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Salford

2010

ANNUAL REPORT


Car Insurance ‘I prefer my car insurance with no nasty surprises.’

• No upper age limit • No hidden fees to pay • Interest free instalments (0% APR Typical) For a no-obligation quote, visit us at: Age Concern Salford 108 Church Street, Eccles, Salford, M30 0LH Tel: 0161 788 7300 (open 10am–4pm Mon to Fri) or call Ageas’ UK based call centre on 0845 600 3327 or visit www.ageuk.org.uk/carinsurance

Motor Insurance is provided by Ageas Insurance Limited.

Age UK is a registered trademark of Age UK (Charity no 1128267). The use of the name and logo Age UK is done so under a licence agreement between Age UK and Age UK Enterprises Limited, its commercial services arm. Net profits are donated to Age UK. Promoter: Age UK Enterprises Limited, Astral House, 1268 London Road, London SW16 4ER. ID9602 10/10. M2036V1OCT10 SL020346_10


Table of Contents 04 05 06 08 10 12 13 14 16 18 20 22 26 28 30 32 33 34

Chairman’s Report Aims and Objectives Chief Executive’s Report Personalisation Advocacy Befriending Volunteering Student Social Worker Placements Humphrey Booth and Clifton Green Day Services Dementia Support Services Support for Carers Community Involvement and Engagement Hospital Aftercare Service Fundraising and Raising Awareness of the Charity Products and Services Donations Legal and Administrative Information Finance Report

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Chairman’S Report

Last year I reported on the changes taking place nationally following the decision that Age Concern England and Help the Aged were to join forces and become a new charity to support and advocate for older people at national level. I expect many of you will have seen the TV advertisements promoting Age UK, the new name for the combined force. We at Age Concern Salford are following these developments with interest. We need to be certain that our relationship with the new charity will in no way hinder our vision for older people of Salford, and so we continue to be involved with the moves underway to build new relationships and understandings with the new charity, whilst maintaining our independence in the interest of local need. To say this has been a difficult year is something of an understatement..

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Everyone, young and old, has been affected by the fallout from the banking crisis. In last year’s report I spoke of the opportunity that was available to us when the lease for Critchley House, became ours to use to provide services for older people in Salford. We have had to trim the vision of our plans for the immediate future, but we are hoping that over the next twelve months we can begin to provide some services from Critchley House, and we will work to achieve our full aim in the future. So ... it may take longer than we had initially planned, but we will not give up. The ‘we’ I refer to are our staff and volunteers. Every last one of them works so hard and with such determination. On behalf of the Trustees, THANK YOU, all of you. It is an honour to know you and be part of the work of Age Concern Salford. Dorothy Knupfer OBE


Aims and objectives Our Overall Vision Age Concern Salford exists to improve the quality of life of all older people in Salford, through the provision of support, advocacy and direct services. Our Strategic Aims • To improve the health and

wellbeing of older people and their carers through the provision of high quality direct services and support and by reaching out to the most excluded. • To seek out, inform and promote

the views of older people and carers in Salford and to work in partnership with others to ensure their voices are heard. • To represent the stated needs

and wishes of all older citizens by inspiring and supporting and by seeking to influence locally and nationally

• To ensure all our activities

maximise the organisation’s resources and potential, value equality, champion volunteering and its benefits and reflect the diversity of our communities. • To embrace new technologies

and strategies to market ourselves innovatively in order to raise awareness of our work and of its benefits to older people and to expand opportunities for income generation, fundraising and trading.

• To see ourselves and be seen

as professional, authoritative, trusted and influential. Collaborating with others as a valued partner to achieve a step change in attitudes, service planning and delivery for older people.

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Chief executive’s report Age Concern Salford has continued to provide a comprehensive array of support, advocacy and direct services during the year in an environment of uncertainty in the economy as a General Election approaches. The impact of the financial and banking crisis is still all too apparent- savings rates have plummeted reducing the incomes of millions of small savers who rely upon interest from Building Society and other investments to fund little extras. Charities are feeling the loss of this unrestricted income too - bank interest has all but disappeared; donations, fundraising and legacies are squeezed. Whatever the result of the election, funds to the public sector will be cut. If this is so, charities and the voluntary sector will face funding cuts too, as a large proportion of their income is derived from Health and Local Authorities who purchase services to the public from them. Each year I seem to refer in this short report to changes. This year is no exception and whilst internally the charity has achieved a number of Strategic objectives and operationally good progress has been made, the challenges ahead including the introduction of the Personalisation Agenda will be challenging and planning for these changes is occupying a great deal of time.

