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State-wide Broadband Initiative Talking Points

The Need: Where we are now… • • • • • • •

The need for Broadband connectivity in schools will increase more than 700% by the year 2011 (2007 America’s Digital Schools (ADS) 2007 survey - from 6.0 kbps to 45.0 kbps) Colorado districts average less than half of the national average bandwidth (Jan 2009 ADS report - 3.0 kbps for Colorado and 6.4 kbps national average) Colorado is one of only 12 states not offering Internet2 connectivity to K-12 schools and districts across the state. The Internet2 Gateway connection is anticipated for July 2009 pending funding of the annual membership fee. No district in the state can currently provide advanced educational opportunities, such as full screen high definition interactive video conferencing over Internet2, that exist for 50,000 other schools and districts across the country. Even with the Internet2 Gateway connection, there are still significant broadband / last mile connectivity issues impacting access to advanced educational opportunities. Full term course offerings and short-term distance learning opportunities for classrooms is difficult to find and does not always meet students and/or staff needs. Low bandwidth opportunities are unreliable. Students’ bandwidth at home or on their personal cell phone often out performs the connectivity and content available to them in school. Many families cannot afford Internet service at home.

The Plan: What we need to do… Business Case • Reduce duplication of resources across the state o Cost of ownership 10 times greater than cost sharing through a consortium • Leverage cost of bandwidth o Nebraska and Utah are examples where costs are leveraged. ($15/Mbps in Nebraska vs. $800/Mbps in some districts in Colorado) Instructional Case • Improve access to educational resources o CDE initiatives: Assessments On-Line, Data Analysis/Sharing, Online Learning, Video Conferencing, Statewide IEP o Utilize existing consortium model, continue development of Eagle-Net managed through BOCES • Ensure long term opportunities for students and staff o Instructional need for bandwidth outpacing funding Develop Partnerships • Public/Private Leveraged Resources • Aggregate Points in a Community to a common High Speed Broadband Connection • Multi-Vendor collaborative Partnerships with Higher Ed, Front Range GigaPop (FRGP), University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Public Libraries, Museums, Fire/Safety, Healthcare, Colorado TeleHealth Network

The Benefits: What it would look like… Bandwidth Vision • High speed broadband infrastructure • Affordable content options to retain and enhance local control and provide a sense of community • Essential model for rural, declining and small districts • CAP4K, Concurrent Enrollment, Online Learning, and College Course Pre-Graduation initiatives can only happen if Colorado meets the bandwidth needs Collaborative Vision • Partners for strong statewide infrastructure connectivity currently include Higher Ed, Colorado Tele-Health Network, Public Libraries, Community Colleges, Fire and Safety • Provide on-net connectivity prior to accessing a gateway to the Internet Economic Development Vision • Private sector and housing values in rural / underserved areas will benefit and promote economic development • Provides for expansion, growth and future partnerships For more Information Please Contact Denise Atkinson‐Shorey, Phone (303) 772‐4420 ext 2344,  Email: connectk12@ucar.edu, Web‐Site http://www.co‐eaglenet.net 


Regions under SB08-038

Colorado Department of Education

PLATTE VALLEY RE-3

PLATEAU RE-5 PAWNEE RE-12 POUDRE R-1 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS RE-2

