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Daniel Vurpillat


inGRAINED

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urban farming

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boutique hotel

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deteroriated codependence

26

[void]

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vault

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cribbed

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inGRAINED spring 2016 design studio new york city, new york group problem: Create a mixed use development including a museum, market, and residential apartments for New York City using primarily wood and timber solution: The project took advantage of the views towards Williamsburg Bridge to the east and the already blooming shopping area to the northwest to bring a large utlizing CLT and glulam members to this neighborhood of New York City. The markets feature a mix of indoor and outdoor spaces, the museum oƛers large gallery spaces, and the residential areas provide outdoor recreation areas for its residents.


ANCHORING A AN NC CH HOR ORIIN N NG G

FUNNELING

URBAN PERMEABILITY

CONVERSION

CARVING

1 The Andy Warhol Museum creates a strong presence on the busy street corner of Delancey and Essex maintaining the streetwall.

The form of the building peels away from Delancey St. to allow passersby a visual prompt to enter into the central courtyard as well as a larger plaza along Delancey for Lowline visitors.

Breaking up the two-plot site with large openings oƛers urban porosity for pedestrians to traverse through the volumes of the project.

When not open for a Market Day, the central court can become an impromptu park and plaza by converting market stands into park benches. Increased permeability allows greater access to this central private-public space.

Corners of the residential portion of the volume are carved away from the solid to create outdoor spaces on multiple floors, peeling back as the volume rises.


Anchoring the north west corner of the site, the Andy Warhol Museum provides large gallery spaces for the local community. The museum structure is made entirely of wood glulam beams and columns to provide large open spaces for art displays and exhibitions. The lower level of the museum oƛers a seamless transition out into the Lowline, an underground park proposed adjacent to the site.

Museum Structure

Floor Slabs

Interior Walls

Museum Facade


Sun Shading Device The Andy Warhol Museum is a large box enclosed with a triple-glazed curtain wall system on three sides. While the entry faces predominantly to the North, the remaining two facades are exposed to Shading Closed

harsh East and West sunlight. To mitigate the undesired eƛects this may cause for gallery viewers as well as to mitigate damage to art work from UV rays, a sun shading system was required. Since these two facades that would be equipped with shading devices suƛer mostly from East/West daylight, vertical louvers oƛer the best shading possibilities. These devices are adjustable via hinge

Shading Partially Open

connections to mullions for year-round protection. Sun shading devices oƛer the opportunity to create an aesthetic touch to the building, thus the theme of wood and verticality are repeated in the louver system’s structure and material.

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Shading Fully Opened

Mixed Use Dedicated Gallery Auditorium Administrative


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The market of the inGRAINED complex is spread throughout the ground level, providing both indoor and outdoor areas. Throughout the market areas benches are placed to provide seating during normal hours. During market times, these benches open and provide tents for vendors to use in selling their items. Temporary stand-alone structures are also placed throughout the market area to help maximize the use of the space. A small cafe with seating is also provided for those who wish to sit and eat or enjoy a cup of coƛee.


Walk up stall, mainly intended for food or delicate/expensive merchandise

Walk in stall allows multiple customers to look at merchandise

Bench that also serves as a tent for use during market days

Bench top opens and poles for tent are taken out

Top of tent is put together

Covering is stretched over the top of the frame

Base poles are attached and set into bench


The residential portion of inGRAINED is made up of a combination of studio, one bedroom, two bedroom, and three bedroom aƛordable housing. The floors are semi-typical using alternating combinations of units to create a more interesting facade pattern. At the corners of the floors are outdoor green spaces to be used by the residents. These spaces grow in size with each floor providing large spaces for recreation without the need to leave the building. The walls between the units are made of CLT and are carried down to the ground floor where they terminate into the foundation of the building. In addition to a structural system, CLT walls also provide excellent fire proofing and noise reduction between units.


