 x 6 1/4 inches. • Bill Clinton Hair With Glitter andLove, 1994, computer digitalized print, 3 liz X 3 inehes. 1994, ge,latin silver and C-prints, • Sears and Clitoris Portraits in Flowered Frames, 3 1/4 X 2 liz inches . • Bathroom and Beach Dipty ch, 1994, gelatin silver and C-prints, 4 x 7 Vz inches. • Cooter Close-Up/ NYC, 1994, gelatin silver and C-prints , 8 liz X 13 inches . • # 7 Dog Mug, 1994, photo mug , 3 314 x 5 inches .


T ANJA ALEXIA HOLLANDER

NUDE #7 1994

30 X 23 liz INCHES

GELATIN SILVER PRINT

21


"THERE IS SOMETHI NG IN MOST OF US THAT REQUIRES US TO FIND BEAUTY REGARDLESS OF THE HORRORS AND TRAGEDY SURROUNblNG US." -UNKNOWN AUTHOR

F

lowers and plants appear in any and all shapes; have intimate details; contain many structures of unusual size, shape and color; their colors are so varied (and vary by season or even by time of day on the same plant) that many cannot be truly represented on film; flowers seem to provide a sense of calm when vie~ed, but the ,colors (and/or shapes) are exciting; the inner details attract the eye and give a sense of wonder; they are symmetric and, at the same time, have irregularities that add something special. The photo­ graphs can be viewed every day and do provide feelings of well-being.

ER

I n short, I find them fascinating.

«NATURE ISNOTALL TOBE REPRESENTED AS IT IS,...., BUT AS IT OUGHT TO BE, AND MIGHT POSSIBLY HAVE BeEN . . . " ~ALBERT SANDS SOUTHWORTH, 1871

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

Red Venus Gallery, San Diego, CA, 1995

Amador County Arts Council, Sutter Creek; CA, 1995 ,

A Gallery Retrospective, California Center for the Arts, Escondido, CA, 1994.

EDUCATION: M.S., San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, 1971. B.A., University of California, San Diego, CA, 1969. EXHIBITION CHECKLIST: Spraxis, 1992, C-print,14 x 11 inches.

o


ARNOLD KESSLER SPRAXIS 1992 C-PRINT 14 X1] INCHES

23


I

n my work I deal with issues that personally touch my everyday life. These include: living in a rural environment; being a woman and an immigrant; reaching maturity; the death of friends and family members; the joy of being alive; and the frustrations of living in a less than perfect society As a daughter of Holocaust survivors born the generation after the war, I share survivors' guilt, anger and acceptance over the collective loss of those murdered. As an artist, I try to use these experiences and transform them into a contemporary context. began thinking about my experiences growing up in Czechoslovakia. Even though I have always known that my parents were interned in concentration camps and that both of their families were annihilated ,there, we never talked about those years in any detail. Those experiences indelib1y changed my parents 'and their outlook on life and in turn affected what they taught me about the world. Even though I grew up watching war movies,it wasn't until my adulthood when I read accounts of other Holocaust survivors, that I realized how little I really know of what actually happened to my family. I wanted to know more. Once I realized how I'd like to present my parents' stories I asked them to recollect what happened, not only for myself, but also as evidence against the revisionists who claim the, Holocaust never hap­ pened. Adding to the collec.tive memory seemed especially important in light of the recurring incidents of anti-Semitism, racism, and ethnic cleansing we are witnessing today