MOFFAT COUNTY RE:NO 1

AULT-HIGHLAND RE-9

RSA 2

NORTH PARK R-1

VALLEY RE-1 BRIGGSDALE RE-10

FRENCHMAN RE-3

PRAIRIE RE-11

HAYDEN RE-1

PARK (ESTES PARK) R-3

WINDSOR RE-4

GARFIELD RE-2

RSA 5

MAPLETON 1 SHERIDAN 2

CLEAR CREEK RE-1

EAGLE COUNTY RE 50

STRASBURG 31J

DENVER COUNTY 1

PLATTE CANYON 1

CHERRY CREEK 5

KIOWA C-2

PEYTON 23 JT

CRIPPLE CREEK-VICTOR RE-1

BETHUNE R-5

STRATTON R-4

HARRISON 2

ELLICOTT 22

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN 12

HANOVER 28

CANON CITY RE-1

GENOA-HUGO C113

CALHAN RJ-1

FALCON 49

WIDEFIELD 3

KIT CARSON R-1

MIAMI/ YODER 60 JT

RSA 7

KARVAL RE-23

COTOPAXI RE-3

CROWLEY COUNTY RE-1-J

FLORENCE RE-2

PUEBLO CITY 60

RIDGWAY R-2 MOUNTAIN VALLEY RE 1 CONSOLIDATED C-1

RSA 10

CHERAW 31

PUEBLO COUNTY 70

ROCKY FORD R-2

RSA 11

MOFFAT 2

WILEY RE-13 JT

MANZANOLA 3J

SWINK 33

MONTEZUMA-CORTEZ RE-1

MANCOS RE-6

SANGRE DE CRISTO RE-22J

RSA 9

MONTE VISTA C-8

DURANGO 9-R

LA VETA RE-2

ALAMOSA RE-11J

NORTH CONEJOS RE-1J ARCHULETA COUNTY 50 JT IGNACIO 11 JT

RSA 12

DEL NORTE C-7

BAYFIELD 10 JT-R

HOLLY RE-3

EAST OTERO R-1

HUERFANO RE-1 SARGENT RE-33J

LAMAR RE-2 MC CLAVE RE-2

CENTER 26 JT

CREEDE 1

GRANADA RE-1

LAS ANIMAS RE-1

FOWLER R-4J

DOLORES RE-4A

PLAINVIEW RE-2

EADS RE-1

WEST END RE-2

SILVERTON 1

CHEYENNE COUNTY RE-5

EDISON 54 JT

GUNNISON WATERSHED RE1J

HINSDALE COUNTY RE 1

BURLINGTON RE-6J

HI-PLAINS R-23

BIG SANDY 100J

FOUNTAIN 8 SALIDA R-32

ARRIBA-FLAGLER C-20

LIMON RE-4J

ELBERT 200

ACADEMY 20 MANITOU SPRINGS COLORADO SPRINGS 11 14

RSA 4

RSA 8

AGATE 300

LEWIS-PALMER 38 WOODLAND PARK RE-2

DELTA COUNTY 50(J) BUENA VISTA R-31

IDALIA RJ-3

LIBERTY J-4

DEER TRAIL 26J

LITTLETON 6

RSA 6 PARK COUNTY RE-2

ARICKAREE R-2

WOODLIN R-104

BENNETT 29J

ELIZABETH C-1

LAKE COUNTY R-1

MESA COUNTY VALLEY 51

DOLORES COUNTY RE NO.2

WRAY RD-2

BYERS 32J

BRIGHTON 27J ADAMSARAPAHOE 28J

DOUGLAS COUNTY RE 1

ASPEN 1

TELLURIDE R-1

YUMA 1

OTIS R-3

ADAMS COUNTY 14

JEFFERSON COUNTY R-1

PLATEAU VALLEY 50

OURAY R-1

RSA 3

ENGLEWOOD 1

SUMMIT RE-1

ROARING FORK RE-1

NORWOOD R-2J

AKRON R-1

KEENESBURG RE-3(J)

BRIGHTON 27J

WESTMINSTER 50 GILPIN COUNTY RE-1

MONTROSE COUNTY RE-1J

BRUSH RE-2(J)

NORTHGLENNTHORNTON 12

BOULDER VALLEY RE 2

DE BEQUE 49JT

LONE STAR 101 FORT MORGAN RE-3

WIGGINS RE-50(J)

WELD COUNTY S/D RE-8

BUFFALO RE-4

WELDON VALLEY RE-20(J)

PLATTE VALLEY RE-7

GILCREST RE-1

ST VRAIN VALLEY RE 1J

EAST GRAND 2

WEST GRAND 1-JT.