Core Wall with Gyp. Board Finish One Side

Typical CLT Exterior Wall 3-Ply CLT Panel with 4” Rigid Insulation, Plywood Sheathing with 1.5” Furring Strips to mount 1” Siding Panels

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Micro Unit - 16’ x 23’

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Typical CLT Demising Wall Two Layers Sound Insulation between Two 3-Ply CLT Panels, Gyp. Board Finish

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One Bedroom - 24’ x 29’

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Two Bedroom - 32’ x 26’

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Typical CLT Floor System 7-Ply CLT Panel with (2) 4” Sound Insulation, (2) Layers Gyp. Board mounted beneath

Three Bedroom (Second Floor)

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urban farming fall 2016 design studio chicago, illinois group problem: Provide a megastructure for the South Loop area of Chicago solution: This area of Chicago is largely a food desert with only one grocery store nearby. There are also limited options in regards to fresh foods with most restaurants being fast food locations with processed food. Urban Farming utilizes a mostly closed loop solution to provide fresh food for the area. Large outdoor spaces allow for farming operations, both crops and small livestock including chickens and turkeys. Indoor areas allow for shelter of the animals, vertical farming in the form of aquaponics, research to advance farming techniques, and market space to sell the fresh products. A residential tower is also provided allowing views to Grant Park and Lake Michigan.


LOBBY LOUNGE APARTMENT HOTEL GYM POOL MARKET RESTAURANT BAR CAFE KITCHEN BACK OF HOUSE STORAGE MECHANICAL SPACE PARKING CLASSROOMS LIBRARY LABORATORIES OFFICES CONFERENCE ROOMS TECHNOLOGY CENTER GALLERY VERTICAL FARMING AQUAPONICS ANAEROBIC DIGESTION COMMUNITY GARDENS S CROP SPACE/PLANTING BEDS SEED LAB PONDS/TANKS GRAZING PASTURE WATER FILTRATION CENTER PROCESSING CENTER DISTRIBUTING CENTER

RESIDENTIAL W A B A S H

11TH STREET

M I C H I G A N

SHOPPING/ SERVICES

RESEARCH

FARMING

SITE MAP Restaurant Education

Fitness

Bar

Bank

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64 256 128

Hotel

Store

Cafe

Business

Religion

18 burger g restaurants 8 sushi restaurants 2 Mexican restaurants 1 Indian restaurant 1 Italian restaurant 5 grocery stores

60 businesses in surrounding area selling or serving food

35 businesses could benefit from fresh locally sourced food

The site is located in the south loop area of Chicago directly across from Grant Park. The building contains four main program areas - residential, shopping/market, research, and farming. The areas are connected throughout the building with research and farming areas mixed together to allow for easy flow between the two. Inside the building, three systems work together in order to maximize crop production while minimizing the need for outside power sources - aquaponics, geothermal heating/cooling, and biomass energy. In order to provide soil for the proposed building, the soil taken from excavation will be reused throughout the open outdoor spaces.

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In order to find the form for the building, a series of blocks were created in four towers signifying the separate programs. The blocks were then shiƞed in order to create separate spaces for each program with the appropriate amounts of blocks being assigned based on square footage requirements. Once an initial form was found, radiation analyses were performed to continue shiƞing the blocks to maximize the solar radiation gains of the building on the roofs and south facing facade to ensure adequate light for crop production. In order to minimize gains within the building, green roofs and double skin facades were used.

BREAK UP GROUND PLANE

USE SOLAR STUDIES TO FINALIZE FORM

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Rainwater Collection is used to refill tanks as needed

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Crops produce food for restaurants Fish produce food for restaurants

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Plants produce for restaurants

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ADD CONNECTIONS BETWEEN PROGRAMS

Artificial Lighting is used when sunlight &+&+02ƛ& &"+1

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OPEN UP TOP HALF FOR FARMING

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Solar Panels absorb sunlight to power system

Throughout the building, three systems work with each other to help it run and produce food. First, an aquaponics system uses the southern walls to grow crops between a double skin facade. This system is self containing as seen below. Second, two forms of energy are utilized on site. Biomass is burned onsite to produce energy for the building while the close proximity to the lake provides an opportunity to use geothermal heating and cooling for the building.

