Page 1

PROGRAM BOOK

ENDING THE

EPIDEMICS IN THEIR MEMORY PAUL. MICHAEL. BOBBY. BRANDY. CALU. CRAIG. DAVID. RICHARD. STEPHEN. RUSS. MICHAEL. EAZY-E. ARTHUR. PEDRO. SYLVESTER. ELIZABETH. HALSTON. PERRY. ROBERT. RYAN. RUDOLF. PETER. ALVIN. KEITH. AMANDA. SEAN. ZACHIE. ALISON. BOB. NKOSI. COLIN. MARLON. MAX. STEWART. MICHAEL. WILLI. TINA. HERB. ISAAC. ESSEX. PATRICK. VITO. LEONARD. RANDY. BOBBI. SUNNYE. JEFFREY. JIM. BJ. TERRY. JACI. CAROLYN. LAWRENCE. JOHN. YVONNE. DENNIS. MARY. PETRA. MELENIE. ALBERT. SALLY. MARTY.

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS - SEPT 5-8, 2019 MARRIOTT MARQUIS WDC #2019USCA WWW.2019USCA.ORG


This ad is not intended to imply that the model pictured has HIV

ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGES OF THE HIV EPIDEMIC

COLLABORAT10N

As we celebrate our 10th anniversary, ViiV Healthcare stands with NMAC and its commitment to health equity and racial justice to end the HIV epidemic in America.


GENERAL INFO USCA CONFERENCE PLANNING TEAM

The 2019 USCA Conference planning team looks forward to making your participation in USCA a comfortable and rewarding experience. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact the planning team in the Conference Operations Office, located in Marquis Salon 15, on Meeting Level 2. TARA BARNES-DARBY Director of Conferences

Tara is your contact for all conference-related information and has overall responsibility for the conference.

03 Welcome Letters 06 Hotel Maps 08 Sponsors 10 General Info 12 In Memoriam

PROGRAM FORMAT 14 23

Conference Format Program Partners

CONFERENCE INFO 24 24

Exhibitor Floor Plan Exhibitor List

ALISON J. MCKEITHEN

THURSDAY

Alison is your contact for all conference related information, particularly questions about sessions, faculty, and special events. Alison is your contact for all things related to workshops, posters, institutes, and affinity sessions.

34 Sessions-At-A-Glance 38 Sessions

Conferences Manager

SHANTA’ GRAY

Conferences and Registration Coordinator

Shanta‘ is your contact for conference registration and scholarship concerns. Shanta‘ will be stationed at the “On-Site Solutions” booth at conference registration. GABRIELLA SPENCER

FRIDAY 50 Sessions-At-A-Glance 56 Sessions

SATURDAY 70 Sessions-At-A-Glance 76 Sessions

Conferences Program Associate

Gabriella is your contact for breakout logistics and the conference app. TERRELL PARKER

Associate Program Manager

Terrell is your contact for breakfast logistics. SAFISHA MANCE-THOMAS Exhibits Coordinator

Safisha is your contact for the conference exhibit hall. She can be reached through the Exhibitor Registration booth in the booth on the Meeting Level 4 of the Marriott Marquis.

SUNDAY 90 Sessions-At-A-Glance 92 Sessions

SESIONES EN ESPAÑOL 96

Translated Sessions

POSTER SESSIONS 100

Poster Presentations

Information is up-to-date as of August 29, 2019. For current information or program changes please download our mobile app which can be accessed on iOS or Android stores using the search term: 2019 USCA

#2019USCA

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HONESTLY there are things everyone can do to help prevent HIV No one wants to think about HIV, but there are things everyone can do to help protect their sexual health. Things like using condoms and lube, getting tested regularly for HIV and other STIs, talking to your partner(s), and if you are HIV-negative, asking your healthcare provider about PrEP. Talk to a healthcare provider and learn more about your HIV prevention options at

HEALTHYSEXUAL, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. Š2019 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC6372 05/19

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WELCOME TO THE 23RD ANNUAL UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

T

his year’s United States Conference on AIDS will focus on the federal plan to end the HIV epidemic in America. We are betting on the promise of biomedical HIV prevention, specifically PrEP and U=U. While we know the science works, we have yet to figure out how to bring the promise of that science to all the communities that are highly impacted by HIV. Fifty-seven jurisdictions have been charged with putting together a plan to end the HIV epidemic in their region. NMAC believes the first priority must be the 400,000 people living with HIV who have fallen out of care or are unaware of their HIV status. They are prioritized because everyone living with HIV needs to be linked to healthcare and adherent to meds if they are to live a longer life. Unfortunately, HIV impacts some of the most marginalized people in our society. People who daily face discrimination, stigma, and even violence because of their HIV status, skin color, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity. HIV related stigma leads to isolation that can contribute to depression. In fact, NMAC found that the majority of people over 50 living with HIV suffer with isolation and depression. Understanding the communities highly impacted by HIV and the challenges that they face is core to our ability to retain PLWH in healthcare and on meds. The solution is not as simple as linkage to care and prescribing meds. While that will work for most PLWH, the answer is more complex for 30% of the people we need to reach. The science of PrEP works, but we have missed many of the communities that are highly impacted by HIV. Recent studies have shown a 500% increase in PrEP. While there was increased usage across all communities highly impacted by HIV, retention remains lower among African American and Latino gay men. To meet the federal goal of 1.1 million Americans on PrEP will require a much better understanding of why PrEP was accepted in certain communities and not others. This is where the Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs) will play a critical role. They will expand their work to look at the implementation science needed to both retain people living with HIV and people on PrEP in healthcare and adherent to meds. This October 1st, our country will start to build plans to end the HIV epidemic. We are about to write history. This is something that most of us only dreamed about happening. As we work to end the HIV epidemic, I do it in the memory of Michael Hirsch. Yours in the struggle,

Paul Kawata Executive Director, NMAC

#2019USCA

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WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 5-8

WEDNESDAY

04

8:00 AM

9:30 am - 1100 am

Social Media Lab

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

11:00 AM

Opening Plenary Luncheon

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

3:00 PM

4:00 PM

Fri..........8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Sat.........9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

5:00 PM

REGISTRATION OPENS 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thurs.....7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

05 8:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Registration Hours

Wed....... 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

SEPT

Institutes:

2:00 PM All attendees must register for the conference. The registration desk is located in the Meeting Level 4 Foyer and is open during the following hours:

THURSDAY

REGISTRATION / 7:30 am - 5:00 pm

AGENDA

7:30 AM

SEPT

Session 1 Workshops 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Session 2 Workshops 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM

Conference Operations Office

The Conference Operations Office is located in Marquis Salon 15 on Meeting Level 2 of the Marriott Marquis. Feel free to stop by the office with conference-related questions and concerns during the following times:

6:00 PM

7:00 PM

Wed....... 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM Thurs.....8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Fri..........8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

8:00 PM

Sat.........8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sun........9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

9:00 PM

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STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018 UNITED

Opening Reception

Affinity Session

6:30 PM -8:30 PM

6:30 PM - 7:30


USCA AGENDA SEPT

06

FRIDAY

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 5-8

SATURDAY

SEPT

07

SUNDAY

SEPT

08

7:30 AM

Session 4 Workshops & Master Lecture Series: 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Session 5 Workshops & Master Lecture Series: 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Social Media Lab

9:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Plenary Luncheon 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Session 9 Workshops & Master Lecture Series:

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

9:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Closing Plenary Luncheon

12:00 PM

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM 1:00 PM Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Poster Presentations

Session 6 Workshops & Master Lecture Series:

11:00 AM

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

9:00 am - 11:00 am

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Plenary Luncheon

REGISTRATION / 8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Social Media Lab

Session 3 Workshops & Master Lecture Series: REGISTRATION / 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Social Media Lab

8:00 AM

Poster Presentations Session 7 Workshops & Master Lecture Series:

2:00 PM

3:00 PM

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM 4:00 PM

Session 8 Workshops & Master Lecture Series:

5:00 PM

4:15 PM - 6:15 PM 6:00 PM

Affinity Session

Affinity Session

6:30 pm - 7:30PM

6:30 PM - 7:30PM

Film Screening 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

7:00 PM

Film Screening 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

#2019USCA

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HOTEL MAPS SECOND FLOOR MEZZANINE

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Boardroom Dahlia Foyer Business Center Geranium Holly Maple Honeysuckle Tulip

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INDEPENDENCE BALLROOM

SALONS A — H LIBERTY BALLROOM

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SPONSORS

A special thank you to our sponsors who have made significant contributions to the United States Conference on AIDS.

PRESENTING SPONSOR PRESENTING SPONSOR

PREMIERE SPONSORS

COLLABORATING SPONSORS

COLLEAGUE SPONSOR

OTHER SUPPORTERS

FEDERAL PARTNERS

Indian Health Service

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Funding for this conference was made possible in part by 1 R13 AI147916-01 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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Visit us at booth 501

Copyright © 2019 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. US-MFA-00315 07/19


GENERAL INFORMATION Affinity AffinitySessions Sessions

Evaluations Evaluations

PLWH Respite Respite Lounge

Affinity sessions are impromptu meetings of conference attendees who want to discuss a particular subject. To schedule an affinity session and receive a room assignment, visit the Conference Operations Office, located in Marquis Salon 15 on Meeting Level 2 of the Marriott Marquis. Announcements for affinity sessions may be placed on the Affinity Session Board located near registration. The affinity session schedule is as follows:

Your feedback provides important information to help us improve USCA in the future. Please take a few minutes to share your thoughts and input by completing the conference evaluation forms found in the conference app.

The PLWH Respite Lounge will be staffed by volunteers from the Host Committee and on-call health providers. The lounge will be open during the following days and times (location will be announced on-site):

Thursday:........................6:15 PM - 7:15 PM Friday:.............................6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Saturday:.........................6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Badges Badges

Conference attendees must wear their official conference badge to all educational sessions, plenary sessions, special events, and the exhibit hall. For your safety, do not wear your badge outside of the convention hotel. Security will not allow conference attendees to enter plenary sessions or the exhibit hall without a badge. A $10.00 fee will be assessed for replacement badges. ConferenceOperations OperationsOffice Office Conference

The Conference Operations Office is located in Marquis Salon 15 on Meeting Level 2 of the Marriott Marquis. Feel free to stop by the office with conferencerelated questions and concerns during the following times: Wednesday: . . . . . . . 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM Thursday: . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: . . . . . . . . . .8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Sunday: . . . . . . . . . . .9:00 AM – 2:00 PM ContinuingEducation EducationUnits Units Continuing

General continuing education units (CEUs) will be available for conference attendees. Additionally, USCA is a provider of Category I continuing education contact hours for certified health education specialists, CEUs for social workers from NASW and general CEUs from George Mason Univ. Please visit the Continuing Education Desk located at conference registration for additional information.

10

Exhibits Exhibits

The exhibit hall is located in the Independence and Liberty Ballrooms on Meeting Level 4. USCA conference partners, government agencies, community-based organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and many others will showcase their exhibits, providing valuable information and giveaways. Complimentary desserts will be offered in the exhibit hall on select days. The exhibit hall will be open during the following hours: Thursday...................... 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM Friday–Saturday........... 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Wednesday.....................4:00 PM - 7:00 PM Thursday – Saturday....... 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday........................... 8:00 AM - 12 noon

PLWH Lounge Walgreens Locations 1155 F St NW, Washington, DC 20005 (202) 969-8814 801 7th St NW, Washington, DC 20001 (202) 789-5345 Message BoardInterpreters Sign Language

Notes for conference attendees may be posted on the Message Board, located near Conference Registration.

(closed during plenary sessions)

MedicalService ServiceInformation Information Medical

For any medical emergency, please call extension 59667 (within the Marriott). Inform the hotel operator of the nature of the emergency and location. A specific response team of hotel managers will immediately respond. In non-emergency situations, the following is a list of nearby medical facilities: Howard University Hospital 2041 Georgia Ave NW, Wash., DC 20060 (202) 865-6100 George Washington University Hospital 900 23rd St NW, Wash., DC 20037 (202) 715-4000 Social Media Lab supported by HIV.gov

The Social Media Lab is your chance to get one-on-one technical assistance with a social media expert during USCA. The Lab is located on Meeting Level 4 of the Marriott in Marquis Salon 14. Closed during plenaries.

No-Smoking Policy Sign Language Interpreters

For the health and comfort of conference participants, smoking is not permitted in any of the conference areas. Registration RegistrationHours Hours

All attendees must register for the conference. The registration desk is located on Meeting Level 4 of the Marriott Marquis and is open during the following hours: Wednesday:. . . . . . . .4:00 PM – 7:00 PM Thursday:. . . . . . . .. . 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM Friday:. . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Saturday: . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

SignLanguage LanguageInterpreters Interpreters Sign

Sign language interpreters are available upon request. This service may be requested through the Conference Operations Office located in Marquis Salon 15 on Meeting Level 2 of the Marriott Marquis.

TGNC/NB Lounge Interpreters TGNC/NBanguage

Youth Lounge Interpreters Sign Language

The location of the TGNC/NB Lounge is George Washington, Meeting Level 1.

The Youth Lounge is located in Treasury on Meeting Level 4 of the Marriott Marquis.


Having Avita Pharmacy onsite at your clinic is proven to improve patient outcomes and maximize your 340B program.

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ENDING THE

EPIDEMICS IN THEIR MEMORY

PAUL. MICHAEL. BOBBY. BRANDY. CALU. CRAIG. DAVID. RICHARD. STEPHEN. This year’s theme of “Ending the Epidemics in Their Memory” is meant to encourage all of us to remember those warriors RUSS. MICHAEL. PEDRO. SYLVESTER. HALSTON. we have lost along the way,EAZY-E. and dedicateARTHUR. ourselves to ending this epidemic not just for ELIZABETH. us and future generations but in tribute to them. PERRY. ROBERT. RYAN. RUDOLF. PETER. ALVIN. KEITH. AMANDA. SEAN. We asked members of the NMAC family to offer names and stories of those they remember. These are the stories we received. ZACHIE. ALISON. BOB. NKOSI. COLIN. MARLON. MAX. STEWART. MICHAEL. WILLI. TINA. HERB. ISAAC. ESSEX. PATRICK. VITO. LEONARD. RANDY. BOBBI. Melenie Mahinamalamalama Eleneke Sonya Leisa (Sunnye) Sherman lived was a Native Hawaiian Mahuwahine, social justice withYN. AIDS for LAWRENCE. nearly three years after herJOHN. 1983 SUNNYE. JEFFREY . JIM. BJ. TERRY. JACI. CAROL activist, social worker, traditional healer, health diagnosis. She became a counselor to other people advocate, and HIV/AIDS prevention advocate. Her living with AIDS and was a spokeswoman for causes YVONNE. DENNIS. MARY. PETRA. MELENIE. ALBERT. SALLY. MARTY. social work/justice education focused on cultural related to HIV. Me” campaign.

competency and health & wellness in the transgender and Native Hawaiian communities. She was a fierce advocate for trans rights and spoke openly about her HIV status with the “HIV Stops with

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS - SEPT 5-8, 2019 MARRIOTT MARQUIS WDC #2019USCA WWW.2019USCA.ORG

She worked with the Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP) as a member of the Leadership Team, as Director of Development & Administration, and as the editor of their prison newsletter, Stiletto. 

Together with the Banyan Tree Project, she shared a story about how the man who transmitted HIV to her came back into her life in a dramatic way, and about letting go, moving on, and healing. She also shared her story of living with HIV for the Taking Root project.

12

#InTheirMemory

She was among the first people in the DC area to publicly discuss details of her battle with AIDS. She was interviewed by The Washington Post and on network television. Her photo was featured on the cover of Life magazine, and she became a symbol for the argument that AIDS threatens both men and women. After her diagnosis, Sonya became active as a volunteer and counselor at Whitman-Walker Clinic where she played a key role in developing local support and care services in the early days of the epidemic.

Marty Prairie was Oglala Lakota Sioux from the Pine Ridge

Reservation, a descendant of Chief Big Foot of the Hunkpapa Nation. He was a long-term survivor of HIV/AIDS, which he first encountered among his friends in San Francisco during the early 1980’s. Following his diagnosis he dedicated his life’s work as an educator for the prevention of


HIV/AIDS, STD’s, TB , and Alcohol/Substance Abuse in minority communities, the homeless, and gay men of color. Marty was an early and guiding member of Asheville’s Loving Food Resources, an HIV/AIDS food bank; C.L.O.S.E.R., a local Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender advocacy organization; and the Western North Carolina Community Health Services clinic (WNCCHS) where he also served on the board of directors. In partnership with Michael Harney, he co-founded and co-directed the Needle Exchange Program of Asheville (NEPA) which has served as a model for prevention of HIV transmission among injection drug users throughout North Carolina and beyond. He was an advisory member to the board of the North American Syringe Exchange Network (NASEN).  On his own and as a representative of the National Native American AIDS Prevention Center (NNAAPC), he worked with many Native American tribes including the Sioux, Navajo, Cherokee, and Catawba, alerting elders and educating youth in an effort to avert the development of an HIV/AIDS epidemic on the reservations and among all Native Americans. Since 2001, NNAAPC has presented an annual award in his name at the United States Conference on AIDS, for outstanding work in HIV/AIDS prevention among Native peoples.

Dr. Albert Ichiki was an activist and support

provider for people living with AIDS long before testing and treatment were available. He was a leader in several Knoxville, Tennessee based efforts to fight HIV, including facilitating a support group for the Hope Center. He provided invaluable support in the early years of Samaritan Ministry as mentor and supporter. He watched (often at a distance with his arms crossed) to be sure that Samaritan’s messages were always about love and that we would never do harm to the LGBT community. He introduced us at USCA to friends like Suki Ports, Paul Kawata, and Dr. David Ho. Dr. Al was a lot of fun and enjoyed many outdoor activities. His university years were spent teaching some of the most fascinating post-doctoral students. He loved a good party and to attend one at his home was truly an international, multi-lingual, intergenerational, inter-racial experience… diverse in every way. His home was always a safe place for any person.

Mary Elisa Martinez was the mother of 50+ Strong & Healthy member Steven Vargas. Here are his words:

May 18th, HIV Vaccine Awareness Day, would have been my mother Mary Elisa Martinez’s 70th birthday. She passed away in August 1995 because of AIDS defining conditions: she had HIV, her T-cells were far below 200, and she was beset by a number of afflictions. She was a fighter, and was in and out of hospice care a couple of times prior to her passing. She was my introduction to the HIV world before I was diagnosed. The activism I do today I do in her memory.

She was the true fighter, though. She was the one who would tell me about an upcoming protest she heard about in one of her HIV support group meetings, like when Galveston considered quarantining people living with HIV. She was the one who attended these, and if by chance I was there, it was to provide transportation for my mother and make sure she was safe. I was not the one in the middle of the fray. She was the one who predicted there were more, and will be ever more, women living with HIV than the three in her support group meeting one night in in the early 1990s. If I had not witnessed her taking the fight to HIV, I do not think I would have been the advocate I became. I am not sure my community would define her as “a leader in the HIV community” but she is singularly responsible for creating this advocate who has helped cultivate even more for our cause. She represents all of the people no longer with us who remain nameless, another face in historic photos without a name, people that also stood and fought for what we have today.

Pedro Zamora became a global household

name when he appeared on the third season of MTV’s “The Real World” in 1994. Pedro was already a well-known and respected HIV activist, and he saw “The Real World” as an opportunity spread the message of HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention to a larger audience. Over the course of the show, millions of viewers got to know someone living with AIDS and see the daily struggles of the epidemic. As an openly gay man of color, Pedro de-stigmatized HIV and showed that gay men live and love like anyone else. His on-screen commitment ceremony with his partner Sean was the first time that many Americans saw the depths of love and commitment gay men have for each other. Pedro passed away soon after the final episode of his season of “The Real World” ended. Now, 25 years later, he is still remembered for his work.

Sean Sasser was Pedro’s partner on “The

Real World” and was also living with HIV. Their relationship played out on camera from their first date to their commitment ceremony and upended widely-held conceptions of what gay relationships were and showed that people living with HIV could still have romance in their lives. After Pedro’s death, Sean continued his HIV advocacy work. In 1995, he spoke at the inaugural White House AIDS conference, and was appointed by President Bill Clinton to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. Sean went on to become an accomplished pastry and dessert chef, first in Portland, Oregon, then Washington, DC. Sean died in DC in 2013. The Sean Sasser Memorial Endowment Fund at AIDS United was established in September 2013 to mobilize support for programs that improve the health outcomes for gay men of color.

#2019USCA

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Dr. Terry Grand was the longest living person with AIDS in the UCLA Men’s Study.

Soon after the AIDS Crisis broke out, Terry felt he would be able to better serve community by becoming a doctor. He went to school and received his degree. Along with his friend Rob Bonin, they formed FOUND, which opened Menlo House for people who were released from incarceration and were addicted as well as suffering from AIDS. At the time of Terry’s death, he was working on putting together the same type of support facility for transgender men and women. It looks like the project will come to fruition. Terry was an avid supporter of C.I.T.Y.X1 Youth Group, the Gay Men’s Chorus, FOUND, The AIDS Memorial Quilt, and many other gay charities. He was a re-founding member of Act Up Los Angeles.

Dr. Jimmy Allen was a Baptist church leader

in the days when progressive thinking was still OK in Baptist life. Jimmy was always larger than life in the TV and radio religious part of his life. Always an advocate for human and civil rights, Jimmy served religious groups and governmental groups to advocate for liberty and fairness. In 1995 he authored a book called Burden of a Secret. This book told the story of his family’s encounter with HIV/AIDS and the terrible rejection that he and his family faced at the hands of Christians. He lost a daughter-inlaw and three grandsons to HIV at a time when there we no treatments, and when compassion was in short supply, especially in Baptist life. Rev. Mack Bingham, one of the ministers at Central Baptist Church of Bearden (Knoxville, TN) at the time, read Dr. Allen’s book and decided that the Babptist Church needed to learn more about HIV/AIDS and explore ways to impact our community. This was the birth, in 1996, of Samaritan Ministry. In spite of the challenges that HIV brought to his family and the struggles that he personally had with his gay son, Skip, Dr. Allen continued to be a courageous warrior, and was not afraid to speak openly about the challenges of HIV for his family, and within the church. 

Jaci Adams was an unparalleled leader in

the Philadelphia transgender community, and her impact on the recognition and rights of trans people in our city was enormous. Born into nightmarish circumstances, gone from home while still a child, living on the streets and surviving however she could, Jaci nevertheless rose above all of it to lead numerous efforts to ensure that transgender people were treated with the dignity and respect they deserved. Because of Jaci Adams’s efforts many agencies in Philadelphia have developed and maintained programs designed to specifically serve the trans community. 

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#InTheirMemory

Because of the influence of Jaci Adams over many years, all of us grew in awareness and understanding of a vibrant and creative community.

Carolyn Massey was a national speaker and

trainer on HIV/AIDS and the intersecting issues of women, aging adults, African American health disparities, and communities of faith. Carolyn served as an expert panelist during the 2010 White House Special Meetings on HIV and Aging, under the direction of President Obama. She served as a speaker before the 2013 Senate Special Committee on HIV and Aging, and participated in the 2012 International Conference on AIDS as a featured panelist on the topic of HIV and Aging held in Washington, D.C.  Carolyn, her face, and her story, were used in national campaigns to educate on Aging and HIV. Carolyn traveled to South Africa over 10 years ago with Emmy-nominated Actress Sheryl Lee Ralph, as part of a group of woman with a singular mission: to educate more South Africans about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and prevention methods.  Carolyn worked tirelessly to fight against the stigma and discrimination that many with HIV/AIDS often faced.  She believed that by giving a face to HIV/AIDS, and highlighting those who were successfully managing their lives with the disease, others would be able to better understand the humanity of HIV/AIDS. Carolyn worked with Magic Johnson over 10 years ago, brought him to her home church, New Samaritan, to educate the community about HIV/AIDS about the full, exceptionally productive, and happy lives people living with the disease can enjoy. As a 25-year survivor of the disease, Carolyn literally won her race and fulfilled the destiny of what became her life’s work and passion. Carolyn served as the Executive Director of OWEL, Older Women Embracing Life, a dynamic group of women dedicated to providing support for women, their families, and care providers —many of whom were and are living with and impacted by HIV/AIDS.

Jeffrey Basinger, diagnosed with HIV in

1985, began his work at the Western Colorado AIDS Project office of Colorado Health Network as an HIV resource coordinator in 1996. In 2007, Jeff accepted the Director position of the Northern Colorado AIDS Project office of the organization in Fort Collins, and returned to Grand Junction in 2012 to become the Director of the office where he began his career in the HIV/AIDS service industry some 16 years prior. Jeff served more than 21 years with the organization that he loved. He was a courageous man and passionate about his calling to serve people battling HIV/AIDS. Jeff was a strong advocate for people living with HIV/AIDS and for members of the LGBTQ community over the years, and volunteered for various community organizations. These efforts included working on the “Vote No on Amendment 2” campaign in 1992; participating as a founding officer for the Common Decency Coalition and American Voices from 1992 to 1994; and participation as an advisory board member for the Warren McKerrow AIDS Foundation in 1993. He also volunteered with Coloradoans Working Together, The Grand Junction Downtown Association, and other community organizations.


In 2017, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper appointed Jeff to the Colorado HIV Alliance for Prevention, Care and Treatment. Jeff served on previous iterations of this Alliance for many years leading up to this appointment.

Robert K. Burns was a respected professional in the delivery of health care services, the former executive director of the COLOURS Organization, a leader in the house ball community, and a beloved DJ around the country.

After moving to North Philadelphia, Burns served as the director of the Mazzoni Center’s Collective Program, a federally-funded multi-agency collaborative serving the needs of African American, Latino, and Asian/Pacific Islander communities. He went on to serve as the deputy director and eventually executive director of COLOURS, ensuring the administration of a federal project geared towards providing assistance to LGBTQ re-entry populations. Burns was passionate about HIV prevention and education. He worked tirelessly to save the lives of same-gender loving men of color. He served the Philadelphia community by being a voice for many, and was an outspoken activist on raising awareness of HIV, and lowering rates of HIV, among the Black LGBTQ community.

Dennis deLeon was an American human rights lawyer, HIV/AIDS

activist, and Latino community leader. He served as New York City human rights commissioner and later became president of the Latino Commission on AIDS. In the 1980s and 1990s, Dennis was a leader in the NYC government. In 1982, he was appointed by Mayor Ed Koch as senior assistant corporation counsel. Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins named him as deputy borough president in 1986. When Dinkins was elected mayor, he appointed Dennis as the city’s human rights commissioner. In 1993, he became one of the first New York city officials to disclose publicly his HIV status when he wrote My Hopes, My Fears, My Disease which was published in the New York Times. Dennis was selected as President of the Latino Commission on AIDS in 1994, a position he held until shortly before his death.

Bobbi Campbell was a public health nurse and an early United States AIDS activist. In September 1981, Campbell became the 16th person in San Francisco to be diagnosed with Kaposi’s sarcoma, when that was a proxy for an AIDS diagnosis. He was the first to come out publicly as a person with what came to be known as AIDS, writing a regular column in the San Francisco Sentinel, syndicated nationwide, describing his experiences, and

posting photos of his KS lesions to help other San Franciscans know what to look for before HIV tests became available. He helped write the first San Francisco safer sex manual and he became known as “the AIDS Poster Boy.” Bobbi rapidly became one of the leading AIDS activists, co-founding People With AIDS San Francisco in 1982 and co-writing the 1983 Denver Principles, the defining manifesto of the People With AIDS SelfEmpowerment Movement. Appearing on the cover of Newsweek and being interviewed on national news reports, Campbell raised the national profile of the AIDS crisis among heterosexuals and provided a recognizable face of the epidemic for affected communities. He also lobbied Margaret Heckler, Secretary of Health and Human Services in the Reagan administration over both practical issues and stigmatizing medical practices that affected millions of people living with AIDS. He also continued to campaign for LGBTQ rights, speaking outside the 1984 Democratic National Convention a month before his death from cryptosporidiosis.

Yvonne “Bunny” Knuckles - submitted by Tazima Jenkins Barnes Bunny was an advocate for people who were living with and affected by HIV/AIDS particularly in Oakland, but she advocated for everyone everywhere! I first met Bunny in deep West Oakland.Thank God for CBOs, for where I went no health department stepped foot in. I was doing outreach for an organization called CAL-PEP, California Prevention and Education Project. While I was handing out condoms and bleach she leaned out her window and said “what organization are you with’? I never seen anyone in my neighborhood doing HIV prevention work.” Then she came outside to meet me. Bunny was living with HIV and wanted people in her community to be educated about it, tested for it, and receive treatment services if diagnosed. I gave her a supply of condoms, bleach, resource pamphlets listing testing sites and other services, and my card. We kept in touch. She had a son in prison who would tell other inmates to contact his Mom for information on HIV. Bunny was a soldier in the struggle for justice, health equity, and awareness. She later joined an organization called WORLD, Women Organized to Respond to Life Threatening Diseases. She became a peer advocate, and she later joined Alameda County’s HIV Services Planning Committee to ensure that Ryan White dollars would be used toward those who needed it most. She later joined me in facilitating HIV+ support groups called ‘Positive Lifestyle Changes.’ As she progressed in the disease, she made me promise to sit on the HIV Services Planning Committee to continue the work with the passion and fervor she was committed to. Bunny passed from complications of HIV and the side effects of her treatment regimen. She will live on in the hearts of many!

BJ Cavnor, Executive Director of One in Four,

was an avid patient advocate in Oregon and Washington. He passed away in December 2018. He was outspoken and worked with the states to ensure they understood the importance of providing access to medications, specifically HIV medications.  The world is less vibrant without BJ’s booming voice, incredible smile, and memorable laugh.  He adored his nephews and nieces and his dog, Bear.  He mourned

#2019USCA

15


the death of his husband but appreciated the great life and love they had. BJ was 51 years young, loved life, and worked tirelessly to advocate for PLWH.  His time on earth may be done, but his fight continues.

John Bell was an HIV activist, mentor to a

generation of ex-offenders, teacher, and our friend. In the years we were privileged to know him, we watched in awe as John took his lived experiences of racism, stigma, war, and disease and transformed them into an inspirational body of thought and knowledge that helped make the way easier for the people who came after him. Executive Director Philadelphia FIGHT Jane Shull said that Bell was critical to the development of the organization’s work with the Philadelphia prison system and ex-offenders. He was the co-creator of Philadelphia FIGHT’s TEACH Outside initiative, a resource for HIV-positive people reintegrating into society from the prison system. Leon King, attorney and former commissioner of the Philadelphia Prison System, says Bell had a key role in transforming the system’s policies around HIV.

Jim Chalgren was a student activist for LGBT

rights at Minnesota State University, Mankato. His advocacy expanded to the HIV/AIDS Community and he was a long-term survivor, having started medications prior to the protease inhibitor successful break through. As a graduate student in the Counseling and Student Personnel program, he established the Alternative Lifestyles office at the Minnesota State University, Mankato in 1977. This was the first gay and lesbian center in Minnesota, and the second in the nation. He served as director of this center until he became too ill to do so. In 2003, students staged a sit-in to hire a new full-time director of the center, which happened in 2004. In 2008, the Minnesota State University, Mankato officially named the center the Jim Chalgren LGBT Resource Center. In 1985, he co-founded The Aliveness Project, a community service program for individuals afflicted with HIV/AIDS. The project started out as a series of potluck dinners, then extended to a food shelf, outreach, and case management services to educate HIV/AIDS patients about nutrition and healthcare. The Aliveness Project served as a model for similar programs across the United States.