T

he first result were twoartist's books: 77 125: Fifty Years of Silence, and B-11226: Fifty Years of Silence, where my parents document their nightmarish years in the concen­ tration camps. In the course of working on these books, I traveled to some of the concentra­ tion camp sites in order tQ understand what my parents were describing. I photographed the camp sites as they are today in order to use these images in the books. The books do not fully record the haunting memories those sites evoked. I needed to try to describe my experiences at these sites. I created this body of photographic works to help others begin to realize the scale of the Holocaust.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS : Retrospective, Western Michig.m University, Kala'mazoo, MI, 1995. Fifty Years of Silence, Tyler Art Gallery, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY, 1994. Retrospective, Foreman Gallery, Hartwick College, Hartwick, NY, 1994. Fifty Years of Silence, Memory and Loss, CEPA Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1993 Memories, Facts, and Lies, Blum Helman Gallery, New York, NY, 1993. Permutations, The Queens Museum at the Bulova Corp, Center, Queens, NY, 1991 REVIEWS , PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS "Means of Transmission, Darkness and Light, and the Second Generation," by Beth Haber, Binnewater Tides Rosendale, NY, Volume 10, Number 1, WSW "Artist Books Reviewed," by Nancy Princenthal, The Print Collector's Newsletter, New York, NY, Volume 23, Number 3, 1992. "Art and Environment = SUNY Exhibition," by Jane Shine, Oaily Freeman, Kingston, NY, July 17,1992. "Sensational Permutations," by Steven Kolpan, Woodstock Times, Woodstock, NY, Septem­ ber 14, 1989.

EDUCATION: M.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, 1974. B.A., Toledo Museum of Art, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 1972.

EXHIBI-rION

CHECKLIST :

• Contested Lands, 1994, gelatin silver prints, 69 x 78 inches. e Family History, gelatin silver prints, 60 x 100 inches.


TATANA KELLNER CONTESTED LANDS 1994

GELATIN SILVER PRINTS 69 X78 INCHES

25


hese photographs stem from my experience in liv­ . ing in north east Georgia. . . These are the men that I see on the street every day. For the past four years, I have been using them to express my photographic ideas. Not only do I respect the cul­ ture and these men but also their visual persona allows my photography to reflect the culture's depth within a narrow range of material. I wanted to work with the idea of perspectives concerning such a tightly defined reality.

T

.,

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: Men of Georgia, Romi Crawford Gallery, New York, NY, 1994.

East Coast, West Coast, Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN, 1994.

Local Iconography, The Strand, Athens, GA, 1992..

The' Diana Show, The Friends of Photography, traveling exhibition,

1980-1981. REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS' "Martin's Photographs of Georgia Men ... ," by Robin Postell, Athens Daily News, Athens, GA, July 1, 1994. "East/West celebrates photography," by Fredric Koeppel, The Com­ mercial Appeal, Memphis, TN, February 26, 1994. "Men of Georgia and Others: Works by New Artist of the South," by Lisa McPherson, Art Papers, Atlanta, GA, Volume 17, Number 6, November/December 1993. EDUCATION: B.F.A., School of Visual Art, New York, NY, 1982. EXHIBITION • Men of Georgia, • Men of Georgia, • Men of Georgia, • Men of Georgia, • Men of Georgia, • Men of Georgia, ~ Men of Georgia,

CHEC.KLIST: Grey Fowler, 1992, C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Paul Nims, 1994, C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Peter Richardson, 1994, C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Ricky Clevelctnd, 1992, C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Roy Leachman, 1994,C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Harold Ney, 1994, C-print, 24 x 24 inches. Adell Wells, 1992, C-print, 24 x 24 inches.


CARL MARTIN

MEN OF GEORGA C-PRINT

7

HAROLD NEY 1994

24 X24 INCHES

27


T

he Problems That Cripple series is an ongoing body of work begun in 1992. It grew out of a series of experiments, explorations and to be honest - mistakes and dead ends. The media , presentation format and conceptual themes have all surfaced independently at various times in my previous work.

T

his series departs from the directly autobiographical mode in which I've previously worked. In these pieces I venture out from familiar domestic settings, prompting questions by juxtaposing images in set sequences. When put in a public context, personal scenes turn political and then private again. This cinematic ebb and flow creates contrasts and tensions between now and then, approach and avoidance, the symbolic al")d the tangible, essential truths and surface observations.

T

he central ideas of the various works allude to subjects such as environmental concerns, shifting gender identities, war, organized religion and child abuse .

T

he idea of sequencing several images together is of great interest to me . An isolated image can have a drastically different interpretation when placed alongside another im­ age. The viewer weighs meaning against meaning, constructs relationships and authors narratives, assigning sense. to a particular intersection of images.