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DENSIFY TOP HALF

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SEPERATE PROGRAMS

Aquaponics Self Sustained System


Solar Radiation April 1 through October 31

kWh/m22 260 235 210 185 160 130 105 80 50 25 0

Initial Form

Middle Form

End Form

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boutique hotel fall 2014 design studio champaign, illinois individual 16 weeks problem: Provide a boutique hotel for downtown Champaign, Illinois solution: A 60 room boutique hotel is provided in the heart of Champaign’s bustling downtown district. The hotel provides a restaurant on its first floor and small banquet hall on its second. The hotel utilizes a double loaded “L” shaped corridor for its rooms.


The site for the project is located on the north edge of the city’s busy downtown district. In recent years, the area has been revitalized and has become increasingly popular with both locals and the college students from the two nearby schools.


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Ground Floor

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Second Floor 40

The hotel’s first floor features a large public lobby with a medium sized restaurant in the rear. The second floor contains a medium sized banquet hall with reception area that is available to guests. The guest floors are typical with a double loaded, L shaped corridor. Each room in the hotel is fully accessible by wheelchair with two rooms per floor featuring fully accessible bathrooms.

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14' - 1"

14' - 1"

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28' - 0"

Typical Guest Room

18' - 8 3/8"

28' - 0"

Mech/Elec

Cleaning Storage

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ADA Accessible Room

28' - 3 5/8"

31' - 8 3/8"

Typical Guest Floor

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Suite


Roof 76' - 0" Level 6 64' - 0" Level 5 52' - 0" Level 4 40' - 0" Level 3 28' - 0"

Level 2 14' - 0"

Ground d Floor 0' - 0" Basemeent -12' - 0"

West Elevation North/South Section Roof 76' - 0" Level 6 64' - 0" Level 5 52' - 0" Level 4 40' - 0" Level 3 28' - 0"

Level 2 14' - 0"

Ground d Floor 0' - 0" Basemeent -12' - 0"

5

South Elevation

20 10

40

East/West Section


Metal Coping

Built-up Bitumen Membrane 6” Rigid Insulation Concrete Roof Slab 5” Rigid Insulation 5/8” Gypsum

Vapor Barrier Sheating 2x6 Metal Stud w/ Batt Insulation Plants Metal Plate connecting Planter to Metal Stud Triple Pane Low-E Window Soil Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Planters Foam

8” Concrete Slab

2.5” x 8” Curtain Wall Mullion

Triple Pane Low-E Curtain Wall

In downtown Champaign there is a general lack of greenery. The hotel helps to alleviate this through the use of planters on its facade. The planters are placed in a checkerboard pattern to cover the entirety of the building allowing for glazing in guest rooms.

Concrete Slab on Grade Foundation Wall

While designing the building, Visari was used to run energy simulations. These simulations were used to develop the exterior walls and roof to allow for higher than average energy eƛiciency, reducing the building’s dependence on active heating and cooling. Concrete Slab Crushed Stone


Ground Floor HVAC Layout

Second Floor HVAC Layout HVAC Layout for Whole Building

In the beginning design stages, HVAC and structural systems were considered and incorporated into the hotel. For HVAC, the public areas use a forced air system to provide proper air flow. The individual rooms use a PTAC system in order to allow for guests to adjust the temperature of their rooms to ensure the highest level of comfort. The structural system relies on a grid based concrete column and slab construction. Due to the low load requirements, the residential floors were able to be made with thin pretensioned slabs that allow reduced floor to floor heights, allowing an extra floor while remaining within zoning limits. Typ. Guest Floor HVAC Layout


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Basement Structural Plan Ground Floor Structural Plan







 

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Second Floor Structural Plan Typ Guest Floor Structural Plan

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deteriorated codependence spring 2015 design studio key largo, florida group problem: ASCA Steel Competition tasked students with designing a building using their own problem exhibiting an advanced use of steel solution: Create an underwater aquarium and research center. Most aquariums rely on removing animals from their natural habitat and being placed in confined spaces in which scientists may conduct research. By placing the aquarium and research facilities in the animals’ habitat, visitors can enjoy the colorful wildlife without disturbing them and scientists can better conduct research within the animals’ natural habitat.