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The Charity is required to provide evidence of meeting specific ‘Expectations of Quality Standards’ within the organisation in the form of a report to Age Concern, the federation as part of ‘Quality Counts’, the Age Concern quality framework and has done so within the year. In addition, the organisation has been audited and certificated to maintain the award of ISO 9001, a pan-European Quality Assessment framework. The planned restructure of the Advocacy and Empowerment Divisions has been successfully implemented. City-wide Advocacy, Information and Advice services have continued to be provided until December 2010 from Reserves in the absence of dedicated funding. The restructured Dementia Support Service (DSS) formerly called the Outreach Carers Service continues to increase its outputs and to achieve satisfactory outcomes. A successful Salford bid was made to the Department of Heath for funding to develop a pilot project as part of the National Dementia Strategy. ‘Friends for Life,’ a Peer Mentoring element of the project is managed within DSS and is training, supporting and reaching out into communities to encourage and sustain ‘Life with Dementia’.


The post of Strategic Manager, Quality and Care Services, held over whilst the outstanding restructure was completed has been filled. A new senior role of Training and Development Manager has been established, and will manage the training needs of the charity and lead the development of student placements as an income generation stream.

So we look back to a satisfactory year of work and forward to an interesting one. Whatever the economic situation, I am confident that the staff and volunteers of Age Concern Salford will be seeking to make later life more fulfilling and enjoyable for older people. Sharon Brearley

We were pleased to learn of an opportunity to acquire Critchley House, a redundant day centre, from another charity. This has been followed through and permission granted by the Charity Commission for the transfer of the Trusteeship to Age Concern Salford. It is planned to convert and update the building to provide suitable accommodation and further facilities for older people and staff. Since the need has been identified to re-house the Dementia Service which has unavoidably remained in unsatisfactory shop premises. Professional advice has been sought in an effort to house that expanding team with additional facilities for older people and a fundraising exercise is under way.

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Personalisation This Annual Report is themed around ‘Personalisation’; but what does that term mean? Personalisation means supporting people with ongoing social care needs to exert control over their lives by empowering them to; make choices of how and where they want to live; decide the support they need; work with people of their choosing; determine how they will spend their personal budget; keep safe; be able to access the relevant information, advice and advocacy to enable them to make these choices. There are four themes which underpin Personalisation:Firstly, Universal Services – this includes services like education, arts/leisure, health, housing, transport, community safety and access to information and advice. These services including the information, advice and support needed for people to be able to use the services effectively, is made available to everyone locally. Secondly, Early Intervention and Prevention Services – determine that people should receive the support available to assist them to receive help at an early stage to enable them to remain independent for as long as possible. This may include support following a recent illness or support to manage a long term condition. These services can include support to commence some physical exercise.

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Thirdly, Choice and Control individuals who are in need of support being able to outline their own care plan including a choice over who provides and manages their support. Also information about how much funding is available to them. Fourthly, Social Capital - aims to enable people to have the opportunity to be part of a community and experience the care and friendships that can come from families, friends, and neighbours. This also includes support for informal carers. Throughout the report you’ll see evidence of the ways in which we work to meet older people’s needs in Salford. The core of every service is personalised around what Older People inform us they want from our services. At Age Concern Salford we aim to collectively voice public opinion for older people; we aim to support older people individually in the situation they present to us; we aim to provide services that empower and improve the wellbeing of older citizens in Salford; we aim to work alongside older people in partnership achieving what is dictated to us by older people.


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Advocacy The Advocacy, Empowerment and Social Rehabilitation project is a well established city wide service which covers a whole range of issues including community care, welfare benefits, housing, consumer rights, neighbour nuisance and health issues relevant to older people. This is a busy service which resolves in excess of 500 cases each year and responds to more than 1300 requests for information. The remit of the service focuses upon the empowerment and social inclusion of older people through advocacy, older people forums and intergenerational work including those individuals from minority groups or in a residential care home setting.

Age Concern Salford has long worked at promoting the best interests of older people in the form of Advocacy. Approximately 78% of the issues presented to the Advocacy team usually involve older people facing systems of bureaucracy from larger organisations including the statutory sector; assisting individuals to overcome barriers and associated impact this causes them. Advocates support individuals to self advocate where possible to enable the person to exercise their rights and remain autonomous within the process. The Advocacy team are well positioned to have a wide range of knowledge and expertise on statutory and local service provision, resources, consumer rights etc. and are independent of statutory services.

The Advocacy model is underpinned by person centred practice, both of which are fundamental to Personalisation.

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This ensures that practice focuses upon the needs and desired outcomes to meet the wishes of individual older people. Personalisation calls for a change in the way that adult social care services are commissioned and how the workforce is developed in local communities and neighbourhoods. One of the biggest benefits of personalisation is that there is now extra focus on how the user would like an issue such as isolation to be resolved. With personalisation comes a greater focus on the principles of Advocacy such as choice, empowerment and user led action, which may result in a broader type of care plan and reduce the chances of people re-presenting.