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#InTheirMemory

Craig Harris was one of NMAC’s founders and

our first board chair. He lived his life as a fierce out gay men living with HIV. In 1986 Craig jumped onto the stage of the American Public Health Associations’ first plenary on AIDS because all of the speakers were white. He grabbed the microphone and said, “I will be heard.” NMAC, like many HIV organizations, started as a protest to the unfair and unequal treatment of communities highly impacted by HIV. NMAC remembers Craig for always pushing us to do more. There was so much need and so little time.

Randy Shilts was an American journalist

and author. He worked as a reporter for both The Advocate and the San Francisco Chronicle, where he became “the first openly gay reporter with a gay ‘beat’ in the American mainstream press.” AIDS, the disease that would later take his life, first came to nationwide attention that same year and soon Shilts devoted himself to covering the unfolding story of the disease and its medical, social, and political ramifications. His 1987 book “And the Band Played On” chronicled the early history of the AIDS epidemic. It would go on to sell more than 700,000 copies through 2004. He also wrote “The Mayor of Castro Street: The Life and Times of Harvey Milk” and “Conduct Unbecoming: Gays and Lesbians in the US Military from Vietnam to the Persian Gulf.” Shilts was diagnosed after he finished writing “And the Band Played On.” He died at the age of 42 in 1994.

Ryan White was an American teenager from

Kokomo, Indiana, who became a national poster child for HIV/AIDS in the United States after failing to be re-admitted to school following a diagnosis of AIDS. As a hemophiliac, he became infected with HIV from a contaminated factor VIII blood treatment and, when diagnosed in December 1984, was given six months to live. Doctors said he posed no risk to other students, as AIDS is not an airborne disease and spreads solely through body fluids, but AIDS was poorly understood by the general public at the time. When White tried to return to school, many parents and teachers in Howard County rallied against his attendance due to concerns of the disease spreading through bodily fluid transfer. A


lengthy administrative appeal process ensued, and news of the conflict turned Ryan into a popular celebrity and advocate for AIDS research and public education. Surprising his doctors, Ryan White lived five years longer than predicted. He died on April 8, 1990, one month before his high school graduation. In August 1990, four months after Ryan White’s death, Congress enacted The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act (often known simply as the Ryan White CARE Act), in his honor. The act is the United States’ largest federally funded program for people living with HIV/AIDS. The Ryan White CARE Act funds programs to improve availability of care for low-income, uninsured and under-insured victims of AIDS and their families.

Arthur Ashe was an American professional

tennis player who won three Grand Slam titles. He was the first black player selected to the United States Davis Cup team and the only black man ever to win the singles title at Wimbledon, the US Open, and the Australian Open. He was twice ranked as the number one male tennis player in the world and retired in 1980. In the early 1980s, Ashe is believed to have contracted HIV from a blood transfusion he received during heart bypass surgery. Ashe publicly announced his illness in April 1992 and began working to educate others about HIV and AIDS. He founded the Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of AIDS and the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health before his death from AIDS-related pneumonia at age 49 on February 6, 1993. On June 20, 1993, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by the United States President Bill Clinton.

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SEE WHY

97% OF PEOPLE

IN A CLINICAL TRIAL WERE SATIS FI ED W H E N

RAPIDLY STARTING TREATMENT WITH SYMTUZA® VISIT US AT BOOTH #310

In a clinical trial of 109 patients new to treatment, and rapidly starting SYMTUZA®, 84% reached undetectable (<50 copies/mL) at Week 48. When asked “How satisfied are you with your present treatment?” in a standardized questionnaire, 97% (93 out of 96) reported that they were satisfied. The Diamond Study was a single-arm study of patients quickly starting SYMTUZA® (within 14 days of diagnosis). Out of 109 total patients, 96 of them completed a 10-question Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) standardized questionnaire (based on a scale of 1-6). Satisfied was defined as reporting a score of 5 or 6.

Please see the accompanying Important Brief Summary, including Boxed Warning for SYMTUZA® on accompanying page and discuss any questions you have with your doctor. 18 © Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP 2019 09/19 cp-99626v1

SYMTUZA.COM/USCA


What is SYMTUZA® Used For? SYMTUZA® is a prescription medicine that is used without other antiretroviral medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in adults who: • have not received anti-HIV-1 medicines in the past, or • when their healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). It is not known if SYMTUZA® is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. Take SYMTUZA® exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking SYMTUZA® without talking to your healthcare provider. If you have difficulty swallowing, the tablet may be split using a tablet-cutter. After splitting the tablet, the entire dose (both halves) should then be taken right away. Do not miss a dose of SYMTUZA®. When your SYMTUZA® supply starts to run low, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy. This is very important because the amount of virus in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. The virus may develop resistance to SYMTUZA® and become harder to treat. What are the most serious risks with SYMTUZA®? SYMTUZA® can cause serious side effects including: Worsening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Your healthcare provider will test you for HBV before starting treatment with SYMTUZA®. If you have HBV infection and take SYMTUZA®, your HBV may get worse (flare-up) if you stop taking SYMTUZA®. If you stop taking SYMTUZA®, your healthcare provider will need to check your health often and do blood tests regularly for several months to check your HBV infection or give you a medicine to treat your HBV infection. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or unusual symptoms you may have after you stop taking SYMTUZA®. What are the important warnings? • SYMTUZA® may cause severe liver problems that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, vomiting, or stomach area pain • SYMTUZA® may cause severe or life-threatening skin reactions or rashes. Stop taking SYMTUZA® and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any skin changes with the following symptoms: fever, tiredness, muscle or joint pain, blisters or skin lesions, mouth sores or ulcers, and/or red or inflamed eyes, like “pink eye” (conjunctivitis) • SYMTUZA® can cause new or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure What should I tell my healthcare provider? Before taking SYMTUZA®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: • have liver problems (including hepatitis B or hepatitis C) • have kidney problems

• are allergic to sulfa (sulfonamide) • have diabetes • have hemophilia

• Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. SYMTUZA® should not be used in pregnant women. It is not known if SYMTUZA® will harm your unborn baby

• Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV to your baby. Do not breastfeed if you take SYMTUZA®

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines interact with SYMTUZA®. Keep a list of your medicines to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist. Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. Who should not take SYMTUZA®? • Do not take SYMTUZA® with any of the following medicines: alfuzosin, carbamazepine, cisapride, colchicine (if you have liver or kidney problems), dronedarone, elbasvir and grazoprevir, ergotcontaining medicines (such as: dihydroergotamine, ergotamine tartrate, methylergonovine), ivabradine, lomitapide, lovastatin or a product that contains lovastatin, lurasidone, midazolam (when taken by mouth), naloxegol, phenobarbital, phenytoin, pimozide, ranolazine, rifampin, sildenafil when used for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), simvastatin or a product that contains simvastatin, St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) or a product that contains St. John’s wort, or triazolam • Serious problems can happen if you take any of these medicines with SYMTUZA® What are the possible side effects of SYMTUZA®? SYMTUZA® may cause serious side effects including: • Immune system changes (Immune Reconstitution Syndrome) can happen in people taking HIV-1 medicines • Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis) which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat • Diabetes and high blood sugar • Changes in body fat can happen in people taking HIV-1 medications • Increased bleeding in people with hemophilia, which can happen when taking protease inhibitors. The most common side effects are: • gas • stomach problems • diarrhea • rash • nausea • fatigue • headache These are not all of the possible side effects of SYMTUZA®. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. What important facts should I know? This information is not complete. To get more information: • Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist • Visit www.SYMTUZA.com to read over the FDA-approved product labeling and patient information © Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP 2019 06/19 cp-60855v5


CONFERENCE FORMAT Session Types

Plenary Sessions

Pathways

2 hours

Plenary sessions are formal, motivational presentations on a specific topic held in the host ballroom and usually feature a guest speaker(s) and a plated lunch.

Aging Hosted by NMAC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hosted by CDC Ending the Epidemic Hosted by Housing Works Faith Hosted by The Balm in Gilead Fast Track Cities Hosted by IAPAC Health Care Providers Hosted by Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC)

Institutes

3 hours

Institutes are 3-hour sessions offering in-depth exploration and discussion of current HIV-related issues and special populations scheduled on Thursday, September 5, 8:00 am - 11:00 am, 11:00 am and Friday, September 6, 9:00am 11:00 am.

Hepatitis Hosted by The AIDS Institute & NASTAD Health Care Access Hosted by Harvard University HRSA Hosted by HRSA American Indian / Alaska Native Hosted by NMAC CAP South Hosted by Southern AIDS Coalition STDs Hosted by National Coalition of STD Directors Structural Interventions Hosted by the Federal AIDS Policy Partnership

Workshops

2 hours

Workshops are in-depth, two hour presentations on topics directly relevant to one of more of the conference tracks.

Poster Presentations

30 min

Poster presentations are placard-type exhibits, which are often accompanied by handouts and/or other material relevant to one of the tracks. Posters are a great vehicle for abstracts that are data-driven and those that are displaying the results of a study. Posters will be displayed in the Meeting Level 1 of the Marriott Marquis.

20

Treatment/CFAR Hosted by NMAC and CFARs U=U Hosted by Prevention Access Campaign


In charge of tomorrow As we continue our unwavering support for the HIV community, Walgreens is committed to: • Providing HIV-specialized pharmacists in your community who are resources for prevention education and risk reduction options, including PrEP • Supporting NMAC’s mission to improve lives and end the HIV epidemic in America • Working with you on the front lines every day to help people impacted by HIV

To learn more, stop by booth 614 or visit HIV.Walgreens.com

©2019 Walgreen Co. All rights reserved. | 1069563-9708

0719


SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

Together We Are Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America

If you are looking for ways to use social media to help you... ... engage people around Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America ... work with influencers ... use video and graphics to promote your programs ... save money on recruitment and retention ... connect your clients to testing, care, and treatment services Don’t leave USCA without a plan for using social media! Social Media Lab - Visit Marquis 16 (Meeting Level 2) to get 1-on-1 TA with a social media expert during USCA: Thurs: 9:30 – 11am and 1:30 – 5:30pm Fri/Sat: 9–11am and 1:30 – 5:30pm Sun: 9–11am

FACEBOOK.COM/HIVGOV @HIVGOV @HIVGOV


CONFERENCE FORMAT Tracks

Biomedical HIV Prevention Biomedical HIV prevention has expanded options to stop the spread of the virus. This track will focus on PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis), Treatment as Prevention (TasP), and START (Strategic Timing of Anti-Retroviral Treatment). It will discuss the latest innovations, programs, and targets in order to scale up biomedical HIV prevention programs at your agency, city, or state. Ending the Epidemic This track will focus on federal, state and local plans to end the US HIV epidemic. Workshops will address topics such as: targeted PrEP programs in key jurisdictions that are driving new diagnoses and getting PLWH to undetectable viral loads. Gay Men Gay men continue to have the highest rate of new infections and the largest number of people living with HIV in America. This track will focus on young gay men, particularly young gay men of color. Youth have the highest rates of new infections. We will address the opportunities, challenges, and innovations in HIV prevention, services, outreach, housing, treatment, and healthcare. Leadership What skills are needed to be an effective leader in the fight to end HIV? This skills-building track focuses on leadership within CBOs, health centers, activist groups, and the government. Leaders are also getting old, when is it time to leave? How do you manage transition? How should our movement identify, nurture, and grow the next generation? What can our movement do to support existing leaders? Opioid Epidemic The nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opioid epidemic is significantly intertwined with the increasing rates of HIV and viral hepatitis in our communities. Workshops will address prevention services for people injecting drugs and developing local plans to coordinate prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment services. PrEP for CBOs PrEP is an important piece to End the Epidemic. Program implementation is an important skill to ensure successful PrEP navigation and client services. Ending the Epidemic requires intentionally demonstrating and offering culturally responsive approaches to engage, navigate, and retain vulnerable populations on PrEP. The track will focus on community-based experiences of PrEP engagement, navigation, and retention. People Living with HIV This track will focus on what it means to live with HIV in America. PLWH are not a monolithic community and should not be treated like they are all the same. Stigma will be a major focus. This

track will also cover aging, empowerment, self-determination, the criminal justice system, advocacy, and building a PLWH movement. The main focus will be for consumers; however, the conference also hopes to have a dialogue between providers and people living with the virus. Public Policy This track will focus on city, county, state, and federal policies. It will examine policies that impact HIV prevention, healthcare, treatment, housing, research, and syringe exchange. It will look at federal programs like the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansion, HOPWA and the Ryan White Care Act. What are the advocacy strategies to stop the criminalization of HIV transmission, increase state and federal appropriations, fund HIV research, prevention, healthcare, and to end the epidemic? Transgender and Gender Non-conforming This track focuses on the needs of transgender and gender nonconforming people and their lived experiences. Workshops will focus on ways organizations can include gender-affirming care to transgender and gender non-conforming people. Specific subjects include decriminalization, PrEP for transwomen and transmen, and systematic approaches for transwomen of color. Special sessions will focus on specific populations under the transgender umbrella, particularly in the South. Trauma-Informed Care Trauma Informed Care (TIC) is an organizational structure and treatment framework that involves understanding, recognizing, and responding to the effects of all types of trauma. TIC also emphasizes physical, psychological, and emotional safety for both consumers and providers, and helps survivors rebuild a sense of control and empowerment. HIV, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia and xenophobia are all possible causes of trauma. Workshops will address how trauma-informed care ultimately results in increased retention in HIV care. Women What are the latest advances in services for women living with HIV or at risk for HIV? What are the opportunities, challenges and innovations in HIV prevention, treatment, housing, and healthcare? What are the effective trauma-informed care and HIV-related violence prevention programs? Is your agency open to cis and transwomen directors, clients, or board members? Youth Sessions under the Youth Track are focused on developing the skills of our next generation of leaders. Topics in this track include: HIV and public health literacy, advocacy, leadership development, and integrating youth-specific messaging in local, state and national HIV/AIDS programs.

#2019USCA

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219 318

117 216

217 316

24

113 212

10'

111 210

315

8'

20'

313

310

211 10'

112

10'

6'x30"

100 AIDSVu 101 Wellness Services Inc. 103 RDE Systems Support Group, LLC 104 Accredo 105, 107 Theratechnologies 106 Global Protection Corp. 108 MDocHaus 111 R&S Northeast, LLC 112 TPAN 113 Rare Patient Voice, LLC 114 Luther Consulting, LLC 116 Houston Health Department 118 Mary’s Center 119 ACRIA Centers at GMHC 120 COMPASS Initiative 124 Southern AIDS Coalition 200 POZ – Smart + Strong 201, 203 CondomDispenser.org 205 ViiV Healthcare 206, 208 Abbott 211,310 Janssen 212 AIDS United 214 National Network to End Domestic Violence 0 216 , 218 Until There’s A Cure 0 217 TargetHIV 219 CCN Pharmacy 300, 302 Avita Pharmacy 301 National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD) 303 Otto Training, Inc. 305 National AIDS Memorial 307 HealthMerch.com 309 Say It With A Condom 313 TheBody

114

10'

8'

Janssen

15'

6'x30"

Company Name

317

10'

115 214

Booth #

319

6'x30"

119 218

6'x30"

118

LIBERTY BALLROOM (LEFT SIDE)

TT8

321

120

116

11'6"

TT12 TT11 TT10 TT9

Dessert Area

124

6'x30"

EXHIBIT HALL

Liberty Ballroom

Entrance

16'

108 106

ViiV

107 208

20'

105 206

205

309 10'

104

100

307 305

103 202

203 302

101 200

201 300

TT14 6'x30"

11'6"

TT13

303 301

6'x30"

1

315

2

A&U – America’s AIDS Magazine 316, 318 Transgender Law Center 317 Chembio Diagnostic Systems, Inc. 319 AIDS Healthcare Foundation Worldwide 321 20' HRSA’s HIV/AIDS 10' 30' 40' 50' Bureau TT14 Prevention Access Campaign 12.20m 15.25m 3.05m 6.10m 9.15m TT13 Cicatelli Associates, Inc. CENTER HALLWAY Booth #

Company Name

TT12, TT3, Common Threads TT4

TT5 My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. TT6 NASTAD TT7 The Change Project TT8 Napo Pharmaceuticals TT9 Valley AIDS Council

Ma Entra


TT7

Dessert Area

725

619 720

517 618

617 718

515 616

10'

613 714

513 614 Entrance

615 716

10'

719

10'

717 715 713

42'

ain ance

Gilead

20'

510

CWI

709

507 506

707

10'

618

16'

504

Merck 20'

502

TT2

603 704

705

601 702

501 500

11'6"

6'x30"

TT1 6'x30"

701

4

3

TT10 T11

Arianna’s Center Trans United Fund

INDEPENDENCE BALLROOM (RIGHT SIDE) Booth #

9

Company Name

7 6 5 500 CEG 501 MERCK 502 Office of Women’s Health 504 B Holding Group LLC 506 Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, Inc. 507 Gilead Sciences, Inc. 510 EMD Serono 513, 515 Total Access Group 514 CDC 516 NMAC 517 AAHIVM 8

D CWO CWO

518 CVS Health 519 PharmBlue 520 National Library of Medicine 521 Celltrion 522 JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc. 601 Human Rights Campaign 603 American Exchange 613, 615 Kaiser Family Foundation – Greater than AIDS 614, 616, Walgreens CWI

8'x30"

DJ

REVISION DATE: 08/07/19

6'x30"

514

10'

519 620

721

DRAWN BY: Tony Harris

516

621 722

September 5 - 8, 2019 Marriott Marquis/Liberty & Independence Ballrooms/Washington, DC

518

521 622

USCA 2019

520

D CWO

TT5

6'x30"

TT4

6'x30"

TT3

11'6"

522

6'x30"

TT6

6'x30"

'

Independence Ballroom

617 Mayer Laboratories, Inc. 619 Meijer Specialty Pharmacy 620 Global Network of Black People Working in HIV (GNBPH) 621 UCHAPS 622 FHI 360 701 Curant Health 702 The Well Project 704 The FC2 Internal Condom 705, 707 OraSure Technologies, Inc. 709 Samaritan Ministry Booth Count 713 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care Expo8x10.................91 Expo16x20...............3 714, 716 CBA Provider Network (CPN) Expo20x42...............1 715 Regional Capacity Building & Technical Assistance/South Table 8ft x 30in........1 Table 6ftRegional x 30in........14 717 Capacity Building & Technical Assistance/NE 718 Capacity for Health 719 Regional Capacity Building & Tech Assistance/Midwest 720 Cicatelli Associates, Inc. 721 Regional Capacity Building & Technical Assistance/West 722 ETR Associates, Inc. 725 HealthHIV TT1 Black AIDS Institute TT2 Hepatitis Policy Project

#2019USCA

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USCA SPONSOR

1000 Vermont Avenue, NW Suite 200 Washington, DC 20001

Staff Executive Office Paul Akio Kawata, Executive Director Kim Ferrell, Director of Operations

Development Robert York, Development Director Diane Ferguson, Development Associate

Conferences Tara Barnes-Darby, Director of Conferences Alison J. McKeithen, Conferences Manager Shanta’ Gray, Conferences and Registration Coordinator Gabriella Spencer, Program Associate

Communications Chip Lewis, Communications Director Luke Hammerman, Communications Associate

Treatment Moisés Agosto-Rosario, Treatment Director Joanna Lopez, Associate Program Manager Sable K. Nelson, Associate Policy & Advocacy Manager NMAC Training Center to End the Epidemic Linda H. Scruggs, Director Charles Shazor Jr., Program Coordinator Marissa Miller, Program Coordinator Terrell Parker, Associate Manager

Board of Directors Chair John W. Hill, Jr., Washington, DC

Secretary Therese Rodriguez, Asian Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS, New York, NY

Treasurer Valerie Rochester, AIDS United, Washington, DC

Oscar De La O Bienestar Human Services Los Angeles, CA

Norm Nickens San Francisco Employees’ Retirement System San Francisco, CA

Evelyn Ullah Broward County Department of Health Miami, FL

Brenda Hunt Borderbelt AIDS Resource Team (BART) Lumberton, NC

Mario Perez County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Office of AIDS Programs & Policy Los Angeles, CA

Rodolfo R. Vega JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. Boston, MA

Co-Chair Lance Toma, San Francisco Community Health Center, San Francisco, CA

Board Members

Monica Johnson HEROES - Helping Everyone Receive Ongoing Effective Support Columbia, LA Kelsey Louie, MSW, MBA Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) New York, NY

26

Leonardo Ramon Ortega, MD, MPH Shalom Health Care Center, Inc. Indianapolis, IN Rev. Ed Sanders Metropolitan Interdenominational Church Nashville, Tennessee


USCA PROGRAM PARTNERS AIDS UNITED

1101 14th St, NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20005

Tel: (202) 408-4848 Fax: (202) 408-1818 www.aidsunited.org

AIDS United’s mission is to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. through strategic grant-making, capacity building, formative research, and policy. AIDS United works to ensure access to life-saving HIV/AIDS care and prevention services and to advance sound HIV/AIDS-related policy for U.S. populations and communities most impacted by the epidemic. To date, our strategic grant-making initiatives have directly funded more than $104 million to local communities and have leveraged more than $117 million in additional investments for programs that include, but are not limited to, HIV prevention, access to care, capacity building, harm reduction, and advocacy. www.aidsunited.org. AMERICAN ACADEMY OF HIV MEDICINE 1705 DeSales Street NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036

Tel: (202) 659-0699 Fax: (202) 659-0976 www.aahivm.org

The American Academy of HIV Medicine is an independent organization of AAHIVM HIV Specialists™ and other HIV clinicians dedicated to advancing excellence in HIV/AIDS care. Through advocacy and education, AAHIVM is committed to supporting all HIV care providers and to ensuring better care of those living with HIV. AAHIVM is the only U.S. medical organization providing its entire membership of MDs, DOs, NPs, PAs and Pharmacists the opportunity to credential as HIV Specialists™, HIV Experts™ or HIV Pharmacists™. ASSOCIATION OF NURSES IN AIDS CARE HIV/AIDS Nursing Certification Board 3538 Ridgewood Road Akron, Ohio 44333

Tel: (330) 670-0101 Fax: (330) 670-0109 www.nursesinaidscare.org

The mission of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care is to promote the individual and collective professional development of nurses involved in the delivery of health care to persons living with or affected by HIV and AIDS. ANAC advances expertise and excellence in nurses engaged in any dimension of HIV disease and its comorbidities, and ensures that nursing expertise is recognized as a key component of inter-professional care models, and is incorporated in decisions affecting the HIV community. ANAC is the leading professional HIV nursing association educating, connecting, and advocating for nurses concerned about HIV and HIV-related care. ANAC promotes a comprehensive, holistic and evidence-based approach to quality HIV care, and advocates for policies grounded in a human rights approach to health. The Balm in Gilead

Tel: (804) 644-BALM (2256) Fax: (804) 560-1324 www.balmingilead.org

620 Moorefield Park Drive Suite 150 Richmond, VA 23236

The Balm in Gilead, Inc.™ is a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization whose mission is to improve the health status of people of the African Diaspora by building the capacity of faith communities to address life-threatening diseases, especially HIV/AIDS. Since 1989, The Balm in Gilead’s pioneering achievements have enabled thousands of churches to become leaders in preventing the transmission of HIV by providing comprehensive educational programs and offering compassionate support to encourage those living with HIV to seek and maintain treatment. The Balm in Gilead spearheads a dynamic response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the faith community through its international programs Healthy Churches 2020, The National Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS, Saving Future Generations, The National Brain Health Center for African Americans and various other capacity building and technical assistance projects. The Balm in Gilead is headquartered in Richmond, VA with offices in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. BLACK AIDS INSTITUTE

1833 West 8th Street, #200 Los Angeles, CA 90057-4920

Tel: (213) 353-3610 Fax: (213) 989-0181 www.blackaids.org

Founded in May of 1999, the Black AIDS Institute (BAI) is the only national HIV/AIDS think tank in the United States focused exclusively on Black people. BAI’s mission is to end the AIDS pandemic in Black communities by engaging and mobilizing institutions, leaders, and individuals in efforts to confront HIV/AIDS. BAI disseminates information, conducts training, offers technical assistance and capacity building, interprets and influences public and private sector HIV/AIDS policies, delivers prevention, and linkage to care services, and provides advocacy mobilization from a uniquely and unapologetically Black point of view. Our motto is: “Our People, Our Problem, Our Solution.”

#2019USCA

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PROGRAM PARTNERS BROADWAY CARES / EQUITY FIGHTS AIDS 165 West 46th Street, Suite 1300 New York, NY 10036

Tel: (212) 840-0770 Fax: (212) 840-0551 E-mail: info@bcefa.org www.broadwaycares.org

Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS is one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading industry-based, non-profit AIDS fundraising and grantmaking organizations. By drawing upon the talents, resources, and generosity of the American theatre community, since 1988 BC/EFA has raised and distributed over $135 million for essential services for people with AIDS and other critical illnesses across the United States, awarding grants to over 400 AIDS and family service organizations nationwide. www.broadwaycares.org INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROVIDERS OF AIDS CARE 1424 K Street, NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20005

Tel: (202) 408-4848, ext. 252 Fax: (202) 315-3651 www.iapac.org

IAPAC represents more than 17,000 clinicians and other healthcare professionals in over 100 countries who deliver both prevention and treatment services in multiple disease areas, including HIV, hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Its educational, research, technical assistance, and advocacy activities are conducted by a professionally diverse staff, and are guided by an international Board of Trustees composed of highly esteemed medical, public health, and advocacy professionals from across five continents. THE NAMES PROJECT FOUNDATION AIDS Memorial Quilt 204 14th St NW Atlanta, GA 30318-5304

Tel: (404) 688-5500 Fax: (404) 688-5552 www.aidsquilt.org

Established in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation, Inc. is the international non-governmental, 501(c)(3) organization that is the custodian of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and its associated document and media archive. The mission of The NAMES Project Foundation is to preserve, care for, and use the AIDS Memorial Quilt to foster healing, heighten awareness, and inspire action in the struggle against HIV and AIDS. NATIONAL AIDS HOUSING COALITION

www.nationalaidshousing.org

1000 Vermont Ave, NW, 5th Floor Washington, DC 20005

The National AIDS Housing Coalition is a national nonprofit housing organization founded in 1994 in the belief that people with HIV/ AIDS have a fundamental right to decent, safe, affordable housing, and supportive services, responsive and appropriate to their self-determined needs. NAHC works to end the HIV/ AIDS epidemic by ensuring that persons with HIV/AIDS have quality, affordable, and appropriate housing Financed by member dues, foundation grants, and individual donations, NAHC is governed by a diverse board of directors representing communities in 12 states and the District of Columbia, with vast personal and professional experience as AIDS housing developers, providers, residents, and AIDS housing advocates. NAHCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributions to AIDS housing include training, educating, and sharing experiences through work in coalitions, AIDS housing institutes, research summits, and workshops at conferences across the country as well as on-going advocacy with policymakers in Congress, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Office of Management and Budget, and other relevant agencies to ensure that government policies are responsive to the housing and service needs of people with HIV/AIDS, including those who are homeless or unstably housed.

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PROGRAM PARTNERS NASTAD

Tel: (202) 434-8090 Fax: (202) 434-8092 www.nastad.org

444 North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 339 Washington, DC 20001

NASTAD is a leading non-partisan non-profit association that represents public health officials who administer HIV and hepatitis programs in the U.S. and around the world. Our singular mission is to end the intersecting epidemics of HIV, viral hepatitis, and related conditions. We do this work by strengthening domestic and global governmental public health through advocacy, capacity building, and social justice. Each of NASTAD’s six programmatic teams—Health Care Access, Health Systems Integration, Policy & Legislative Affairs, Hepatitis, Health Equity & Prevention, and Global—interpret and influence policies, conduct trainings, offer technical assistance, and provide advocacy mobilization for U.S. health departments and ministries of health around the world to improve health outcomes for people living with HIV and hepatitis. THE AIDS INSTITUTE

Program and Administrative Office 17 Davis Boulevard, Suite 403 Tampa, FL 33606

National Policy Office FL 1705 DeSales St., NW Tel: (813) 258-5929 / Suite 700 Fax: (813) 258-5939 Washington, DC 20036

DC

Tel: 202-835-8373 Fax: 202-835-8368 www.theaidsinstitute.org

The AIDS Institute is a national nonprofit and nonpartisan public policy organization with offices in Washington, DC, Tampa and Tallahassee, FL. Its mission is to promote action for social change through public policy, advocacy, research, and education and began as a grass roots community mobilization effort in 1985. In 1992, this advocacy network became incorporated as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization. Over the years, The AIDS Institute has expanded its vision and scope to include an affiliation with the Division of Infectious Disease and International Medicine at the University of South Florida, College of Medicine. The AIDS Institute remains focused on HIV/AIDS while incorporating other disease focuses including hepatitis and systems issues such as access to care, treatment, services, poverty, and human rights. The AIDS Institute achieves its mission and goals through collaborations, networks and programs that are targeted and focused, such as: • AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families • Florida HIV/AIDS Advocacy Network • I Am Essential Campaign • HepFlorida and HepInfoNow.org • Patient Advocacy Leaders Summit • National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day • Capacity Building Assistance Network • Florida Consortium for HIV/AIDS Research

#2019USCA

29


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS Pathway: American Indian / Alaska Native American Indian/ Alaskan Native

Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Pathway: ENDING THE EPIDEMIC

Healthy Native Youth

Sustaining Culture in a Time of Change and Challenges for Native Hawaiian and Native Alaska Communities

Celebrating Our Magic Toolkit

Developing and Implementing PrEP Services in Native Communities

Pathway: Aging Pathway: Aging

Healthy Aging with HIV: Tips on Managing, Surviving and Thriving (Presented by Association for Nurses in AIDS Care)

Building Positive Relationships

HIV and Aging – Housing Considerations

• • • • • •

Co-Morbidities and Aging Related Health Challenges While Living with HIV Addressing the Needs of the HIV 50+ to End the HIV Epidemic in 2030. Get your “Advocate” On U=U Black Gay Men Living with HIV Over 50

Social Security Disability Benefits, Work and Aging HIV 50+ – Micro Loans

Creating a Psychosocial Infrastructure for Older Adults with HIV

Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention

Be You. Be HIV Free. A PrEP Campaign for Youth.

Viva PrEP: A Community-Driven PrEP Campaign for the Latinx Community ((es))

• •

The Start of a START Program, 2 Years of Data

PEP – Pushed under the Rug?