T

he meaning of a group of pictures is more difficult to pin down than that of a single picture. It remains tentative, in flux. In this way groups of pictures can serve to explore edges and gray areas more productively.

A

quartetof 2. 7/8 X 3 3/ 4 inch Polaroid transfer prints matted in a single vertical sequence compose each individual piece from the series . The image area of each piece is 11 7/ 8 x 3 3/ 4 inches.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: Alternatives '94, Seigfred Gallery, Ohio University, Athens, OH, 1994.

Michigan Friends of Photography Members Exhibition, Urban Park Gallery, Detroit, MI, 1994.

Photospiva '92, Spiva Art Center, Joplin, MO, 1992 .

Recent Work, Wooley Gallery, Eastern Shore Art Center, Fairhope, AL, 1991

New Works/ New Alabamians, Foy Union Gallery, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 1990.

REVIEVVS , 'PUBLICATIO N S s CATALOG.S : The Photo Review, Langhorne, PA, Volume 16, Number 3, summer 1993.

Review by Christine Neal, Art Papers, Atlanta Art Papers, Inc., Atlanta , GA, May/June 1991

Shots Magazine, Joseph, OR, August/September 1990.

Shots Magazine, Joseph, OR, February 1990.

EDUCATION: M.F.A., Ohio University, Athens, OH, 1989.

B.F.A., Parsons School of Design; New York, NY, 1984.

EXHIB ITION

PAUL

ROMJKO ALMA MICHIGAN

C HE C KL I ST :

• Problems That Cripple #7· Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, 1994, Polariod transfer prints, gouache, 11 ?fa x 3 3/4 inches. 1993, • Problems That Cripple #5: Synesthesia, Polariod transfer prints, gouache, 1 1 7/8 X 3 3f4 inches. • Problems That Cripple #2: Broken Fingernails, 1992, Polariod transfer prints, gouache, 1 1 7/8 X 3 % inches. • Problems That Cripple # 7: Superman Loses His Power of Flight, 1992, Polariod transfer prints, gouache, 1 1 ?fax 3 % inches.


PAUL ROMEJKO PROBLEMS THAT CRIPPLE #2_足

BROI<EN FI NGERNAILS . POLAROID TRANSFER PRINTS, GOUACHE 11 7/8 X 3 3/ 4 INCHES

,

29

1992


y current body of work uses decoupage to combine appropri­ ated photographic images with found dinnerware. This process is a satire on the kitschy decorative assemblages made by popular craft artists. The iconic sensibility of the assemblages promotes a parabolic narrative. The decorative qualities of the plates juxtaposed against the powerful messages ofthe tales create the duality of opposing eclectic images: baroque aesthetic is the result. The di­ chotomy of dissimilar elements and imagery is fundamental in my work. I negotiate the variety of representations and their historical and popular metaphors into a cohesive form in the contemporary icons.

M

SELECTED EXHIB ITIONS : 20th Anniversary Show, Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, Buffalo, NY 1994. 3rd Annual Member Show, Big Orbit Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1994. B-Girls Show, World Tattoo Gallery, Chicago, IL, 1993. Solo exhibition, Squeaky Wheel Gallery-, Buffalo, NY, 1992. Three Rivers Arts Festival, USX Tower, Pittsburgh, PA, 1992. Devotions, Gallery Northwest, Indiana University, Gary, IN, 1990.

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS:

"What You See is What You Get," by Richard Huntington, The Buffalo

News, January 30, 1992. "Devotions," by Rick Trosper, The Northwest Phoenix, December 5, 1990. "Paschke Picks," by Andy Argyropoulos, New Art Examiner, December 1990. "Gallery Scene," by David McCracken, Chicago Tribune, October 5, 1990. "Paschke's Proteges," by Ted Fishman, New City, September27, 1990. "Paschke's Picks," by Mary Gillespie, Chicago Sun- Times, September 14, 1990.

EDUCATION : M.F.A., Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 1989. B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, 1985.