MEEKER RE1

GARFIELD 16

GREELEY 6

JOHNSTOWNMILLIKEN RE-5J

SOUTH ROUTT RE 3

RANGELY RE-4

THOMPSON R-2J

HOLYOKE RE-1J

HAXTUN RE-2J

EATON RE-2

RSA 1

JULESBURG RE-1

SIERRA GRANDE R-30

HOEHNE REORGANIZED 3 KIM REORGANIZED 88

SANFORD 6J

CENTENNIAL R-1 SOUTH CONEJOS RE-10

AGUILAR REORGANIZED 6

PRITCHETT RE-3

SPRINGFIELD RE-4

VILAS RE-5

TRINIDAD 1 PRIMERO REORGANIZED 2

BRANSON REORGANIZED 82

CAMPO RE-6

WALSH RE-1


Current Colorado School District Internet Bandwidth Kbps Per Student By Regional Service Area 45.0

40.0

35.0

Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service for K12 at 40.0 Kbps Per Student - $80 Million

Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service for K12 at 6.48 Kbps Per Student - $12 Million

2008 Colorado Average3.57 Kbps Per Student Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service for K12 of $6M

25.0 Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service for K12 at 3.57 Kbps Per Student - $6 Million

20.0

2008 National Average- 6.48 Kbps Per Student Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service for K12 of $12M

15.0 2011 Projected Kbps Required Per Student- 40.0 Kbps - Estimated Colorado Annual Cost of ISP Service of $80M

10.0

Source for 2008 National Average and 2011 Projected Kbps: America’s Digital Schools 2008 Internet Bandwidth Report

5.0

t - Sou theas RSA 12

- Sou theas RSA 11

RSA 10

- Sou thwes

t Pike s Pe a k

t

t - Sou thwes RSA 9

heast - Nort RSA 8

k s Pea - Pike RSA 7

- Metr o RSA 6

hwes t - Nort RSA 5

t Cen tral - Wes RSA 4

heast - Nort RSA 3

h Cen tral - Nort RSA 2

- Nort

hwes t

0.0

RSA 1

Kbps Per Student

30.0

2008 Colorado Average School District Kbps Per Student

Colorado K12 School District Regional Service Area

Prepared By: EAGLE-Net


How Colorado School Districts Compare to Colorado's State and National Average Bandwidth State Map of School Districts * Colorado School District Average Bandwidth per Student = 3.57 kbps AULT-HIGHLAND RE-9

RE - 3

VALLEY RE-1

E-

* 2011 Projected Bandwidth Required per Student = 40.0 kbps HOLYOKE RE1-J

O

EA TO

AL FF

K

R 4 E-

R PA K)

G WIG

R3

AIN V AL L EY

R E 1J

R 10

Denver Region

1

ST VRAIN VALLEY RE 1J WELD COUNTY S/D RE-8 AKRON R1

KEENESBURG RE-3(J)

WRAY RD-2

YUMA 1

OTIS R-3

BOULDER VALLEY RE 2

)

3

O ADAMS C

WELD COUNTY S/D RE-8 KEENESBURG RE-3(J)

WEST GRAND 1-JT

STA

5 0( J

T RE

EAST GRAND 2

R E-

O UT

ST V R

IN S

TH R

WELD COUNTY RE-1

LON E

RANGELY RE-4

BOULDER VALLEY RE 2

URG 31J ST R AS B

2 9J BENNET

LIBERTY J-4 DEER TRAIL 26J

ACA

MANITOU SPRINGS 14 COLORADO SPRINGS 11

DELTA COUNTY 50(J)

T 22 HARRISON 2 I C OT CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN 12 ELL CRIPPLE CREEK-VICTOR RE-1 WIDEFIELD 3

