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Digital Design - Module 02 Semester 1, 2018 Daniel Ze Yan

911907 Daniel Parker + Studio 6


Week Three

Reading: Kolerevic B. 2003. Architecture in the Digital Age

Kolerevic described three fundamental type of fabrication techniques in the reading. Outline the three techniques and discuss the potential of Computer Numeric Controlled fabrication with parametric modelling. (150 words max)

The three fundamental types of fabrication techniques that Kolerevic outlines were the subtractive, additive and formative fabrication. Subtractive fabrication is where the final target is carved out of a larger piece of material using CNC machinery. Additive fabrication is where you start off with a smaller piece of material and use CNC machinery to add to it. Formative fabrication is when heat or steam is applied to a material to form it into its desired shape through reshaping or deformation. The potential of Computer Numeric Controlled fabrication or CNC is limitless, aside from processing power of the computer that controls it. With CNC we are able to model parametric modeling a lot more accurate when compared to hand and it allows us to form very complex shapes and objects while also saving a lot of time.

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Week Three

Surface Creation

The process of creating the surface was quite straight forward when using what was tought to us on IDDA and also the workshops. Basically 2 adjustable lines that had variables points on them that we could further adjust, these 4 points were then linked together to create a surface. Initially the surfaces that I created were more based on how nice they looked, but as the assignment went further on it shifted from asethetics to functionality as very complex surfaces would create panels that would intersect.

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Week Four Panels & Waffle

My idea behind my surfaces were to create a concave and convec surface. One surface is shaped to focus everything onto one central point, while the other surface is meant to disperse everything outwards. Some of my inspiration came from a crystal prism, which also why my surfaces look like one.

Due to the curvy surfaces that this waffle had to apply to, some of the support beams within this waffle have turned out to be pretty interesting. The waffle structure also looks like a building by itself, without the surfaces.

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Week Four

Laser Cutting

The laser cut file preperations started once the surfaces were finalised. At the very start we used the _ptTabs and UnrollSrf commands in rhino to achieve the folding panels and also the tabs we needed to make the final model. The reason that I didnt use grasshopper to do this was because I found that grasshopper tabs were a bit too small for me to use, thus I remained with the Rhino tabs. The next step in this process was to number all of these sections and bake out the waffle grid, after that everything was transfered to the template FabLab gave us. I basically played a minigame of tetris trying to fit everything in, as if the objects were too far apart, it would take too long to laser cut. This file with the panels and tabs was then submitted to Fablab. Throughout this process I realised that grasshopper is more efficient when used alongside commands from Rhino, as using grasshopper alone can have certain restrictions.

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Week Five

The initial setup of the boolean form is all set up within Grasshopper, this is done by using the chain of commands that was taught during the workshops. After this portions of the commands were modified, the sphere container was replaced with a hexagon container from the Weaverbird Grasshopper addon, and also adding a shear and scale container to modify my internal object even more. After the grasshopper file was set up, it was all baked into Rhino and then manually cut using the _booleandifference and _booleansplit command, I personally prefer _bolleansplit as it gave more freedom over what was cut. This structure was then further cut down so it was shrunk down to the 1/8th that it had to be. The second line of images from left to right describes the process of where the grasshopper preview was set, then baked and the baked objects in Rhino were trimmed down to get into the desired view that I wanted. 6


Week Five

Isometric

Initially, I tried to cut my 150 by 150 square into 1/8 corners, kind of like a pizza, but after a few versions of this, I realized that these were too plain and were very bad at conveying the idea I was trying to express. Afterward I shifted towards cutting the box with curved lines, this methods was able to show the varying shapes and such, but also failed to convey any form of ideas. My final idea with how to cut it was a sequence of weird sideways cuts that weren’t perpendicular to each other, this created my final shape. My final boolean object is the top corner quadrant of the full 150 by 150 cube. This quadrant is able to show many different ideas, while also allowing the object to look aesthetically pleasing. The idea behind my object to is to show the modifications that I’ve done to the shapes of the object, this is done by cutting the object so more then 1 row and 4 columns of the object can be seen, through this, we can see the change of size and angle of the objects. The second idea I played with was vision through the side, from one side of the object you can see the full interior, but from the other side you cant, this is due to the unique ‘V’ shaped insides that open up when you look into the object.

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Week Six Task 01

(85,150,150)

(150,150,140)

(110,150,150)

(125,150,150)

(10,0,150)

(75,150,150)

(150,25,150)

(140,0,150)

(140,0,150)

(150,0,135)

(10,0,150) (150,150,150)

(150,150,150)

(150,140,0)

(105,150,0)

(10,150,0)

(10,150,0)

(0,0,65)

(0,0,60)

(120,0,0)

(120,0,0)

(120,0,0) (0,0,30)

(0,75,0)

(0,75,0)

(0,80,0)

(30,0,0)

(20,0,0)

(30,0,0)

(20,0,0) (0,10,0)

(0,0,0)

One surface folding under the other surface

Flat over-arching surfaces

Twin twisting surfaces

A balance between twisting and arching

(82,137,128)

(38,69,113) (53,147,76)

(45,82,108)

(23,66,30)

(12,22,30)

(13,47,8)

(0,14,0)

Curve and Point Attractors

Curve and Point Attractors

Curve and Point Attractors

Curve and Point Attractors

Basic shapes with and without openings

More complex indented shapes

Mixture of semi flat and multiple objects

A balance between opened objects and complx objects

Task 01 Matrix My matrix is aimed to show my thinking as I approached the final version of my design. At the start, I played around with unique base surface combination, whether they were wrapped around each other or they were arching over each other, my final design was a combination of the two panels twisting while also having a slight arch. The variation within the attractor points and curves were also tested, initially, I tried the basic attractors, then I tried the extremes with different magnitude of the attractors. In the end, I decided to go with a medium between the two, as too extreme attractor points made the panels impossible to unroll and make. During the geometry testing phase, I tried 2D and 3D panels and also the combination between them. I also tested panels with ‘windows’ on the side of them, but I personally didn’t feel like these type of panels suited my design. My final design contained opens within the top that were all skewed sideways. The main isometric I used was the entire model exploded, with dotted lines showing where the panels were attached relative to the waffle structure. From the SE angle, I felt this angle was able to show the most of the panels and the waffle it self.