EXHIBITION

CHECKLIST:

• Limited Edition Collectables, inches.

1994, mixed mediums, 72 x 72


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JACK SHEFFLER DETAIL OF LI MI TED EDI TION COLLECTABLES 1994 MIXED MEDIUMS 72 X72 INCHES

31


T

he peculiar nature of rebellion in remote areas of the Midwest has been at the heart of our photographs since 1986. The physical and psychological distance of small towns from major commercial/cultural centers has fomented a sense of personal individualism that is a reaction to the easy conformity perpetrated by a mass culture that validates people by their possessions.

Q

ur process draws on photogr9phic conventions responsive to the instinctive theatricality of the people we photograph. We work with many different kinds of cameras, but what seems very right at this time is the 8 x 10. For us, the most special thing about the 8 x 10 is how subtle the depth-of-focus can e manipulated, allowing the viewer's eyes to drift around until landing on an area of perfect definition. Very specific parts of the scene can be given emphasis. The picture becomes more about the thing than about how the thing has been framed by the photographer

T

he photowaphs end up referencing the exaggerated emotions of made-for-TV-movies and the static compositions of 1 7th~century genre-painting. We record a post-TV era . Everyone knows the language of melodrama and fantasy now an integral part of our culture. By-products of MTV's proliferation of hipness, the cult of personality, and talk show theatrics define and incite rebellion. .

T

he specificity of each subject's environment creates a baroque tableaux revealing·a fleeting, self­ conscious fragment of an idiosyncratic existence now recorded as shadow on film . Claustrophobic domestic spaces and nondescript vernacular architecture ground these portraits of unknown people in Midwestern reality. These people strug.gle to escape homogenization by mass culture. We've conie to know each of them well , and share a willingness to communicate their resistance. We live ouf lives as a protest against the institutionalized, provincial blandness and feel-good polemic around us.

W

hat we aspire to do is make pictures that resonate with our sensibilities, that have some sort of meaningfulness and insight into how things may be. This pursuit mayor may not be art. What most people consider art has a lot to do with conceptual novelty and decorative -appeal. Most of our pictures include subject matter that has become ugly photo cliche; stuff like black leather .jackets, guitars, tattoos. The campiness of this appeals to us. When we rely on the kitsch elements to legitimize the photo­ opportunity, we can get right down to the business of getting a picture with some emotional substance.

M

ID W EST ERN REB ELL I 0 Ndoesn't have anything to do with ethnography. the subjects in these photographs are just the people directly around us. The work is directed solely by our personal . visual interest. Initially these photographs are the imposition of our own ideas on the surrounding culture. Because the subject's ideas are involved, they evolve into something else. What they seem to end up representing is a universal state-of-being.

T

he expansiveness of Midwestern spaces along with the anesthetic quality of electronically-propagated­ cultural-doctrine permeate our subconscious. The precariousness and isolation that results places Mid­ western people in a vacuum that serves as a source of anxiety, feeding either a reactionary placidity or a selfstyled rebellion. .

Itis the physical beauty of this rebellion that has inspired these photographs. SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: Midwestern Rebellion, Silver Paper Gallery, Milwaukee, WI, 1994. Toluca ,Milwaukee High School of the Arts, Milwaukee, WI,1990. Salon Portraits, Walker's POint Center for the Arts, Milwaukee, WI, 1989. The Elders, Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, WI, 1988. St. Nazianz, Madison Art Center, Madison, WI, 1988. REV IEWS, PU BLICA TIONS , CATALOGS "Rebel Rousers," by Janice Paine, Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, WI, November 4, 1994. "Out of the Darkroom," by James Auer, Milwaukee Journal, Milwaukee, WI, November 7, 1994. "Neo-Post-Now," by Jeff Perso, Wisconsin Pop, Milwaukee, WI, October 1992. "Artists at Home," by Jeff Felshman, Chicago Reader, Chicago, Il, May 22, 1992. "The F Stops Here," by Jeff Workman, Shepherd Express, ' Milwaukee, WI, June 22, 1989. "The Elders," by Tom Bamberger, Art Muse/e, Milwaukee, WI, September 1988.