Many of the cases the Advocacy team work with are to support the person to speak for themselves at meetings. Rather than take the responsibility and choice away from the person. Individual workers support people through the process and ensure that the person’s voice and any decision they make is fundamental to their preferred outcome. There are wider issues than the case at hand in the work advocates carry out. Exploring a person’s capability, improving their confidence and changing their perspective to ensure what’s achievable, right and fair also takes place.  The Advocacy team operate an open referral and appointment system. The service is delivered face to face through home or office visits or via the telephone.

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BEFRIENDING Befriending significantly contributes towards the quality of life for isolated older people. Feeling lonely and isolated can contribute to poorer physical and psychological health. Current research indicates that by providing simple non directive emotional support over time through regular contact with a ‘Befriender’ may improve a person’s quality of life and self worth by reducing symptoms of depression. (Study of local Age Concern Befriending services 2010).

Furthermore Befriending services may also encourage the person to see their GP regularly and therefore ensure their health needs are being met.

Befriending is intended to be a positive experience for both the befriended individual and the volunteer Befriender. During which it is hoped both will develop a long term friendship based on mutual trust and respect. The service relies heavily upon volunteers who are willing and able to provide Befriending, undertaking home visiting or telephone support. Volunteer Befrienders vary in age between mid 20’s and mid 70’s. Some Befrienders work in full-time paid employment, some Befrienders are retired and they dedicate between an hour and 8 hours a week to the person or persons they are matched with.

(Research Realities 2010)

Age Concern Salford’s Befriending service has been established over a number of years. This service operates an open referral system and is offered to individuals who are over the age of 60, who live alone and are socially isolated and reside within Salford. The Befriending service provides both telephone support and/or home support. Individuals are matched up with a volunteer who establishes a relationship, spending quality time with the person with whom they are matched with.

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If you have some spare time and would like to make a valuable contribution to this service, or refer someone please contact us.


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volunteering Over the past 12 months Age Concern Salford has created new volunteer opportunities includung the ‘Friends for Life’ project situated within the Dementia Support Services, involving volunteers from particular neighbourhoods being placed in peer-support groups for people with memory problems in Salford. Volunteering is becoming more recognised as an effective way to gain experience and confidence for the long term unemployed. Subsequently other organisations who support people within this area are contacting us more frequently to determine what we can offer their clients.

The organisation is able to mentor people and let them build on, not only their experience, but also their confidence in a safe and supportive environment. Several volunteers have progressed to work for Age Concern Salford or other health and social care related organisations. These have been positive outcomes for the organisation which highlight the mutual benefit that volunteering can bring an individual. As more pessimistic news within the economy arises, a more diverse group of potential volunteers are approaching Age Concern Salford searching for something new and worthwhile. We have the panel beater and the accountant who now both work in health and social care. We have provided people with an opportunity to change their lives and in return they have contributed so much with the help and additional expertise from the hours they have devoted to volunteering.

Offering volunteering opportunities for some people who have been unemployed long-term can be for a variety of reasons. Volunteering can build the person’s personal growth and development by raising their self confidence and self esteem in addition to enhancing their knowledge and skills.

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Student social worker placements •

Age Concern Salford provides placements to Social Work Students by:• Providing a welcoming and safe

• Providing opportunities for

• Promoting flexible and diverse

• Encouraging active student

• Valuing the contribution of

• Ensuring that the support we

• Fostering the intellectual, ethical

• Striving for equality of treatment

• Ensuring quality through

• Ensuring high quality training and

learning environment for students which will promote equality and opportunity.

learning opportunities.

students.

and professional, development of students.

continuous improvement by obtaining and responding to feedback from students.

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developing the confidence, competence and knowledge of students.

participation in the work of the organisation.

offer meets the individual’s learning needs.

and opportunity in terms of gender, sexuality, disability, ethnic origin, religion and age.

mentoring for on-site and off site assessors.


During 2009/2010 Age Concern Salford successfully placed a number of students in all of the services. The placements ranged from 30 – 100 days duration, thus providing a range of learning opportunities to meet the student’s learning needs; to enhance the student’s growth and development enabling them to meet the requirements of the social work course. In addition to providing a positive contribution to practice learning within the organisation. Age Concern Salford have successfully networked with and have now established collaborative working relationships with Salford Social Services and with 3 local universities; Manchester University, Manchester Metropolitan University and Salford University. This has enabled the organisation to provide placements for both the BA and MA students at all levels.