BUENA VISTA R-31

STRATTON R-4

LIMON

E LI Z

1 RTY UN CO E LA K

WOODLAND PARK RE-2

PEYTON 23 JT

Y 20 DE M

CLEAR CREEK RE-1

SHERIDAN 2 ENGLEWOOD 1

BIG SANDY 100J

GENOA-HUGO C113

CHERRY CREEK 5 LITTLETON 6

RJ-1

MESA COUNTY VALLEY 51

ADAMS-ARAPAHOE 28J JEFFERSON COUNTY R-1

N RE-6J

PARK COUNTY RE-2

BENNET 29J

0

LMER 38 LEWIS-PA

ER C-2

200 ELBERT CALHAN

ASPEN 1

DOUGLAS COUNTY RE 1

HINSDALE CO RE 1

KIOWA C-2

R E -4J

TH C

JE F F E R

AGATE 300

-FLAGL

PLATEAU VALLEY 50

ADAMS 12 FIVE STAR SCHOOLS MAPLETON 1

GILPIN COUNTY RE-1

BETHUNE R-5

ROARING FORK RE-1

WESTMINSTER 50

BURLINGTO

6

PLATTE CANYON 1

IDALIA RJ-3

DENVER COUNTY 1

ABE

IELD 1

SUMMIT RE-1

ARICKAREE R-2

A ARRIB

SO N C O

GARFIELD RE-2

WOODLIN R-104

-1

CLEAR CREEK RE-1

FALCON 49

GARF

DE BEQUE 49JT

BYERS 32J

UNTY R-1

EAGLE COUNTY RE 50

UNTY 14

GILPIN COUNTY RE-1

BRIGHTON 27J ADAMS COUNTY 14 WESTMINSTER 50 ADAMS 12 FIVE STAR SCHOOLS MAPLETON 1 DENVER COUNTY 1 ADAMS-ARAPAHOE 28J SHERIDAN 2 ENGLEWOOD 1 CHERRY CREEK 5 LITTLETON 6

BRIGHTON 27J

STRASBURG 31J

S TE

WELDON VALLEY RE-20(J) GREELEY 6 PLATTE VALLEY RE-7 JOHNSTOWN-MILLIKEN RE-5J

BRUSH RE-2(J)

S (E

THOMPSON R-2J

GAN RE-3

E -2

R PA

N

R

-1 0

UN R

RE

E- 2 J

PRAIRIE RE-11 E

HA X T

AL

2

G SD

BU

SR IN G

WINDSOR RE-4

SO U

MEEKER RE1

IG

FORT MOR

SPR

HAYDEN RE-1

BR

* National School District Average Bandwidth per Student = 6.48 kbps

MA N

OAT

NORTH PARK R-1

PAWNEE RE-12

NC H

MB

POUDRE R-1

PLATTE VALLEY RE-3 JULESBURG RE-1

F RE

A STE

MOFFAT CO RE-1

PLATEAU RE-5

MIAMI/YODER 60 JT

PLATTE CANYON 1

CHEYENNE WELLS RE-5

KIT CARSON R-1

DOUGLAS COUNTY RE 1

BE IZA EL

C-1 TH

KIOWA C-2

KARVAL RE-23

FOUNTAIN 8

31 ER H C

LAMAR RE-2

3J ANOL A MA N Z

HUERFANO RE-1

LAS ANIMAS RE-1

COLORADO SPRINGS 11

HARRISON 2 CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN 12 D3 RE IE L EK F E -VIC WID TO RR E-1