E DUCA T ION: M.F.A., Illinois State University, Normal, IL, 1989. B.F.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 1983. E • • •

X H I B I TI 0 N C H EC K L I ST: Rod with Wendy, Spring Lake, WI, 7992, gelatin silver print, 18 x 18 inches. Todd on the Beach, Manitowoc, WI, 7992, gelatin silver print, 22 x 17 inches. Bitty in His Room, Manitowoc, WI, 1993, gelatin silver print, 22 x 17 inches.


J. SHIMON AND J. LINDEMANN TODD ON THE BEACH,

MANITO lIVIC, VVI 1992

GELATIN SILVER PRINT 22 X17 INCHES

33


N ORK

A

s an artist who has had formal education in the fields

of Psychology , Art Therapy , Business Management ,

and Communication Design, and as an educator who

teaGhes. rel ated yet diverse tOPICS such as the History of Mod­ ern Art, Advertising Design and Photography, I frequently re­ flect upon my value s as an individual/ artist/ educator ..

,

t

n my work , I find the juxtaposition of text and image an in­ triguing and satisfying way in which to reflect the disparate

elements of my experiences .

W

hen I was a freshman in high school , I ·took a religious education course which was markedly different from other religious education courses that I had taken previously. In this course I was introduced to ) Corinthians, Chapter 13: A Digress ion on Charity . Of course I had recognized parts of the verse : " love is patient , is kind . "but the manner in which it was presented to me (and the manner in which I understood it) during my 14th year was strong enough for th e verse to remain with me throughout my life. My interpretation of this verse , and its subsequent impact upon me, has, to a large extent, shaped my life.

I

believe that 7 Corinthians, Chapter 1 3, has been misre ad and misrepresented in our culture. Parts of the verse have been trivialized in advertising and on pos ters , bookmarks , coff ee mugs, tee shirts, etc ... The verse has seemingly been romanticized into a poem about how lovely love is, and is often quoted at weddings. My understanding of 7 Corinthians, Chapter 13 is not easily put into words. Mine is not, however, the understanding that makes the verse such a popular quote. I grapple with what is to me a familiarity, an intimacy, with the verse. It speaks to me of hardship and pain , struggle and acceptance, fear and growth, of the process of losing and finding, losing and finding, losing and finding. one's way.

E

arly in 1992, a separate research project I.ed me to explore the effects of visual simulacra upon a culture. Visual images may be identified and recognized by people within a culture, and the meaning of visual images may be understood both in a personal manner by individuals and in a global manner by the culture as a larger entity. It was at this time that I took the photographs that comprise the visual imagery for this oody ofwo~. .

I

ntentionally, for two years (until January 19·94), I did not touch the work . Rather I gave it ·considerable thought. It was during this period that I decided to use the photog raphs that I took early in 199 2 to convey my interpretation of the subtleties of 7 Corinthians, Chapter 13 .

I

bel ieve that 7 Corinthians, Chapter 13 speaks to us in a personal manner and also in a global manner.

Much more than a simple poem about love, it speaks about identity. Through th e juxtaposition of its

t ex t with photographic images , I have attempted to express this concept of identity by addressing the

multifaceted personal / cultural ramification s of oppression , gender identity, innocence , betrayal , strength ,

Intellectu al growth, opposition , personal values, abuse, consent , determination, submission . The use of

repetition (of both images and te xt) is intended to be comforting in one respect; jarring in another The

use of certain excerpts of the text of 7 Corinthians, Chapter 13 with the chosen images is intended to

raise niany questions. .

S E LECTE D EXH I B I l ' l 0 N S :

Metamorphosis, Impact Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1994.

Exultation/ Soliloquy, Fanette Goldman/ Carol Greenfield Gallery , Amherst , NY, 1994 .

CEPA 2nd Biennial Photography Auction, CEPA Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1994.

CEPA Members Exhibit, CEPA Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1994.

Contemporary Criticism, Bethune Gallery, Buffa lo, NY, 199 2 .