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Humphrey Booth and Clifton Green Day Services One of the key features of the day services is the implementation of the Healthy Living project. The project was initiated and started a few years ago to provide holistic health promotion and opportunities/ services to the over 50’s. From this initiative a number of 8-12 week Healthy Living programmes have now been completed at both the Humphrey Booth and Clifton Green Day Centres. The Healthy Living programme aims are to:• Encourage health promotion

(including both local and national health promotion strategies on a regular/weekly basis) • Working and building links/

partnerships with other agencies and those in the local area Some of the topics covered included those of:• Movement and physical exercise • Diet and nutrition • Injuries, self help strategies and

basic first aid information • Age Concern Salford Advocacy • Personal and home safety advice

and tips

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These sessions and topics that were brought into the centres have been provided by a range of specialists. These include NHS dieticians, oral hygiene experts and various other health professionals; promotion experts from the local health authorities as well as demonstrations delivered by local Police and Police Community Support Officer’s. The aim of which is to improve relations and trust between service users and the local community officers. Sessions are carefully planned and much consideration is made towards the benefits of each topic in regards to the individual needs of service users. This ensures everyone attending these sessions will gain some information/ knowledge of the benefits to enable them to continue living independently for as long as possible. The latest programme was taken advantage of by up to 22 service users with an average of 6 per session. The end of programme evaluation concluded that participants found the programme of benefit to them and also ‘fun and exciting.’


The healthy programme also promotes motor therapy assisted exercise at the Humphrey Booth Centre. These machines have NHS individuals who actively use them on a regular basis. Others have also tested them out and completed personalised exercise programmes including external customers. The above also involves partnership working between Humphrey Booth Centre and the Salford leisure staff. Overall the health improvement services provided at the Centres has had a positive impact upon those people who use them

by promoting the health and independence of individuals. This is achieved by focusing on the individual’s support needs and physical, mental and social well being. Additionally by empowering service users, promoting independence and minimising risk.

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Dementia Support Services Age Concern Salford Dementia Support Service is a well established community-based service commissioned by Salford’s Health & Social Care Directorate and NHS Salford. The service aims to support people in the early stages of dementia who have been formally diagnosed with one of the dementia illnesses and their carers. The service operates an open referral system and offers friendship, peer support and opportunities to try new activities or maintain old ones. The service currently runs a number of initiatives including ‘Friends for Life’ and Buddy Service projects including carer support.

support groups have been established in the first six months of the project, in 4 neighbourhoods including Swinton and Irlam. By adopting a neighbourhood approach it is hoped to reduce the stigma attached to dementia, by raising awareness and by promoting a more positive image of people living with dementia; encouraging more people to seek an early diagnosis and/or support. Work continues in developing closer partnership working with statutory services.

Buddy Service Friends for Life In September 2009 the service was selected as a demonstrator site as part of the National Dementia Strategy to pilot the ‘Friends for Life’ project for a period of 18 months. This was to build upon the innovative work of the ‘Buddy Service’. As a result, a total of 4 peer

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In order to extend this service to more people with dementia, more groups have been established within the community. This includes the weekly ‘Men’s Group’ which meets at Swinton Moorside Cricket Club and provides a male orientated environment. The venue is ideal as it offers good amenities and is staffed mainly by male staff and volunteers to assist service users to participate


in a range of activities.

if unsuitable.

A walking group has also been set up in Victoria Park to promote individual physical health and emotional wellbeing. The session enables service users to have a leisurely stroll around the park, noticing the changing seasons and chatting to dementia support staff and park attendants as they go. In good weather they have hot drinks sat on the park benches, or inside

A ladies coffee and exercise group has also started and, again, the ladies who attend really enjoy chatting and laughing while they do gentle exercises. The Buddy Cafe continues to run successfully and, if resources allow, the Buddy Service Co-ordinator will establish another similar session as carers particularly appreciate having the longer break which the 10am-2pm programme allows.

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Support FOR Carers Practical support for carers includes ensuring that carers know their entitlements to welfare benefits, carers services, health and social services and are assisted to access these services. Carers also appear to manage better if they have a greater understanding of dementia and how it affects the cared for person. Training is provided to groups of carers and literature and fact sheets made available. Practical support may also be provided to carers to enable them to attend appointments etc. Additionally, emotional support is provided by individual staff on a 1:1 basis or within a group session. This may be a listening ear available at the end of the phone or regular visits from one of the Carers Support Team. so that carers can share issues and be helped to think through problems and make difficult decisions. This enables carers to share issues, solve their problems and make difficult decisions. Social Support is provided by a range of carers groups, activities and trips, some that are for carers only, and others that husbands, and wives, children and parents, enjoy together as a social activity. Regular groups run in Little Hulton, Pendleton, Irlam, Swinton and Worsley.