John Pennekamp State Park

8 10 13 7 6

12

24

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Key Largo 5.7

5m

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The site chosen was the Florida Reef, oĆ› the eastern coast of Key Largo, Florida. The decision to choose the site was based oĆ› of the proximity to the John Pennekamp State Park, the only underwater wildlife refuge in the world, and Key Largo, which is considered the dive capital of the world. The reef is one of the largest in the world and currently provides for excellent diving opportunities. The proximity of the combined aquarium research center allows tourists a closer look at the reef while staying dry, allowing accommodations for those with limited swimming abilities, while also allowing tourists to enter the reefs from the facility. The proximity also allows for research opportunities within the reef. Researchers are able to enter the reef from the facility to collect necessary data or samples and return labs provided within to analyze their findings.

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4.6 mil es

the gulf stream flows at 5.6 mph, moving 30 million cubic meters of water per hour

hydroelectric turbines in acrylic cylinders funnel the current through to generate power

measurements are taken to adjust output and allocation of turbines production

the produced alternating current electricity is converted to more storable direct current

energy is stored in battery banks to allow for use throughout the building systems

stored direct current is converted back to alternating current for building distribution

the building grid distributes the stored electricity throughout the building systems

the power supply brings electricity from the building grid into the protection system

measurements of salinity are taken near the ocean floor to monitor output of the system

inputs from the power supply and reference electrode are monitored and displayed

information from monitoring panel is used to control the output of the system

cathodic protection | rust free steel

sacrificial floating anodes protect structural steel by deteriorating through rusting

structural members are protected by electrical charging for chemical balancing


rolled steel arches - creates tensile arches aiding the polymer in resisting the compressive pressure forces

The building uses a series of systems to make underwater occupancy possible. As the building utilizes a steel frame, cathodic protection is used in order to prevent it from rusting. The frame is made of a series of rolled steel arches, connected through spider connections to the tubes, that are anchored to the ocean floor through concrete piles. A space frame is used in the flooring to provide space for mechanical systems and to keep from obstructing views while still providing the structure necessary. Turbines are located beneath the building to provide hydroelectric power from the Gulf Stream ocean current.

3 inch cast polymer - creates transparent enclosure to allow external views and protects occupants from crushing water

steel spider connections - connects enclosing polymer to the structural arches and transmits compressive pressure forces

1/2" space frame - resists occupant live loads in flooring while allowing transparent views to the reef below

mechanical system - exposed mechanical components provides transparency into building systems

2 inch cast polymer - creates transparent floor system to allow viewing of structural/mechanical components and reef

HSS25x20x1/2 - provides structural connection between rolled steel arches, space frame floor, and footing columns

four mixed metal anodes - floating to provide constant sea water contact

hydroelectric turbines - accesses the constant flow of the gulf stream to generate electricity to power the entire center

MC20x70 - provides connection between pod body and footing to counter buoyant tensile forces

reference electrode - measures water salinity and electrical charge to provide proper cathodic current

remote cable system - allows for overall protection without need for individual anodes

buoyant cathodic protection system - provide 450 amps (enough to protect 80,000 sq ƞ of steel)

gearbox

bored concrete pile - provide footing for prefabricated pod structure with minimal reef disturbance

turbine blades

electric generator supporting bars

1’

2’

5’

10’


To make construction possible, the pods for the building are built onshore and shipped via a barge fitted with a crane. The pods are then dropped into the water and sunk to their desired location. Here they are secured to their foundation and their adjoining pods to create a watertight seal. They are then pumped free of water and opened for use. This system allows the building to immerse itself in the natural habitat of the animals. While it may initially disturb them, research shows that they will quickly return and live among the new structure. This type of construction allows the building to grow or change alongside the needs of the building to allow it to fit the necessary goals of the research center.