ELLICOTT 22

FOUNTAIN 8

E- 4 LD R

PUEBLO CO RURAL 70 FLORENCE RE-2 60 CI TY BL O

CROWLEY COUNTY RE-1-J

CUSTER CO SD C-1

PU E

CAMPO RE-6

FOWLER R-4J

GF I E

PRITCHETT RE

-3

D ZE NI GA OR RE NE EH

SPRI N

3

LA VETA R

E-2

HO

WALSH RE-1

3

BRANSON RE-82

D1

PRIMERO RE-2

DA

CENTENNIAL R-1 SOUTH CONEJOS RE-10

KIM REORGANIZED 88

R E-

I NI TR

6J

MONTEZUMA-CORTEZ RE-1

EDISON 54 JT

CANON CITY RE-1

XI OPA COT

ORD

ARCHULETA COUNTY 50 JT

SANF

NORTH CONEJOS RE-1J

AGUILAR RE-6

VILAS RE-5

SIERRA GRANDE R-30

MIAMI/YODER 60 JT KARVAL RE-23

HANOVER 28

ALAMOSA RE-11J

3

FALCON 49

-22

MONTE VISTA C-8

BIG SANDY 100J

MANITOU SPRINGS 14

DEL NORTE C-7

IGNACIO 11 JT

CALHAN RJ-1

UGO C 11

CR O W

AW

SARGENT RE-33J

R IS T O RE

ACADEMY 20

E-2

EAST OTERO R-1 DE C

LEWIS-PALMER 38

R PARK

SAN G RE

LE C

ELBERT 200

DOUGLAS COUNTY RE 1

LAND

CR IPP

CENTER 26 JT

10 JT-R

DURANGO 9-R

CT CREEDE SCHOOL DISTRI

BAYFIELD

S

RE-1

-1

M

CO AN

RE

-6

FOWLER R-4J

SWINK 33

E RE-2

-2

ER

SILVERTON 1

DOLORES RE-4A

MOFFAT 2

HOLLY RE-3

ID

DOLORES COUNTY RE NO.2

ROCKY FORD R-2

GRANADA

UR

PUEBLO CO RURAL 70

MC CLAV

CUSTER CO SD C-1

YR WA

LL TE

G RID

MOUNTAIN VALLEY RE 1

HI-PLAINS R-23

WILEY RE-13 JT

PARK COUNTY RE-2

PUEBLO CITY 60

OURAY R-1

NORWOOD R-2J

KIOWA C-2 JEFFERSON COUNTY R-1

D WOO

FL O

RE

WEST END RE-2

EADS RE-1

Colorado Springs and Pueblo Region

L EY C

NC

COTOPAXI RE-3

PLAINVIEW RE-2

PEYTON 23 JT

ER

MONTROSE COUNTY RE-1J

OU N T

E -2

Y R E-

CANON CITY RE-1

GENOA -H

1 -J

SALIDA R-32

LIMON RE-4J

EDISON 54 JT

HANOVER 28

GUNNISON WATERSHED RE1J

MANZANOLA 3J

CHERAW 31

Legend School District's District Office Bandwidth Less Than the State Average Bandwidth Greater Than the State Average but Less Than National Average Bandwidth Greater Than the National Average but Less Than Projected Need by 2011 Bandwidth Equal to or Greater Than 2011 Projected Bandwidth Required

* Source of Colorado Data - 2009 Survey or Interview of School Districts * National Average Bandwidth and Projected Bandwidth Requirement - America's Digital Schools 2008 Internet Bandwidth Report

Map Published 7/1/09


K‐12 Bandwidth Application and Software Analysis Model Basis    250 Students; 12 Teacher/Admin; 260 Computers; 12 VoIP Phones; 10/100 Ethernet LAN Dynamic Use ‐ 260 Computer Users using one or more Applications simultaneously across LAN and Internet

 Application *

Per User*

VoIP

50 kbps

Email and Web Browsing

50 kbps

Audio Streaming (MP3)

100 kbps

School Portal 

100 kbps

Student Created Content 

150 kbps

Online Learning 

150 kbps

Virtual Field Trips

150 kbps

Web/School 2.0 Tools

250 kbps

Online Assessment 

250 kbps

TV‐Quality Streaming Video (320 x 240) Interactive Video at a Desktop Standard Definition Good Quality 

250 kbps

DVD Quality Streaming Video (640 x 480)

1040 kbps 

1/2 HD Quality Streaming Video (1024 x 720)

4977kbps

H.264 HD (1080 P) Video Conference

6000 kbps

Full HD Quality ‐ Streaming Video (1920 x 1080) 