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There is a dedicated art and craft group, an allotment and a theatre group. In this way carers can be mutually supportive. It can take time to build a trusting relationship and some people need more support than others. It can also be difficult for carers to ask for help and the role of the Carers’ Support staff is to encourage the carer to look after themselves, balancing their needs with the needs of the person with dementia. Carers Training remains a popular and effective way of enabling carers to develop their own support networks, increase their knowledge and confidence, and be encouraged to consider their own needs. The carers’ training is invaluable in that it allows carers, who are facing very similar difficulties, to talk to and learn from each other. Response to the service indicates that friendships are formed which support people throughout the course of the illness and beyond. The Dementia Support Service also continues to run events and trips for service users. Wherever possible the service participates in city-wide initiatives such as the ‘Young at Heart’ promotion and has offered unusual activities such as line dancing, belly dancing and archery alongside singing, ballroom dancing and reminiscence work.


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‘There are many challenges ahead but our staff and volunteers continue to be motivated and inspired by the humour, resilience and appreciation of our clients. The fact that, when cognitive abilities are lost due to dementia, people are more open to each others’ emotions and the simple pleasures of life is a lesson for us all’ (DSS Manager 2009/2010).

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COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT AND ENGAGEMENT

Over the past 12 months work has continued on developing links with older people’s groups in all 8 neighbourhoods within Salford. Significantly improving the involvement of black and other minority groups (particularly African and Caribbean older people) and encouraging joint working.

Additionally Involvement Advocacy supported the Gemini Group based in Charlestown and Lower Kersal, with assistance from the East Salford Neighbourhood team, following cessation of funding from the New Deal Team. Information has been shared with a wider audience through placing articles in the neighbourhood newsletters, having a stand at community events and responding to requests for information from general callers. Involvement Advocacy also developed successful links with statutory agencies through their involvement in the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender MultiAgency Group and Salford Equalities Network. Both these networks have enabled a closer working relationship with a range of agencies.

As part of this process Involvement Advocacy established links with older people’s groups and neighbourhood older people task groups across the districts of Salford. During which Advocacy have continued to provide information to all of the groups on matters such as issues arising from the Older People’s Partnership Board. Events being held by older people’s groups across the city, promotion and involvement in the Age Concern Radio Show, Young at Heart and the work of Salford Forum of Older People (SFOP).

A review was undertaken of the above work in the neighbourhoods to establish how working in partnership could be improved. Alongside this a decision was made by the Executive Committee of SFOP to rationalise their

Age Concern Salford was commissioned to carry out a review of older people’s groups in Greater Manchester by Greater Manchester Council of Voluntary Organisations (GMCVO). The conclusion of this work presented an opportunity for Age Concern Salford to work further with GMCVO but equally to work with Age Concerns in the region to develop a Greater Manchester Forum.

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work because of a diminishing membership but to also undertake a recruitment drive. Further consideration of these points culminated into a proposal to develop a partnership project to bring representatives/older people’s groups together into a collective of older people groups.

Salford Forum of Older People There have been various policy drivers that have championed the role of a forum including benefits of having the representation of citizens and service users. Working in partnership with a local authority to achieve change and personalised services.

The collective would aim to have a greater focus on equality and representation of black and other minority groups as well as LGBT older people.

‘Support for at least one local user led organisation and mainstream mechanism to develop networks which ensure people using services and their families have a collective voice.’ (Putting People First 2007)

Linked to the above a member of the community has been supported to establish an African and Caribbean Older People’s Network in conjunction with the North Manchester African and Caribbean Care Group and Salford Refugee Link. Representation from a range of African and Caribbean communities. Participants were keen for older African and Caribbean people to work together, meet on a regular basis and support each other.

Transforming Adult Social Care 2009 and Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007 also heavily advocate in favour of the process citizen contribution in the form of a User Led Organisations. The Older People’s forum may not fit directly under the description of users as such but their ethos is certainly aimed towards reaching the goal of client led decisions and services. Most local authorities have an Older People’s forum. Salford City Council has keenly invested time and effort in working with the forum to give it creditability and the platform to speak from. Age Concern Salford has supported the forum to run independently and to perform to their best ability. Age Concern Salford has also assisted the forum on providing them with opportunities to work with and represent their community.

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SFOP has been fundamental in identifying the needs highlighted in Salford’s Wellbeing Strategy. They also have made themselves available to work providing consultation to a Pension Credit myths leaflet. Every member of the forum is involved in other activities across Salford. To name a few, Beryl Murray the chair is involved in the carers forum, Vice Chair Val Buygourne was a former Councillor, Secretary Daisy Shortman gives her time to help improve the housing situation for older residents in Salford, Treasurer Gilbert Hearn sits on the neighbourhood committee for Eccles as well as the History Society and June Smith has set up the forget me not library, the dementia choir and volunteers her time for the older peoples radio show on Salford Radio. Not only does that list highlight what excellent committed members the forum is blessed with but it highlights the diverse ways people in Salford are able to get involved and spend their time on worthwhile causes to help improve the life of older citizens of Salford.