U=U in Practice: Results from a Midwest HIV Provider Survey

• • • • • • • • • • •

Ending the Epidemic: Our Time for Our Solution (Presented by The Black AIDS Institute) Ending the HIV Epidemic - A Community Based Approach

What to Do When “Ending the HIV Epidemic” Comes to Town? Leading with Race Cards Deck: Starting the Conversation PrEP Cascade Community Best Practices ((es))

Peer-Support: Adapting an EBI to achieve Viral Load Suppression Among LYLWH Ending the Epidemic: The Role of HRSA Programs and Funding You CAN Sit With Us: Building an ETE Plan ((es))

Keeping Up with the HIV CURE: Taking Care to Include Women

PrEP Institutes: Community Engagement in Technical Assistance for PrEP Uptake

Achieving Together: Texas’s Community Plan to End the HIV Epidemic Novel Urine PrEP Adherence Test Implemented by Houston/ DC Health Departments

Cause Behind the Cause: Undoing Racism® to End the Epidemic

Pathway:Faith Faith Pathway:

• • • • •

Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in Church (Presented by The Balm in Gilead) Sacred Collaborations: A Comprehensive Look at Interfaith HIV Partnerships

Breaking the Divide Among the Faith Community, LGBTQ and Persons Living with HIV HIV/AIDS and Trauma – Informed Congregations Exposé: Scandals in Sacred Settings

Pathway: CDC Pathway: Capacity Building

Pathway: Fast Men Track Cities Track: Gay

Implementing an End HIV initiative

Fast-Tracking the Use of Data-to-Care for HIV Healthcare

• • •

PrEP and SSP Strategies to End HIV: Successes and Challenges

Supporting Linkage, Retention, and Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to End the Epidemic Partnering for Public Health Response to End the HIV Epidemic How Do We DIAGNOSE HIV As Soon As Possible?

• •

Tackling Stigma from Within. Why Your Clients Don’t Come Back ((es)) How to Make #PrEP4All for Everyone Track: Gay Men

Pathway: DC CFAR Pathway: CDC

• • • •

Implementation Research and The Role of Centers For AIDS Research (CFAR) in the Federal Plan to End the HIV Epidemic ((es)) NIH Priorities for HIV and HIV-Related Research HIV Cure Research and The Role of Community An HIV Treatment Guidelines Update

• • • • •

30

The Role of Black Gay Men in the Ending the Epidemic Plan, Our Seats at the Tables, What You Need to Know

Drivers of Sexual Health Knowledge for Two-Spirit and/or gbM2M HIV Testing to Gay and Bisexual Males on College Campuses

Unpacking “MSM”: How Evolving Language Will Help End the Epidemic

Black, Gay, and Depressed: A Conversation on Mental Health & Substance Use


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS •

Pleasure vs Survival: The Realities of Black Queer Men and Sex

eMPowerment: The Success of Combination HIV Prevention and Treatment Strategies R

Meeting at the Intersection: Black Gay Men & Black Transwomen

eaching Gay, Bisexual and other Men Who Have Sex With Men of Color on the Margins

Pathway: Health Care Access Pathway: Health Care PROVIDERS

• • • •

The New Digital Age: Using Technology to Expand Access to Health Care Medicaid Waivers: Are We Out of the Woods Yet?

Strategies for Addressing Attacks on HIV Health Care

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Trump Era

Pathway: Health Care Providers Pathway: Hepatitis

Ask a Clinical Provider – Updates on HIV Health & Wellness ((es))

Connect the Risk Dots…. STI, IPV, Trauma and HIV Outcomes

Women, Substance Use and Trauma…. Developing a TraumaInformed Perspective for Health Survivors gifts: Thriving & Supporting Wellness, Resilience & Emotional Health

Pathway: Hepatitis Pathway: HHS SMAIF

Breaking Down Barriers to Care: Expanding Hepatitis Treatment Access

The ABCs of Hepatitis

Using What You Have: Leveraging Existing Public Health Programs to Address Hepatitis Hepatitis Elimination in the Era of Ending the Epidemic

Pathway: HRSA Pathway: HRSA

Community Engagement and Involvement of People with HIV

Building on HRSA Programs’ Infrastructure Supporting Ending the HIV Epidemic

Innovation through Implementation Science

Ending the HIV Epidemic Listening Session ((es))

• • •

• • • • • • •

Understanding Stigma Through the Experience of Participants in an HIV Leadership Program Using Media to Amplify Your Mission: Learn from GLAAD on how to pitch your own narrative The Future is Female: WoC Leadership in the HIV Movement Penalizing Blackness: Anti-Black Racism in HIV and LGBTQ+ Organizations Time to C.H.A.T. Event of ASO Professionals / Case Manager

CBO Leaders’ Responses to Shifting Government HIV Prevention Mandates

Inspirational Leadership for Latinx Employees in Management or Leadership Roles Using Organizational Assessments to Enhance Southern Organizational and Leadership Capacity

Decolonizing the Way We Lead: Dismantling White Supremacy Work Culture

Track: Opoid Epidemic Track: Opioid Epidemic

More Than Tested, Empowered

Coordinated Care and Partnership: Combating the Opioid Epidemic in Chicago

SSP Program Fidelity: Developing Standards and Best Practices for SSPs

Integrated Harm Reduction Programming: Syringe Service Programs & HIV/HCV Testing

Pathway: PrEP for CBOs

Strategies for Increasing PrEP Uptake Among Black MSM

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Uptake: Awareness and Navigation Among Priority Populations ((es))

• •

Lessons Learned from Washington, D.C.’s PrEP for Women Initiative

PrEP in Paradise: Making PrEP Accessible on Geographically Isolated Islands Let’s Get Mobile, Navigators Without a Clinic

Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV

Voices Heard: HOPWA Safe House or House of Pain?

Leveling up: An intentional Conversation About Power, Privilege and Accountability (Presented by AIDS United)

Honoring the Healing Power of Our Stories’ -The Reunion Project

American Indian / Alaska Native Institute

Track: Leadership Track: Leadership

The Power of Storytelling: Inspiring Change in Communities Impacted by HIV

Healthysexual® – Tools for Honest Conversations about Sexual Risk Fostering Cross-Generational Collaboration in HIV Advocacy

• •

Giving Attitude-HIV Care in a Culture of Intersecting Stigmas

Gentlemen Respecting & Interacting In Truth (G.R.I.T) Healthy Black Masculinity What Unity Looks like for PLWHA (Old Title: Together We Stand) Combatting Stigmas for Persons Living and Aging with HIV

#2019USCA

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SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS

• Track: Public Policy • • • • •

HIV Drug Pricing in the Age of Healthcare Cost Containment Syncing Activism, Advocacy, & Organizing through HIV Criminalization Modernization HIV Advocacy at Home: Building Power in the States

HOPWA Formula Modernization: Updates from the Third Year of Implementation

Federal HIV/AIDS Funding: What’s Happening, What’s Been Done, What’s Next?

Pathway: South Pathway:

Voter Suppression Meets Viral Suppression

Exploring Southern Solutions: A Community-Centered Response to the Needs of the Deep South ((es))

Ain’t That Good News? Overcoming Religious Stigma in the South

What’s in a Story?

Pathway: STD PATHWAY STD

• •

Meeting Communities Where They Are: Condom Distribution Programs Clinic+: STD Services for the Community

Pathway: Structural Interventions Pathway: Structural Interventions

• • • • •

Housing as an End to HIV (Presented by National AIDS Housing Coalition) Expanding Employment Opportunity for Communities Most Impacted by HIV

America’s Affordable Housing Crisis & The Impact on HIV/AIDS

Food Is Medicine: Addressing Racial Equity and Health through Innovative Nutrition Services Connecting the Dots: Uprooting Social Determinants and HIV

Pathway: TRANSand COMMUNI Pathway: Trangender Gender Non-Conforming •

Transgender Leadership in Theory and Practice

Puzzled: The Missing Pieces to Ending the Epidemic among TGNC!

• • • • •

32

Casa Ruby - Featuring Ruby Corado

Scared or Scarred: BLACK TransMen Only

The Conversation: Engaging Transmen into HIV Prevention Practices and Care Knowledge=Power: Demystifying Philanthropy for Trans Leaders Eliminating Barriers to Healthcare for the Trans Community

Track: Trauma-Informed Care

Making TIC Come to Life – Creating Organizational Cultural Changes

Indigenous Peoples, Historical Trauma, & Sexually Transmitted Blood Borne Infections/HIV

Trauma -Informed Care Enhances Client Experience and Expands Staff Support

Building Multi-Level Trauma Informed Care Capacity with Communitybased Organizations

Pathway: U=U Pathway: U=U

Unpacking the U=U Basics: The Message and The Movement

Community Event: Should Undetectable People Disclose Their Status?

Breastfeeding and HIV in the Era of U=U: Research, Policy, and Lived Experiences

U=U for Providers: How to Have the Conversation

Track: Women Track: Women

• • • • • • •

AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families (Presented by The AIDS Institute)

Everyday Discrimination and HIV Risk Perceptions Among Black Women Corrections Partnerships: Criminal Justice System Re-Entry

Overcoming Housing Obstacles: Owning Property and Prioritizing Housing for PLWH

Prevention for Women Engaged in Modern Modalities of Sex Work CRI Purple-Removing The Bandages of Women Living with HIV All About Us: Women and Biomedical HIV Prevention

Track: YouthYouth PTracky:

Empowering Queer Youth of Color in Managing their HIV Care

Put Some “R.E.S.P.E.C.T.” in HIV Prevention for Heterosexual Black Boys

Strategies for Integrating HIV Prevention into Non-traditional Settings for Adolescents

Moonlight Boys: Qualitative Research on the Queer Black Male Experience


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SEPT

05

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE THURSDAY

7:00 am 7:30 am

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE

7:30 am 7:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

Scarlet Oak, Second Level

Meeting Level 4 Foyer Institutes

8:00 am 11:00 am

Centering GBM of Color at the Margins Presented by NASTAD Catholic University, Meeting Level 1

Housing as an End to HIV Presented by National AIDS Housing Coalition Congress, Meeting Level 4

Intersections – Where Sex, HIV, and Faith Meet in Black Communities Coordinated by the NMAC CAP Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

Ho’ōla Lāhui: Supporting Healthy Nations and Healthy Communities LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

Leveling Up: An Intentional Conversation About Power, Privilege and Accountability Presented by AIDS United Mint, Meeting Level 4 Ending the Epidemic: Our Time for Our Solution Presented by the Black AIDS Insitute Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Healthy Aging with HIV: Tips on Managing, Surviving and Thriving Presented by Association for Nurses in AIDS Care Silver Linden, 2nd Floor AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families Presented by The AIDS Institute Howard University, Meeting Level 1

34

Latinx Institute Capitol, Meeting Level 4 South Institute Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 American Indian / Alaska Native Institute Coordinated by the NMAC CAP Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Krazy Poor Asian Gone Wild: Engaging the Asian Community & New Leaders Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in Church Presented by The Balm in Gilead Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor


SEPT

05

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE THURSDAY

9:30 Am 11:00 Am

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

10:00 am 5:00 pm

EXHIBIT HALL

11:30 am 1:30 pm

Marquis 14, Meeting Level 2

Indepence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4 Luncheon Plenary

Making it Real: The Federal Plan to End the Epidemic in America Marquis Ballroom • Lunch will be served Session 1: Workshops

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Fostering Cross-Generational Collaboration in HIV Advocacy Presented by Merck Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 1

Strategies for Increasing PrEP Uptake Among Black MSM Catholic University, Meeting Level 1

Casa Ruby - Featuring Ruby Corado Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3

The Future is Female: WoC Leadership in the HIV Movement Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

Sacred Collaborations: A Comprehensive Look at Interfaith HIV Partnerships Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

PrEP and SSP Strategies to End HIV: Successes and Challenges Archives, Meeting Level 4

Breaking Down Barriers to Care: Expanding Hepatitis Treatment Access Mint, Meeting Level 4

Voices Heard: HOPWA Safe House or House of Pain? Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1

What to Do When “Ending the HIV Epidemic” Comes to Town? Congress, Meeting Level 4

Ask a Clinical Provider - Updates on HIV Health & Wellness ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

Leading with Race Cards Deck: Starting the Conversation Howard University, Meeting Level 1

Healthy Native Youth LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

Co-Morbidities and Aging Related Health Challenges While Living with HIV Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

#2019USCA

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SEPT

05

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE THURSDAY Session 2: Workshops

4:15 pm 6:15 pm

Breaking the Divide Among the Faith Community, LGBTQ, and Persons Living with HIV Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Giving Attitude-HIV Care in a Culture of Intersecting Stigmas Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3

PrEP Cascade Community Best Practices ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

Drivers of Sexual Health Knowledge for Two-Spirit and/or gbM2M Howard University, Meeting Level 1

Expanding Employment Opportunity for Communities Most Impacted by HIV Congress, Meeting Level 4 Transgender Leadership in Theory and Practice Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Supporting Linkage, Retention, and Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to End the Epidemic Archives, Meeting Level 4 Be You. Be HIV Free. A PrEP Campaign for Youth Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Using What You Have: Leveraging Existing Public Health Programs to Address Hepatitis Mint, Meeting Level 4 HIV Drug Pricing in the Age of Healthcare Cost Containment LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

6:30 pm 7:30 pm

AFFINITY SESSIONS

7:00 pm 8:30 pm

WELCOME RECEPTION

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Women, Substance Use and Trauma…. Developing a Trauma-Informed Perspective for Health Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Lessons Learned from Washington, D.C.’s PrEP for Women Initiative Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 More Than Tested, Empowered Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 A Call to Action –EtE Among Black Gay/Bisexual Men University of DC, Meeting Level 1 HIV and Aging Housing Considerations Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

Location: *Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2


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VISIT US AT Booths 300/302 AVITAPHARMACY.COM 37


SEPT

05

THURSDAY

INSTITUTES

7:00 am - 7:30 am Early Risers

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

8:00 am - 11:00 am Institutes

Reaching Gay, Bisexual and other Men Who Have Sex With Men of Color on the Margins

shame, fear and fulfillment in honest and groundbreaking dialogue. This workshop is for every person who wants to share and learn in a safe and affirming space.

Presented by NASTAD Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1

This session will highlight opportunities to increase linkages to PrEP among GBM of color who would benefit from more equitable/targeted strategies, specifically GBM living with disabilities, of trans experience, and undocumented immigrants as well as increase visibility and provide a platform for GBM of color often left out of public health strategy, conversations, and response.

Leveling up: An intentional conversation about power, privilege and accountability

This will be done through a mix of engaging modalities including education, participant discussion, and interactive activities to foster encouragement, collaboration, planning, and action among participants.

Location: Tulip, 2nd Floor Level: Beginner

American Indian / Alaska Native Institute Coordinated by the NMAC CAP Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

The American Indian/Alaska Native Institute will convene the National Native HIV Network (NNHN), which was established in response to the lack of representation in national HIV advocacy for AI/AN communities. The NNHN will discuss formalization of the membership structure and address three areas of focus including the National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day coordination, HHS HIV Implementation Plan, and HIV Biomedical.

Intersections – Where Sex, HIV, and Faith Meet in Black Communities Coordinated by the NMAC CAP Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 Track: Women Level: Beginner

An interactive and lively discussion with focus on 3 of the most important and impactful aspects of life. The African American CAP will discuss stigma,

38 38

Presented by AIDS United Presenters: Tobeya Ibitayo, AIDS United, Washington, DC Teresa Bedzigui, MPH, AIDS United, Washington, DC

This institute will build on AIDS United’s introductory cultural humility workshop from 2018 USCA and will focus on the application of cultural humility toward strengthening institutional accountability, supporting productive engagement and sustaining community impact. During this session, participants will explore the principles of cultural humility and, through guided conversation, reflect on issues of race, power, and privilege as they show up within professional spaces. Using the social and racial justice lenses of this framework, participants will develop and exchange strategies for improving personal and organizational relationships, attitudes, and behaviors.

Latinx Institute: Enough is Enough, Latinx Moving It Forward Coordinated by the NMAC CAP Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Track: Leadership Level: Pending

All members of the Latinx community at USCA are invited to attend the Latinx Institute. The institute will include work sessions where we will begin developing a national action plan to engage, respond to, and create structural/political changes to end the HIV epidemic. Anti-Latinx attacks including the recent shooting in El Paso and the Pulse Nightclub Shooting, combined with anti-immigrant rhetoric and actions, including ICE raids, create many barriers both physical and structural for our communities. As


INSTITUTES

Latinx communities face violence, discrimination, and ongoing fear for safety, barriers and exclusion from health care systems create challenges accessing care. The National Response to End the HIV Epidemic can no longer ignore the socio-political agendas putting Latinxs at greater risk for HIV and that cause fear of seeking treatment. Enough is Enough! Following the workshop, representatives from CDC, NMAC, Latino Commission on AIDS, and Valley AIDS Council will discuss advancing a health care response for HIV prevention and care within the context of today’s political climate. Be a part of the conversation and action to End the Epidemic in the Latinx Community! The Latinx Institute will help set the stage for USCA 2020 in Puerto Rico identifying critical Latinx topics, identify influential Spanish and English speakers/presenters, and diverse Latinx leaders impacting local change on the ground.

Ending the Epidemic: Our Time for Our Solution Presented by the Black AIDS Insitute Presenters: Raniyah Copeland, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Leisha McKinley-Beach, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Maximillian Boykin, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

The Trump administration has released its plan to end the HIV epidemic in the United States by 2030. Unfortunately, the plan keeps the systemic tradition of excluding the factors that impact Black America’s access to resources, stigma, medical mistrust, and social determinants of health are not included in the plan. All too often, plans are created then adapted to serve the Black community; however, those adaptations do not work for us. Come be a part of the creation, not the adaptation. Share how Black communities and leaders are responding to the plan across the country. Join BAI as we strategize around the implementation of the plan and ensure that the needs of our communities are not ignored.

Healthy Aging with HIV: Tips on Managing, Surviving and Thriving Presented by Association for Nurses in AIDS Care Presenters: Carole Treston, RN, Association of Nurses In AIDS Care, Philadelphia, PA David Vance, Ph.D., Association of Nurses In AIDS Care /University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL Dorcas Baker, RN, Association of Nurses In AIDS Care/Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Jeffrey Kwong, DNP, Association of Nurses In AIDS Care /Rutgers University, Newark, NJ Damon L. Jacobs, LMFT, Association of Nurses In AIDS Care, New York City, NY Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Track: Healthcare Providers Level: Intermediate

THURSDAY

SEPT

05

This interactive and informative session will offer clinical perspectives on aspects of aging with HIV, including tips on managing changes, assessing symptoms and capabilities and strategies for thriving and enhancing wellness. This open forum will address quality of life topics and participants will learn ways to enhance their own wellness and safety— or —strategies to guide clients as they thrive and age with HIV. Topics include: Neuro-cognitive changes & impact on daily living, Women’s health through menopause, Keeping your heart and bones healthy, Sexuality and aging: the joy of embracing pleasure and purpose. This session is intended for consumers and providers and is eligible for Continuing Nursing Education credits through ANAC, an accredited provider of CNE through ANCC. (Upon completion of the session, participants will be eligible for 3.0 CNE hours.)

AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families Presented by The AIDS Institute Presenters: Ivy Turnbull, AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Childre, Youth & Families, Washington, DC Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Women Level: Intermediate

The institute will focus on topics that address women and youth. Sub-topics that address broader issues will be explored. Community inclusion will be emphasized, particularly from women living with HIV, into the Federal Plan to End the Epidemic. Presenters will highlight the importance of women within strategic partnerships to address the epidemic.

Housing as an End to HIV Presented by National AIDS Housing Coalition Presenters: Dr. Russell Bennett, Executive Director, National AIDS Housing Coalition, Washington, DC Amy Griffin, Project Officer, Division of State HIV/AIDS Programs, HIV/AIDS Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Rockville, MD Rita Harcrow, Director, Office of HIV/AIDS Housing, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Intermediate

We can’t end HIV in America without housing! This session will explain how Ryan White funds can be used to provide housing and why this is important. We will also learn how HOPWA funds should be best leveraged to provide innovative housing, especially as some grantees are getting gains in funding or preparing for losses in funding. We will hear from community members about their successful housing programs and how they do it—from funding source, housing model, to impact of their program. Come learn how housing is directly tied to better medical outcomes and how to start, renew, or boost your housing program! Housing is healthcare!

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THURSDAY

Ho’ōla Lāhui: Supporting Healthy Nations and Healthy Communities Presented by NMAC CAP Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NH/PI) are often underrepresented in the broader HIV discussion. However, these communities warrant special attention from medical providers and service providers. In fact data shows that NH/PI populations are growing in all 50 states, demonstrating the need to build the capacities of medical and service providers. Building on last year’s institute, this session will focus on delivering services to Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. This session will examine the particular cultural differences that set NH/ PI apart in healthcare settings as well as their unique barriers to care. Within a cultural context, this session will also highlight modern examples of overcoming barriers and building bridges between communities with opposing views. Workshop presenters will equip participants with tools to better serve the NH/PI population in their own communities by providing resources that are culturally appropriate. Learning Objectives By the end of the session, all workshop participants will: 1. Have an increased understanding of the cultural differences that set the NH/PI community apart in healthcare settings 2. Be able to better identify and overcome cultural barriers to care in a real-world setting 3. Have an increased capacity to provide culturally sensitive services to NH/PI individuals

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INSTITUTES

Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in the Church Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

Conversations of sex and sexuality in many churches are silent. Today, many congregations address healthy sexuality openly and directly. However, many churches send messages that sex and sexuality are not topics that are not generally open for discussion. Many feel it is too awkward perhaps because of their own personal struggles or it hits too close to home. For some faith leaders, they tend to avoid the topic of sex and sexuality altogether. The challenge is: saying nothing still sends a message. The impact of silence is usually taboo or shameful undertones around the topic of sex and sexuality in the church. This session will give a comprehensive look at the culture of sex in the church - providing research/data, addressing stigma and sharing controversial cases.

Krazy Poor Asian Gone Wild: Engaging the Asian Community & New Leaders Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1

For full description, see the USCA mobile app.


INSTITUTES

THURSDAY

SEPT

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10:00 am - 5:00 pm Exhibitions

Exhibit Hall Independence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4

Closed during plenary sessions

11:30 - 1:30 pm Plenary Luncheon

Opening Plenary: Making it Real: The Federal Plan to End the Epidemic in America Location: Marriott Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2 Opening Prayer/Dance: Tony Enos (enrolled member, Echota Cherokee Tribe), American Indian Community House, New York, NY Moderator: Joy Reid, Political Analyst for MSNBC and host of AM Joy Presenters: Anthony S. Fauci, MD, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Robert R. Redfield, MD, Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. Laura Cheever, HRSA, Rockville, MD Rear Admiral Michael D. Weahkee, Principal Deputy Director, Indian Health Service

Enos

Fauci

Reid

Ending the HIV epidemic is truly a big, audacious goal. To reach this ambitious goal, the movement needs a clear plan, measurable goals and evaluation tools that community can Redfield Cheever Weahkee implement. As we approach the roll-out of the federal plan to end the HIV epidemic in America, it is important that we hear from our Federal leaders on plans for implementation. Representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Resources and Services Administration, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Indian Health Service will be joined by a panel of community members to discuss the best ways to reach impacted populations and ensure a continuum of care.

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THURSDAY

SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

SESSION 1: 2:00 – 4:00 PM Session 1 Workshops

Fostering Cross-Generational Collaboration in HIV Advocacy

Casa Ruby - Featuring Ruby Corado

Presented by Merck

Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

Presenters: Gabriel Maldonado, CEO, TruEvolution Aquarius Gilmer, Senior Manager of Government Affairs & Advocacy, Southern AIDS Coalition Raniyah Copland, President & CEO, Black AIDS Institute Guillermo Chacón, President, Latino Commission on AIDS Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

Over 1.1 million Americans are living with HIV, and AIDS has killed more than 700,000 people since the start of the epidemic (Kaiser Family Foundation 2019). Advocates were – and remain—on the frontlines in the fight against the epidemic, paving the way for the remarkable progress we’ve seen over the past few decades. Their legacy is being adopted and carried forward by a new generation of advocates striving to end the epidemic. This session, designed to respond to areas of urgent, emergent, and unmet community needs, will convene a diverse group of HIV/AIDS advocates from different generations. In the second half of the session, utilizing their collective knowledge and experiences, the panelist and audience will come together to craft an effective advocacy campaign to address pressing issues facing the HIV community. Learning objectives: • Build knowledge of the historical, current, and future of HIV patient advocacy landscape • Support improved understanding and application best practices in HIV patient advocacy • Foster discussion around the skills and tools needed to conduct patient advocacy today

Healthy Native Youth Coordinated by the NMAC AI/AN CAP Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: American Indian/ Alaska Native Level: Beginner

HealthyNativeYouth.org contains health promotion curricula and resources for American Indian and Alaska Native youth. The site is designed for tribal health educators, teachers, and parents – providing the training and tools needed to access and deliver effective, age-appropriate programs.

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Presenter: Ruby Jade Corado, DC Humanist-Transgender Woman

Ruby was born in San Salvador, El Salvador. She fled a civil war when she was 16 years old. Now 43 years old, she has lived in Washington, DC for the past 27 years where she has devoted the last 20 years to advocate for the inclusion of transgender, genderqueer, and gender non-conforming, gay, lesbian, and bisexual people in mainstream society. She is a self-made, tireless advocate and leader for social justice, and her hard work has helped gain legal protections in Washington, DC. She has fought for LGBTQ human rights, transgender liberation, immigration quality, and access to health care. She has fought against hate crimes/ violence and many other disparities and issues facing the communities that she represents.

Breaking Down Barriers to Care: Expanding Hepatitis Treatment Access Presenters: Michaela Jackson, Hepatitis B Foundation, Doylestown, PA Phil Waters, Harvard Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, Cambridge, MA Dr. Edwin Chapman, Medical Home Development Group, Washington, DC Jane Pan, HBI DC, Washington, DC Moderator: Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Location: Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

Despite the ability to prevent and treat hepatitis B and C, many people do not have access to these life saving medications. Some of the biggest barriers to care include treatment restrictions put in place from both public and private payers, stigma, and a limited number of providers who can and are willing to treat hepatitis B and C. This session will explore restrictions on HBV and HCV treatment and ways that programs, providers, and communities are overcoming these challenges.


SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

THURSDAY

Sacred Collaborations: A Comprehensive Look at Interfaith HIV Partnerships Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

Partnerships are defined as collaborative relationships between individuals and organizations. The purpose of these relationships is to work toward shared goals that all parties have as a common interest. Partnerships are intricate vehicles for delivering practical solutions to societal and community issues. For years, persons from various faith traditions have worked in partnership to support efforts to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in their varying faith traditions and communities. This session will look at past, present and future collaborative endeavors through various faith traditions, the role these partnerships play in prevention and linkage to care, and as opportunities that attendees can partake in.

What to Do When “Ending the HIV Epidemic” Comes to Town? Presenters: American Academy of HIV Medicine HIVMA NASTAD Southern AIDS Coalition Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: AAHIVM Level: Beginner

Ending the HIV Epidemic (EtE): A Plan for America” will officially swing into action as a new federal initiative in 2020. Designed to escalate HIV outreach, prevention, and care services in the states and counties hardest hit by HIV, EtE will directly affect HIV organizations and public health programs already serving these areas. How can our organizations best collaborate with EtE to ensure that local HIV prevention, testing, and services are expanded while cultural norms and priorities in each area are fully understood and respected? In this session, experienced HIV service providers and organizations working in these areas will discuss their highest priorities for this new initiative, their concerns, and how they plan to interact with EtE to support its integration into the existing HIV/AIDS response in each area.

Leading with Race Cards Deck: Starting the Conversation Presenters: Moisés Agosto-Rosario, NMAC, Washington, DC Joanna Lopez, MSPH, NMAC, Washington, DC Rodolfo Vega, Ph.D., JSI, Boston, MA Terrance Payton, DC Dept of Health, Washington, DC

SEPT

05

Location: Howard, Meeting Level 1 Pathway: Treatment Level: Beginner

The leading with race card decks serves as a tool to understand and navigate the intersection of race and HIV/AIDS in conversations that arise with clients and co-workers. The card deck should further knowledge about racism in health and HIV in communities of color. This workshop will focus on how to use the Leading with Race Cards and how organizations can normalize the conversation about race and health, especially HIV/AIDS. The NMAC team will describe results from a pre and post-implementation study with the card deck and the DC Health Department will provide feedback based on experience of using the card deck in their organization.

Co-Morbidities and Aging-Related Health Challenges While Living with HIV Presenters: W. David Hardy, MD, George Washington University, Washington, DC Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: Aging Level: Advanced

As individuals living with HIV and aging, it is becoming increasingly important to identify and manage co-morbidities that may increase the risk of aging-related conditions, such as cardiovascular complications, kidney disease, osteoporosis, and bone fractures. It is important to consider the interaction of these co-morbidities along with HIV to optimize health. In addition to co-morbidities, those aging with HIV may also experience social and mental challenges. This workshop will address the impact of these comorbidities with HIV and how to manage competing demands.

Strategies for Increasing PrEP Uptake Among Black MSM Presenters: Andrew Ellis, Primary Care Development Corporation, New York, NY Henrietta Croswell, Primary Care Development Corporation, New York, NY Nicole Andrews, Primary Care Development Corporation, New York, NY Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: PrEP for CBOs Level: Intermediate

This workshop is designed to deliver tools to Health Care organizations and Community Based Organizations who currently provide PrEP, enabling them to improve their capacity for increasing PrEP uptake among Black MSM’s and in effect, reduce HIV transmission in this key population. These tools will focus on addressing distrust in the health care system, resulting from trauma of the historical Black experiences. At this session’s conclusion, participants will learn the fundamentals of; providing culturally and linguistically appropriate care, trauma-informed care, and creating a safe and inviting space.

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THURSDAY

The Future is Female: WoC Leadership in the HIV Movement Presenters: Morénike Giwa Onaiwu, Women’s HIV Research Collaborative, Houston, TX Sandra Agola, ATN-YEAH, Chapel Hill, NC Dazon Dixon Diallo, Sisterlove; WHRC, Atlanta, GA Naiymah Sanchez, WHRC, Philadelphia, PA Holly Dakkus, HART/HPTN Tana Pradia, PWN-USA, Houston, TX Valerie Rochester, Women’s HIV Research Collaborative; AIDS United, Washington, DC Abigail Echo-Hawk, Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle, WA Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

From the early years of the epidemic to the present, the HIV movement has been a formidable vehicle of change -- largely due to the tireless efforts of cisgender and transgender women of color. It is often stated that we “stand upon the shoulders of giants,” and many of these giants have remained committed to laboring for the HIV movement. Yet, the importance of cultivating new leaders among women of color to work alongside current ones and eventually assume greater responsibility in the movement is paramount—especially as the demographics, needs, and perspectives of the HIV community continue to evolve. This session will highlight factors relevant to acknowledging, supporting, and developing women of color as leaders in the HIV movement. Existing and aspiring leaders (cis and trans women of color) will discuss opportunities, challenges, and crucial issues as well as resources for helping emerging leaders, supporting youth leaders, and sustaining seasoned ones.

PrEP and SSP Strategies to End HIV: Successes and Challenges Presenters: Michael Kharfen, BA, DC Department of Health, Washington, DC Mario J. Pérez, MPH, County of Los Angeles, Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA Silvana Mazzella, MA, Prevention Point Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Michael Kilkenny, MD, MS, Cabell-Huntington Health Department, Huntington, WV Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: CDC Level: Intermediate

Presenters will provide an overview of their current PrEP/SSP program, including successes and/or challenges and lessons learned with program implementation. Additionally, there will be a focus on how lessons learned may inform future efforts related to Ending HIV Epidemic Initiative. Topics will include: Decreasing racial/ethnic disparities of PrEP uptake in neighborhoods with the highest rates of new HIV-diagnoses; addressing barriers related to PrEP service delivery that contribute to racial/ethnic

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SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

disparities in neighborhoods with the highest rates of HIV incidence; engaging local stakeholders to increase overall uptake among most vulnerable social networks; monitoring the continuum of PrEP services to improve program delivery and address racial/ethnic disparities; increasing SSP uptake in areas with the highest rates of new HIV diagnoses; addressing barriers related to SSP service delivery in areas with the highest rates of HIV incidence; engaging local stakeholders to increase overall uptake among most vulnerable social networks.