13998 kbps

One T‐1 (1.5 Mbps)

Two T‐1s  (3 Mbps) 

Four T‐1s (6 Mbps)

10 Mbps Ethernet

20 Mbps  Ethernet

250 kbps

KEY                ‐ Full Functionality                ‐ Problematic               ‐ Unable to utilize with concurrent users * Source ‐ School 2.0 Bandwidth Planner/Calculator and Video  Bandwidth Estimater ‐ Sorenson Services USA


K-12 Broadband Cost Study The Data There are over 800,000 students in K-12 in Colorado. The current Internet Bandwidth average per student is Colorado is 3.5 kbps or 2.4 Gbps of Internet Bandwidth total for Colorado Students. By 2011 the need for Bandwidth (ADS) will be 40 kbps per student or 32 Gbps of bandwidth for Colorado Students By 2015 the need for Bandwidth will be 400 kbps per student or 320 Gbps of bandwidth for Colorado Students The Costs This is based upon the assumption that the E-rate filings are inclusive of correct combinations of Internet bandwidth costs and Internet connector transport costs per each district. Data gathered regarding past E-rate practices have shown that many districts have not had sufficient understanding of the two components that comprise the connections and may not be filing for Erate on both E-rate eligible components. Estimated Internet costs for 2008 is $6 million/ year for 3.5 kbps/ student Current Internet Cost per student per year in Colorado is 7.50/student or $2.50 per kb /student per year (.21/kbps per students per month) At this rate to reach the 40kbps needed by 2011 the annual cost of Internet Service will be $80 million per year. The costs for bandwidth by 2015 will grow to over $800,000,000 to deliver the needed bandwidth for Colorado Students at the current rates Estimated cost to build fiber to 178 school districts at $325,000 per site for broadband connectivity is $57,850,000. Estimated cost to build fiber to 2,000 schools at $325,000 per site for broadband is $650,000,000. Estimated ongoing costs for a 1 Gbps to all 2,000 schools after a broadband fiber build out to each school is $30,720,000 per year based on rates from new Utah agreement.


Comparisons Compare the rates in Colorado Schools to states with cost sharing non-profit statewide consortiums that pay $80 per mbps the cost is $30,720,000 per year for 32 Gbps Utah students currently average 9.3 kbps of Internet at a cost of Cost per student of $.77 per student per month (or $.08 per kbps per student per month). Utah will upgrade their network to a 1Gbps connection for all 450 schools in the next 12 months at a cost of $7 million annually. Internet Cost per student per year in Nebraska - Nebraska pays $ .08 per kbps per student per month. Incentives to join the statewide cost-sharing consortium include the statewide E-rate paying 65% of the costs and the State subsidizing 80% of the remaining 35% leaving the School Districts to pay less than 5.4% of the total costs Statewide. U.S. CONSUMERS PAY MORE FOR SLOWER SPEEDS and SCHOOLS IN COLORADO PAY EVEN MORE THAN CONSUMERS FOR SLOWER SPEEDS.

In the U.S., DSL generally reaches speeds of up to 1.5 — 3.0 mbps at a price averaging $30-$50 per month (not including fees)while cable modems generally reach speeds of 3-5 mbps for $40-$50 per month. In Japan, the cost of an average connection with the speed of 26 mbps costs about $22.15 The contrast is even more striking when expressed in terms of cost per 100 kbps. The top speed generally available in Japan is 51 mbps at a cost of $0.06 per 100 kbps. The top speed generally available in the U.S. is 6 mbps available at a cost of $0.72 per 100 kbps. In other words, the Japanese have 8.5 times the speed at 1/12 of the cost.—CWA Speed Matters

C Why K-12 is called the Dead Zone for Internet Access in Colorado Type of Internet Access

Bandwidth

Cost

Comparison

US DSL Home use

3.0 Mbps

$50.00 per month

Cost of $1.44/100 kbps

US Cable Home Use

6.0 Mbps

$50.00 per month

cost of $0.72/100kbps

Japan 8.5 times the speed at 1/12 the cost for home use Colorado K-12 Schools

51 Mbps

$22.00 per month

cost of $0.06/100kbps

.00035 Mbps per student

Up to $800.00/mbps

Cost of $21.00/100kpbs


GOVERNOR BILL RITTER, JR. 