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The future of the forum will hopefully be one whereby it is able to continue to evaluate itself, carry on with the momentum it has gained. It has so many valuable members but is always looking for people to join them who wish to contribute in the work that they do.


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Hospital Aftercare Over the years there have been many changes in the issues facing older people. Generally these issues can be particularly attributed to demographic changes, increased poverty and poor health profile in deprived wards throughout the City of Salford. This has resulted in an ageing population living for many years with ill health, mobility issues, chronic long term conditions and carer’s whose own health has been neglected. The Hospital Aftercare Team has risen to these challenges that face our locality, by providing additional support to older people who are admitted to Salford Royal Hospital Accident and Emergency unit. There are increasing numbers of people aged 60 plus who attend the hospital’s A&E department some with quite complex social needs and others with multiple attendances specifically related to unanticipated changes and social isolation. The Hospital Aftercare team responded to 5,578 individual patients between the period of 1st April 2009 - 31st March 2010. Consequently The Hospital Aftercare Team operates a system for prioritisation in terms of risk and need that individuals present with. The system is working well in

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targeting resources and ensuring people receive early intervention and prevention services and appropriate support with their identified care needs. Additionally the Hospital Aftercare Team facilitate the effectiveness and smooth-running of the interface with other agencies to ensure that older people do not ‘fall through the gaps’ or experience unnecessary delays. An improved tool for hospital and community assessments has been designed by the service and evaluated by the Rapid Response team’s hospital assessors and Falls Manager, and is now in use. The assessment tool is more comprehensive to ensure that additional information can be provided to Statutory Agencies when making referrals for Occupational Therapy (OT), Falls Clinic, Social Services, Care Assessments and Single Entry Point referrals. The information gathered has also proved invaluable when looking at issues of Safeguarding. The Hospital Aftercare Team adopts a personalised approach in their work providing a flexible service. Utilising services available in the community such as making referrals to Heart Care


support groups; signposting to Health Improvement; identifying community based activities such as luncheon clubs, art groups and day care, geared towards the older person; providing support. Hopefully this will reduce the number of re-attendances to the A&E departments for non-medical issues.

The service operates 365 days per year between 9am – 9pm on week days and 9am – 7pm at weekends; provides a community outreach service and is located on the ground floor of Salford Royal Hospital.

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Fundraising and Raising Awareness of the Charity Age Concern Salford has a continued and increasing need to raise unrestricted funds to support our charitable aims especially in the current economic climate as traditional methods of grant funding are dwindling or facing cutbacks.

at Salford market in October 2009. A representative from Salford Radio was on hand to entertain shoppers and fabulous raffle prizes were donated by local businesses.

We continue to raise awareness of our charitable services for the benefit of older people of Salford and to promote fundraising events. Below is a sample selection of events held throughout this period:Manchester Retirement Show A high profile two day event held in conjunction with Age Concern Enterprises drawing in 7000 people who are either retired or contemplating retirement, and are therefore a key audience for our products and services range and who may have an affinity to our charitable aims and objectives. Eccles Traders Association The Eccles Traders Association held weekend tombola stalls throughout May 2009 with prizes donated by Eccles retailers in order to raise funds for Age Concern Salford. Salix Homes A successful promotional event hosted by Salix Homes was held

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Cheque presentation by Salix

Salford Charity Dragon Boat Race The first Salford Charity Dragon Boat Race was held at Salford Quays. Lima Networks a local IT business and Salix Homes, a Salford housing association each sponsored a boat and team of rowers in aid of Age Concern Salford. This was a fabulous fun day and a great teambuilding exercise as well as raising a sizeable amount for the charity.

Salix Homes, Dragon Boat Team


Bupa Manchester 10K Run Age Concern Salford had two runners participating in the race, raising awareness of our charity whilst at the same generating significant sponsorship monies to fund our charitable work. We have reserved a block of places for next year’s run which will be held on 15th May 2011 anyone interested in running on behalf of Age Concern Salford please contact George on: 0161 788 7300 or email gwrigglesworth@ ageconcernsalford.org.uk

Celebration of Christmas An acclaimed annual fundraising evening full of Christmas stories, seasonal reflections and excellent music held at Salford Cathedral. Acclaimed Salford tenor Jon Christos and soprano Jenny Williams sang for us. More festive music and song was provided by Notability and St. John’s Cathedral choir. Local Broadcaster Fred Fielder entertained us with amusing, sometimes sentimental tales of ‘old Salford’. ‘I look forward to this concert every year the beautiful music and amusing, often thought provoking Christmas tales make it a real treat’ Salford resident

Jon Christos

Fright Night at Smithills Hall, Bolton Smithills Hall is known for spooky goings on with a number of ghostly apparitions in residence. On Friday 11th February 2011 you can find out what really makes things go bump in the night by taking part in a Fundraising Fright Night in aid of Age Concern Salford and hosted by Ghost Tours UK. To book a place or for more information please contact Anna on 0161 788 7700 or email dssadmin@ageconcernsalford.org.uk To donate online www.justgiving. com/AgeConcernSalfordFrightnight