Voices Heard: HOPWA Safe House or House of Pain? Presenters: Robert Pompa, LVHN CHS Jim Thorpe, PA Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV Level: Beginner

Research has shown that housing is the greatest unmet service need for people living with the disease. Housing is healthcare. Stable, affordable housing offers the best opportunity for persons living with HIV/AIDS to access drug therapies, treatments, and supportive services that will enhance the quality of life for themselves and their families. This workshop is meant to give voice to PLHIV and highlight some experiences in pursuit of housing assistance through the HOPWA program and/or other housing resources while advocating for more trauma-informed approaches to the delivery of such services.

Ask a Clinical Provider - Updates on HIV Health & Wellness Presenters: Carole Treston, RN, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Philadelphia, PA Jeffrey Kwong, DNP, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Rutgers University School of Nursing, Newark, NJ Marik Moen, Ph.D., Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD Dorcas Baker, RN, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Lisa Scotti, CRNP, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, MD Damon Jacobs, LMFT, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, New York, NY Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Health Care Providers Level: Beginner

The Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC) presents an update and dialogue on HIV & hepatitis treatments, managing symptoms, smoking cessation & other risk reduction, U=U, PrEP, sexual health, mental health screening, wellness, provider communications, and overall health. Come ask our panel of nurses, nurse practitioners, therapists, and psychologists the questions you’ve been wondering about.


SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

THURSDAY

SEPT

05

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Presentations

Poster Presentations Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level 1 For a full listing of Poster Presentations please refer to page 100.

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THURSDAY

SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

SESSION 2: 4:15 – 6:15 PM Session 2 Workshops

Breaking the Divide Among the Faith Community, LGBTQ, and Persons Living with HIV

Expanding Employment Opportunity for Communities Most Impacted by HIV

Presented by The Balm in Gilead

Presenters: Brett Andrews, PRC, San Francisco, CA Liza Conyers, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA Mark Misrok, National Working Positive Coalition, New York, NY Aisha Muhammad, Office of HIV/AIDS Housing, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC Tim Young, Open Health Care Clinic, Baton Rouge, LA April Watkins, GMHC, New York, NY

Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

Spirituality and religion are significant to many people living with HIV. It has been defined as a multidimensional phenomenon which improves health and the overall quality of life. With that, there are many who are constantly at a point of reconciling their faith because of negative past experiences in faith settings. This interactive session will look at opportunities to address division among the faith community, LGBTQ individuals, and persons living with HIV while facilitating dialogue in an effort to identify solutions. Attendees will have an opportunity to share their voice in hopes of coming to a common ground amongst varying viewpoints.

PrEP Cascade Community Best Practices Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters: Sable K. Nelson, NMAC, Washington, DC Moisés Agosto-Rosario, NMAC, Washington DC Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Treatment Level: Intermediate

Participants from eight jurisdictional were convened between 2016 and 2017. A subset from those eight jurisdictional workgroups participated in a Learning Collaborative which occurred both in-person as well as through follow-up video calls in the Summer of 2018. The participants shared several successes and challenges as it relates to increasing PrEP awareness, access, utilization and adherence in communities of color. The most important element of our strategy was based on the expertise and experience in the field of the frontline HIV prevention workforce. NMAC acted in the role of convener and facilitator of the process. Leveraging their lived experiences and practical knowledge from participants from the eight jurisdictional workgroups and those who participated in the Learning Collaborative, NMAC developed its’ PrEP Cascade Best Practices for each of the “steps” of the PrEP Cascade (awareness, access, utilization, and adherence).

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Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Beginner

HIV care and prevention programs are applying ingenuity and expertise to develop and sustain programs to address the self-determined employment needs and goals of individuals they serve. This training will spotlight how HOPWA grantees are being funded to launch employment initiatives, with an overview of the development of a HOPWA-supported HIV employment program in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Two additional examples of HIV care and prevention employment programs will be presented for representation of diverse service models and funding strategies. Recent findings will be discussed from a pilot research survey of the employment needs, issues and strategies of people living with HIV, and available linkages for community-based employment services outside of HIV programs will be described.

Transgender Leadership in Theory and Practice Presenters: Tori Cooper, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, College Park, GA Beautifull Devynne, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, College Park, GA Bri Walker, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, College Park, GA Queen Hatcher-Johnson, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, College Park, GA Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

Four Black transgender women will co-facilitate a discussion addressing best practices to engage, empower and employ people living with HIV, Black people and transgender people: particularly Black transgender women living with HIV. We will provide problem areas, historical context, best practices, and solutions for those who are the most marginalized within an already marginalized HIV community. One of the goals in this group facilitation is to model what effective leadership looks like by and for Black, trans persons living with HIV.


SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

THURSDAY

Supporting Linkage, Retention, and Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to End the Epidemic Presenters: Bisrat Abraham, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, NYC, NY Susa Coffey, University of California, San Francisco, CA Suleima Salgado, Georgia Department of Public Health, Atlanta, GA John Weiser, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta GA Robyn Neblett-Fanfair, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Christie Olejemeh, DC Department of Health, Washington, DC Jieri Sumitani, Grady Memorial Hospital Infectious Disease Program, Atlanta, GA Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: CDC Level: Intermediate

The session will include interactive, case-based presentations with leaders from programs on the forefront of success linking persons newly diagnosed with HIV to care, keeping them in care, and initiating antiretroviral therapy rapidly. The goal of these strategies is viral suppression, improved health outcomes, and prevention of HIV transmission.

Be You. Be HIV Free. A PrEP Campaign for Youth Presenter: Donna Futterman, Adolescent AIDS Program, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

Nationally, youth aged 13-24 account for 21 percent of new HIV infections. PrEP is a highly effective HIV prevention tool but it is greatly underused by young people most at risk for HIV infection, including young men of color who have sex with men and young transgender women. One reason for the lack of PrEP uptake among youth is the lack of awareness about PrEP efficacy and availability, which is partly due to PrEP only recently being approved by the FDA for use by adolescents. To inform a new social marketing campaign aimed at promoting PrEP to high-risk youth, the Adolescent AIDS Program (AAP) commissioned a market research study to identify motivators and barriers to PrEP use among young YMSM and trans women of color. This workshop will explore the key findings from our market research, describe the campaign’s creative process and social marketing strategy, and share the campaign’s print and video assets.

Using What You Have: Leveraging Existing Public Health Programs to Address Hepatitis Presenters: Laura Weinberg, Denver Public Health, Denver, CO Christine Simon, National Nurse-Led Care Consortium, Philadelphia, PA Colleen Lane, Whitman Walker Health, Washington, DC Kristine Gonnella, National Nurse-Led Care Consortium - Cost-Benefit Evaluation of Universal HCV Screening and Comprehensive Treatment Programs Alexandra Bradley, HIPS - Effective Peer Navigation in a Syringe Service Program Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4

SEPT

05

Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

With highly effective vaccines that can prevent Hepatitis A and B, and treatments that can cure individuals of Hepatitis C in as little as eight weeks, eliminating viral Hepatitis from the United States is more possible than ever before. However, it will take leveraging the existing public health infrastructure and integrating partnerships to deliver a successful coordinated system of care. This session will explore ways to incorporate hepatitis services into existing public health programs.

HIV Drug Pricing in the Age of Healthcare Cost Containment Presenters: Tim Horn, NASTAD, Washington, DC Amy Killelea, NASTAD, Washington, DC Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will review the fundamentals of antiretroviral drug pricing and costs in the United States and describe emerging public and private policies with potential impact on spending and access across the health care system.

Giving Attitude-HIV Care in a Culture of Intersecting Stigmas Presenters: Karen McKinnon, Northeast/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center, New York, NY Francine Cournos, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY Daria Boccher-Lattimore, Northeast/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center, New York, NY Adam Thompson, Northeast/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center, Voorhees, NJ Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Health care provider (HCP) attitudes about HIV, mental health, and substance use have been shown, separately, to impact the quality of care delivered as well as clients’ engagement and retention in care. For people living with HIV (PLH), these stigmas often come together and are detrimental to physical and mental health outcomes. This workshop will present results from two recent HCP surveys and review what’s known about these intersecting stigmas, how they affect quality of care, and interventions designed to reduce the negative health outcomes associated with them. We will share approaches that HCPs and PLH can use to improve the culture of care in different settings so that care teams and clients can overcome the negative consequences of intersecting stigmas. The workshop will include discussion, practical examples, and interactive exercises to further our understanding and ability to address stigma and create opportunities to strengthen therapeutic alliance and client empowerment.

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SEPT

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THURSDAY

Drivers of Sexual Health Knowledge for TwoSpirit and/or gbM2M Presenters: Harlan Pruden, BC Centre for Disease Control/Clinical Prevention Services/ Chee Mamuk, Vancouver, BC Travis Salway, BC Centre for Disease Control/Clinical Prevention Services, Vancouver, BC Theodora Consolacion, BC Centre for Disease Control/Clinical Prevention Services, Vancouver, BC Jannie Leung, BC Centre for Disease Control/Clinical Prevention Services, Vancouver, BC Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Rarely are Two-Spirit and/or Indigenous gay, bi, or MSM (2S/gbMSM) men included in research projects that centers their experiences and ways. Using the Indigenous responses from a Canadian National 2014-15 Sex Now data set, this study explores the drivers of sexual health knowledge with the 2S/gbMSM community(ies). As a result of subject matter, the authors utilized Indigenous ways of knowing theoretical, methodological and epistemological while working to find a balance with western ways of knowing. The following examines the differences in drivers between those who use the term Two-Spirit and those who identify as Indigenous gay, bi or MSM men. This study also examines differences between those living in urban settings and those living in non-urban (suburban, small city/town, rural or remote) settings. Findings from this study can inform public health initiatives that better address the unique context of these groups.

Women, Substance Use and Trauma…Developing a Trauma-Informed Perspective for Health Presenters: Carole Treston, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Philadelphia, PA Marik Moen, Ph.D. RN, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care/University of Maryland School of Nursing Baltimore, MD Nikki E. Akparewa, RN, MPH, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JACQUES Initiative, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD

SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

of CNE through ANCC. (Upon completion of the session, participants will be eligible for 3.0 CNE hours.)

Lessons Learned from Washington, D.C.’s PrEP for Women Initiative Presenters: Ashlee Wimberly, Washington AIDS Partnership, Washington, DC Rachel Browning, MPH, Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington, Washington, DC David Cornell, MBA, DNP, FNP, AAHIVS, Mary’s Center, Washington, DC Diane Jones, LICSW, Family and Medical Counseling Service, Washington, DC Allison Kimmel, Boston University School of Public Health, Washington, DC Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: PrEP for CBOs Level: Intermediate

The PrEP for Women Initiative is a public-private partnership between the Washington AIDS Partnership and the DC Department of Health’s HIV/ AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Administration (HAHSTA). The initiative aims to increase PrEP uptake among women of color through grantmaking, which supports integration of PrEP into existing medical services; PrEP and sexual health outreach, education, and training in the community and for CBOs and health providers; and a social marketing campaign. This workshop will feature a panel of representatives from three communitybased organizations funded by the initiative. Participants will discuss their first hand experiences building PrEP programs, including successes and challenges on the patient and organizational level, and how those have informed their current work. There have been a number of lessons learned around providing PrEP education and services, from what settings work best for uptake to messaging, which will help inform other PrEP programs for women of color.

More Than Tested, Empowered Presenters: Mojgan Zare, Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition, Inc., Atlanta, GA Louise Vincent, Urban Survivors Union, Greensboro, NC

Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Pathway: Health Care Providers Level: Beginner

Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

In this session, we will focus on the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity and co-occurring epidemics of HIV, violence, substance use, and trauma. We will examine the additive effect of each of these epidemics on health and wellbeing and to the economic status of women living with HIV. The conditions of social and economic disadvantage and discrimination that contribute to poor social determinants of health for women living with HIV and substance use will be examined. Through interactive case studies, basic principles of trauma informed care as part of an approach to addressing traumatic stress in women living with HIV and experiencing substance use disorder will create a shared learning experience for participants.

This project is a collaborative effort between Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition (AHRC), Peoples Harm Reduction Alliance (PHRA), Urban Survivors Union (USU), and National Viral Hepatitis Round Table (NVHR) to improve linkage to care for People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs) through removing barriers, specifically stigma. Previous models of linkage to Hepatitis C (HCV) care interventions are often clinician-led and not drug user led, which is paramount to increasing access to HCV care. This project represents a successful national drug user led collaborative effort to increase access to care at all steps of the HCV care continuum in three communities in the United States. Evidence supports the inclusion of active PWIDs at every phase of research and evaluation not only to strengthen the study but to strengthen the individual and community.

*This session is intended for consumers and providers and is eligible for Continuing Nursing Education credits through ANAC, an accredited provider

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SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

HIV and Aging - Housing Considerations Presenters: Charles King, Housing Works, New York, NY Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

By 2030, the number individuals 50 years and older living with HIV 50 is expected to rise to 70%. For many, HIV and aging can be overwhelming. In addition to navigating the healthcare system to address medical concerns, some older PLWHIV must think about where they will live, who will take care of them and how to pay for housing. This workshop will address housing concerns and other related concerns for aging PLWHIV. Homeownership may be a viable option for some areas in the country and it can become an integral part of their HIV/AIDS housing continuum as well. Most communities address only emergency to long-term rental assistance options in their HIV/AIDS Housing continuums. Many rental assistance programs are being strained and are being depleted quickly, particularly emergency or short-term options as longer-term rental assistance options are becoming more difficult to access, i.e., HOPWA, Shelter Plus Care slots, Section 8 vouchers, etc. Investigating and integrating homeownership as an option may relieve these stressors.

THURSDAY

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05

A Call to Action – EtE Among Black Gay/Bisexual Men Presenter: Dr. Darrin Johnson, BU Wellness Network Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1

Black gay men pose the greatest risk for contracting HIV in 2019. Black gay men have a one-in-two chance of contracting HIV within their lifetime, and they are least likely to reach viral suppression. As discussions about ending the epidemic increase, this workshop will examine tools, strategies, and barriers to ending the epidemic among Black gay/bisexual men.

7:00 – 8:30 PM Opening Reception

Welcome Reception Location: Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2

Welcome to DC! Join NMAC and the DC USCA Host Committee for a welcome reception for all USCA attendees. Enjoy an evening of entertainment, fellowship, and a Special Exhibition Ball featuring Dominique Jackson, Mother Elektra from “Pose!”

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY 7:00 am 7:30 am

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE

7:30 am 7:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

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06

Scarlet Oak, Second Level

Meeting Level 4 Foyer Session 3: Workshops

9:00 am 11:00 am

Healthysexual® – Tools for Honest Conversations About Sexual Risk Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

America’s Affordable Housing Crisis & the Impact on HIV/AIDS Congress, Meeting Level 4

Keeping Up with the HIV CURE: Taking Care to Include Women Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2

Puzzled: The Missing Pieces to Ending the Epidemic among TGNC! Dogwood, 2nd Floor

Time to C.H.A.T. Event for ASO Professionals/ Case Manager University of DC , Meeting Level 1

Meeting at the Intersection: Black Gay Men & Black Transwomen Howard University, Meeting Level 1

How Do We DIAGNOSE HIV As Soon As Possible? Archives, Meeting Level 4

Hepatitis Elimination in the Era of Ending the Epidemic Mint, Meeting Level 4

Indigenous Peoples, Historical Trauma, & Sexually Transmitted Blood Borne Infections/HIV Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Overcoming Housing Obstacles: Owning Property and Prioritizing Housing for PLWH Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3

Honoring the Healing Power of Our Stories’ -The Reunion Project LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

PEP - Pushed Under the Rug? Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3

Survivors Gifts: Thriving & Supporting Wellness, Resilience & Emotional Health Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

Strategies for Integrating HIV Prevention into Non-traditional Settings for Adolescents Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Integrated Harm Reduction Programming: Syringe Service Programs & HIV/HCV Testing Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 4

9:30 Am 11:00 Am

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

10:00 am 5:00 pm

EXHIBIT HALL

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You CAN Sit With Us: Building an ETE Plan ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

The Role of Black Gay Men in the Ending the Epidemic Plan, Our Seats at the Tables, What You Need to Know. Scarlet Oak, Meeting Level 4 Women’s Institute: Building a Women’s Culture of Wellness: From Trauma to Resiliency Catholic University, Meeting Level 2

Marquis 14, Meeting Level 2

Indepence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4 (closed during plenary sessions)


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY

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06

11:30 am 1:30 pm

Luncheon Plenary

WHAT WE LIVE FOR: CELEBRATING THE POWER OF THE COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE, MOTIVATE, AND INSPIRE CHANGE Presented by Gilead Sciences Meeting Level 2

1:30 pm 2:00 pm

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

1:30 Pm 5:30 Pm

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level 1

Marquis 16, Meeting Level 2 Session 4: Workshops

Using Media to Amplify Your Mission: Learn From GLAAD on How to Pitch Your Own Narrative Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

Peer-Support: Adapting an EBI to Achieve Viral Load Suppression Among LYLWH Catholic University, Meeting Level 1

Understanding Stigma Through the Experiences of Participants in an HIV Leadership Program Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3

Everyday Discrimination and HIV Risk Perceptions Among Black Women LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

HIV/AIDS and Trauma - Informed Congregations Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Partnering for Public Health Response to End the HIV Epidemic Archives, Meeting Level 4

Celebrating Our Magic Toolkit Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Unpacking the U=U Basics: The Message and the Movement Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Implementation Research and the Role of NIAD’s Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) in the Federal Plan to End the HIV Epidemic ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

The Start of a START Program, Two Years of Data Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 SSP Program Fidelity: Developing Standards and Best Practices for SSPs Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Synching Activism, Advocacy, & Organizing Through HIV Criminalization Modernization University of DC, Meeting Level 1

Addressing the Needs of the HIV 50+ to End the HIV Epidemic in 2030. Get Your “Advocate” on Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

HIV Testing to Gay and Bisexual Males on College Campuses Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1

Connect the Risk Dots…. STI, IPV, Trauma and HIV Outcomes Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

Scared or Scarred: BLACK TransMen Only Congress, Meeting Level 4

Making TIC Come to Life - Creating Organizational Cultural Changes Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3

The ABCs of Hepatitis Mint, Meeting Level 4 Youth Institute: Get the Gig BootCamp Youth Professional Toolkit Clinic Tulip, 2nd Floor

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IMPORTANT FACTS FOR BIKTARVY®

This is only a brief summary of important information about BIKTARVY and does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your condition and your treatment.

(bik-TAR-vee)

MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT BIKTARVY

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF BIKTARVY

BIKTARVY may cause serious side effects, including:

BIKTARVY may cause serious side effects, including:  Those in the “Most Important Information About BIKTARVY” section.  Changes in your immune system. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new symptoms after you start taking BIKTARVY.  Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys. If you develop new or worse kidney problems, they may tell you to stop taking BIKTARVY.  Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat.  Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain.  The most common side effects of BIKTARVY in clinical studies were diarrhea (6%), nausea (6%), and headache (5%).

 Worsening of Hepatitis B (HBV) infection. If you have both HIV-1 and HBV, your HBV may suddenly get worse if you stop taking BIKTARVY. Do not stop taking BIKTARVY without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to check your health regularly for several months.

ABOUT BIKTARVY BIKTARVY is a complete, 1-pill, once-a-day prescription medicine used to treat HIV-1 in adults. It can either be used in people who have never taken HIV-1 medicines before, or people who are replacing their current HIV-1 medicines and whose healthcare provider determines they meet certain requirements. BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS. Do NOT take BIKTARVY if you also take a medicine that contains:  dofetilide  rifampin  any other medicines to treat HIV-1

BEFORE TAKING BIKTARVY Tell your healthcare provider if you:  Have or have had any kidney or liver problems, including hepatitis infection.  Have any other health problems.  Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if BIKTARVY can harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant while taking BIKTARVY.  Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in breast milk.

These are not all the possible side effects of BIKTARVY. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking BIKTARVY.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take:

Take BIKTARVY 1 time each day with or without food.

 Keep a list that includes all prescription and overthe-counter medicines, antacids, laxatives, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist.  BIKTARVY and other medicines may affect each other. Ask your healthcare provider and pharmacist about medicines that interact with BIKTARVY, and ask if it is safe to take BIKTARVY with all your other medicines.

Get HIV support by downloading a free app at

MyDailyCharge.com

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/ medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with BIKTARVY.

HOW TO TAKE BIKTARVY GET MORE INFORMATION  This is only a brief summary of important information about BIKTARVY. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more.  Go to BIKTARVY.com or call 1-800-GILEAD-5.  If you need help paying for your medicine, visit BIKTARVY.com for program information.

BIKTARVY, the BIKTARVY Logo, DAILY CHARGE, the DAILY CHARGE Logo, KEEP MOTIVATING, LOVE WHAT’S INSIDE, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. Version date: December 2018 © 2019 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. BVYC0104 02/19


KEEP MOTIVATING. Because HIV doesn’t change who you are. BIKTARVY® is a complete, 1-pill, once-a-day prescription medicine used to treat HIV-1 in certain adults. BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS.

Ask your healthcare provider if BIKTARVY is right for you. To learn more, visit BIKTARVY.com.

Please see Important Facts about BIKTARVY, including important warnings, on the previous page and visit BIKTARVY.com.


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY

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06

Session 5: Workshops

4:15 pm 6:15 pm

Ending the HIV Epidemic A Community Based Approach Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

Trauma-Informed Care Enhances Client Experience and Expands Staff Support Shaw, Meeting Level 3

A Conversation with Cecilia Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3

Ending the Epidemic: The Role of HRSA Programs and Funding Howard University, Meeting Level 1

Mykki Taylor Discussion University of DC, Meeting Level 1 Community Planning Session Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Positively Fearless Presented by Janssen Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Breastfeeding and HIV in the Era of U=U: Research, Policy, and Lived Experiences Archives, Meeting Level 4

The Conversation: Engaging Transmen into HIV Prevention Practices and Care LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 HIV Advocacy at Home: Building Power in the States Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Penalizing Blackness: Anti-Black Racism in HIV and LGBTQ+ Organizations Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

NIH Priorities for HIV and HIV-Related Research Congress, Meeting Level 4

Viva PrEP: A Community-Driven PrEP Campaign for the Latinx Community ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

Coordinated Care and Partnership: Combating the Opioid Epidemic in Chicago Mint, Meeting Level 4

Unpacking “MSM”: How Evolving Language will Help End the Epidemic Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3

Corrections Partnerships: Criminal Justice System Re-entry Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Social Security Disability Benefits, Work and Aging Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

Empowering Queer Youth of Color in Managing Their HIV Care Catholic University, Meeting Level 1

Exposé: Scandals in Sacred Settings Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1

6:30 pm 7:30 pm

AFFINITY SESSIONS

7:00 pm 8:30 pm

SCREENING AND DISCUSSION PANEL OF “5B”

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*Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Presented by Janssen (logos will be added in last draft after ALL workshops are in place because they move around) Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2


NCE O ER S C I ET I G M V A S

Expertise in HIV, PrEP, HCV, and LGBTQ+ Care 340B & TPA Services:

Pharmacy Services:

∞ Cost Saving TPA Services

∞ Prior Authorization Teams

∞ Customized Data Reporting

∞ Adherence Programs

∞ Dedicated Account Manager

∞ Financial Assistance

∞ Policy & Procedure Assistance

∞ Refill Reminders

∞ Audit Assistance

∞ Benefits Coordination

∞ Strategic Consulting Partnership

∞ Free Delivery ∞ Pharmacist Support 24/7

VISIT US AT Booths 300/302 AVITAPHARMACY.COM


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FRIDAY

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 3: Workshops

Keeping Up with the HIV CURE: Taking Care to Include Women Presenters: Danielle M. Campbell, MPH, AIDS Treatment Activist Coalition, Los Angeles, CA Lynda Dee, JD, AIDS Action Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Liz Barr, PhD, ACTG Community Scientific Subcommittee, Baltimore, MD  Kimberly Parker, PhD, MPH,  Texas Woman’s University, Frisco, TX Eileen Scully, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 3 Track: EtE Level: Intermediate

Women’s consistent underrepresentation in HIV cure efforts presents several moral and ethical considerations. Over half the world’s population with HIV are women, yet women are minimally, if at all, included in HIV cure trials. If and when there is an HIV cure, will women experience the same scientific benefits or adverse events as other populations that are more well represented in clinical and social science research?  This workshop will: 1) Overview current HIV Cure science strategies including those that have yielded the world’s only “cured” individuals, 2) Describe the state of women’s participation in clinical and social science research, and 3) Address scalable strategies for the ethical inclusion of women in HIV Cure efforts. 

A Café Scientifique style discussion will take place with participants during the session. Panel presenters will discuss science-based aspects of a women centered HIV cure aimed at stimulating an organic, culture focused dialogue utilizing SMS text technology.

Healthysexual® – Tools for Honest Conversations About Sexual Risk

with clients about individual and community HIV risk. Participants will gain access to prevention tools they can use back home, including an interactive Doctor Discussion Guide that focuses on honest conversations with healthcare providers. The workshop will also include a panel discussion on how two community leaders plan on taking these educational resources back to their communities and put them into practice in their own organizations.

Time to C.H.A.T. Event for ASO Professionals/ Case Manager Presented by ViiV Healthcare Moderator: Marc Meachem Presenters: Shelly Lindahl, MPAS,PA-C, AAHIVS, Community Medical Liaison Octavia - ASO Ambassador Kelvin - ASO Ambassador Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1

At this live talk, discover a treatment option for adults new to HIV-1 treatment and learn about C.H.A.T., a tool to help your clients start the conversation about treatment. C.H.A.T. stands for Communicate, Hear about a treatment, Ask questions, and Talk with your clients. This workshop is designed to provide you, as an ASO professional, a tool to help you have productive treatment discussions with your clients. That’s important because there are many conversations people need to have when they receive an HIV diagnosis. These conversations can occur with family, friends, a support team, healthcare providers and ASO professionals. Preparing your clients for these conversations may enable them to become their own best advocates in their personal healthcare.

Presented by Gilead Sciences

Learning Objectives:

Presenters: Blake Rowley, Community Liaison Leslie Medeiros, Community Liaison

Raise awareness of and educate about a treatment option for patients new to HIV-1 treatment

Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

Inspire and empower People Living with HIV, wherever they are in their journey, with real, relatable stories and experiences (Patient and ASO Pro Ambassadors)

This session will introduce staff working in the HIV prevention community to educational resources designed to help enable honest conversations

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SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

Provide a forum to demonstrate effective dialogue between ASO professionals and patients

Support clients in developing an active voice in their own healthcare

How do we Diagnose HIV As Soon As Possible? Presenters: Elizabeth DiNenno, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Kevin Delaney, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Weyman Edwards, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, San Bernadino, CA John Sapero, HIV Prevention Program, AZ Department of Health Services, Phoenix, AZ Stephanie Hubbard, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY Bryan Collins, Virginia Department of Health, Richmond Virginia Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: CDC Level: Intermediate

The goal of Ending the HIV Epidemic, a plan for America (EtHE) is to reduce new HIV infections in the US by 75 percent in five years, and by 90 percent in ten years. The ability to DIAGNOSE all people with HIV as early as possible after infection will be required. We will review novel and successful strategies that could ensure that all people in the US receive an HIV test at least once and make testing more readily available to those at ongoing risk. Speakers will outline both baseline data on testing coverage and frequency in the EtHE jurisdictions compared to the rest of the US, and review strategies such as self-test distribution, testing in new locations such as pharmacies and other retail stores, and programs that increase HIV screening in Community Health Centers and other clinical settings. This will hopefully generate a discussion of best practices for HIV testing within the EtHE.

Indigenous Peoples, Historical Trauma, & Sexually Transmitted Blood Borne Infections/HIV Presenters: Gabrielle Evans, Legacy Project, Greensboro, NC Harlan Prudan, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC Tyler Adamson, Legacy Project, Baltimore, MD Russell Campbell, HANC Deputy Director/Community Partners Coordinator, Seattle, WA Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) account for only two percent of the United States population, yet rank fourth-highest among people living with HIV. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported a 46 percent increase in HIV diagnosis from 2010 - 2016 in AI/AN overall and a 86 percent increase among AI/AN gay and bisexual men. Contributing factors to the increase of HIV diagnosis among this population include stigma, discrimination, low HIV prevention literacy, high rates of poverty, and medical mistrust as a result of historical trauma including but not limited to unethical sterilization and erasure of Indigenous peoples. This workshop will focus on the importance of engaging Indigenous peoples around

FRIDAY

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sexually transmitted blood borne infections (STBBIs), HIV and HIV research, the impact of historical trauma among this population, and how to address historical trauma to move forward in HIV prevention and retention in care.

Overcoming Housing Obstacles: Owning Property and Prioritizing Housing for PLWH Presenters: Shannon Farrar, Carolinas CARE Partnership, Charlotte, NC Shaunte Dickson, Carolinas CARE Partnership, Charlotte, NC Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting level 3 Track: Women Level: Intermediate

Many organizations are facing barriers when attempting to improve the housing status for PLWH, especially women, including the lack of affordable housing in their communities, and challenges faced by clients with previous involvement in the criminal justice system. Even with vouchers, funding for double deposits, and intensive supportive services, it’s still very difficult to find safe, affordable, decent housing. During this workshop, we’ll look at other options, and do a deep dive on ways that non-profits can increase the number of “affordable” properties in their communities, by funding set-asides, developing new housing, and preserving existing affordable housing. We’ll discuss creating partnerships, being inclusive of PLWH (especially women), being trauma-informed in all aspects of providing housing and housing services, developing a funding plan, and avoiding (or working through) pitfalls from the acquisition and rehab of property to the day-to-day management.

PEP - Pushed Under the Rug? Presenters: Mario Forte, Cempa Community Care, Chattanooga, TN Location: Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 1 Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Beginner

This workshop looks at how PEP is perceived and utilized in the South, where enormous barriers exist getting people onto PEP medicines within the 72-hour window from a potential HIV exposure. We will explore “what are the right questions to ask” when a patent seeks PEP. We will identify examples of high, medium, low and no effective exposure risk. This session can be used as a template for educating HIV prevention staff, clinicians and medical professionals to accurately identify the exposure risks and overcome the barriers that may exist to successfully navigate a patient onto PEP as quickly as possible.

Strategies for Integrating HIV Prevention into Non-traditional Settings for Adolescents Presenters: Alison Greene, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN Monica Davis, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Track: Youth

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FRIDAY

Level: Beginner

System-involved youth (youth in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and/ or behavioral health systems) are a vulnerable population with increased risk for HIV, other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and unintended pregnancy. To reach this population, it is necessary to provide HIV prevention and sexual health interventions in out-of-school settings, yet there are significant barriers and challenges in effectively doing so. For over 15 years, the Southwest Institute for Research on Women (SIROW) has been implementing HIV prevention and sexual health interventions with system-involved youth by partnering with substance abuse treatment programs, day reporting centers, independent living programs, county health departments, group homes, and other behavioral health programs. The presenters will draw on examples from this work to describe effective strategies and a process to successfully integrate HIV prevention and sexual health interventions into non-traditional settings for adolescents.