Dimensions of WeI/ness, University at Buffalo,Amherst, NY , 1992.

REVIEWS, PUBLICATIONS, CATALOGS

"Gallery showcase makes impact studying surreal metamorphosis ," by Patricia Donovan, The Buffalo

News,Buffalo, NY, June 15, 1994. "Democracy in action," by Ronald Ehmke, The Buffalo News, Buffalo, NY, March 11, 1994 . The Marketing of Consumerism: The Use of Photography in American Advertising During the Late 793 0s,produced to accompany slide lecture, University at Buffalo Foundation Activities Scholarship, Buffalo, NY, November. 11, 1992.

E .D U C A T I O N : M.F.A., SUNY Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 1993. M.B.A., Canisius College, Buffalo, NY, 1983. B.A., Daemen College, Amherst, NY, 1976. EXHIBITION CHECKLIST • Knowledge (In the Know), 1994, dye sublimation prin.t, 5 x 5 lj, in ches . • Provoked (Red Light), 1994, dye sublimation print , S x 5 % inches .


DONNA STANTON

KNOWLEDGE (IN THE I<NOW) 1994

DYE SUBLIMATfON PRINT 5 X5 314 INCHES'

35


rt is one of the most meaningfl~1 and provocative ways to .inspire social change. It has always been my Intent to create artwork which questions , and examines some of the current issues of our daily lives. Racial injus­ tice, women's ' issues, environmental politics, and the sense of an uncertain future are a few of the themes about which I am concerned .

A

y work is often described as photosculptures. I enjoy creating mixed media projects which hopefully allow more visually complex interpre­ tations of these 'social topics. Alternative processes such as liquid emulsion, cyanotype/Van Dyke Brown prints and fabric transfers have become a great outlet for my expression and experimentation. Book arts and the use of found objects have also provided another avenue for verbal puns and visual clues.

W

hat I aspire to achieve by exhibiting this work is an illustration about the frustrations and anger of our society yet also to depict some optimism for cultural improvement through the use of irony and humor

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Galeric;l Tonantzin, San Juan Bautista, CA, 1994. Issu,es: Other Than White, Community College qf Southern Nevada, North Las Vegas, NV, 1994. Art as a Forum for Social Change, San Francisco State University Student Union Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1994. The American Dream, Central Arts Collective , Tucson, AZ, 1994. Alternatives 94, Ohio University, Athens, OH , 1994.­ Off the Shelf" Books by Artists, Tempe Arts Center, Tempe, AZ, 1994. Hope and Harmony, Falkirk Cultural Center, San Rafael, CA, 1993

REVIEWS,

PUBLICATIONS, C:ATALOGS:

"Cultural Constructions: Rethinking Past and New Realities," by Theresa Harlan, Camerawork Journal of Photographic Arts, SF Camerawork Gallery, San Francisso, CA, Spring/Summer 1994.

EDUCATION: B.A.., San Francisco State University, 'San Francisco, CA, 1995 B.A ., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, 1992

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST: • Specimens, 1990, gelatin silver prints, petri dishes, fabric, acetate. Dimensions of round dish: 3 3f4 inches in diameter; square dish: 4 x 4 inches.


SHARON TANI

SPEC/MANS

1990

GELATIN SILVER PRINTS, PETRI DISHE~1 FABRIC, ACETATE

3 3/ 4 INCHES IN DIAMETER AND 4 A 4 INCHES

PHOTOGRAPH BY DIANE TANI

37


F

rom childhood we learn that freedom comes at a price. Because of this, most of us spend our lives balancing our desires with society's expecta­ tions. In this series, I have chosen as my subject transsexuals, who are individuals who have rejected society's most basic assumption, that we must embrace the gender into which we were born . While the transsexual commu­ nity is a diverse one, my photos document one particular segment, those pre-, post-, and rlOn,-operative transsexuals and transvestites who congregate and work in New York City's Times Square. Many of these "girls" make their living off their looks, working as go-go girls, "models ," or escorts, and have become obsessed with appearing conventionally feminine. They take hormone shots to "soften" their appearance and use plas­ tic surgery to sculpt their faces and bodies into societal ideals of female beauty