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Week Six Task 02

(60,75,82)

(78,113,63)

(85,93,30) (75,90,34)

Point Attractor

Point Attractor

Point Attractor

Point Attractor

Hexagon shapes sprouting from a corner

Cubes

Cylinder based shapes

Full Hexagon shapes

(68,78,-30)

(-50,6,-30)

(-10,23,6)

Point Attractor

Point Attractor

Point Attractor

(-13,-8,-14)

Point Attractor

Task 02 Matrix This matrix is the same as the Task 01 Matrix, the matrix is aimed to show my thought train as I reached the final boolean object. During the initial phase of modifying the cube’s inner point structure, I purposely left the rear row unaffected, as this acted as control lines for my boolean object. For the front 2 rows, I modified so they’d be skewing towards a certain way. I preferred the point attractor over the curve attractor within Task 02 due to the fact that I didn’t want the linear type of attraction, I preferred the accurate single point attraction. Within the second row, I attempted different geometries. Ranging from geometries that sprouted from an origin point and then simple shapes such as squares. I felt that squares were too simple, but the weird geometries were way too confusing, therefore I settled for something in the middle a hexagon prism. The final row was just the modifications I tried to the geometries themselves. I preferred that the attraction points were always outside of the bounding box, as this created more of an attraction effect, compared if the attraction point was put in the middle of the bounding box. The main isometric I used had different views of my final boolean object due to my object being slightly hard to understand if it could only be seen from one way.

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Week Six

Final Isometric Views

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

The initial grasshopper command chain that built the initial outside layer of the bounding box. The image to the right shows the grasshopper commands used to form the index selection around the edges of the cube.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

Using the index selection within grasshopper on the cube, I was able to create lines that were able to create the surfaces shown in the image on the right.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

The surfaces were then baked out into rhino and the shapes were also made, then using the command within grasshopper, as shown above, the shapes were then modeled onto the surfaces.

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Appendix

Using the command from the Waffle workshop, I slightly

Task 01 Process

modified it to fit my paneled surfaces, this resulted in the waffle that connected my two panel surfaces together. I shrunk the number of waffles to allow for a more easy connection and more clear structure.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

This entire waffle and the paneled surfaces were all baked out into rhino and checked for intersections and anything that would be physically impossible to make. The waffle was also split from the panel to allow for the laser cut preparation to begin.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

Using the grasshopper command within the left image, I am able to bake out the outlines of the waffle grid in an exploded method, this was then transferred into the laser cut template and sent into Fablab for laser cutting.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

The panel surfaces were exploded into single panels (I did this due to the shape of all my panels and unrolling them one by one was the only way to not have them intersect with each other.) Within rhino, all of the panels were laid out in the order that they were to be assembled, then they had the etch and cut lines put onto a different colour coded layers and their respective panel number placed next to them.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

Using the grasshopper command within the left image, I am able to bake out the outlines of the waffle grid in an exploded method, this was then transferred into the laser cut template and sent into Fablab for laser cutting. The laser cut was then taken home and taken apart.

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

The remaining photos were just pictures during the making of the physical model, this included using super glue and scissors to prepare the panels for putting them together and also the attachment of them to the waffle structure,

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Appendix

Task 01 Process

Other Images from the finished model

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Appendix Task 02 Process

Shown here are the grasshopper command and their previews within rhino. On the left, this is the 150 by 150 by 150 bounding box that our structure had to be limited in. On the right, this showed the grid points that we were to adjust and then put our unique geometry into.

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Appendix

Task 02 Process

These 4 photos show the next step of the process of setting up the boolean structure. On the right was the attractor point that skewed the grid of the box. On the right, this showed the lines of the skewed box, with each cube being displayed, we are more able to see the skewing within the cube.

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Appendix Task 02 Process

On the left, this was the final process of the grasshopper side within Task 02. This was the grasshopper code that gave my boolean object it’s shaped, with the shape being hexagons. On the right, this shape was baked out with the bounding box of the shapes. These were then made into closed surfaces using MeshtoNurbs and also Extrude command from Rhino.

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Appendix

Task 02 Process

On the left, the geometries and the extruded bounding box were combined and the command Booleandifference was used to trim the geometries out of the 150 by 150 by 150 solid box. This object was further cut by half. On the right, the half-object from previously was then cut in half again to get the quarter of the object. The next image shows the unique curved line that was used to cut the quarter down to the eighth that we wanted. I used this curved line because it shows as much of the object as I can.

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Appendix Task 02 Process

On the left, it shows the final object that I have created for Task 02 and also the same object within its .stl file view. On the right, the object within the makerbot file, this file was then exported as a makerbot print then submitted to Next lab for 3D printing using while filament.

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