Kathleen Sheridan, in a penguin suit

Just Giving Website You can donate to Age Concern Salford by using our Just Giving Website www.justgiving.com/ ageconcernsalford

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products AND services Our Trading Company continues to face an ongoing challenge to generate unrestricted income to fund its charitable activities. We offer a second to none approach to treating our customers fairly and employ a unique ‘face to face’ service. Our highly trained, accredited staff are always on hand to give the information you need to help decide if the policy suits your needs and we offer a no obligation quotation. Our friendly staff and volunteers take pride in offering a sympathetic and caring approach to all our customers. ‘It is the first time I have bought home insurance from Age Concern and the customer service at the Eccles office was first class, I will certainly use Age Concern Insurance Services again’ Age Concern Salford insurance customer. All profits generated by Age Concern Salford Trading Ltd are Gift Aided to the Charity to support the charity’s work with older Salford residents. Over 50? Products and Services you can rely on. We offer a wide range of products and services for the over 50’s to choose from:TRAVEL INSURANCE No upper age limit. CAR INSURANCE & BREAKDOWN Great value car insurance with no upper limits. HOME & CONTENTS INSURANCE New for old cover tailored to your needs. FUNERAL PLAN The Age UK Guaranteed Funeral Plan allows you to pre-pay for a cremation at today’s prices. GAS & ELECTRICITY Age UK Energy is a tailor-made gas and electricity package developed with our provider E.ON. OTHER SERVICES Other services we offer range of other services including Wills, Weekly Lottery and Charity Flowers. Our Trading Offices are open Monday to Friday from 10.00am to 4.00pm at our Head Office in Eccles and we have weekly trading sessions at both Swinton and Walkden. For more information on all our Products and Services call in for a face to face quotation or call us on: 0161 788 7300. Age Concern Salford, 108 Church Street, Eccles, Salford, M30 0LH

AGE CONCERN SALFORD ANNUAL REPORT


Home Insurance ‘It’s not just any home, it’s my home.’

• Award-winning claims service* • No hidden fees to pay • Interest free instalments (0% APR Typical) For a no-obligation quote, visit us at: Age Concern Salford 108 Church Street, Eccles, Salford, M30 0LH Tel: 0161 788 7300 (open 10am–4pm Mon to Fri) or call Ageas’ UK based call centre on 0845 606 5075 or visit www.ageuk.org.uk/homeinsurance

Home Insurance is provided by Ageas Insurance Limited. *Winner Claims Initiative of the Year and Winner Customer Care, British Insurance Awards 2010. Age UK is a registered trademark of Age UK (Charity no 1128267). The use of the name and logo Age UK is done so under a licence agreement between Age UK and Age UK Enterprises Limited, its commercial services arm. Net profits are donated to Age UK. Promoter: Age UK Enterprises Limited, Astral House, 1268 London Road, London SW16 4ER. ID9604 10/10. H2040V1NOV10 SL020347_10


32

Donations Thanks are also sent to the following individuals and organisations who have generously supported the charity: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

A Anderson A C Support Services NW Alice Palmer (Deceased) Ann Smith Bridgewater School Carriages Funeral Service C Bramer Clarnedon Rd Primary School Cyril Roberts David Winston Dorothy Dobson Eccles Traders Association Elsie Fox E Moorcroft Endowment Fund Florence Townsend Holm Court James Smith J Crook J Murphy Joan Chester John Gordon Joyce Hunter-Mann Kathleen Eason Kathleen Kelly Kay’s Chemist Keith Austin Lima Networks Mary Hayes Mavis Salmon Megan Sandiford Miss A Goodfellow Miss Gladys Waits Mr Arthur Prestage Mr A Snell Mr B D Turner Mr B Lees Mr D Pimblett

AGE CONCERN SALFORD ANNUAL REPORT

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Mr Fishwick Mr George Dickson Mr H McLeod Mr John Gordon Mr K Airey Mr & Mrs Alexander Mr & Mrs Barrow Mr & Mrs Cosgrove Mr & Mrs Farran Mr & Mrs R Jensen Mr N Pollock Mr P F Busuttil Mrs A Kelly Mrs B Murray Mrs B Wright Mrs E Wood Mrs I Fahey Mrs J Booth Mrs Jean Edwards Mrs M Dixon MBE Mrs Pamela Orford Mrs P Beckett Mrs U Starke Mrs Wood Ms B Phillips Ms Dora Lane Ms Iris Hitchen Ms Teresa Jaloveckas Sainsburys Salix Homes Sandra Jones Sidney Webb Swinton and Moorside Sick and Poor Fund • The Booth Charities