ABE

F

or many of these "girls" vanity a high price. Many of these procedures are per­ formed under dangerous condi­ tions. The exorbitant prices they pay for surgery and hormones keep them dependent on jobs within the sex indus­ try While one deplores the conditions in which they often live, one can't help but admire their quest for perfection and the boldness and honesty with which they express their feminine personas. Where most of us are uncomfortable with our sexual complexity, they embrace theirs,. looking uriflinchinglyinto the lens of the camera. I want to thank these "girls" for welcoming me into their community and their lives. In them, I discovered a wor.ld where beauty, fantasy, and reality have merged into one.

RK

comes~t

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS: The New Face of the Portrait, Fuller MuseuI'D of Art, Brockton, MA, 1994.

Unity '94 Art and Fantasy, Puck Building, New York, NY, 1994.

The Men of New York, Retsky/Martin Gallery, New York, NY, 1993.

Reincarnation, Kodak Photo Salon, Tokyo, Japan, 1992.

EXHIBITION

CH~CKLIST:

• Tiffany with Wig, 1993, gelatin silver print, 18 x 18 .inches . • Jennifer (I), 1992, gelatin silver print, 18 x 18 inches. • Samantha and Raymond (I), 1993, gelatin silver print, 18 x 18 inches . • Christina (after breast implant operation), 1993, gelatin silver print, 1 8 x 1 8 inches.


HAJIME WATANABE CHR5TINA(AFTERBREAST

IMPLANTOP E RATION) 1993

GELATIN SILVER PRINT 18 X 18 INCHES

39


ACKNOVVLEDGEMENTS The FORUM Gallery

at Jamestovvn Community College

525 Falconer Street

P. O. Box 20

Jamestovvn...;. Nevv York 1 4702-0020

(,.-16) 665-9107

GALLERY HOURS :

Tuesday - Saturday 1 1 a.m. - 5 p.m.

(Tliursday 1 1 a.m. - 7 p.m.)

G A L L ERY S T A F F :

Dan R. Talley, Director

M'ichelle Henry, Assistant

S T UD E N T A S S . S T A N T S :

Clark Myers

D. Clarke Smith

GALLERY

D EVE L OPMENT COMM I T T E E :

Suzanne Allen

Nancy Bargar

Reginald Darling

Waae Davenport

Shauna Frisclikorn

Robert Hagstrom

John Hiester

Gloria Lasser

David Munnell

Lois Strickler

Mary Beth Zacher

J A M E S T O VVN COM M U N ITY COLLEGE BO A R D OF TR U STEES: , Samuel Alessi Je' Anne Bargar Donna Beal Mary Ellen Bonner Victoria James Marianne McElrath Dr. Lillian Ney , Clarence Peterson Samuel Price, Jr., Esq.

The FORUM Gallery presents significant and professionally executed solo and group exhibitions of contemporary art and related programs, events, and services to both the artist and non-artist residents of Chautauqua County, NY, and the surrounding area. Through our programs, we strive to stimulate discussion, to challenge assump­ tions, and to present artwork relevant to the social and cultural life of the general and special populations within our service area. This exhibition, organized by the FORUM Gallery at Jamestown Community College, is funded in part by the Fund for the Arts in Chautauqua County, which is managed by the Arts Council for Chautauqua County Programs of The FORUM Gallery are funded in part by the Jamestown Community College Foundation; the Faculty Student Association at JCC; and our corporate and indiviaual members. C A TALOG DESIGN: C AT A L O G

Shauna Frischkorn

P R I N T IN G:

Studio Printing, Jamestown, New York

Unless otherwise noted, all photographs were provided by the artists. All dimensions are listed in inches with height preceding width, then depth. The FORUM Gallery is an Associate Member of the National Association of Artists Organizations.

Š 1995, The FORUM Gallery


PhotoNominal 1995  

Exhibition catalog for national curated exhibition of contemporary photography

PhotoNominal 1995  

Exhibition catalog for national curated exhibition of contemporary photography