Integrated Harm Reduction Programming: Syringe Service Programs & HIV/HCV Testing Presenters: Paul Harkin, Mr, San Francisco, CA Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 4 Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

We are currently in the throes of a syndemic of HIV, HCV, and the Opioid Epidemic. As a response GLIDE created an Integrated Harm Reduction Program Model, which includes providing: Street Outreach; HIV & HCV Testing Navigation and Linkages; Syringe Access Services & Overdose Prevention/Education & Narcan Distribution, and Community (Peer) Navigation Program. This workshop will demonstrate how to develop an integrated program, through an expansion of services (or collaboration) to deliver efficacious and cost-effective HIV, HCV prevention and care that is not possible in the old model of programs that silo services. By cross-training staff GLIDE has created a national model of Harm Reduction Integrated Programming. Our model has been very successful in working with so-called “hard to reach populations” mostly homeless PWID and PWUD, and engaging them successfully in our programs. The proximity of the Opioid Epidemic and it’s intersectionality with HIV and HCV requires an integrated response.

America’s Affordable Housing Crisis & The Impact on HIV/AIDS Presenters: Lauren Banks Killelea, National AIDS Housing Coalition, Washington, DC Kahlib Barton, True Colors United, Washington, DC Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Beginner

All over America, communities are facing a shortage of affordable housing. More and more people cannot afford anywhere to live and viral suppression is lowest among Ryan White clients who don’t have stable housing. HOPWA programs continue to have waiting lists.

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SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

This workshop will examine the relationship between housing and the prevention and treatment of HIV. We will look at the impact of housing instability on LGBTQ youth, people who use drugs, and those at high risk of or living with HIV. We cannot end the HIV epidemic without supportive housing services. Housing is healthcare!

Meeting at the Intersection: Black Gay Men & Black Transwomen Presenters: Aryah Lester, Transgender Strategy Center, Washington, DC Charles Stevens, The Counter Narrative Project, Atlanta, GA Yolo Robinson, Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective, Los Angeles, CA Tatyana Moaton, Transgender Strategy Center, Chicago, IL Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Black gay men and Black transwomen are the most disproportionately impacted populations within the US HIV epidemic. Funding and service systems are often designed in a way that creates competition for resources and attention between these two communities. Each of these communities has its own rich history of survival, resilience and struggle within the epidemic. However, there are areas of common ground on racial and economic justice issues and stigma that cut across communities. Many of the most innovative and exciting leaders and organizations working on HIV in the US today come from these two communities. This workshop will explore the power of collaboration and mutual support between Black gay men and Black transwomen and discuss what is possible together moving forward.

Hepatitis Elimination in the Era of Ending the Epidemic Presenters: Garrett Eberhardt, NASTAD, Washington, DC Boatemaa Ntiri-Reid, NASTAD, Washington, DC Lauren Orkis, Pennsylvania Department of Health, Pittsburgh, PA Nirah Johnson, New York City Department of Health, Long Island, NY Amber Casey, New York City Department of Health, New York, NY Katie Burk, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA Carol Jimenez, HHS - Federal Commitment to Hepatitis Elimination Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

Movement towards hepatitis elimination planning is gaining momentum worldwide with the World Health Organization (WHO) committing to eliminating hepatitis B and C by 2030, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) providing recommendations and targets for elimination in the US, and HHS OHADIP working to update the National Viral Hepatitis Action Plan to align with domestic elimination efforts. State and local jurisdictions are bringing together partners and stakeholders to start the conversation about what it would take in their communities to make elimination a reality. This session will explore hepatitis elimination at the national, state, and local level, and its intersection with HIV elimination efforts.


SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

You CAN Sit With Us: Building an ETE Plan Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters: Sara Semelka, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL John Peller, MPP, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Whether local, regional, or statewide, a successful Ending the Epidemic plan, must include collaborations and community engagement as its building blocks. Getting to Zero Illinois (GTZ-IL) is based on a unique partnership of non-profit and governmental entities, including the AIDS Foundation of Chicago, the Illinois Department of Public Health, and the Chicago Department of Public Health, along with nearly 50 other agencies and organizations. For more than two years, GTZ-IL has worked to build its’ Ending the Epidemic plan in continual collaboration, spanning different gubernatorial administrations and shifting political landscapes. Learn how small, informal discussions among colleagues led to a statewide effort that grew from the ground up into a statewide organizing group that has engaged hundreds of advocates, providers, organizers, and public health workers to create a plan that will ground Illinois’ work to the end the HIV epidemic over the next decade.

Honoring the Healing Power of Our Stories’ -The Reunion Project Presenters: Waheedah Shabazz-El, The Reunion Project, Philadelphia, PA Jeff Taylor, Positive Life Series Palm Springs, Palms Springs, CA Chris Barlett, Philadelphia, PA Greg Cassins, The Reunion Project, Chicago, IL Louis Spraggins, The Reunion Project, Chicago, IL Jeff Berry, T-pan, The Reunion Project, Chicago, IL Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Deep and lasting healing can often be found by way of sharing one’s experience; especially when done within a compassionate and empathetic space with others who’ve overcome similar challenges. There is something profound that happens through the personal sharing of one another’s stories that help us recognize our deep connectedness to one another. Between guiding stories shared by facilitators, participants will be given an opportunity to share a short part or version of their entire story with the intention to provide hope, constructive guidance, positive inspiration, helpful knowledge, or other positive experiences for those who hear their story. After each sharing, open up to all in attendance (with facilitation and temperance provided by the facilitators) to give constructive feedback and encouragement on how to improve the telling of their tale, so as to emphasize their strengths, resiliency, benefits gained, and lessons learned in the process of living the tale.

FRIDAY

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06

Survivors Gifts: Thriving & Supporting Wellness, Resilience & Emotional Health Presenters: Carole Treston, ANAC, Philadelphia, PA Jesse Milan, Jr., AIDS United, Washington, DC Derrick Mapp, HIV Health Counselor and LTS Services Care Navigator, Shanti Project, San Francisco, CA Graham Harriman, Director of Care and Treatment, New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, NYC, NY Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Pathway: Healthcare Providers Level: Intermediate

This participatory workshop features a powerful strategy to support mental health and wellness through finding your story of emotional strength and resilience. We will use a storytelling method that is focused on describing and highlighting a narrative of emotional strength and resilience amongst long term survivors’ experiences. The authors will share excerpts of our stories to model the sharing format then invite attendees to participate by recalling and sharing their authentic stories of strength and resilience from their own death and loss experiences from HIV/AIDS. Attendees are invited to participate in this interactive workshop to the extent that they feel comfortable.

The Role of Black Gay Men in the Ending the Epidemic Plan, Our Seats at the Tables, What You Need to Know. Presenters: Ernest Hopkins, National Black Gay Men’s Advocacy Coalition, Washington, DC Dr. Eugene McCray, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Dr. Laura Cheever, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, MD Dr. James McCrae, US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Track: TBD Level: Intermediate

This institute will provide participants an opportunity to engage directly with federal leaders tasked with implementing the Ending the Epidemic: A Plan for America (EtE) to reduce HIV infections in the United States below epidemic levels, and how Black gay/SGL men must engage in at all levels to successfully implement EtE plans and programming across the nation. The institute will include presentations from federal officials and be engaged in dialogue between federal leaders and session participants about the EtE Plan.

Women’s Institute: Building a Women’s Culture of Wellness: From Trauma to Resiliency Presenter: Vanessa Johnson, J.D., Ribbon Consulting Group, Largo, MD Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Women Level: Intermediate

Trauma-informed care is an approach that recognizes the importance of

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FRIDAY

engaging women vulnerable to or living with HIV with histories of trauma, recognizes the presence of trauma symptoms, and acknowledges the role that trauma has played in the lives of women. This session will provide an overview of SAMHSA’s trauma-informed framework followed by a two-prong focus on 1) the impact of chronic intersectional trauma - the intersection of individual trauma-life experiences, overlapping community-based and intergenerational traumatic stressors - on women vulnerable to or living with HIV; and 2) participants sharing experiences of how they support women vulnerable to or living with HIV through their traumatic lived experiences.

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

Puzzled: The Missing Pieces to Ending the Epidemic Among TGNC! Location: Dogwood, 2nd Floor Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Intermediate

What would it take to End the HIV Epidemic among one of the most vulnerable populations, transgender and gender non-conforming individuals? This institute will examine the structural, economic, and cultural challenges to ending the epidemic among transgender/gender nonconforming individuals. Going beyond typical conversations on HIV, this institute will examine intersecting social determinants such as, transphobia, poverty, and stigma and how they correlate to higher rates of HIV, murder, suicide and homelessness among the TGNC community.

11:30 am - 1:30 pm Plenary Luncheon

WHAT WE LIVE FOR: CELEBRATING THE POWER OF THE COMMUNITY TO EDUCATE, MOTIVATE, AND INSPIRE CHANGE Location: Meeting Level 2 Sponsored by Gilead Sciences

United by passion and driven by a common purpose, the HIV community has achieved stunning progress toward developing the tools needed to make it possible to truly envision an end to the HIV epidemic. But even as we celebrate the strides that have been made, it is necessary to acknowledge that there is still much that needs to be done to make that vision a reality. Ending HIV will require that we all continue to work together to empower individuals and strengthen communities to reduce disparities, eliminate stigma, and educate patients and providers so that all of those impacted by HIV have access to the care that they need. Please join us for a plenary presentation that celebrates the strength of the community response in the face of HIV and raises our collective voices to reflect on how we can continue to accelerate progress toward ending the epidemic. 

10:00 am - 5:00 pm Exhibitions

Exhibit Hall Independence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4 • Closed during plenary sessions

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Presentations

Poster Presenations Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level 1 For a full listing of Poster Presentations please refer to page 100.

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SESSION 4 WORKSHOPS

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2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Session 4 Workshops

Using Media to Amplify Your Mission: Learn From GLAAD on How to Pitch Your Own Narrative Presented by Gilead Sciences Presenters: Janae Williams, GLAAD Shanell L. McGoy, Gilead Sciences, Inc. Morris Singletary, HIV Advocate George M. Johnson, Guest Journalist DaShawn Usher, GLAAD (Moderator) Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 Track Leadership Level: Beginner

What are the core components to telling your story and how do you get the media to pay attention? Learn media engagement 101, hear from a journalist who knows how to pitch stories to the media and hear from an advocate who told his story before introducing Beyoncé. This session will feature an interactive workshop, conversation and tools to create and pitch your own narrative to the media. GLAAD’s Accelerate COMPASSion, of the Gilead COMPASS Initiative, seeks to engage communities, media, and celebrity influencers to amplify stories about intersecting HIV issues.  Participants will be trained in the GLAAD Media Institute’s (GMI) media engagement workshop followed by an interactive panel discussion on how local communities and advocates have developed and pitched their original story ideas to the media.  Participants will use all they have learned to create and practice a pitch of their story to the media.   Learning Objectives:

• Attendees will gain skills from the Media Engagement 101 training on 1) Identifying Your Audience; 2) Framing & Messaging; 3) Storytelling and 4) Social Media Engagement • Attendees will learn practical tools from an Interactive Panel featuring writer, George M. Johnson (Teen Vogue, Entertainment Tonight, NBC, The Root, Ebony, THEM, OUT, Afropunk, and more) and Morris Singletary, HIV Advocate and Peer Educator • Attendees will practice skills by crafting their own narrative and preparing a pitch for the media placement

Understanding Stigma Through the Experience of Participants in an HIV Leadership Program Presenters: Lorin Boyce, Spencer Schaff, Senior Research Scientist at ICF Location: Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3 Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

Stigma is one of many barriers people of color living with HIV have to address in their journey to actively serve as community leaders. The impact of HIV-related stigma can prevent people from learning their HIV status, disclosing their status, and accessing and adhering to treatment. It is

further compounded when people experience additional stigma related to sexual orientation, gender identity, substance use, and mental health.

In this workshop we will explore how stigma is addressed in the Building Leaders of Color (BLOC) Program, created by NMAC, a national leader in HIV/AIDS among persons of color, in an effort to increase leadership of people of color living with HIV in local communities. We will share some of the stigma-related training activities/information, discuss findings about the impact of training on BLOC participants, and explore ways the BLOC leaders work to reduce stigma in their communities.

Celebrating Our Magic Toolkit Coordinated by the NMAC AI/AN CAP Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: American Indian/ Alaska Native Level: Beginner

A culturally-specific resource for American Indian & Alaska Native communities that aims to provide resources for LBGTQ and Two-Spirit youth, their relatives, and their healthcare providers. The toolkit was developed by the Indian Health Services and Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board.

HIV/AIDS and Trauma-Informed Congregations Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

Across the country, there is a growing movement to create “traumainformed” services, organizations, and communities. While many individuals experience traumatic events without lasting harm, trauma can place a heavy burden on individuals, families, and communities. For some, religious beliefs and faith provide a source of wisdom or a narrative that can help re-establish a sense of meaning after a life-shattering event. For others, relationships formed in spiritual community are deeply supportive. Faith communities can be places of hope and healing when we practice spiritual life together, build positive and loving relationships, and work to bring justice and healing. There is a network of people of faith who are creating a community of congregations who are aware of the impact of trauma and thoughtful about how they support and nurture resilience and healing for their members and the communities they serve. A congregation that fully understands the impact of trauma and knows how to respond is trauma-informed. In addition to understanding the impact of stress, a trauma-informed congregation:

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• Expects and supports recovery after adversity; • Has physical, social, and psychological resources to help buffer and heal the negative effects of traumatic events; and • Is prepared to take deliberate, collective action in the face of adversity.

Unpacking the U=U Basics: The Message and the Movement Presenters: Murray Penner, Prevention Access Campaign, Washington, DC Brady Dale Morris, Nashville Regional HIV Planning Council, Nashville, TN Davina Conner, POZ Haven Foundation, Denver, CO Deondre Moore, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Houston, TX Bryan Jones, Ursuline Piazza, Cleveland, OH Alleen King-Carter, Living in 3-D, Shreveport, LA Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: U=U Level: Beginner

In early 2016, people living with HIV organized with allies and researchers to communicate a life-changing but widely unknown and radical fact: a person living with HIV who has an undetectable viral load and is taking medication as prescribed cannot transmit HIV to sexual partners. In other words, Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U). The U=U campaign began in the U.S. as a struggle for truth rooted in the principle that all people living with HIV have a right to accurate and meaningful information about their sexual and reproductive health. It grew into a community-driven global movement accepted by the international scientific and medical community, and reaching every key affected population in nearly 100 countries – and growing. In this workshop, you’ll hear the inside story of how it started from some of the founders of the movement, and you’ll gain tools and strategies to communicate this game-changing message in meaningful ways in your communications, clinical, and advocacy work.

Implementation Research and the Role of NIAID’s Centers For AIDS Research (CFAR) in the Federal Plan to End the HIV Epidemic Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenter: Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, NIAID, Division of AIDS, Rockville, MD Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: CFAR Level: Advanced

Implementation science is crucial to figure out if biomedical research discoveries work in real life scenarios. That is why it is an important component of the federal plan to end the HIV epidemic by 2030. This workshop looks at the fundamentals of implementation science as well as case studies of implementation research involving Black Gay Men

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initiation and adherence to PrEP. It also discusses the role of NIAID’s CFARs in developing implementation research and the CFARs’ working group responsible to develop an implementation science HIV research agenda.

Addressing the Needs of the HIV 50+ to End the HIV Epidemic in 2030. Get Your “Advocate” on Presenters: Ronald Johnson, PLWH Advocate, Washington, DC Sean Bland, The O’Neill Institute, Washington, DC Gail Graham, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

Social isolation is somewhat a “naturally occurring phenomenon” as people age whether its empty nest syndrome or attrition due to death or other factors. PLWHIV already experience social isolation at larger numbers than the general population. To effectively end the HIV epidemic in 2030, HIV care agencies will have to continue to shift their focus to meet the needs of the pending reality: 70 percent of all PLWHIV will be over the age of 50 by 2030. This workshop will discuss the role of advocacy to ensure the voice of PLWHIV are heard in the development of a plan to end AIDS. This workshop will create an interactive opportunity for brainstorming within the HIV 50+ strong and healthy cohort. Participants will take ideas back to their healthcare providers and advocate for the creation of programming specifically for HIV 50+.

Connect the Risk Dots…STI, IPV, Trauma and HIV Outcomes Presenters: Kamila Alexander, Ph.D., MPH, RN, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care/Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Lisa Scotti CRNP MPH RN, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care/Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, MD Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Intermediate

This nurse-led session will explore the connections between intimate partner and community violence and other forms of trauma including reproductive coercion that lead to heightened risks for sexually transmitted infections and poorer HIV outcomes in vulnerable communities. Through interactive case studies, participants will gain a better understanding of STIs and explore how we might expand current prevention efforts to recognize the impact of trauma, mitigate intimate partner violence, and improve approaches to sexually transmitted infections and HIV. This session is intended for consumers and providers and is eligible for Continuing Nursing Education credits through ANAC, an accredited provider of CNE through ANCC. (Upon completion of the session, participants will be eligible for 3.0 CNE hours.)


SESSION 4 WORKSHOPS

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Making TIC Come to Life - Creating Organizational Cultural Changes

Everyday Discrimination and HIV Risk Perceptions Among Black Women

Presenters: Gricel Arredondo, CAI, New York, NY Lindsay Senter, CAI, New York, NY Beth Hurley, CAI, New York, NY Mary Dino, CAI, New York, NY

Presenters: Danielle Campbell, DARE MDC CAB/ Women’s HIV Research Collaborative, Los Angeles, CA Kimberly Parker, Texas Woman’s University, Frisco, TX

Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Intermediate

Up to 90 percent of People Living with HIV (PLWH) have reported one or more lifetime, severe traumatic events, compared to 50-60 percent in the general population. Trauma can impact PLWHs’ ability to seek care, remain in care, adhere to treatment, and achieve viral suppression. Integrating a trauma-informed care (TIC) approach into the suite of HIV care services has the potential to increase service delivery and improve HIV care continuum outcomes and client-level experiences. With capacity building support from CAI, New Jersey has taken a bold, innovative approach to TIC integration throughout all state-funded HIV care, treatment, and support service agencies. This workshop will provide an overview of the model’s strengths-based TIC service delivery approach for non-mental health settings. We will also describe and review concepts associated with conducting organizational trauma-informed cultural and physical assessments, which is a critical and foundational first step to ascertaining readiness for integrating TIC services.

Peer-Support: Adapting an EBI to achieve Viral Load Suppression Among LYLWH Presenters: Alexandra Bonnet, Prconcra, San Juan, PR Marcos Gonzalez, Prconcra, San Juan, PR Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Among Latinos in the United States, YMSM are heavily affected by HIV/ AIDS. CDC 2017 data indicates that Latino men accounted for 9,908 of all estimated new HIV infections among Latinos with 25,748 of these new estimated infections among MSM. The goal of this intervention is targeting Latino YMSM in order to: (1) increase access to HIV medical care services to underserved Latino YLWH, (2) increase adherence among Latino HIV positive youth who are coming in and out of care, (3) obtain viral load suppression, (4) have Latino YPLWH access Peer Support Services in order to reduce health disparities and increase treatment retention and adherence, (5) increase recruitment, engagement and retention among Latino HIV positive youth along the HIV, linkage to care and treatment continuum by the use of innovative adaptations and approaches, and (6) increase knowledge of HIV/AIDS and Treatment and reduce HIV stigma in the targeted population.

Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: Women Level: Beginner

Experiences of racial and ethnic discrimination serve as the underpinnings of several health determinants including poverty, access to care, and adverse health outcomes. As such, discrimination on the basis of race, along with the intersection of gender, sexuality, and class, increases the risk for negative health outcomes, including HIV/AIDS. This session will examine the correlation between everyday experiences of discrimination and risk perceptions for HIV/AIDS among black women in Los Angeles County that participated in the Sexual Risk Assessment Study. Variable data was collected from black women to assess statistically significant relationships between attitudes towards condoms, self-efficacy to prevent HIV, HIV stereotypes, attitudes towards PrEP, and experiences of everyday discrimination. This session will include study results and an interactive digital storytelling component to demonstrate how various forms of discrimination such as microaggressions and implicit bias transcends health decisions for black women and increases their risk for HIV.

Partnering for Public Health Response to End the HIV Epidemic Presenters: Renata Ellington, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Marlene McNeese, Houston Health Department, Houston, TX Elia Chino, Fundación Latinoamericana De Acción Social, Inc., Houston, TX Jeremy Turner, HIV/STD/Viral Hepatitis Division, Indiana State Department of Health, Indianapolis, IN Kevin Cranston, MDiv, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: CDC Level: Intermediate

This session will describe examples of public health response to clusters and outbreaks and the role that this work can play in efforts to end the HIV epidemic. The presentations will include examples of responses in diverse settings (Houston; small cities in Northeastern Massachusetts; rural Indiana) and among different populations (Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men; people who inject drugs). The presenters will discuss the important role of public health response in identifying gaps in existing prevention efforts and how partnerships with community-based organizations, AIDS service organizations, providers, and other community members play a critical role in effective response.

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The Start of a START Program, Two Years of Data Presenters: Celeste Onujiogu, Crescent Care, New Orleans, LA Joseph Olsen, Crescent Care, New Orleans, LA Katherine Conner, Crescent Care, New Orleans, LA Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

This workshop will discuss two years of successful START strategies from an FQHC that links newly diagnosed clients to care within 72 hours via testing in both the clinic and community; making Treatment as Prevention a large and now successful tool in our Biomedical Prevention efforts.

SSP Program Fidelity: Developing Standards and Best Practices for SSPs Presenters: Laura Pegram, NASTAD, Washington, DC Katie Burk, MPH, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Beginner

This session will highlight NASTAD/CDC efforts to develop SSP performance standards and best practices that aim to ensure program success and fidelity with harm reduction practices and policies. This project was completed over the past year and included input from multiple stakeholders and subject matter experts who have decades of experience operating successful Syringe Services Programs. The project resulted in the development of an informational resource on SSP standards and best practices and an accompanying program evaluation and guidance tool that can be utilized by SSPs and community stakeholders to help guide program implementation, development, and policy.

Synching Activism, Advocacy, & Organizing through HIV Criminalization Modernization Presenters: Cedric Pulliam, ECHO VA Coalition, Woodbridge, VA Deirdre Speaks, ECHO VA Coalition, Petersburg, VA Kamaria Laffrey, The SERO Project, Winter Haven, FL Eric Paulk, Georgia Equality, Atlanta, GA Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1 Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will educate participants about HIV and the criminalization of people living with HIV that is occurring domestically and globally. Knowledge of this issue coupled with other stigmatizing intersectionalities is what participants need in creating and building advocacy programs. The model of this session will be based off a coalition recently organized and two established movements as your key presenters which are - The Ending HIV Criminalization and Overincarceration in Virginia Coalition (ECHO VA), Florida HIV Justice Coalition, and the Georgia HIV Justice Coalition.

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HIV Testing to Gay and Bisexual Males on College Campuses Presenters: Maria Wilson, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX Samira Ali, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX Oscar Perez, Avenue 360 Health and Wellness, Houston, TX Roberta Leal, University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, TX Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

This workshop will describe a community-centered, multi-level intervention for young adults called SMART Cougars (SC). There will be a discussion on the role of rapid HIV testing on college campuses for gay and bisexual male youth of color. SC reduces barriers to HIV testing usually present in traditional clinical settings. SC has created institutional change by changing the norms around sexual health and HIV testing by making sexual health and HIV status knowledge part of overall wellness, meeting the individual where they are and using a peer approach to client-centered care on a university campus. The purpose of this workshop is to: a) discuss the ways SC promotes a convenient and routine HIV testing option to gay and bisexual male youth of color and b) discuss strategies and tools for community-based organizations to replicate this intervention strategy in collaboration local college campuses.

Scared or Scarred: BLACK TransMen Only Presenters: A. Toni Young, Community Education Group, Washington, DC Dana Hines, George Washington University, Washington, DC Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

This 90-minute video recorded session is LIMITED TO 25 BLACK, transMEN. Far too often gender nonconforming persons do not have access to or have faced challenges with medical providers - gender misidentification and poor service are the first of many barriers to accessing needed annual exams. Providers are uncomfortable discussing the full range of needs and opportunities for gender TransMen. The mental, emotional, physical and spiritual work that it takes for one to accept their identity and the burden to explain this history to a physician can make it difficult to go in for routine visits. During this session participants will be developing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pocket Wellnessâ&#x20AC;? guide to reduce missed appointments and medical screenings, especially for HPV, Pap screenings and cervical cancer. This dialogue will include increasing access to HIV prevention and STD/PrEP services as well.


SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

The ABCs of Hepatitis Presenters: Jasmine West - NASTAD (moderator) Corinna Dan - HHS - National Viral Hepatitis Action Plan Rita Kuwahara, AAPCHO -Policy and Practice Opportunities to Increase Adult Vaccination to Prevent the Spread of Hepatitis Lauren Canary, NVHR- Hepatitis A and C- rural and communities most affected Eman Addish, Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) The Hepatitis Alphabet Devin Reaves, Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

In recent years, everything we know about the A,B,Cs of Hepatitis has changed. The US is experiencing a multi-state Hepatitis A outbreak that is affecting people experiencing homelessness and incarceration, people who use drugs, and gay and bisexual men. For the first time in decades, new cases of Hepatitis B are on the rise and we have seen a 350 percent increase of new cases of Hepatitis C, primarily affecting young people who use drugs. This session will explore the new state of the Hepatitis alphabet.

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Youth Institute: Get the Gig BootCamp Youth Professional Toolkit Clinic Presenters: Larry Walker, THRIVE SS, Atlanta, GA Dwain Bridges, THRIVE SS, Atlanta, GA Location: Tulip, 2nd Floor Track: Youth Level: Beginner

Youth ages 18-25 are you having difficulty writing a professional resume or bio? Or think you don’t need one? If so, grab your laptop or flash drive and join us in this hands-on training clinic.  The Clinic team will provide you with new tools for career readiness to get your resume or bio right! We will have professional resume editors offering their support and guidance by reviewing your resume. You can also win a chance to get a professional headshot as well! Please come with a laptop. (Youth Only 18-25). You will be partnered with seasoned mentors to support you for three to six months through a professional engagement action plan goal.  Space is limited to 30-40 youth.

4:15 pm - 6:15 Pm Session 5: Workshops Aquarius Gilmer, Southern AIDS Coalition (Moderator)

Exposé: Scandals in Sacred Settings Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Pathway: Faith Level: Intermediate

With the advancement of news media and social media, there has been an influx of scandalous headlines that have been involved the church or clergy. While no church or denomination is exempt, it is utterly shocking at what is reported through various media outlets. The purpose of an exposé is generally to uncover the hidden truths about a situation, someone or something that usually involves shocking facts. This session will look at recent news stories that garnered national media attention where sex/sexuality in the church is at the forefront.

Ending the HIV Epidemic - A Community Based Approach Presented by Gilead Sciences Presenters: Ernest Hopkins, NBGMAC Guillermo Chacon, Latino Commission on AIDS Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network Arianna Lint, Arianna Center

Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Advanced

This session will feature an interactive cross-community panel discussion with members of priority populations focused on ending the HIV epidemic within their communities. Panelists will discuss the respective needs of their communities and what is needed to align community-based prevention efforts with the President’s End the Epidemic plan. Panelists will also provide tools for attendees to engage their local stakeholders to ensure community involvement within local End the Epidemic or Getting to Zero plans. Learning Objectives:

• Attendees will gain a better understanding of the President’s End the Epidemic plan and how it affects community prevention efforts

• Attendees will identify strategies to engage local stakeholders to ensure community input in their jurisdiction’s respective End the Epidemic plan

Positively Fearless Presented by Janssen Presenters: Yolo Akili Robinson Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2

In this panel, self-care guru, Yolo Akili Robinson, Executive Director and Founder of the Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective (BEAM),

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will host a panel discussion with Dr. Theo W. Hodge and the Positively Fearless campaign ambassadors to discuss the importance of prioritizing mental health as a critical component of HIV care. By identifying common mental and emotional health challenges, sharing real-life experiences and offering takeaway tips for better mental fitness, the panel discussion will help participants gain a greater understanding of the importance of caring for their mental health in order to live their best personal and professional lives

A Conversation with Cecilia Presented by ACT NOW: END AIDS Location: Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level: Beginner

Before you knew her as Ms. Orlando from the hit television show Pose, Cecilia Gentili has been a tireless advocate for the LGBT community. Since leaving Argentina, Cecilia Gentili has embarked on an incredible journey of transformation, ultimately turning her into a widely respected advocate for trans rights in New York City. Most recently, she has been fighting for sex work decriminalization in New York State through her work with Decrim NY. Decrim NY advocates and organizes to shape New York City and State policy and public opinion around people in the sex trades by seeking to improve the lives of people who perform sexual labor by choice, circumstance, or coercion, people profiled as such, and communities impacted by the criminalization of sex work and sexual exchange. At this workshop, you will hear Cecelia’s personal story as well as learn more about her work with Decrim NY.

Breastfeeding and HIV in the Era of U=U: Research, Policy, and Lived Experiences Presenters: Krista Martel, Executive Director, The Well Project, New York, NY; Marielle Gross, MD, MBE, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Ciarra Covin; and Claire Gasamagera Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: U=U Level: Intermediate

U=U has raised questions about how data on breastfeeding in the setting of HIV should be interpreted in high-resource settings. Many now question if U=U applies to breastfeeding and is adding a new level of urgency to the lack of research and education on this topic, as well as how the current guidelines impact women’s lives and their decisions. This workshop will provide an unbiased overview of the complicated landscape of infant feeding for U.S. women living with HIV. The workshop will highlight evidence regarding the risks and benefits of breastfeeding and summarize current national guidelines. It will feature a panel of women living with HIV, who will discuss their infant feeding experiences. This workshop will also serve as a confidential forum in which attendees will have the opportunity to share their personal experiences and decisions around breastfeeding and to pose questions directly to a Johns Hopkins provider and bioethicist.

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NIH Priorities for HIV and HIV-Related Research Presenters: Maureen M. Goodenow, Ph.D., Associate Director for AIDS Research and Director, Office of AIDS Research; Dr. Carl Diffenbach Ph.D, Director, NIAID Division of AIDS Dianne Rausch, Ph.D., Director, NIMH Office on AIDS Dr. Minnjuan Flournoy Floyd, Ph.D., Health Scientist Administrator, NIDA Facilitators: Timothy Holtz, M.D., MPH, Deputy Director, Office of AIDS Research Mary Glenshaw, Ph.D., Health Scientists Administrator, Office of AIDS Research Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Track: DC CFAR Level: Advanced

The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) establishes HIV/AIDS research priorities for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These research priorities are based on current data about the pandemic and the science to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure HIV. OAR partners with key stakeholders in the scientific community, academic institutions, HIV advocates, community members and nongovernmental HIV organizations to develop the priorities. This workshop will discuss the established priorities from the perspectives of OAR, the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Disease (NIAID), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). These trans-NIH presentations will be followed by an open discourse with attendees in a town hall/listening session format facilitated by the OAR Science Team.