Colorado’s Recovery Act  Broadband Framework   

      7/16/2009       

 


Executive Summary   As Colorado’s economy and government transition further into an information age, it is  essential that the state utilize every possible avenue to increase access to broadband  technologies.  The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which President Obama signed in  Denver, presents a unique opportunity to increase broadband in all four corners of our state.  Broadband enables communication and information sharing which connects communities.  As  we become increasingly dependent on Internet technologies to share information and access  resources, there is a need to make sure that Colorado’s citizens have access to high‐speed  internet.  Broadband will soon be a requirement for our classrooms, hospitals and other  community sites to engage not only others around the state, but throughout the world.  Colorado has already made significant steps to bring a more comprehensive  telecommunications network to the state.  Through public, private and nonprofit partnerships,  we have created and consolidated systems to expand Colorado’s path to ubiquitous broadband  coverage.  With our Multi‐use Network, Colorado Telehealth Network and other existing  programs, we can use the Recovery Act to  help Colorado communities thrive and compete for  jobs in the information economy.  We are all well aware of how the Internet impacts our lives and  will continue to play a vital role  in our economic and educational future.  Furthering our telecommunications infrastructure is a  top priority and the Recovery Act offers us a tremendous opportunity.  To help move Colorado toward ubiquitous coverage, the State has established a framework of  priorities to help guide Recovery Act grant applications.  The State of Colorado is looking at all  options as we move to enhance broadband coverage. However, for the first round of funding ‐  and while subject to change ‐ the state decided  to allow the private sector to take full  advantage of this opportunity.  Many of the services provided by the State of Colorado depend  on broadband, but the government’s best role is to facilitate the building of broadband  networks rather than taking the place of private industry.  Our primary focus is to work with  industry around the state to provide broadband to community sites that are unserved or  underserved.   The state will prioritize applications that seek to create or improve high‐speed  Internet access at community anchor institutions.  The best application(s) will  coordinate with  industry partners, local governments and other public entities to create a comprehensive  approach to providing broadband coverage throughout the state. The state would like to see  proposals that build off of our state’s existing infrastructure instead of  building new lines  where there is existing access.   2   


While the state as a government entity will not submit an application  during the first round, we  will be thoroughly engaged in the process and will aid the private and non‐profit sectors with  their applications.  As we work together on this first round of funding we will learn where the  barriers are and potentially how to remove those barriers.  If necessary, the State  will apply  for  funding in rounds two or three of the process.     Our Priorities  The Recovery Act includes two major competitive grants for broadband projects that can go to  public and private entities. The National Telecommunications Information Administration  (NTIA), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is distributing $4.7 billion through the  Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP). The Rural Utility Service (RUS), a division  of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is distributing $2.5 billion through the Broadband  Initiatives Program (BIP) to rural communities.    For the rural program, the Notice of Funds Availability did not define the state’s role  Therefore,  the state will  provide assistance to entities that wish to apply for these funds. The BTOP  program guidelines indicate that the NTIA may consult with states regarding  funding priorities.    Under the BTOP Program, the NTIA has prioritized three categories of available funds:  Broadband Infrastructure (projects focused on Last Mile and Middle Mile in unserved and  underserved areas), Public Computing Centers (projects focused on expanding public access  and capacity to these locations) and Sustainable Broadband Adoption (projects focused on  broadband education, awareness, training, access equipment or support).  The following  contains the Governor’s Office’s priorities for each of these categories.   Broadband Infrastructure (up to $1.2 billion available)  The highest priority of the Governor’s Office regarding broadband stimulus funds is to  support  services to community anchor institutions.  In accordance with the NTIA, for  purposes of this framework, a ‘community anchor institution’ is defined as: schools,  libraries, medical and healthcare providers, public safety entities, community colleges  and other institutions of higher education, and other community support organizations  and agencies that provide outreach, access, equipment and support services to facilitate  greater use of broadband service by vulnerable populations, including low‐income,  unemployed, and elderly residents. The Governor’s Office intends to  support  applications that:   1. Focus on providing broadband services to one or more community anchor  institutions currently without access to broadband services and not already  3   