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2

3

continue to drop connecting tunnels and pods from the barge into the coral reef

remove and replant coral where concrete footings are to be poured

barge transports prefabricated units to which are dropped by crane and sunk to the concrete footings by loading the units with sand bags

4

5

join connecting units by welding steel bracket from around exterior of unit final unit


THIN SKINNED [void] spring 2016 design seminar champaign, illinois individual problem: Create a useful object through vacuum forming solution: A multiuse object. [void] is more about the empty space contained within rather than the form itself. By creating a standing object with an empty inner space, there are many applications to the object. Here it is shown being used as a sandbox and a planter. It can also be used, storage, a water table, or any other use that fits the need of the user.


Thin Skinned was a design seminar in which diƛerent uses for vacuum forming were explored. void was created as a small table with many uses depending how the empty space inside was used. Two variations were created for the project but both can be utilized for a variety of uses. Before creating full sized models, smaller 1:8 scaled tests were done using basswood on a dental vacuum former. The forms to be vacuumed were created using 1/4� MDF. The pieces were laser cut the cut at an angle on a table saw to allow the pieces to join smoothly. Two variations were created, one with an arch between the legs and one with straight edges between the legs, creating a triangle. At the end of the seminar, a small exhibit was held to present the work from the previous sixteen weeks. For the exhibit, a sand table and a planter were created for display.

plastic is heated

air is puffed under plastic table is lowered

Vacuum Form Process

table with form is raised up to heated plastic

air is puffed to release form from plastic

fans blow to cool plastic

vacuum is turned on forming plastic to form


vault spring 2014 independent study champaign, illinois group 8 weeks problem: Create a structure that explores the relationship between density of structure and light allowed through solution: A cardboard vault was created with varying sized perforations. Triangular pieces were used as a basic geometry to allow for the vault to stand. The holes were either non existent or small near the base of the structure growing in size as they neared the center.


A series of densities were explored to determine the optimal balance between light allowed through and material required for structural stability.

Upon completion of the studies, a full scale model was built and displayed in a gallery space at the Illinois School of Architecture. In addition to the physical studies, several computer iterations were performed to optimize the balance between structure and light.


1

Using a CNC machine, the panels were cut along with reinforcement material due to the expected fragility of the cardboard used

2

The panels then were removed from the excess cardboard and placed in piles to be assembled

3

The panels were folded and assembled using zip ties and wood glue then organized based on their eventual placement

4

The overall canopy was divided into 5 parts and each part was assembled oĆ› site separately before being moved to the project location

5

On site, the 5 pieces were assembled using zip ties. The feet of the canopy were held in place using wooden boxes.

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The completed canopy was kept for several weeks in an exhibition space for the School of Architecture


Floor Plan


cribbed spring 2014 independent study champaign, illinois group project problem: The courtyard of Temple Hoyne Buell Hall at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign is rarely used due. An intervention was needed in hopes of activating the space for student use. solution: A large wooden structure that would facilitate gatherings of students. The structure provided interior seating and was perforated to allow for light inside. The space inside is intended for any sort of gathering - pin up space, lunches, or general meetings. The outside of the structure can also be used as pin up space.


Three densities were explored for the project using the Grasshopper plugin for Rhinoceros. The densities were evaluated for the light allowed into the space to create a balance of intimacy with adequate light levels. The structure is created with overlapping 2x4 members connected with steel rods. The wood is stained blue at the ends and along one edge. Tiered seating is provided inside of the structure for meetings between students and faculty.


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cut material to size

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joint one side

3

rip to square longitudinally

4

paint one side and both ends

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joint one face

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plane to square transversly

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drill vertical hole

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drill diagonal hole

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partial assembly

12 tightening of fasteners

9 drill countersink hole

10 organize elements


Daniel J Vurpillat

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