Coordinated Care and Partnership: Combating the Opioid Epidemic in Chicago Presenter: Sarah Boulton, Public Health Institute of Metropolitan Chicago, Chicago, IL Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

This workshop highlights the collaborative partnership between 19 community-based agencies in Chicago that implement comprehensive services - including prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation - to combat the opioid epidemic. This coordinated effort provides services to Chicago residents who are uninsured, underinsured, experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, formerly incarcerated, dually diagnosed, and/or living in highly impacted communities. Through comprehensive, coordinated, accessible services, facilitated by the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) and the Public Health Institute of Metropolitan Chicago (PHIMC), the Substance Use Disorder/Medication Assisted Treatment (SUDS/MAT) Program aims to meet the complex needs of people who use drugs. The SUDS/MAT program leverages lessons from the HIV epidemic for the treatment of opioid use disorders. This program, like the effective response to HIV, involves system-level coordination and strong networks of care which encompass prevention, treatment, behavioral health, and targeted services to those most impacted by opioid use disorders.


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Corrections Partnerships: Criminal Justice System Re-entry Presenters: Michael Gaines, Illinois Department of Public Health, Springfield, IL Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Track: Women Level: Intermediate

In this workshop, we will discuss how state Public Health Department, Correction, Parole, Probation and Re-entry Programs partnerships can contribute to realizing the goals of high-impact HIV prevention approaches among individuals and women in the U.S. criminal justice system.

Empowering Queer Youth of Color in Managing their HIV Care

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literacy among staff and building institutional capacity to recognize and mitigate the effects of trauma on clients and staff. Phase 2 focused on implementing a TIC approach towards enhancing client experience that has improved client experience, staff relations and reduced the number of incidents agency-wide. This work includes our newly developed Crisis Response Team which is tasked with addressing trauma and clients in crisis by immediately responding in a trauma-informed manner thereby increasing the likelihood that they stay connected to care. At its core, this model is grounded in an understanding of and responsiveness to the impact of trauma that emphasizes safety, a sense of control, and empowerment.

Ending the Epidemic: The Role of HRSA Programs and Funding

Presenters: Abigail George, JASMYN, Jacksonville, FL Christina Woodhouse, MPH, JASMYN Jacksonville, FL John Jackson, JASMYN, Jacksonville, FL Kristin Kennedy, JASMYN, Jacksonville, FL Christina Woodhouse, JASMYN, Inc., Jacksonville, FL

Presenters: Stephanie Hengst, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Carl Schmid, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Laura Cheever, HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau (invited) Judith Steinberg, HRSA Bureau of Primary Health Care Adena Greenbaum, Baltimore City Health Department (invited) John Sapero, Arizona Department of Health Services Sean Cahill, The Fenway Institute

Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Youth Level: Intermediate

Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Engaging Young BMSM in HIV care can be immensely challenging. Not only are they navigating multiple marginal identities, but the HIV healthcare systems can be intimidating and confusing: interpreting lab reports, collecting paperwork for Ryan White/ADAP, reoccurring appointments. This interactive, collaborative workshop will discuss ways in which we can better engage this population in managing their HIV care. From historical discrimination in the healthcare industry to modern-day inaccessibility, we will discuss current barriers our clients face. We will then turn towards a solution-based approach, and discuss the various youthcentric, educational strategies JASMYN has utilized in engaging clients. One of our most effective strategies is our “Youth Empowerment Folder”, a tool we designed to assist youth with keeping track of their everyday HIV medical care needs. Examples from the folder will be shared. We will conclude with an open conversation on engagement strategies that have worked for participants’ communities.

We have the data, the tools and if Congress approves it, the dedicated resources to end the US HIV epidemic; however, to be successful, we must ensure the Plan is implemented effectively. HRSA oversees two agencies integral to implementing the Plan; the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program and the Community Health Centers. Programs must be developed, and funding appropriately distributed to maximize care, treatment, and prevention to those most in need. The AIDS Institute will present an updated analysis of RWHAP funding by state and case count that will show current funding distributions. Additionally, the 2019 CDC HIV Prevention Progress Report state assessments will be reviewed to help determine where and how additional funding should be allocated. Experts from diverse perspectives will discuss new policies and programs, including access to PrEP through the CHCs, strategies for ensuring funding reaches the targeted areas, and capacity development to successfully end the HIV epidemic.

Trauma-Informed Care Enhances Client Experience and Expands Staff Support Presenters: Rhonda Harris, GMHC, New York, NY Alexandra Valentine, GMHC, New York, NY Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Advanced

GMHC has created and implemented a Trauma Informed Care (TIC) Approach to Client Experience that can be replicated by AIDS Service Organizations across the country. In our efforts towards ETE, we implemented Phase 1 that focused on building trauma-informed care

Master Lecture - Mykki Blanco Session Presenter: Mykki Taylor Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Mykki Blanco is the pseudonym of Michael David Quattlebaum Jr. He is an American rapper, performance artist, poet and activist and identifies as a member of the LGBTQ Community. He is a transgender rights activist and has supported the trans community. He recently was featured in Madonna’s video “Joan of Arc.” In this session, Mykki will tell his story of both before and after his HIV diagnosis. Living with HIV didn’t stop him from being a success.

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Instead, he’s risen to new heights. He will discuss trauma, stigma, and transcendence and how HIV frames and impacts his art.

The Conversation: Engaging Transmen into HIV Prevention Practices and Care Presenters: Justine Ingram, Fulton County Board of Health, Atlanta, GA Derick Wilson, Fulton County Board of Health - Sexual Health Promotion, Atlanta, GA Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

The sexual health needs of the Transgender community have rightfully gained increasing attention in recent years. Documented high rates of infection among Transwomen have pushed their voices to the forefront of HIV prevention and treatment advocacy. Often left out of the conversation though is the impact of HIV on Transmen. Transmen face significant risk for HIV transmission yet due to a multitude of factors, their sexual health needs are often overlooked. This workshop will utilize selected clips of “The Conversation” to explore the sexual health needs of Transmen. “The Conversation” is a talk show format video project featuring 6 Atlanta based Transmen discussing their sexual health needs and barriers to HIV prevention for Transmen. The clips of “The Conversation” will be interspersed with opportunities for facilitated collective community conversation focused on Transmen and their sexual health needs.

HIV Advocacy at Home: Building Power in the States Presenters: Ian Palmquist, Equality Federation, Raleigh, NC Mandisa Moore-O’Neill, Equality Federation, New Orleans, LA Kim Welter, Columbus, OH Christina Adelanke, Charlotte, NC Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Track: Public Policy Level: Beginner

Most of the attention in domestic HIV advocacy is, understandably, focused at the federal level. But there are critical decisions about everything from access to treatment and PrEP to fighting stigma to ending criminalization being made at the state level. How can we mobilize to win in the states? In this session, we’ll explore what HIV policies are made at the state level and share lessons learned on the ground in three states—Louisiana, Ohio, and North Carolina—working to address them. How do you build a coalition for this work? What’s the role of statewide LGBTQ advocacy groups? How do grassroots advocacy and professional lobbying complement each other? Whether you’re already engaged in state-level advocacy or want to learn more about what could be done in your state, join us!

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Penalizing Blackness: Anti-Black Racism in HIV and LGBTQ+ Organizations Presenters: Charles Stephens, Counter Narrative Project, Atlanta, GA Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

Anti-Black Racism has come to be more widely understood as a significant barrier to care for people impacted by and living with HIV. However, an important consideration is not only how anti-black racism impacts the communities served, but also the workforce and organizational culture of institutions. This session seeks to unpack how anti-black racism shapes everything from hiring decisions, reward and punishment, management culture, and even funding. Questions that this session will explore include: What does it mean to uproot anti-black racism from HIV and LGBTQ+ organizations? How can racist narratives about black people manifest in institutional policies and practices? How does anti-black racism continue to harm movement organizations? And, how can organizations transform themselves into being more affirming and support environments?

Viva PrEP: A Community-Driven PrEP Campaign for the Latinx Community Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters: Rafael Velazquez, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, San Francisco, CA Esteban Cuaya-Muñoz, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, San Francisco, CA Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Beginner

As Latinx, we have a different worldview, and although mainstream information is accurate, its messaging is largely told through a sociocultural lens that does not resonate with underrepresented communities. For this reason, campaigns like Viva PrEP are crucial for reaching communities historically left out of the conversation. In this workshop, we will discuss Viva PrEP, one of the first Spanish-language PrEP awareness campaigns created by and for the Latinx community. We will focus on the strategies for embracing and weaving language and culture into social marketing strategies and highlight four core elements; community assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation. By the end of this session, participants will learn approaches for engaging Latinx MSM and transgender women in the design process, strategies for community-based organizations to develop and implement their own social marketing campaigns, community outreach strategies, and evaluation.


SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

FRIDAY

Unpacking “MSM”: How Evolving Language Will Help End the Epidemic

Social Security Disability Benefits, Work and Aging

Presenters: Andrew Zapfel, NASTAD, Washington, DC

Presenters: Sylvester Askins, Urban League of Hampton Roads, Portsmouth, VA Mark Misrok, National Working Positive Coalition, New York, NY Michael Smith, The Housing Trust, Santa Fe, NM

Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 4 Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

This session will focus on the term men who have sex with men, or “MSM”, and foster discussion over how our language needs to evolve to effectively reach different populations. The term “MSM” was coined in 1994 with the intention of serving as a neutral public health term to describe men at a greater risk of HIV given the pervasive stigma and homophobia associated with HIV at the time. Yet, in 2019, the term is overly used to identify sexual minorities who would prefer new language that respects their identity and increases understanding of the social dimensions inherent to sexual health. This session will include how evolving language needs to happen both at the programmatic level and the structural level. This session will “unpack” the term MSM and discuss the evolving landscape of language to better reach those in need of services.

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Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

Fear of losing benefits and medical coverage due to earnings is the primary reason why most people receiving these benefits do not seek employment. Regulations surrounding work while on disability benefits are hugely complex and discourage many people from seeking employment. Most people have a hard time keeping track of benefit program components and parameters and mistakes can lead to severe financial penalties. We all know that there is an essential link between financial security and a person’s health and well-being. There are thousands of individuals who work or want to work but are uncertain how earnings will impact their benefits. Stabilizing income and financial security becomes even more paramount as we age. This workshop will cover a brief summary of how to earn money while receiving Social Security and which income counts and doesn’t count, what happens to our SSI/SSDI when we hit retirement age, and how earnings are counted differently.

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM Affinity Sessions Location: Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Documentary Screening

Screening and Discussion Panel of “5B” Presented by Janssen Location: TBD

To help us remember the early days, there will be a free screening of the new, critically acclaimed documentary, “5B,” which tells the important story of the courageous nurses and caregivers at San Francisco General Hospital who worked together to revolutionize care for those diagnosed with AIDS in the early 1980s.  At a time when so much was feared and unknown about AIDS, this team, led by nurses, broke new ground to establish a new standard of compassionate care. The documentary will be shown on Friday evening, September 6, and followed by a panel discussion with some of the nurses in the film. Thank you to Janssen for sponsoring this showing.

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY 7:00 am 7:30 am

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE

9:00 am 3:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

9:00 am 11:00 am

07

Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Meeting Level 4 Foyer Session 6: Workshops

Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for Transgender Women with HIV Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2

CRI Purple-Removing the Bandages of Women Living with HIV Howard University, Meeting Level 1

Sustaining Culture in a Time of Change and Challenges for Native Hawaiian and Native Alaska Communities Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3

Cause Behind the Cause: Undoing Racism® to End the Epidemic Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

Ethical Tensions in a Turbulent Time Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 HIV 50 +: Mini-Grants Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Federal HIV/AIDS Funding: What’s Happening, What’s Been Done, What’s Next? Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Strategies for Addressing Attacks on HIV Healthcare Archives, Meeting Level 4 Moonlight Boys: Qualitative Research on the Queer Black Male Experience Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Leveraging RWHAP Part B/ADAP Funds and Services to Support Syringe Service Programs Mint, Meeting Level 4

9:30 Am 11:00 Am

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

10:00 am 5:00 pm

EXHIBIT HALL

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Fast-Tracking the Use of Data-to-Care for HIV Healthcare LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Exploring Southern Solutions: A CommunityCentered Response to the Needs of the Deep South ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4 U=U in Practice: Results from a Midwest HIV Provider Survey Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Building on HRSA Programs’ Infrastructure Supporting Ending the HIV Epidemic Shaw, Meeting Level 3 An HIV Treatment Guidelines Update Congress, Meeting Level 4 The Power of Storytelling: Inspiring Change in Communities Impacted by HIV Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

Marquis 14, Meeting Level 2

Independence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4 (closed during plenary sessions)


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11:30 am 1:30 pm

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY Luncheon Plenary

CELEBRATING U=U AND ITS CRITICAL ROLE IN ENDING THE HIV EPIDEMIC Lunch will be provided Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2

1:30 pm 2:00 pm

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

1:30 pm 6:00 pm

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level 1

Marquis 14, Meeting Level 2 Session 7: Workshops

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Building Positive Relationships Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Black, Gay, and Depressed: A Conversation on Mental Health & Substance Use Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3 Community Planning: How to Set Up and Manage Your Planning Bodies Silver Linden, 2nd Floor HIV 50+ Session Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

Prevention for Women Engaged in Modern Modalities of Sex Work Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 CBO Leadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Responses to Shifting Government HIV Prevention Mandates Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Gentlemen Respecting & Interacting In Truth (G.R.I.T) Healthy Black Masculinity University of D.C., Meeting Level 1

HIV Cure Research and the Role of Community Congress, Meeting Level 4

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Uptake: Awareness and Navigation Among Priority Populations ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4

Community Engagement and Involvement of People with HIV Shaw, Meeting Level 3

Meeting Communities Where They Are: Condom Distribution Programs Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3

PrEP Institutes: Community Engagement in Technical Assistance for PrEP Uptake Mint, Meeting Level 4

HOPWA Formula Modernization: Updates from the Third Year of Implementation Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1

Building Multi-level Trauma-informed Care Capacity with Community-based Organizations Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Knowledge=Power: Demystifying Philanthropy for Trans Leaders Howard University, Meeting Level 1

Voter Suppression Meets Viral Suppression Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3

Implementing an End HIV Initiative LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY The New Digital Age: Using Technology to Expand Access to Healthcare Archives, Meeting Level 4

4:15 pm 6:15 pm

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07

Using Organizational Assessments to Enhance Southern Organizational and Leadership Capacity Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2

Session 8: Workshops

Food Is Medicine: Addressing Racial Equity and Health through Innovative Nutrition Services Congress, Meeting Level 4

Achieving Together: Texas’s Community Plan to End the HIV Epidemic Mint, Meeting Level 4

Pleasure vs Survival: The Realities of Black Queer Men and Sex University of DC, Meeting Level 1

Clinic+: STD Services for the Community Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3

Community Event: Should Undetectable People Disclose Their Status? LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Novel Urine PrEP Adherence Test Implemented by Houston/ DC Health Departments Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 HIV 50+ Session Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Ain’t That Good News? Overcoming Religious Stigma in the South Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Innovation through Implementation Science Shaw, Meeting Level 3

PrEP in Paradise: Making PrEP Accessible On Geographically Isolated Islands Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor What Unity Looks Like for PLWHA Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Tackling Stigma from Within. Why Your Clients Don’t Come Back ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Inspirational Leadership for Latinx Employees in Management or Leadership Roles Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Medicaid Waivers: Are We Out of the Woods Yet? Archives, Meeting Level 4

Put Some “R.E.S.P.E.C.T.” in HIV Prevention for Heterosexual Black Boys Silver Linden, 2nd Floor

6:30 pm 7:30 pm

AFFINITY SESSIONS

7:00 pm 8:30 pm

FILM SCREENING: JUMPING THE BROOM WITH NOAH’S ARC STAR RODNEY CHESTER

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Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Georgetown, Meeting Level 1


GILEAD and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. © 2019 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC6737 08/19


W H AT WE LIVE FOR S TA N D I N G

SIDE BY SIDE WITH THE

COMMUNITY

It will take all of us to put an end to the HIV epidemic. All of us working together to focus on the HIV issues that matter most such as inclusion, equality, stigma and disparities.

Together we can lift each other up until HIV is no more. Because there is no greater force than people united by a shared purpose, rallying together for a common goal. That’s what unites us. And that’s what will someday put an end to HIV once and for all. THIS IS WHAT WE LIVE FOR

GILEAD IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF USCA 2019. V I S I T U S AT B O O T H 5 0 7


SEPT

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SATURDAY

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:30 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 6: Workshops

Ethical Tensions in a Turbulent Time Presenter: Jaron Benjamin, Housing Works Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Level: Beginner Pathway: ETE

Donald Trump announced a new federal initiative to end HIV as an epidemic, immediately creating an ethical dilemma for community advocates. While community leaders are not strangers to working with unexpected political partners to fulfill our mission to meet the needs of those living with and most vulnerable to the virus, this administration has exhibited unprecedented racism, transphobia, and xenophobia, all while seeking to undermine healthcare for poor and marginalized communities. Community-based organizations find themselves in increasingly challenging partnerships with Big Pharma. Pharmaceutical companies frequently remain the only funders for several initiatives that are significant to community. This workshop will create space to frame some of the major ethical tensions that exist for community leaders so that we may discuss how to best navigate these challenging partnerships and avoid becoming ethically compromised in our efforts to end HIV as an epidemic.

Sustaining Culture in a Time of Change and Challenges for Native Hawaiian and Native Alaska Communities Coordinated by the NMAC AI/AN CAP Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: American Indian/ Alaska Native Level: Beginner Level: Pending

This workshop will include presentations by Native providers in Alaska and Hawaii on ways of keeping Native culture central in HIV prevention and treatment services.

An HIV Treatment Guidelines Update Presenters: Roy Gulick, MD, Cornell University, New York, NY Tim Horn - NASTAD, Washington, DC Danielle Campbell - HIV Guidelines Panel, Los Angeles, CA Steven Vargas - HIV Guidelines Panel, Austin TX.

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Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Level: Advanced Pathway: Treatment/ CFAR Pathway

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) is a working group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council (OARAC). The primary goal of the Panel is to provide HIV care practitioners with recommendations based on current knowledge of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) used to treat adults and adolescents with HIV in the United States. The Panel reviews new evidence and updates recommendations when needed. These guidelines represent current knowledge regarding the use of ARVs. Because the science of HIV evolves rapidly, the availability of new agents and new clinical data may change therapeutic options and preferences. The Panel frequently updates the guidelines (current and archived versions of the guidelines are available on the AIDSinfo website at https://www.aidsinfo.nih.gov).

Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for Transgender Women with HIV Presenters: Arlene Edwards, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Dana Williams, The Community Wellness Project, St. Louis, MO Jamila Shipp, California Prostitute Education Project, Oakland, CA Kelly Stevens, AIDS United, Washington, DC Tatyana Moaton, Howard Brown Health, Chicago, Il Tori Cooper, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, Atlanta, Ga Octavia Lewis, Bronx, New York Nevaeh Anderson, The Empowerment Program, Denver, Co. Carmarion Anderson, Black Transwomen, Inc. Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Track Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

The majority of HIV prevention interventions diffused by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are appropriate for adaptation for transgender (TG) women. Recently, the Women Involved in Living and Learning from Other Women (WILLOW) intervention was adapted for TG women and renamed Transgender Women Involved in Strategies for Transformation (TWIST). Three community-based organizations are piloting TWIST in two cities (Atlanta and Chicago).


SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

HIV 50+: Mini-Grants Presenters: Lillibeth Gonzalez, Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC), New York, NY Bryan Jones, Equality Ohio, Cleveland, OH Michelle Jackson Rollins, Garden Valley Neighborhood House, Cleveland, OH Jared Hafen, Utah AIDS Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT Janice Shirley, Carolina Care Partnership, Charlotte, NC Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

Last year’s HIV 50+ Strong and Healthy cohort completed some great minigrant and internship projects. We have invited five past scholars to present on their mini-grant/internship projects and highlight their successes and challenges with executing the project in their community. Lillibeth Gonzalez will be presenting about her Thriving at 50 & Beyond group, including the topics discussed, the activities held and the end results. Bryan Jones and Michelle Jackson Rollins will present on the Sankofa Retreat, a 2-day intergenerational retreat that paired an experienced PLWHA over 50 years old with a young PLWHIV. Jared Hafen will present on the Positive Force Reunion, which is a social support group for people over 50 years old who are living with HIV. Janice Shirley will present on her “Thriving at 50” project and how her clients have been able to use the information they learned during the sessions.

Federal HIV/AIDS Funding: What’s Happening, What’s Been Done, What’s Next? Presenter: Nick Armstrong, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Diala Jadallah, Office of Rep. Barbara Lee Carl Schmid, The AIDS Institute Mike Weir, NASTAD Lauren Killelea, National AIDS Housing Coalition Ernest Hopkins, SF AIDS Foundation Sam Cyrulnik-Dercher, SEICUS Elizabeth Lovinger, Treatment Action Group Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will focus on the federal funding needed for domestic HIV programs, especially in the context of the administration’s Ending the HIV Epidemic Plan. The EtE Plan is one of the biggest proposed increases to domestic HIV programs in recent years and provides an opportunity to increase resources across the country to significantly impact our Nation’s response to HIV. Recent and current federal appropriations and budget cycles will be discussed, including proposals from Congress, the Administration, and the HIV community. Policy advocates, congressional staff and federal grantees will present the potential impact increased funding would have on ending the HIV epidemic, as well as the political challenges and opportunities to increase funding under a divided government and an extreme partisan environment. Participants will gain a greater understanding of the federal appropriations landscape and will be provided with tools for engaging in community advocacy for HIV programs.

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07

Strategies for Addressing Attacks on HIV Health Care Presenters: Robert Greenwald, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA Aquarius Gilmer, Southern AIDS Coalition, Washington, DC Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network – USA, Oakland, CA Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Beginner

To say the least, we are living in interesting and challenging times. This workshop will provide an overview of recent efforts by the Trump administration and Congress to undermine the Affordable Care Act and other important health reforms. It will describe several of the successes we have had fighting against dangerous proposals that threaten access to highquality and affordable HIV care. Learn more about efforts to challenge this administration and Congress and how to participate in advocacy to protect and promote the health, rights, and dignity of people living with HIV.

Moonlight Boys: Qualitative Research on the Queer Black Male Experience Presenters: Jasmine Jones, Larkin Street Youth Services, San Francisco, CA Ri-Lee Boyd, Larkin Street Youth Services, San Francisco, CA Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Youth Level: Beginner

The young queer black male community and their experiences are often omitted from discussions about mainstream queer rights movements. This workshop will present youth-led qualitative research that aims to address these omissions by studying the lives of individuals ages 21 - 25 in the queer black male community, and their experiences in the San Francisco Bay Area. This demographic is at a disproportionate risk of HIV, yet their experiences are seldom represented in research. To reach the end of the epidemic, we must center marginalized communities with persistently poorer prevention and treatment outcomes, including young queer black men. The presenters are members of the Youth Advisory Board at Larkin Street Youth Services, a non-profit serving youth experiencing homelessness. This workshop will include a discussion of youth-led research, youth leadership, and youth-led advocacy at organizational, local, and state levels. The presenters will share insights and lessons learned and engage in questionand-answer and discussion with the audience.

CRI Purple-Removing The Bandages of Women Living with HIV Presenters: Kneeshe Parkinson, Kneeshe Speaks STL / PWN Missouri State Lead, Arnold, MO Alecia Tramel, Positive People Network, Miami Gardens, FL Shelia Crockett, PWN USA, Dallas, TX Olga Irwin, PWN USA, Youngstown, OH Location: Howard, Meeting Level 1 Track: Women Level: Intermediate

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This workshop focuses on the stories of four women living with HIV and their experience and perseverance in overcoming intimate partner and domestic violence. The trauma of violence impacts women living with HIV in their health and safe disclosure of serostatus. Additionally, criminalization keeps women in domestic violence situations. Removing the bandages means understanding the power of personal testimony for healing and taking brave steps forward to find support and resources.

Cause Behind the Cause: Undoing Racism® to End the Epidemic Presenters: Kimberley Richards, The People’s Institute for Survival & Beyond, New Orleans, LA Rocky Block, Louisiana Department of Health, New Orleans, LA Helen Burnside, The Denver Prevention Training Center, Denver, CO Teffany Anderson, Chicago Department of Health, Chicago, IL Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Beginner

While it is an incredible success that the federal government is providing $30 million in planning grants to 58 jurisdictions to build plans to End the Epidemic in their city, state, or nation (Indian Country). It will be critical for these plans to work toward dealing with stigma, isolation, and racism that continue to impact health outcomes. Racism continues to be the primary barrier preventing communities from overcoming institutionalized oppression that continues to contribute to health disparities. This workshop will describe how several jurisdictions have utilized the Undoing Racism® workshop by the Peoples Institute for Survival and Beyond to launch public health efforts to address racism within the HIV epidemic. The stories often have similar beginnings, a recognition that prevention and service efforts need to focus on the social determinants of health. To achieve racial equity, public health systems need to engage in structural analysis alongside individual interventions.

Fast-Tracking the Use of Data-to-Care for HIV Healthcare Presenter: Ace Robinson, IAPAC, Washington, DC

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

Exploring Southern Solutions: A CommunityCentered Response to the Needs of the Deep South Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters: Dafina M. Ward, JD, Southern AIDS Coalition, Birmingham, AL Samira Ali, Ph.D., LMSW, University of Houston. Houston, TX Neena K. Smith-Bankhead, MS, Emory University, Atlanta, GA Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: South Level: Beginner

Facilitated by the Gilead COMPASS Initiative® Coordinating Centers, this session will feature organizations and regional leaders who are utilizing resources to build programs, develop new skills, and improve service delivery to meet the needs of southern communities. The COMPASS Initiative® supports southern communities with investments through grantmaking, organizational capacity building, and skill-building programs for persons living with HIV. Through this session we will explore: • Takeaways from inaugural Southern HIV/AIDS Awareness Day held in August • Presentations by community-based partners who are using innovative approaches to address key issues in the South, including models for trauma-informed care and stigma reduction • Overview of resources available through the COMPASS Initiative® • Emerging issues in southern communities and strategies to build capacity in the region to effectively address them

U=U IN PRACTICE: RESULTS FROM A MIDWEST HIV PROVIDER SURVEY

Presenters: Mariah Wilberg, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN Sarah Rybicki, Midwest AIDS Education and Training Center, Minneapolis, MN Emily Petran, Midwest AIDS Education and Training Center, Minneapolis, MN

Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: Fast Track Cities Level: Intermediate

Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

During this workshop, we will review the impact of utilizing surveillance data to direct public funding to support communities impacted by HIV. As the epidemic continues to shift demographically and geographically, the breadth and whereabout of these services have also shifted: • Medical Services • Oral Health • Behavioral Health • Education • Outreach • EIS • Care Coordination • Transportation

The Minnesota Department of Health and Midwest AIDS Training and Education center partnered to create, distribute, and analyze a survey for HIV clinical care providers in the Midwest Region about how U=U is being integrated into the HIV care setting. The survey includes demographic information; provider knowledge and beliefs, and patient characteristics that can influence whether providers counsel patients about using viral suppression for sexual HIV prevention. The survey also included a message testing section and asked providers to rate arguments encouraging them to counsel patients about U=U.

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At the time of abstract submission, over 300 providers and healthcare professionals have taken the survey. The workshop will discuss: 1) the purpose of the survey, 2) methods: the process of creating the survey


SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

and the survey distribution process, and 3) results: the majority of the workshop will be discussing the survey findings, conclusions, and next steps.

Building on HRSA Programs’ Infrastructure Supporting Ending the HIV Epidemic Presenters: Steven Young, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Chrissy Abrahms, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Rene Sterling, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Susan Robilotto, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: HRSA Level: Intermediate

This session will describe the areas of alignment between the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative and HRSA’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program and Health Center Program. The workshop will highlight HRSA’s approach to addressing each of the four pillars of the initiative: Diagnose, Care and Treatment, Prevent, and Respond. The presentation will include opportunities, challenges, and next steps that will need to be addressed in order to reach the goals of the initiative.

Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for Transgender Women With HIV Presenters: Arlene Edwards, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Dana Williams, The Community Wellness Project, St. Louis, MO Jamila Shipp, California Prostitute Education Project, Oakland, CA Kelly Stevens, AIDS United, Washington, DC Tatyana Moaton, Howard Brown Health, Chicago, Il Tori Cooper, Advocates for Better Care Atlanta, LLC, Atlanta, Ga Octavia Lewis, Bronx, New York Nevaeh Anderson, The Empowerment Program, Denver, Co. Carmarion Anderson, Black Transwomen, Inc.  Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Track Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Level: Beginner

The majority of HIV prevention interventions diffused by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are appropriate for adaptation for transgender (TG) women. Recently, the Women Involved in Living and

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Learning from Other Women (WILLOW) intervention was adapted for TG women and renamed Transgender Women Involved in Strategies for Transformation (TWIST). Three community-based organizations are piloting TWIST in two cities (Atlanta and Chicago).

The Power of Storytelling: Inspiring Change in Communities Impacted by HIV Presented by Gilead Sciences Presenters: Ashley Innes, HIV Senior Community Liaison, Gilead Sciences Inc. Jalysa Conway, Screenwriter for Grey’s Anatomy Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 3 Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

This is a 2-hour skills-building workshop designed to help attendees appreciate and leverage the power of personal stories to communicate key concepts related to HIV prevention and care. With the help of professional television writer Jalysa Conway (Grey’s Anatomy), attendees will be provided with an overview of how stories can educate and inspire social change and will learn how to identify and arrange the key components of a strong story. They will be given instruction on how to craft their own personal narratives and receive guidance on how those narratives can be employed to facilitate conversations and education related to HIV. Learning Objectives

Participants will learn:

• How stories can be used to educate others and inspire positive action in communities impacted by HIV • The components of strong and compelling stories

• How to present their own stories on the impact that HIV has had on their lives and how these stories can be used to reach others

Leveraging RWHAP Part B/ADAP Funds and Services to Support Syringe Service Programs Mint, Meeting Level 4 For full description, see the USCA mobile app.

10:00 am - 5:00 pm Exhibitions

Exhibit Hall Independence and Liberty Ballrooms, Meeting Level 4 Closed during plenary sessions

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SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

11:30 am - 1:30 pm Plenary Lucheon

CELEBRATING U=U AND ITS CRITICAL ROLE IN ENDING THE HIV EPIDEMIC Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2 Moderator Deondre Moore, AIDS Healthcare Foundation Demetre Daskalakis, MD, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Cyndee Clay, HIPS Michael Kharfen, DC Department of Health (not confirmed) Dr. Theo Hodge, MD, AAHIVS Yonce Jones, Harlem United Jesse Milan, JD, AIDS United Ronald Johnson, AIDS United Naina Khanna, Positive Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Network - USA Davina Otalar Mark S. King Manuel Diaz-Ramirez Bruce Richman Alleen King-Carter Mariah Wilberg Luciano Reberte

Moore

Daskalakis

Clay

Hodge

Kharfen

Elektra

Special Performance: Jade Elektra

This plenary session will celebrate the U=U movement and the amazing opportunity it presents to reduce stigma and motivate HIV testing and treatment uptake. It will also focus on the role PLWH play in furthering the U=U movement and demonstrate their commitment to working together to end the HIV epidemic.

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Presentations

Poster Presentations Marriott Marquis, Meeting Level 1 For a full listing of Poster Presentations please refer to page 100.

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SESSION 7 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

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07

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Session 7: Workshops

Community Planning: How to Set Up and Manage Your Planning Bodies Presented by ACT NOW: END AIDS Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level:

Planning body procedures ensure that planning council and HIV advisory bodies function effectively and remain in compliance with legislative requirements. Panelists from three states will share lessons learned on how to manage a planning council or advisory body including recommended processes for bringing on new members, ensuring ongoing orientation throughout the year, and best practices for establishing consumer trust.