covered by a binding, legally‐enforceable commitment to provide broadband by  the end of 2010;     2. Uses infrastructure that currently exists as opposed to overbuilding a community  or service area.    3. Enhance the speed or other aspects of broadband services performance to areas  which currently have no service or only lower‐quality service; and    4. Can show long‐term sustainability.    Public Computer Centers (up to $50 million available)    The Governor’s Office will support applications that focus on maximizing the  accessibility of these centers by either increasing the number of computers available or  the number of participants that can access the site.  Additionally, priority will be given to  projects that:     1. Uses infrastructure that currently exists as opposed to overbuilding a community  or service area.    2. Enhance the speed or other aspects of broadband services performance to areas  which currently have no service or only lower‐quality service.     3. Can show long‐term sustainability.    Sustainable Broadband Adoption (up to $150 million)    The Sustainable Broadband Adoption Category is designed to fund innovative projects  that promote broadband strategies and access around the state.  For this category, the  Governor’s Office will give priority to applications that:     1. Includes a combination of rural and urban territories.      2. Increases the overall penetration rate of new subscribers.    3. Contains the lowest cost per new subscriber.    Other proposed projects may receive secondary support, but in the ranking of state priorities  and recommendations, coverage of community anchor institutions will receive the highest level  of support from the Governor’s Office and the State of Colorado. The Governor’s Office may  4   


also solicit additional proposals from entities which have not responded  to help meet  community anchor needs that aren’t met by existing applications.    The State of Colorado reserves the right to apply for funding if it becomes apparent that the  private and non‐profit sector are not adequately addressing the needs of the public through  their applications.  It is strongly encouraged that potential applicants inform the State of their  plans prior to submitting an application. .  Following the initial awards, the Governor’s Office  will evaluate  coverage gaps  and why they were not addressed.  The state will then evaluate  possible solutions and ideas for second‐round funding, which may include an application from  the state itself.    Additionally, the State of Colorado will apply for Broadband Data Improvement Act mapping  funds that will ensure Colorado’s maps are updated to include the new requirements set forth  by this initiative.     Timeline and Process  1. July 14, 2009 www.connectcolorado.org will be available on the Internet.  This website  is dedicated to the Colorado’s broadband mapping project.    2. July 14, 2009 Application can be submitted for Broadband funding    3. On or before July 16, 2009 a release of Colorado’s priorities.  These priorities will allow  applicants  to  ensure  their  proposal  is  aligned  with  the  State’s  priorities  and  create  a  coordinated process.    4. July 16, 2009 a map will be posted to www.colorado.gov/recovery showing the rural and  remote areas of Colorado.  The definitions used are those contained within the rules of  the federal programs.    5. July 16, 2009 a meeting will be held at the Old Supreme Court Chambers with streaming  audio.  Members  of  the  Public  Utilities  Commission,  Governor’s  Office  of  Information  Technology,  and  others  will  be  on  hand  to  discuss  the  rules  and  answer  questions.   These meetings will occur weekly through August 13, 2009.    6. Colorado will release updated maps on July 21st, 30th and August 6th.      7. August 14, 2009 applications are due for broadband funding.   

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8. 20 calendars after receipt of applications from the federal government, a list of  Colorado projects will be prioritized and made publicly available.    It is unknown  precisely when the states will receive this list.   

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Colorado Broadband