Legal and Administrative Information Age Concern Salford is registered with the Charity Commission (Registered Number 1105769) and was incorporated on 12 August 2004 as a Company Limited by Guarantee, Registered in England and Wales with Companies House (Registered Number 5204296). The Charity was founded in 1973. This Annual Report and the Audited Accounts contained therein covers the period from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. The registered office is currently 108 Church Street, Eccles, Salford, M30 0LH. The organisation operates within the terms of its Memorandum and Articles of Association. Age Concern Salford is a member of Age Concern, a federation of registered charities and works with Age Concern bodies in the federation locally, in the North West region and in the rest of England. It has no connected charities. Board of Trustees The Trustees are responsible for the governance and management of the Charity. Trustees met regularly during the year. Honorary Officers and Members of the Board are elected at the AGM and retire by rotation in accordance with the Articles of Association.

The following served on the Board during the period under review: Mrs Dorothy Knupfer OBE (Chairman) Mrs Sheila Levell (Vice Chair) Mr Peter Griffin (Treasurer) Mr Bob Boyd Mr Imonina Kayoma Mrs Eve Murphy Mr Steve Pugh Mrs Val Burgoyne P Green (resigned 10 June 2009) I Bryan (resigned 14th Dec 2009) Structure, Policy and Procedures A number of sub-committees (including Premises and Personnel) met during the year and reported to the Board. The Board also received regular reports from the Treasurer and from the Director, to whom responsibility for the day-to-day running of the organisation is delegated. The Trustees regularly assess the major risks to which the charity is exposed, in particular those related to the finances of the charity, and are working towards increasing its reserves. No formal complaints were received during the financial period. All comments are positively encouraged as an opportunity to evaluate and improve performance. Director: Sharon Brearley Bankers: The Royal Bank of Scotland Auditors: Mitchell Charlesworth

AGE CONCERN SALFORD ANNUAL REPORT

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34

Finance Report The Group

The Charity

The Group

2010

The Charity

2009

£

£

£

£

149,790

149,790

154,852

154,335

-

2

-

2

149,790

149,792

154,852

154,337

Debtors and prepayments

54,054

90,658

37,707

36,940

Current asset investments

522,152

552,152

569,074

569,074

Cash at bank and in hand

338,886

270,368

413,802

383,632

915,092

883,178

1,020,583

989,646

56,042

42,224

57,784

47,328

859,050

840,954

962,799

942,318

Total assets less current liabilities

1,008,840

990,746

1,117,651

1,096,655

Creditors: amounts falling due in more than one year

6,560

-

8,960

-

1,002,280

990,746

1,108,691

1,096,655

-

-

764

262

1,002,280

990,746

1,107,927

1,096,393

General

413,649

413,649

99,155

99,155

Designated funds

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

613,649

613,649

299,155

299,155

377,097

377,097

797,238

797,238

11,534

-

11,534

-

1,002,280

990,746

1,107,927

1,096,393

Fixed Assets Tangible assets Investments

Current assets

Creditors: amounts falling due within one year Net current assets

Net assets Capital grants Net assets

Funds Unrestricted funds

Restricted Funds Non charitable trading funds

AGE CONCERN SALFORD ANNUAL REPORT


35

Age Concern Salford Consolidated Statement Of Financial Activities Incorporating An Income And Expenditure Account Year Ended 31 March 2010 Unrestricted Funds

Restricted Funds

Total Funds

Total Funds

2010

2009

£

£

£

£

31,699

3,293

34,992

34,556

129,550

1,937

131,487

117,878

8,848

-

8,848

29,150

170,097

5,230

175,327

181,584

4,436

1,029,664

1,034,100

1,014,934

174,533

1,034,894

1,209,427

1,196,518

65,691

194

65,885

87,106

104,164

1,138,834

1,242,998

1,045,237

6,191

-

6,191

5,750

176,046

1,139,028

1,315,074

1,138,093

(1,513)

(104,134)

(105,647)

58,425

Gross transfers between funds

316,007

(316,007)

-

-

Net Movement of funds in year

314,494

(420,141)

(105,647)

58,425

Total funds brought forward

299,155

797,238

1,096,393

1,037,968

Total funds carried forward

613,649

377,097

990,746

1,096,393

Incoming resources Incoming resources from generated funds: Voluntary Income: Activities for generating funds: Investment Income interest received

Incoming resources from charitable activities Total incoming resources

Resources expended Costs of generating funds: Fundraising costs

Charitable activities Operation of the charity Governance costs Total resources expended Net incoming resources before transfers

Reconciliation of funds

The statement of financial activities includes all gains and losses recognised in the year. All incoming resources and resources expended derive from continuing activities.

AGE CONCERN SALFORD ANNUAL REPORT


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Age Concern (Salford) Annual Report