Black, Gay, and Depressed: A Conversation on Mental Health & Substance Use Presenter: Joseph D. Williams, MSW, The Misunderstood Social Worker Location: Dupont Circle, Meeting Level 3 Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

Mental health and substance use continue to pose barriers for retention in care and reaching viral suppression for Black Gay and Bisexual men. This workshop will feature two Black gay men working proving mental health services. Presenters will discuss their personal experiences dealing with mental health, the innovative work they’re currently doing to heal Black Gay/Bisexual men, and how mental health should be prioritized in ending the epidemic for Black gay/bisexual men.

Building Positive Relationships Presenters: Brian Gill, private psychotherapist, Hope DC a social network Justin Finner, Tai Chi Instructor Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

Description This workshop will discuss the importance of building positive relationships as we grow older living with HIV. People living with HIV over 50 years old experience isolation. Some lost many friends due to AIDS, others retired at an early age thinking that they will not live as long as they have losing the opportunity to build a career, romantic relationship and social networks. This workshop will offer ways to examine self and reach out to others in order to build new relationships.

HIV Cure Research and the Role of Community Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Presenters: Pending Level: Pending For futher information on this session please refer to the usca mobile app which can be downloaded for free with the search term “2019 usca” in your mobile application stores.

Community Engagement and Involvement of People with HIV Presenters: Chrissy Abrahms, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Makeva Rhoden, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Glenn Clark, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: HRSA Level: Intermediate

The purpose of this session is to examine the importance and continued need for community engagement to address the HIV epidemic. As a component of the session, participants will receive an overview and an update on current and proposed HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau initiatives that focus on meaningful collaboration through community engagement and involvement of people with HIV. This workshop will also discuss ideas for new partnerships.

PrEP Institutes: Community Engagement in Technical Assistance for PrEP Uptake Presenters: Mary Adams, University of Rochester Center for Community Practice (UR-CCP), Rochester, NY Juhua Wu, University of Rochester Center for Community Practice (UR-CCP), Rochester, NY Ali Mansaray, SC Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC Mike Wilson, University of Rochester Center for Community Practice (UR-CCP), Rochester, NY Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Toward the goal of expanding PrEP implementation in priority states in the South, CDC encouraged key state health departments (HDs) to conduct PrEP Institutes, developed with technical assistance (TA) provided by selected CDC-funded Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Providers. Each two to three-day Institute was designed to optimize ongoing, active engagement and communication among state HDs and their funded partners including local HDs, health care and community-based organizations (HCOs and CBOs). Evaluation data from Institute participants

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in three states demonstrated that networking, collaboration and learning from each other were highly valued aspects of participating. Characteristics of each of the following Institute organizing components informed the development of statewide implementation plans: Determination of Needs; Assembling Invitees; Partnering with Champions; Organizing Presenters; Assembling a “PrEP User Panel”; and Institute Facilitation.

Building Multi-level Trauma-Informed Care Capacity with Community-based Organizations Presenters: Samira Ali, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX Megan Stanton, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Intermediate

The role of trauma in HIV prevention and treatment has been increasingly documented and therefore integrated into HIV intervention efforts. However, there are multiple barriers to implementing TIC approaches within organizations. Community-university partnerships provide an opportunity to draw on each entities’ unique perspectives and strengths resulting in actionable knowledge sharing. This model can be leveraged to develop community capacity regarding trauma-informed care. Additionally, community-based providers and academic scholars alike increasingly recognize the multi-level nature of trauma including the impact of collective and historical forms of trauma on marginalized communities, who are at disproportionate risk for HIV. In this interactive workshop, facilitators will discuss multilevel forms of trauma as well as engage participants in examining opportunities and challenges of such collaborative models. Facilitators will also introduce a racial justice/ intersectionality HIV service framework and discuss its implications for a multi-level approach to trauma-informed care.

Voter Suppression Meets Viral Suppression Presenters: KJ Smith, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Lisa Johnson-Lett, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Janine Brignola, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: South Level: Beginner

The intersection of identities that many people living with HIV/AIDS fall into are often subjected to difficulty in ways that no one should be subjected to. Furthermore, difficulties from lack of housing to lack of transportation leave people living with HIV/AIDS with more barriers to voting. Their power in the voting booth directly impacts these difficulties which further compounds them. The goal of viral suppression only becomes that much more difficult when partnered with voter suppression.

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Prevention for Women Engaged in Modern Modalities of Sex Work Presenter: Steven Fernandez, Latino Commission on AIDS, New York, NY Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1 Track: Women Level: Beginner

Though sex work has existed in various forms throughout human history, shifting discourses on sexuality, aided by the rise of the internet, has allowed new methods of sex work to evolve rapidly. Traditional HIV prevention and sexual health messaging may not be reaching women, of cisgender or transgender experience, who engage in methods of sex work outside of payment (including money, food, and/or housing) in exchange for penetrative or oral sex- such as webcam performance, exotic dancing, web-enabled escorting, pornography, and Domming/Subbing in the BDSM community. To conceptualize modern sex work simply as money in exchange for incentive/penetrative sex discounts a large community of women that may be left out of services. To begin engaging women participating in modern forms of sex work, community-based organizations (CBOS) must understand the behaviors and subsequent risks associated with different modalities of modern sex work.

CBO Leaders’ Responses to Shifting Government HIV Prevention Mandates Presenter: Keith Green, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Pathway: Fast Track Cities Level: Intermediate

Community-based organizations (CBOs) focused on HIV prevention in the U.S. emerged in response to the federal government’s neglect of the AIDS crisis in the early 1980s. Over time, the primary funder of these CBOs has become the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), dictating both the practice ideologies and service technologies employed within these organizations. Little is known, however, about the impact on CBOs of being dependent upon this same neglectful government for resources and the dissemination of effective HIV prevention models. Moreover, despite standardized service-delivery approaches and major advances in HIV treatment/prevention, African Americans, Latinos and gay/bisexual men of all races continue to be disproportionately affected. The research presented in this workshop explores how CBOs have increasingly become dependent upon the CDC for resources to support HIV prevention services and the implications of such dependence, offering a framework for examining and influencing programming decisions made by CBO directors/managers.


SESSION 7 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

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07

Gentlemen Respecting & Interacting In Truth (G.R.I.T) Healthy Black Masculinity

Meeting Communities Where They Are: Condom Distribution Programs

Presenter: Corey Ingram, (Palmetto AIDS Life Support Services) PALSS, Lexington, SC

Presenters: Megan McCool-Myers, Ph.D., MPH- Jane Fonda Center for Adolescent Reproductive Health at Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA Miguel Chion, MD, MPH- Cicatelli Associates, Inc., Los Angeles, CA Cornelia Jessen, MA, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK

Location: University of D.C., Meeting Level 1 Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

This presentation provides an overview of healthy masculinity from the viewpoint of people of color from Serena Williams to former President Obama while focusing on dominant stories, the history of race and rape, and strategies to engage men of color. The intersectionality of race and interpersonal violence creates an interesting dichotomy of perceptions surrounding men of color (e.g. “the boogeyman”). Men of color are often portrayed as perpetrators of interpersonal violence; however, research has shown that white, middle-class males represent the majority of offenders. Therefore, men of color should be seen as potential allies. Some ways to deconstruct these misconceptions is by educating all individuals on social norms and engaging men of color in the discussion of interpersonal violence, healthy masculinity, and male programming. A major tenet of G.R.I.T. is that “We all are equally invested and engaged in the future, betterment, and success of this society”.

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Uptake: Awareness and Navigation Among Priority Populations Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters: Veronica McCants, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Stephen Fallon, Ph.D., Latinos Salud, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Naomi Busler, LMSW, Someone Cares, Atlanta, GA Eric Paulukonis, Mazzoni Center, Philadelphia, PA Dwayne Jenkins, Nashville Cares, Nashville, TN Earl Banks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Christian Spears, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Yvonne Greene, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Track: PrEP for CBOs Level: Intermediate

According to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) 2020, a critical focus is to ensure “full access to comprehensive PrEP services”. As a result, some CDC-funded programs have begun developing PrEP programs in response to this indicator. HIV prevention leaders are working together to increase awareness and improve access to PrEP services among priority populations and reduce the cross-sectional forms of stigma (homelessness, mental health, race, economic, and geographical, etc.) for successful navigation services within community-based organizations (CBO). This forum will provide a demonstration of different approaches utilized by CDC-funded programs that have created supportive HIV prevention and care environments, as well as addressed barriers and promoted access to PrEP. Four unique CBOs will present the development and implementation strategies of their PrEP programs with an emphasis on men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender (TG) persons of color.

Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: STD Pathway Level: Beginner

Condoms continue to be an essential STD prevention strategy as STD rates continue to rise around the nation. Condom distribution programs within health departments and other organizations are great methods to reach those who may have issues related to healthcare access, such as those living in rural areas and youth who have concerns around confidentiality.

HOPWA Formula Modernization: Updates from the Third Year of Implementation Presenters: Amy Palilonis, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC Benjamin Ayers, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC Rita Harcrow, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

The formula for allocating Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) program funds to cities and states was changed to better reflect current HIV epidemic trends with the passing and signing of the Housing Opportunity Through Modernization Act (HOTMA) in July 2016. To avoid highly volatile funding shifts in either direction for any one jurisdiction, the modernized formula is being phased in over five years with a stop-loss provision. This workshop will provide updates from the third year of the phase-in of the new formula, including the impact of recent increases to HOPWA appropriations on modernization and updated projections. Presenters will also provide updates and best practices from HUD’s ongoing efforts to assist communities in thoughtfully planning for projected funding increases or decreases due to modernization. In addition, presenters will discuss how HOPWA formula modernization contributes to the plan to end the HIV epidemic in America and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

Knowledge=Power: Demystifying Philanthropy for Trans Leaders Presenters: Morey Riordan, Transgender Strategy Center, Berkeley, CA Aryah Lester, Transgender Strategy Center, Berkeley, CA Reagin Wiklund, Transgender Strategy Center, Roxbury, MA Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming

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SATURDAY

Level: Intermediate

All too often trans-led organizations and their leaders are underresourced and face an uphill battle in securing funding. Typically, there is no fund development department or professionally trained grant writer on staff. This means that trans-led grassroots groups are competing for funding with organizations that have resources to put together competitive grant applications and a cycle of disenfranchisement is perpetuated. This session will be an opportunity for trans leaders to learn about the culture and language of philanthropy, information on navigating the system and tips on submitting a strong and competitive application to funders.

Implementing an End HIV initiative Presenter: Ace Robinson, IAPAC, Washington, DC Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: Fast Track Cities Level: Beginner

Realizing the success of Fast-Track Cities/Counties will require a structured set of inclusive planning to achieve long-term success. The initiative focuses on engaging: community members, policymakers, clinicians, and health departments at a minimum through these tenets: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Community Engagement/Advocacy Promulgation/Awareness Planning & Implementation Monitoring & Evaluation Medical Services Oral Health Behavioral Health Education Outreach EIS Care Coordination Transportation

The New Digital Age: Using Technology to Expand Access to Health Care Presenters: Maryanne Tomazic, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, Cambridge, MA Rachel Landauer, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, Cambridge, MA Heang Kim Tan, Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, MD Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Intermediate

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This workshop will highlight local and state efforts to expand access to health care through telemedicine and other technology. In communities where access to medically-necessary and culturally-appropriate services is limited, programs are leveraging technology to expand and improve health care in innovative ways. In this session, panelists will discuss best practices and lessons learned in program development and implementation. We will highlight how telemedicine can specifically address health inequities and invite attendees to consider how technology can improve access to healthcare in their own communities.

Using Organizational Assessments to Enhance Southern Organizational and Leadership Capacity Presenters: Neena Smith-Bankhead, MS, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA Kia Colbert, MPH, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA Darion Banister, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA Danielle Lambert, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Decatur, GA Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

Community-based organizations (CBOs) are an important resource for providing HIV prevention and care services, especially when trying to reach priority populations. Southern CBOs share similar challenges including board governance, cultivating new leadership, efficient internal management and operations, and resource development. Organizational assessments are an important tool used to help CBOs identify operational strengths while highlighting opportunities to improve an organization’s structure, internal operations, and service delivery. This workshop will teach CBO leaders how to use the results of selfadministered organizational assessments to identify priority needs and gaps in management structure and function. The Emory COMPASS Coordinating Center will also share the results of organizational assessments completed by CBO leaders across the South, highlighting how COMPASS Initiative resources, including grants, tailored training, and technical assistance can be used to increase funding, expand services, and influence better outcomes for clients. The needs of young, new and/or emerging leaders will also be highlighted.


SESSION 8 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

SEPT

07

4:15 pm - 6:15 pm Session 8: Workshops

HIV 50+ Session Location: Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

For futher information on this session please refer to the usca mobile app which can be downloaded for free with the search term “2019 usca” in your mobile application stores.

Novel Urine PrEP Adherence Test Implemented by Houston/ DC Health Departments Presenters: Marlene McNeese, Bureau Chief of HIV/STD Prevention, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX Michael Kharfen, Senior Deputy Director of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Administration (HAHSTA), DC Department of Health, Washington, DC Giffin Daughtridge MD MPA, CEO, UrSure Inc. Boston, MA Location: Marquis Salon 12, 2nd Floor Pathway: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level:

In November 2018, the Houston and Washington, DC Departments of Health began implementing the UrSure urine PrEP adherence test in their public health clinics. These adherence tests achieved two goals: 1) show patients that their PrEP drug is in their system at a level consistent with protection and 2) help providers identify individuals on PrEP struggling with adherence so that resources could be allocated to them. This was the first time a health department had utilized an objective adherence test to optimize PrEP adherence and retention support. To date, over 300 samples have been run in the two cities. About 75 of those samples have been sub-optimally adherent (no PrEP taken in last 48 hours), and those patients have received additional support mechanisms like an assigned PrEP navigator, more frequent follow up visits, and targeted counseling to help them improve their adherence and remain engaged in care.

Pleasure vs Survival: The Realities of Black Queer Men and Sex Presenter: Richard Hutchinson, BA, He Is Valuable Inc. Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1 Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

This workshop will explore the complex nature of queer black men and sex with a specific focus on survival sex and sex work. Featuring the voices of queer black men in Atlanta, this workshop will explore the social determinants that often lead Black queer men to sex work. How does sex work lead to higher rates of HIV transmission rates and violence for Black queer men, what can be done to address the social determinants that make sex work a viable option for queer black men, and how to reduce harm for those engaging in survival sex.

Ain’t That Good News? Overcoming Religious Stigma in the South Presenters: Tony D. Christon-Walker, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Dr. David Barnhart, Jr. Saint Junia United Methodist Church, Birmingham, AL Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: South Level: Intermediate

The purpose of this workshop is to help marginalized communities, including PLWHA, find inclusive, affirming spaces.

Innovation through Implementation Science Presenters: Antigone Dempsey, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Stacy Cohen, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD April Stubbs-Smith, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Corliss Heath, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: HRSA Level: Intermediate

This session will give an overview of implementation science and discuss using implementation frameworks builds on the work HRSA’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program has been doing for many years. The workshop will discuss how implementation science can support the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative and methods used for tailoring it for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program. Methods for the rapid enactment of implementation science activities, project examples, and available resources will assist participants in understanding how they can adopt this approach within their own programs.

Community Event: Should Undetectable People Disclose Their Status? Presenters: Mark S. King, Baltimore, MD aheedah Shabazz-El Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3 Track: U=U Pathway Level: Beginner

Is disclosure to sex partners still necessary by those who are undetectable, now that science has proven that people living with HIV on effective treatment who are undetectable cannot sexually transmit HIV? How do personal ethics, practical considerations, and sexual context play a role in this decision?? Join facilitators Mark S. King (My Fabulous Disease) and Waheedah Shabazz-El (Positive Women’s Network) for a dynamic community discussion that welcomes the views of everyone, HIV positive and HIV negative alike. (Note: While HIV criminalization undeniably impacts disclosure in many jurisdiction, this discussion will set aside HIV criminalization for the purposes of this conversation.)

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SESSION 8 WORKSHOPS

Put Some “R.E.S.P.E.C.T.” in HIV Prevention for Heterosexual Black Boys

Achieving Together: Texas’s Community Plan to End the HIV Epidemic

Presenter: Quinn Gentry, Messages of Empowerment Productions, LLC, Atlanta, GA

Presenters: Jennifer Bloom Greenberg, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Robin Atwood, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Melissa Wilson, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Liza Hinojosa, University of Texas at Austin, Leander, TX

Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor Track: Youth Level: Intermediate

This workshop highlights the “R.E.S.P.E.C.T.” model as an effective strategy for building HIV prevention capacity and partnerships with existing mentoring programs for young black boys. The RESPECT approach is designed to “reach male-centered community-based mentoring programs where they are” in terms of their readiness to engage mentees in evidence-based curriculum and candid conversations about HIV prevention and intervention. Assessment findings revealed several themes that substantiated the need for an integrated approach to HIV prevention and mentoring for black boys. Select themes include: (1) unreported sexual molestation and/or abuse, (2) pressure to prove one’s manhood through sexual activity, and (3) stress due to questioning one’s sexual identity or hiding one’s sexual identity. Using a platform of 7 modules comprised of an acronym for “R.E.S.P.E.C.T.”, the workshop focuses on (male) gender-specific, and culturally responsive programmatic frameworks for addressing HIV prevention for black boys within the context of broader life skills development.

Food Is Medicine: Addressing Racial Equity and Health through Innovative Nutrition Services Presenters  Karen Pearl, President & CEO, God’s Love We Deliver, New York, NY, and Chair of the Food Is Medicine Coalition Matthew Pieper, Executive Director of Open Hand Atlanta, Atlanta, GA; CoVice Chair of the Food is Medicine Coalition Advisory Board, and member of the Fulton County HIV/AIDS Prevention, Care and Policy Committee Thomas Pietrogallo, CEO, Poverello Center, Wilton Manors, FL Ana Ayala, Vice President of Programs, Project Open Hand, San Francisco, CA Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4 Track: Structural Interventions Level: Intermediate

This workshop will address the field of food and nutrition services (FNS) for PWH from the perspective of disproportionately affected communities, discussing innovative engagement strategies using nutrition interventions as the gateway. The panel will begin with a national focus on nutrition quality standards and how they have been incorporated in the NYC Ryan White-funded programs. We’ll then introduce an on-the-ground program in Fulton County, GA that is addressing ending the epidemic at its epicenter in the South through integrated, community-driven solutions. We’ll then turn to Implementing Evidence-Informed Interventions (E2i) to improve HIV care – a SPNS project - in the nontraditional setting of a food pantry in FL, as well as that program’s participation in a county-wide initiative that promotes racial equity. We will finish by examining emerging research in the field that is proving the efficacy of these approaches and implications for wider adoption.

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Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Track: Ending the Epidemic Level: Beginner

Ending the HIV epidemic requires us to explore questions that do not have an immediate or simple answer, including: Where are we ending the epidemic and where are we maintaining the status quo? How can we honor individuals by creating systems that work for them? Are we cultivating acceptance or stigma? How can we prioritize communities without further stigmatizing them? How can understanding our history help us move forward? Texas is one of a growing number of jurisdictions to develop an ending the HIV epidemic plan. Achieving Together was developed as a vision-based plan led by the Texas HIV Syndicate. Texas’s diversity and size offered unique challenges as well as opportunities to model a collaborative and inclusive process among a group of stakeholders with varying needs and priorities. This workshop will present the development and design of Achieving Together and how the plan has become a movement.

Clinic+: STD Services for the Community Presenter: David C. Harvey, National Coalition of STD Directors, Washington DC Location: Judiciary Square, Meeting Level 3 Pathway: STD Level: Beginner

STD clinics and other settings that provide STD care services remain a critical component of the health care system in the U.S. They provide STD testing, treatment, and partner services; risk reduction counseling; HIV testing and linkage to care for those found to be HIV-infected; and STD and HIV prevention activities for the community, specifically PrEP services. This session will describe preliminary data on STD and PrEP services provided in the jurisdictions named in the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative; describe efforts to ramp up access to PrEP in these care settings; and discuss ways to actively engage the community, particularly through NCSD’s STD Voices project.


SESSION 8 WORKSHOPS

SATURDAY

PrEP in Paradise: Making PrEP Accessible On Geographically Isolated Islands Presenters: Kekoa Kealoha, Hawaii Island HIV/AIDS Foundation, Kailua Kona, HI Maya Barney, University of Hawaii Clinics at Kaka’ako, Honolulu, HI Kunane Dreier, Hawaii Health & Harm Reduction Center, Honolulu, HI Maya Barney, University of Hawaii, Clinics at Kaka’ako, Honolulu, HI Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Track: PrEP for CBOs Level: Beginner

Delivering HIV care and prevention in rural areas is difficult at best; there is often a lack of resources, too few providers, and limited public health infrastructure. In Hawai’i, the unique separation of rural areas from their urban center in Honolulu makes these challenges particularly difficult. How can one access PrEP on an island without knowledgeable Primary Care Providers or HIV specialists? This session will examine the way Community Based Organizations can partner with Medical Providers and each other to provide access to isolated rural communities, even when a PrEP patient is unable to see a specialist or knowledgeable provider in person immediately.

What Unity Looks Like for PLWHA Presenter: Tammy Kinney, Advantage Behavioral Health System, Stone Mountain, GA Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1 Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV Level: Advanced

Together we stand will be a dialogue between all communities so that we as PLWHA can come together and represent each other when one is not present a the table. We have been using labels, categories, and other structures to form or suggest separation among PLWHA for so long that it has become a way of thinking when there is one disease that affects us all. This presentation will attempt to bridge this “gap” of separation. The presenter and co-presenter will present two sides of this theory and the attendees will hopefully have some tools to continue the conversation in their community. If we are inclusive then why are we separating the issues? The very structure that we have designed and put in place to help assist PLWHA have actually propagated stigma and further complicated the conversation around PLWHA.

Tackling Stigma from Within. Why Your Clients Don’t Come Back Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenter: Ace Robinson, IAPAC, Washington, DC

SEPT

07

impacted adherence and sustained engagement. Best practices to create a stigma-free environment will be discussed.

Inspirational Leadership for Latinx Employees in Management or Leadership Roles Presenters: Natalie Sanchez, UCLA, Los Angeles,CA Hilda Sandoval, Social Exchage Institute, Granada Hills, CA Gabriela Leon, APAIT, Los Angeles, CA Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

Between 2010-2016, Latinx youth experienced an increase in new HIV infections by 17 percent. Latinx youth were the only population that had an increase. Yet little effort has focused on developing youth in the Latinx community into leaders. We need more Latinx leaders including youth across the US who can be prepared to turn this around. In employer surveys, they found that less than half of employees reported having a leader that is inspiring. Inspirational Leadership is about energizing and creating a sense of direction and purpose for employees and excitement and momentum for change. The workshop will increase the attendee’s Confidence in Leading an Effective Team by providing participants with inspirational leadership tools and skills. The workshop will be delivered by 3 Inspirational Leaders who each have over 10 years of Management and Leadership experience.

Medicaid Waivers: Are We Out of the Woods Yet? Presenters: Phil Waters, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA Dori Molozanov, NASTAD, Washington, DC Matt Pagnotti, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Intermediate

Too many people are living with HIV, the Medicaid program plays a vital role in ensuring access to medically necessary care and treatment. Despite the success advocates enjoyed in defending Medicaid from congressional action, the administration is continuing to erect new barriers to Medicaid coverage. Through Medicaid waivers, the federal government is allowing states for the first time to implement restrictive and punitive policies that make it harder to get and keep Medicaid coverage. In this session, we will discuss Medicaid waivers generally, examine the current landscape with respect to proposed and approved waivers, and give concrete examples of advocacy you can engage in to push back against this disturbing new trend. We will also discuss how you can advocate for positive reforms in Medicaid despite these negative initiatives.

Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Pathway: Fast Track Cities Level: Intermediate

This workshop will be addressing HIV- and demographic stigma and prejudice exhibited by clinicians and supportive clinical staff directly

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SATURDAY

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM Affinity Sessions Location: Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Jumping the Broom with Noah’s Arc Star Rodney Chester Location: Georgetown, Meeting Level 1

“Noah’s Arc,” the groundbreaking Logo television network series chronicling the lives and loves of a quartet of gay black men spun-off into the feature plunge with “Jumping the Broom.” Picking up a couple of years after the show’s last episode, the film, marking Logo’s first foray onto the big screen, finds Darryl Stephens’ nice guy screenwriter Noah formally tie the knot with his partner, Wade (Jensen Atwood).

Noah’s Arc is groundbreaking for its unfiltered portrayal of Black gay men, their relationship, sex-lives, and friendship. Noah’s Arc placed sexuality and sexual health at the forefront of the show, featuring characters living with HIV and sero-discordinate couples. Rodney Chester, who plays an HIV nurse on the groundbreaking show will be live to discuss the impact of Noah’s Arc, its role today in pop culture, and his perspective on ending the HIV epidemic among Black Gay and bisexual men.

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OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROBLEM, OUR SOLUTION

During 2019 BAI commemorates 20 years of unapologetically leading the effort to end HIV in Black America. We stand on the shoulders of giants who were courageous enough to fight. As we journey into the future, we continue our commitment to end the epidemic by dismantling the drivers of HIV: homophobia, transphobia, misogynoir, healthcare inequality, mass incarceration, racism. The Black AIDS Institute is deeply entrenched in the community, providing services at all points of the care continuum along with a well-respected research, policy, mobilization and capacity building portfolio that is uniquely and unapologetically Black. We honor and uplift those who came before us by fighting to end HIV in Black communities with a plan that is for us and by us. Join us in the fight! Raniyah Copeland, M.P.H. President and CEO Black AIDS Institute


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SUNDAY 7:00 am 7:45 am

MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE

9:00 Am 11:00 Am

SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

9:00 am 11:00 am

Marquis Salon 14 Meeting Level 2 Session 9: Workshops

All About Us: Women and Biomedical HIV Prevention Mint, Meeting Level 4

How to Make #PrEP4All for Everyone LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3  Decolonizing the Way We Lead: Dismantling White Supremacy Work Culture  Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor 

Let’s Get Mobile, Navigators Without a Clinic  Catholic University, Meeting Level 1 

U=U for Providers: How to Have the Conversation  Shaw, Meeting Level 3 

Connecting the Dots: Uprooting Social Determinants and HIV Congress, Meeting Level 4 

Eliminating Barriers to Healthcare for the Trans Community Howard University, Meeting Level 1 

What’s in a Story? Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3 

Creating a Psychosocial Infrastructure for Older Adults with HIV Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2

Combatting Stigmas for Persons Living and Aging with HIV Silver Linden, 2nd Floor  eMPowerment: The Success of Combination HIV Prevention and Treatment Strategies  Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1  Ending the HIV Epidemic Listening Session ((es)) Capitol, Meeting Level 4 

Developing and Implementing PrEP Services in Native Communities Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Perspective: U=U Black Gay Men Living with HIV Over 50 University of DC, Meeting Level 1

Closing Plenary Brekafast

Getting Your House in Order: Systematic Approaches to Addressing Foundational Issues to Ensure Success of Biomedical HIV Prevention Efforts Lunch provided. Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2

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Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Current Era Archives, Meeting Level 4 

11:30 am 1:30 pm

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08

SUNDAY

SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 9: Workshops

Perspective: U=U Black Gay Men Living with HIV Over 50

All About Us: Women and Biomedical HIV Prevention

Presenters: Larry Walker, Thrive SS Nathan Townsend, Thrive SS

Presenters: Clare Collins, Microbicide Trials Network, Pittsburgh, PA  Tori Cooper, Atlanta, GA  Melissa Turner, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 

Location: University of DC, Meeting Level 1 Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

THRIVE SS is an Atlanta-based 501c3 nonprofit organization that created the Undetectables Model – a tiered peer support model that combines online support, traditional in-person support, and friend/social/ “Judy support” - to address issues that Black people are living with HIV face. In the United States, many people of color living with HIV have trouble reaching viral suppression or undetectable status, disclosing their HIV status to partners, family, and friends, addressing their hierarchy of needs (shelter, employment, medical care) and gaining support.

The mission of the THRIVE SS is to improve health equity for Black gay men living with HIV through direct support, advocacy, and building collective power. Thrive will lead an engaging discussion with Black Gay Men around their thoughts and experiences with U=U. How are current U=U messages reaching Black gay men? Are they impacting stigma? How do we create systems that help Black Gay Men see higher rates of viral suppression?

Developing and Implementing PrEP Services in Native Communities Coordinated by the NMAC AI/AN CAP Location: Marquis Salon 12, Meeting Level 2 Pathway: American Indian/ Alaska Native Level: Intermediate

Discussions from Native programs on developing PrEP services as HIV prevention for high risk individuals and the capacity building needs and strategies for implementation.

Location: Mint, Meeting Level 4 Track: Women  Level: Beginner 

Since the beginning of the epidemic, cisgender and transgender women have been hard hit by HIV. Yet there has been little attention paid to the development and distribution of comprehensive informational resources on women-focused biomedical approaches to HIV prevention. To help fill this gap, the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (WHRC) developed a slide presentation on biomedical HIV prevention for cisgender and transgender women that can be used to promote HIV prevention and research advocacy for all women. During this workshop, presenters from the WHRC, representing the National Institutes of Health-funded networks engaged in biomedical HIV prevention research, will introduce the slide presentation and describe its use as a vital resource for promoting awareness of the urgency for HIV prevention in women. Presenters will also engage attendees in a discussion about approaches to using the slide presentation in communities to raise the visibility of biomedical HIV prevention research among women.

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Current Era Presenters:  Kevin Costello, JD, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA  Wayne Turner, JD, NHeLP, Washington, DC  Harper Jean Tobin, JD, MSSA (MSW), National Center for Transgender Equality, Washington, DC  Sasha Buchert, JD, Lambda Legal, Chicago, IL  Location: Archives, Meeting Level 4  Pathway: Health Care Access  Level: Intermediate 

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SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

In the past year, we have seen health care policy at both the federal and state level endure a volatile regression, with many previously won advancements now in jeopardy. This panel will focus on how advocates are continuing the health care fight for access in two important arenas: Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.  We will discuss the three pending U.S. Supreme Court cases that have the potential to decide the future of how federal law recognizes discrimination against the LGBTQ community.  We will identify the range of areas in which the Trump Administration has acted to erase legal protections on the basis of gender identity.  We will also describe some of the worst examples of how discriminatory health care policies affect vulnerable populations and how it is possible to fight back.  Join us and learn how to hold the public and private insurance industries accountable to the HIV community! 

Presenters: Bryan Fiallos, Lifelong, Seattle, WA  Matthew Noble, Lifelong, Seattle, WA  Tony Koster, Lifelong, Seattle, WA  Location: Catholic University, Meeting Level 1   Track: PrEP for CBOs  Level: Intermediate 

Lifelong is a CBO in Seattle that includes HIV testing, free condoms, and PrEP Navigation services for 3 counties in Western Washington. Lifelong currently does not operate a PrEP clinic. Therefore, in order to expand PrEP Navigation services to the wider, “harder” to reach populations, we developed a robust online PrEP navigation program. The online PrEP navigation is a multifaceted approach using “hook up” apps, like Grindr and Jack’D, to perform outreach to clients while linking interested persons to PrEP Navigation services. Some of the online services include completing applications, providing education, risk assessments, benefits navigation, as well as scheduling appointments and referrals to community clinics. As the program grew it became clear that there needed to be seamless transitions from online to provider services. As a result, partnerships with local community clinics developed. These partnerships provided clients with quick and easy access to qualified PrEP providers. 

Connecting the Dots: Uprooting Social Determinants and HIV Presenters:  Kate D’Adamo, Reframe Health and Justice, Baltimore, MD  Breanna Diaz, Positive Women’s Network, DC  Scott Schoettes, Lamda Legal, Chicago, IL  Drew Gibson, AIDS United, Washington, DC  Jada Hicks, The Center for HIV Law and Policy, New York, NY  Location: Congress, Meeting Level 4  Pathway: Structural Interventions  Level: Intermediate 

Research shows that behavioral and social determinants directly affect health outcomes and impact an individual’s risk of acquiring HIV. This panel will address how those structural interventions exist at the nexus of HIV and criminalization. While HIV criminalization laws are described

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in narrow terms, the issue of status-based criminalization touches on policing, surveillance, and marginalization in ways that are often ignored. HIV criminal laws act as a barrier to the public health goal of ending the HIV epidemic. Marginalized communities—people of color, sex workers, members of the LGBTQ community, people who inject drugs, those who are currently incarcerated— are disproportionately impacted by HIV criminalization, and by the structural inequities which perpetuate the transmission of HIV.   This panel addresses how structural interventions can be used to target the social determinants of HIV transmission:   •

Public health buy-in

Comprehensive sex-ed

Let’s Get Mobile, Navigators Without a Clinic 

SEPT

Syringe exchange programs Decriminalize sex work 

What’s in a Story? Presenters:  Kathie Hiers, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL  Location: Mount Vernon Square, Meeting Level 3  Pathway: South  Level: Beginner 

Nothing has a greater impact on helping others to understand the struggles of living with HIV than the voices of the people living with and working with HIV every day. Come hear some of these powerful stories that exemplify courage, humility, and even a little humor.

Combatting Stigmas for Persons Living and Aging with HIV Presenters:  Alisha Hurwood, Legal Aid Service of Broward County, Inc., Plantation, FL  Erin Weiss, Legal Aid Service of Broward County, Inc., Plantation, FL  Location: Silver Linden, 2nd Floor  Track: Prioritizing People Living with HIV  Level: Beginner 

This presentation addresses the prevalence of HIV in persons aged 50 and older, and potential reasons why 17 percent of new HIV diagnoses are attributable to people in this age demographic and 35 percent of them already had a late-stage infection at the time of diagnosis according to the CDC (2016). This presentation also explores the unique factors affecting persons who are living and aging with HIV, such as: stigma and the consequences thereof; the interaction between HIV stigma and agerelated stigma; the intersection of HIV and the LGBTQ community living in long-term care facilities; delays in diagnosis of HIV; and, examples of legal rights afforded to persons with HIV living in assisted living facilities, nursing homes and shelters. The challenges to finding adequate and inclusive housing as people age with HIV will be examined in this presentation.

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SEPT

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SUNDAY

eMPowerment: The Success of Combination HIV Prevention and Treatment Strategies Presenters:  Cedric Pulliam, Gay Men’s Health Collaborative, Woodbridge, VA  Dr. Andre Rosario  Rodney Lewis, Inova Juniper Program/Gay Men’s Health Collaborative, Alexandria, VA  Jason Watler, Gay Men’s Health Collaborative, Fairfax, VA  Dwight Venson, Gay Men’s Health Collaborative, Fairfax, VA  Location: Gallaudet, Meeting Level 1  Track: Gay Men  Level: Intermediate 

eMPowerment: The Success of Combination HIV Prevention and Treatment Strategies will be a session that educates participants about the success of the Gay Men’s Health Collaborative, an MPowerment Project devoted to young Black gay, bisexual, and same gender loving men ages 16-34 on combination HIV prevention and treatment strategies and the foundational modeling of GMHC with the Inova Juniper Program, which is the largest HIV-servicing clinic in Northern Virginia apart of the largest hospital system in Virginia known as Inova Health System. The sustainability of the GMHC and its seven-year history serves as one-of-a-kind catalyst of the MPowerment Project and participants will gain insight on creating effective combination HIV prevention and treatment modeled organizations like GMHC in their communities or adopting the model in their ASO/CBO.

Ending the HIV Epidemic Listening Session Spanish language translation available ((es)) Presenters:  Steven Young, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD  Susan Robilotto, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD  Antigone Dempsey, HRSA HAB, Rockville, MD  Location: Capitol, Meeting Level 4  Pathway: HRSA  Level: Beginner 

The purpose of this fourth HRSA session is to conduct an open dialogue and get feedback from participants on challenges, barriers, opportunities, and recommendations regarding technical assistance efforts needed to support the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative work.  This listening session will review key themes, expectations, activities, and/or resources presented in the first 3 workshops and will facilitate a discussion with probing questions to help elicit ideas on stakeholders need to meet the goals of the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative. 

How to Make #PrEP4All for Everyone Presenter:  Ace Robinson, IAPAC, Washington, DC  Location: LeDroit Park, Meeting Level 3  Pathway: Fast Track Cities  Level: Advanced 

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SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

Increasing PrEP Access for high-burden communities within high-burden jurisdictions will require a strategy to be successful. During this workshop, best practices will be offered to develop a systems approach to utilizing funding to increase PrEP access, utilization, and sustained engagement.

Decolonizing the Way We Lead: Dismantling White Supremacy Work Culture Presenters:  Marcus Stanley, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX  Samira Ali, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX  Katie McCormick, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX  The SUSTAIN TEAM, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Houston, TX  Location: Scarlet Oak, 2nd Floor Level  Track: Leadership  Level: Intermediate 

Consciously and unconsciously, leaders, service providers, researchers, and HIV service organizations perpetuate a system designed to leverage services and resources for white and/or cis-gender people, organizations and institutions. Few examples or models exist that actually provide guidance on dismantling such systems and structures rooted in white supremacy.  Thus, the purpose of this workshop is to discuss structural/ systemic factors and resultant leadership practices that are subtle, yet pervasive mechanisms that shape the ways in which marginalized communities are treated. Moreover, this becomes essential to unpack given the role of emerging young leaders who are also impacted by oppressive systems. Using the SUSTAIN Wellbeing COMPASS Coordinating Center as a case study, this workshop will provide concrete recommendations for leaders, service providers, and researchers that aim to dismantle and counteract institutional oppression and help move culturally-specific communities and organizations from the margins to the center of the decision-making tables. 

U=U for Providers: How to Have the Conversation  Presenters:   Dr. Theo Hodge, George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC  Andrea Weddle, HIV Medicine Association, Washington, DC  Location: Shaw, Meeting Level 3  Pathway: U=U  Level: Intermediate 

Doctors have a responsibility to be sharing the science behind the Undetectable = Untransmittable movement with their patients. Doing so, however, requires that providers are given the tools to do so. In this workshop, we will provide an in-depth review of the science underpinning U=U, share resources and communications for how to talk to patients, and discuss implementation strategies for how this incredible news can be implemented at every stage of the care continuum. 


SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

SUNDAY

SEPT

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Eliminating Barriers to Healthcare for the Trans Community

Creating a Psychosocial Infrastructure for Older Adults with HIV

Presenters: Lucas Wehle, Metro Inclusive Health, St. Petersburg, FL  Kiala Emmons, Metro Inclusive Health, St. Petersburg, FL 

Presenters: Stephen Karpiak PhD, Senior Director for Research, GMHC, New York, NY Michelle Lopez, Community Liaison GMHC, New York, NY

Location: Howard University, Meeting Level 1  Track: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming  Level: Intermediate 

Location:Marquis Salon 13, Meeting Level 2 Track:Aging Level:Intermediate

This workshop will focus on the importance of creating spaces in the healthcare setting that are inclusive of all humans regardless of gender identities. Through interactive discussions and case studies, attendees will collaborate with peers to tackle realistic scenarios they might come in contact with at their own agency. This activity-based session will cover reallife examples of what positive trans healthcare can look like. Attendees will participate in break-out groups to discuss what barriers the trans community faces when seeking healthcare overall. The facilitators will provide examples of strategies used within their own organizations and answer questions from attendees. Participants will also work on case studies as a group to identify barriers in situations they may face at their own agencies. 

GMHC is committed to providing needed services for Older Adults with HIV. A comprehensive series of programs will be reviewed that address the needs of this population. The National Resource Center on HIV and Aging; The HUB for Long Term Survivors; The Buddy Program and Hot Line; “We ARE Still Here” a 2day intervention based on the AIDS Survivor Syndrome. These programs are supported by data from the multisite Research on Older Adults with HIV (ROAH). Attendees will provide feedback interactively to illustrate local programming.

11:30 am - 1:30 pm Closing Plenary

Getting Your House in Order: Systematic Approaches to Addressing Foundational Issues to Ensure Success of Biomedical HIV Prevention Efforts Marquis Ballroom, Meeting Level 2 Moderator: Sable K. Nelson, NMAC Presenters: Kehinde Bademosi, Bureau of HIV Services Fredy Roberts-Ramirez, Howard Brown Health Rocky Block, MPH, Louisiana Office of Public Health

Biomedical HIV prevention is going to play a critical role in our collective efforts to end the HIV epidemic in America. As communities across the country prepare to either initiate or enhance their participation in the growing movement of U.S. jurisdictions that have committed to and formulated plans for ending their respective HIV epidemics, it is crucial that we share our resources, experiences, challenges, and best practices related to biomedical HIV prevention with each other. This plenary will address community mistrust of health systems, provide examples of successful multilevel/interdepartmental staff training, best practices in promoting self-care in human service organizations, and perspectives from community members during their journey to access and remain adherent to PrEP.

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SESIONES PARA LA INTERPRETACION EN ESPANOL 5 DE SEPTIEMBRE Talleres (Institutes): De 8:00 a 11:00 AM Talleres (Institutes): De 8:00 a 11:00 AM

Taller Latinx / Latinx Institute Presentado por el panel CAP del Consejo Nacional de Minorías contra el SIDA (NMAC)

Todos los miembros de la comunidad latinx en USCA están invitados a asistir al Instituto Latinx. El taller incluirá sesiones de trabajo donde comenzaremos a desarrollar un plan de acción para participar, responder y crear cambios estructurales/políticos para acabar con la epidemia de VIH. Los ataques contra las comunidades latinx tales como el reciente tiroteo en El Paso y el tiroteo en la discoteca Pulse, junto con la retórica y las acciones contra los inmigrantes, tales como las redadas de ICE, crean muchas barreras tanto físicas como estructurales para nuestras comunidades. Al mismo tiempo que las comunidades latinx enfrentan la violencia, la discriminación y el temor constante por su seguridad, las barreras y la exclusión de los sistemas de salud crean desafíos para el acceso a la atención médica.

Lisa Scotti, Enfermera con Práctica Médica Certificada y Registrada (CRNP), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), Baltimore City Health Department (Departamento de Salud de la Ciudad de Baltimore), Baltimore, MD Damon Jacobs, Terapeuta con Licencia en Matrimonio y Familia (LMFT), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), Nueva York, NY Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: Profesionales de atención médica Nivel: Inicial

La ANAC (Association of Nurses in AIDS Care /Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA) presenta una actualización y diálogo sobre los tratamientos para el VIH y la hepatitis, el manejo de los síntomas, dejar de fumar y otra reducción de riesgos, Indetectable=Intransmisible, profilaxis preexposición, salud sexual, evaluación de salud mental, bienestar, comunicaciones con el proveedor y salud en general. Acérquese a consultar con nuestro panel de enfermeros, enfermeros con práctica médica, terapeutas y psicólogos cualquier duda que tenga.

La Respuesta Nacional para Acabar con la Epidemia de VIH ya no puede ignorar las agendas sociopolíticas que aumentan el riesgo de VIH para las comunidades latinx y que causan temor de buscar tratamiento. ¡Ya basta!

Sesión 2: De a 6:15 PM SESIÓN 2: 4:15 De 4:00 a 6:00 PM

Después de la mesa redonda, los representantes de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC), del Consejo Nacional de Minorías contra el SIDA (NMAC), de la Comisión Latina sobre el SIDA (Latino Commission on AIDS), del Consejo sobre el SIDA del Valle (Valley AIDS Council) discutirán como avanzar una respuesta para la prevención y la atención médica del VIH dentro del contexto del clima político actual. ¡Sea parte de la conversación y acción para Acabar con la Epidemia en la Comunidad Latinx!

Expositores: Sable K. Nelson, Consejo Nacional de Minorías contra el SIDA (NMAC), Washington, DC Moisés Agosto-Rosario, Consejo Nacional de Minorías contra el SIDA (NMAC), Washington DC

Sesión 1: De 4:00 PM SESIÓN 1: 2:00 De a1:45 a 3:45 PM

Pregúntele a un clínico - Actualizaciones sobre salud y bienestar en torno al VIH Expositores: Carole Treston, Enfermera Registrada (RN), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), Filadelfia, PA Jeffrey Kwong, Doctorado en Enfermería (DNP), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), Rutgers University School of Nursing (Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Rutgers), Newark, NJ Marik Moen, Doctorado (PhD), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), University of Maryland (Universidad de Maryland), Baltimore, MD Dorcas Baker, Enfermera Registrada (RN), Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Asociación de Enfermeros para la Atención del SIDA), Johns Hopkins University, (Universidad Johns Hopkins), Baltimore, MD

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Mejores prácticas para la cascada de profilaxis preexposición en el ámbito comunitario

Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: Tratamiento Nivel: Intermedio

Fueron congregados participantes de ocho grupos jurisdiccionales entre 2016 y 2017. Un subgrupo de esos ocho grupos participó en un Aprendizaje Colaborativo que tuvo lugar en persona y a través de llamadas de video de seguimiento en el verano de 2018. Los participantes compartieron varios sucesos y desafíos relacionados con generar mayor conciencia, acceso, utilización y adhesión a PrEP en las comunidades de color. El elemento más importante de nuestra estrategia fue el conocimiento y la experiencia en el área que tenía el personal de contacto directo de prevención del VIH. El Consejo Nacional de Minorías contra el SIDA (NMAC) fue coordinador y facilitador del proceso. Haciendo uso de las experiencias vividas y los conocimientos prácticos de los participantes de los ocho grupos de trabajo jurisdiccionales y de aquellos que participaron en el Aprendizaje Colaborativo, NMAC desarrolló sus Mejores Prácticas de la Cascada de PrEP para cada uno de los “pasos” de la Cascada de PrEP (conciencia, acceso, utilización y adhesión).


SESIONES PARA LA INTERPRETACION EN ESPANOL 6 DE SEPTIEMBRE Sesión 3: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Sesión 3: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM Usted PUEDE sentarse con Nosotros: Desarrollo de un plan para acabar con la epidemia Expositores: Sara Semelka, AIDS Foundation of Chicago (Fundación contra el SIDA de Chicago), Chicago, IL John Peller, Máster en Política Pública (MPP), AIDS Foundation of Chicago (Fundación contra el SIDA de Chicago), Chicago, IL Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Área temática: Cómo acabar con la epidemia Nivel: Intermedio

Ya sea local, regional o estatal, un plan exitoso para Acabar con la Epidemia, debe incluir colaboraciones y participación comunitaria como sus pilares fundamentales. La iniciativa Getting to Zero Illinois o GTZ-IL (Llegar a Cero en Illinois) se basa en una alianza única de entidades sin fines de lucro y gubernamentales, incluyendo la AIDS Foundation of Chicago (Fundación contra el SIDA de Chicago), el Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois y el Departamento de Salud Pública de Chicago, junto con otras casi 50 agencias y organizaciones. Durante más de dos años, GTZ-IL ha trabajado en el desarrollo de su plan para Acabar con la Epidemia en continua colaboración, abarcando diferentes administraciones gubernamentales y atravesando distintos escenarios políticos. Aprenda cómo discusiones pequeñas, informales entre colegas llevaron a un esfuerzo a lo largo del estado que creció hasta convertirse en un grupo organizado a nivel estatal que ha congregado a cientos de defensores, proveedores, organizadores y trabajadores de salud pública para el desarrollo de un plan que guiará el trabajo de Illinois para acabar con la epidemia de VIH en la próxima década. Sesión 4: De 4:00 PM Sesión 4: 2:00 De a2:00 a 4:00 PM

Investigación de implementación y el papel de los Centros para la Investigación del SIDA (CFAR) del Instituto Nacional de Alergias y Enfermedades Infecciosas (NIAID) en el plan federal para acabar con la epidemia de VIH

La ciencia de la implementación es crucial para averiguar si los descubrimientos de la investigación biomédica funcionan en la vida real. Es por eso un componente importante del plan federal para acabar con la epidemia de VIH para 2030. Este taller aborda los fundamentos de la ciencia de la implementación y estudios de casos de implementación de la iniciación y adhesión a PrEP de hombres gay de color. También discute el papel de los Centros para la Investigación del SIDA (CFAR) del Instituto Nacional de Alergias y Enfermedades Infecciosas (NIAID) en el desarrollo de investigaciones de implementación y del grupo de trabajo de los CFAR responsable de desarrollar una agenda de investigación de VIH acerca de la ciencia de la implementación. Sesión 5: De 4:15 a 6:15 PM Sesión 5: De 4:15 a 6:15 PM

Viva PrEP: Una campaña sobre profilaxis preexposición dirigida por y para la Comunidad Latinx Expositores: Rafael Velazquez, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, San Francisco, CA Esteban Cuaya-Muñoz, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, San Francisco, CA Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Área temática: Prevención biomédica del VIH Nivel: Inicial

Como Latinx, tenemos distintas visiones del mundo y aunque la información general es correcta, el mensaje es en gran medida transmitido desde una perspectiva sociocultural que no resuena entre las comunidades subrepresentadas. Por esta razón, las campañas como Viva PrEP son cruciales para llegar a comunidades que históricamente fueron dejadas fuera de la conversación. En este taller, abordaremos Viva PrEP, una de las primeras campañas de toma de conciencia sobre profilaxis preexposición en idioma español creada por y para la Comunidad Latinx. Nos enfocaremos en las estrategias para aceptar y entrelazar el lenguaje y la cultura en estrategias de marketing social y destacaremos cuatro elementos claves; análisis, diseño, implementación y evaluación a nivel comunitario. Al término de esta sesión, los participantes conocerán los enfoques para hacer participar a las mujeres transgénero y los HSH Latinx en el proceso de diseño, las estrategias para que las organizaciones de base comunitaria desarrollen e implementen sus propias campañas de marketing social, las estrategias de acercamiento a la comunidad y la evaluación.

Expositores Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, Instituto Nacional de Alergias y Enfermedades Infecciosas (NIAID), Division of AIDS (División de SIDA), Rockville, MD Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: Centros para la Investigación del SIDA (CFAR) Nivel: Avanzado

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SESIONES PARA LA INTERPRETACION EN ESPANOL 7 DE SEPTIEMBRE Sesión 6: 9:00 a 11:00 AM Sesión 6:DeDe 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Exploración de soluciones en el Sur: Una respuesta centrada en la comunidad a las necesidades del sur del país (Deep South) Expositores: Dafina M. Ward, Doctorado en Jurisprudencia (JD), Southern AIDS Coalition (Coalición contra el SIDA en el Sur), Birmingham, AL Samira Ali, Doctorado (Ph.D.), LMSW, University of Houston (Universidad de Houston). Houston, TX Neena K. Smith-Bankhead, Maestría (MS), Emory University (Universidad Emory), Atlanta, GA Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: El Sur Nivel: Inicial

Facilitada por los Centros de Coordinación de la Gilead COMPASS Initiative® , esta sesión presentará a organizaciones y líderes regionales que están utilizando recursos para elaborar programas, desarrollar nuevas habilidades y mejorar la prestación de servicios para satisfacer las necesidades de las comunidades del sur. La COMPASS Initiative® apoya a las comunidades del sur con inversiones a través de subsidios, el desarrollo de capacidad a nivel de la organización y programas de desarrollo de habilidades para personas que viven con VIH. A través de esta sesión exploraremos: • Los aportes o conclusiones del Día inaugural de Concientización sobre VIH/SIDA en el Sur en agosto • Las presentaciones de aliados de base comunitaria que están utilizando enfoques innovadores para abordar problemáticas claves en el sur, lo que incluye modelos para la atención informada de traumas y la reducción del estigma • Resumen de los recursos disponibles a través de la COMPASS Initiative® • Problemáticas emergentes en las comunidades del sur y estrategias para desarrollar capacidad en la región para abordar estas problemáticas de manera efectiva.

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Sesión 7: 7: De a 4:00 PM PM Sesión De2:00 2:00 a 4:00

Uso de profilaxis preexposición (PrEP): Concientización y navegación entre las poblaciones prioritarias Expositores: VeronicaMcCants, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades), Atlanta, GA Stephen Fallon, Doctorado (Ph.D.), Latinos Salud, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Naomi Busler, Maestría en Trabajo Social (LMSW), Someone Cares, Atlanta, GA Eric Paulukonis, Mazzoni Center, Filadelfia, PA Dwayne Jenkins, Nashville Cares, Nashville, TN Earl Banks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades), Atlanta, GA Christian Spears, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Centros para el Control y Prevención de Enfermedades), Atlanta, GA Yvonne Greene, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades), Atlanta, GA Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Área temática: PrEP para Organizaciones de Base Comunitaria (CBO) Nivel: Intermedio

De acuerdo con la Estrategia Nacional de VIH/SIDA (NHAS) 2020, garantizar “pleno acceso a servicios integrales de PrEP” es esencial. Como resultado, algunos programas financiados por los CDC han comenzado a desarrollar programas de PrEP en respuesta a este indicador. Los líderes de prevención del VIH están trabajando juntos para aumentar la conciencia y mejorar el acceso a los servicios de PrEP entre las poblaciones prioritarias y reducir las formas transversales de estigma (tales como falta de vivienda, de salud mental, raciales, económicas y geográficas, etc.) para lograr servicios exitosos de navegación dentro de las organizaciones de base comunitaria (CBO). Este foro proporcionará una demostración de los distintos enfoques utilizados por programas financiados por los CDC que han creado entornos favorables para la prevención y atención del VIH, y también han enfrentado las barreras y promovido el acceso a PrEP. Cuatro CBO exclusivas presentarán las estrategias de desarrollo e implementación de sus programas de PrEP con énfasis en los hombres que tienen sexo con hombres (HSH) y las personas transgénero (TG) de color.


SESIONES PARA LA INTERPRETACION EN ESPANOL Sesión 8: 4:15 a 6:15 PM PM Sesión 8:DeDe 4:15 a 6:15

8 DE SEPTIEMBRE

Enfrentar el estigma desde adentro. Por qué los clientes no vuelven

Sesión 9: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM Sesión 9: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Expositores: AceRobinson, IAPAC, Washington, DC Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: Fast Track Cities Nivel: Intermedio

Este taller abordará el estigma contra el VIH y el prejuicio demográfico demostrado por médicos, y personal clínico de apoyo que tiene un impacto directo sobre la adhesión y el compromiso sostenible. Se abordarán las mejores prácticas para crear un entorno libre de estigma.

Sesión para escuchar: Cómo acabar con la epidemia de VIH Expositores: Steven Young, Oficina de VIH/SIDA (HAB) de la Administración de Servicios y Recursos de Salud (HRSA), Rockville, MD Susan Robilotto, Oficina de VIH/SIDA (HAB) de la Administración de Servicios y Recursos de Salud (HRSA), Rockville, MD Antigone Dempsey, Oficina de VIH/SIDA (HAB) de la Administración de Servicios y Recursos de Salud (HRSA), Rockville, MD Lugar: Capitol, Meeting Level 4 Marco: La Administración de Servicios y Recursos de Salud (HRSA) Nivel: Inicial

El propósito de esta cuarta sesión de la HRSA es entablar un diálogo abierto y recibir opiniones de los participantes sobre los desafíos, barreras, oportunidades y recomendaciones acerca de los esfuerzos de asistencia técnica necesarios para apoyar el trabajo de la Iniciativa “Ending the HIV Epidemic” (Cómo acabar con la epidemia de VIH). Esta sesión para escuchar analizará los temas claves, las expectativas, las actividades o los recursos presentados en los 3 primeros talleres y facilitará una discusión con preguntas de sondeo para ayudar a obtener ideas acerca de la necesidad de los interesados para alcanzar los objetivos de la Iniciativa “Ending the HIV Epidemic” (Cómo acabar con la epidemia de VIH).

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POSTER SESSIONS

September 6 & 7 1:30 -2:00 PM by Track

Poster Sessions are located on Meeting Level 1

Biomedical HIV Prevention Let’s Stop HIV Together! A Model for Increasing PrEP Uptake Presenters: Aviva Joffe, Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, PA John Rose, Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, PA Laura Martindale, Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, PA

PrEP Use Among African American Women Residing in Texas Presenter: Dominique Guinn, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

Ending the Epidemic EtE: Building Healthcare Capacity Through HIV Preceptorship Programs Presenters: Robert Walsh, Mount Sinai Institute for Advanced Medicine, New York, NY Jessica Steinke, Cicatelli Associates Inc., New York, NY Terri Wilder, Mount Sinai Institute for Advanced Medicine, New York, NY Brooke Levandowski, Clinical and Translational Science InstituteUniversity of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY

Evaluation of Florida’s Statewide HIV Test and Treat Initiative Presenters: Karalee Poschman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tallahassee, FL Emma Spencer, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL Jeffrey Beal, Florida Department of Health, North Fort Myers, FL Using Financial Incentives to Improve HIV Outcomes in Louisiana Presenters: Sarah Chrestman, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA Russell Brewer, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL Tejal Patel, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA Katie Lass, The Policy & Research Group, New Orleans, LA

Gay Men A Culturally Competent Social Media Campaign Targeting Young Latino MSM Presenters: Maria Cabrera, Fenway Community Health Center, Boston, MA Ricardo Holguin, Fenway Community Health Center, Boston, MA Alix Pupo Wiss, Fenway Community Health Center, Boston, MA Matan Benyishay, Boston, MA

Analyzing Effectiveness of Socialization for Black Gay Men Health Awareness Presenters: Obie McNair, My Brother’s Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS Daniel Chavez-Yenter, My Brother’s Keeper, Inc., Jackson, MS At-home Chlamydia/Gonorrhea Screening and Remote Video Counseling Among MSM Couples Presenters: Stephen Sullivan, University of Michigan Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities, Ann Arbor, MI Rob Stephenson, University of Michigan Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities, Ann Arbor, MI

Leadership From Pioneer to Mentor in 5 Not So Easy Steps Presenters: Miguel Taveras, PROCEED Inc., Elizabeth, NJ Gisele Pemberton, PROCEED Inc., Elizabeth, NJ Brenda Cruz, PROCEED Inc., Elizabeth, NJ

Moving from Talk to Action: Developing New Leaders of Color Presenters: Christopher Allen, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Robin Atwood, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Self-Care in Social Justice & HIV Leadership Presenter: Maurice Eckstein, Lere Agency, Atlanta, GA

100 100


POSTER SESSIONS

September 6 & 7 1:30 -2:00 PM Poster Sessions are located on Meeting Level 1

Opioid Epidemic Kentucky Finding Cases (KyFC) Project; Finding new HIV cases=Early Diagnosis. Presenter: Monica Ridgeway, Kentucky Department for Public Health, Frankfort, KY

Learning Communities: A Model for Engaging SSP Stakeholders Presenters: Moya Brown-Lopez, NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY Gabriella Hermosi, Queens, NY

PrEP for CBOs PrEPinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on a Budget: Providing PrEP with Limited Resources Presenters: Monique Eppinger, Fulton County Board of Health, Atlanta, GA Kara Garretson, Fulton County Board of Health, Atlanta, GA

The Eight and Wrong Turns of PrEP Navigation in Appalachia Presenters: Ernie W. Hoskins, Positively Living/ Project Act, Knoxville, TN Dominick White, Positively Living/ Project Act, Knoxville, TN Ryan Hood, Positively Living/ Project Act, Knoxville, TN

Prioritizing People Living With HIV Empowering Positive Health Practices Through Peer Advocacy Presenters: Debbie Cestaro-Seifer, Broward Regional Health Planning Council, Naples, FL Michele Rosiere, Broward Regional Health Planning Council, Hollywood, FL

Using Social Network Strategy to Connect PLWH with Health Insurance Presenter: Naquetta Davis, University of Rochester- Center for Community Practice, Rochester, NY

Mental Health and Wellbeing Among Older Adults Living with HIV Presenters: Rebecca Incledon, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Diana Lemos, Chicago, IL Banita McCarn, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Public Policy 10 Yrs of Routine HIV Testing in Two Urban Emergency Centers Presenter: Jennifer Carey, Harris Health System, Houston, TX

The Equitable Access Project, An Intersectional Rural Approach Presenter: A. Toni Young, Community Education Group, Washington, DC

Stigma and Leel of Care Among Health Providergs to PLHIV Presenters: Felisse Julien Jegonia, Maria Reyna-Xavier University Hospital Inc., Cagayan De Oro City, SC Joey Marie Jegonia, PSYB Human Resource Clinic and Consultancy, Cagayan De Oro City,

Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Two-Spirit: Subtle and at the Same Time Radically Different Presenter: Harlan Pruden, BC Centre for Disease Control/Clinical Prevention Services/Chee Mamuk, Vancouver, BC

#2019USCA

101


POSTER SESSIONS

September 6 & 7 1:30 -2:00 PM Poster Sessions are located on Meeting Level 1

Trauma-Informed Care Glitter Never Fades: Queering Sanctuary Models as Public Health Intervention Presenters: Mayadet Patitucci Cruz, Broadway Youth Center, Chicago, IL Cassie Warren, Broadway Youth Center, Chicago, IL

Project Impact: Supporting the Re-entry Population Presenter: Anthony Singleton, AMAAD Institute, Los Angeles, CA Shifting the Paradigm: Intimate Partner Violence in the LGBTQ Community Presenters: Ines Tamajong, UCHAPS, Washington, DC

Women Exploring the Use of PrEP in Black Women in Mississippi Presenters: Sandra Melvin, Open Arms Healthcare Center, Jackson, MS Mychal Robinson, East Tennessee State University, Jackson, MS Sandra Melvin, Open Arms Healthcare Center, Jackson, MS

One Test. Two Lives. Do pregnant Women Need HIV Testing? Presenters: Rhonda Harris, Georgia Department of Public Health, Office of HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, GA Jamila Ealey, Georgia Department of Public Health, Office of HIV/AIDS, Atlanta, GA

Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Rates amongst Women Living with HIV/AIDS. Presenters: Joanne Tillman, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA Sandra Najuna, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA Youth Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk About Sex: Comprehensive Sex Ed on College Campuses Presenters: C. Virginia Fields, National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS, Inc., New York, NY Shirley Torho, New York, NY The Man Box: Engaging Young Men-of-Color for HIV/STD Prevention Presenters: Madison Albright, Louisiana Department of Health, STD/ HIV/Hep C Program, New Orleans, LA Ty-Runet Bryant, Louisiana Department of Health, STD/HIV/Hep C Program, New Orleans, LA

102

Wellness Web: Using Text Messaging for Linkage, Engagement, and Retention Presenters: Alison Johnson, Coastal Bend Wellness Foundation, Corpus Christi, TX Hillary Vallejo, Coastal Bend Wellness Foundation, Corpus Christi, TX


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USCA 2019 Program Book  

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USCA 2019 Program Book  

Program book for the 2019 United States Conference on AIDS