{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

JOIN THE SEARCH DEATH IN THE ICE

THE MYSTERY OF THE FRANKLIN EXPEDITION MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MAGAZINE • FALL / WINTER • 2018


TOGETHER

SUPPORT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM, WHERE WE ASPIRE EVERY DAY TO CREATE A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND TO RE-IMAGINE THE INTERCHANGE BETWEEN MARITIME HERITAGE AND BROADER CONTEMPORARY CULTURE.

Just as a captain needs a good crew to make a voyage successful, so Mystic Seaport Museum relies on its donors. Your gift to the Annual Fund supports exemplary programs in every area of the Museum and ensures its vitality and its community. By making a donation, you stimulate wonder, excite curiosity and learning, and inspire an enduring connection to America’s maritime heritage for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. Please make your donation by December 31, 2018. To make your gift today, please call 860.572.5365 or visit www.mysticseaport.org/support

Mystic Seaport Museum Annual Fund • 75 Greenmanville Ave • P.O. Box 6000 • Mystic, CT 06355-0990 • 860.572.5365 • www.mysticseaport.org


CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MAGAZINE is a publication of Mystic Seaport Museum

SEASCAPES .............................................................. 4

PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. WHITE

ADVANCEMENT NEWS ........................................... 5-7 Q & A WITH DAVID PATTEN ...................................... 8

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT SUSAN FUNK

MUSEUM BRIEFS .................................................. 9-11

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID PATTEN

NEW EXHIBITION: DEATH IN THE ICE .................. 12-13

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR CURATORIAL AFFAIRS NICHOLAS BELL

NEW EXHIBITION:

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT LAURA HOPKINS EDITOR GÖRAN R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

5

PRODUCTION SUSAN HEATH

MUNSON INSTITUTE .......................................... 16-17 UPCOMING EXHIBITION ON J.M.W. TURNER’S WATERCOLORS ............................. 18

11

DESIGN KAREN WARD DESIGN CONTRIBUTORS ELISSA BASS ELYSA ENGELMAN CHRIS FREEMAN GLENN GORDINIER ARLENE MARCIONETTE

MONUMENT MAN: KEVIN SAMPSON ..................... 14-15

BUCKINGHAM-HALL HOUSE...................................... 19

DAN MCFADDEN PAUL O’PECKO SHERRI RAMELLA ERIC PAUL ROORDA

ON BOOKS........................................................ 20-21 FROM THE COLLECTIONS ........................................ 22 EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM....................... 23

PHOTOGRAPHY CANADA MUSEUM OF HISTORY CESAR MELGAR JOE MICHAEL

ANDY PRICE KEVIN SAMPSON TATE, LONDON, UK

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVES

FALL / WINTER

ON THE COVER: The Museum’s newest exhibition, Death in the Ice: The Mystery of the Franklin Expedition, will open on December 1 in the Collins Gallery, the Thompson Exhibition Building.

14

2018

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.0711 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 ADVANCEMENT: 860.572.5365 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5331 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 PLEASE GO TO THE MUSEUM’S WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION ON WINTER AND SPRING SCHEDULES ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355-0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

3


SEASCAPES

STORYTELLERS O ur lives are comprised of stories— some are of family members,

others more specifically about

the lives we have led. Some stories are written down into the family record while

Mystic Seaport Museum is blessed with a staff of outstanding storytellers. They are found everywhere

others evolve with more or less color from

throughout the Museum, where

one family member to the next. It makes

they engage with visitors and

sense that one family member emerges as the storyteller, perhaps because her

students. In particular, I would like

or his style is the most engaging. And so

to cite the depth and breadth of

it goes with every family or community. There’s no denying it; stories are an es-

our role-players, whose storytelling

sential component to who we are. Not

is grounded in hours and hours of

long ago, when thinking about this piece,

research and reflects their deep

I challenged myself to avoid telling a story during my work day. It didn’t last; an hour into the day, I needed a story to illustrate what I was trying to convey. One of the greatest strengths of muse-

SEASCAPES

understanding of the people and the roles they have filled.

ums, and Mystic Seaport Museum in particular, is the capacity for storytelling. Ev-

plied, “Please, tell me another story!” in

Importantly, we can learn a significant

ery object has a story­—some more unique

the same manner that a grandson might

lesson from the Franklin story: one must

than others—that helps give meaning to

have asked his grandfather.

listen carefully to the details of a story and

what we see, whether it is the object alone

It seems to me that mariners are par-

not rush to judgment or assumption. Had

or with an ensemble of others. The object

ticularly good at and value storytelling.

Franklin and his crew members listened

may have its own story, but its history, as

The ability to tell a good story, and in our

more carefully to the stories of the ice and

it relates to people, is what truly brings

case factually based stories, seems to be

its residents, the result may have been

something as simple as a rock forward

closely tied to those who embark on ad-

much different. The same is glaringly true

to a life of its own. Mystic Seaport Mu-

ventures and especially voyages or jour-

for those who were in search of Franklin,

seum is blessed with a staff of outstanding

neys that involve discoveries. Just imagine

for had they truly listened to what the

storytellers. They are found everywhere

the importance of a gam in the middle of

Inuit were sharing with them, perhaps

throughout the Museum, where they en-

the Pacific Ocean as whalers search for

this mystery would have been solved long

gage with visitors and students.

whales or their next landfall for provisions.

ago. It was researcher and author David

Such stories provided livelihood if not

Woodman who listened and interpreted

hope for a better turn of events.

so that answers could be found. He closes

I would especially like to cite the depth and breadth of our role-players, whose

4

storytelling is grounded in hours and hours

This brings me to our next stirring ex-

his preface in his book Unravelling the

of research and reflects their deep un-

hibition at Mystic Seaport Museum, Death

Franklin Mystery (1991; 2015) by saying:

derstanding of the people and the roles

in the Ice: The Mystery of the Franklin

“As ephemeral individuals and societies,

they have filled. It goes without saying

Expedition. What makes this story—the

ultimately all that we leave behind are

(but I will anyway!) that they are remark-

absolute core of the exhibition—so cap-

the stories.”

ably engaging with our visitors, willing to

tivating is that even now, some 173 years

explore, usually spontaneously, the path

after the story began, the ending is still

a visitor may lead them down.

unknown and continues to evolve. It is a

Earlier this summer, I witnessed a par-

story searching for a conclusion. Over all

ticular interaction between a young boy

these years, clue upon clue has yielded a

and an interpreter. The latter had finished

deeper understanding of what happened

his explanation or story, and the boy re-

to the Franklin Expedition.

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

Enjoy the exhibition!

STEPHEN C. WHITE, President


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

DAWN RILEY AND OAKCLIFF SAILING: RECIPIENTS OF THE 2018 AMERICA AND THE SEA AWARD

Dawn Riley captivated by Paul Alexander Nolan’s performance.

WE SINCERELY THANK THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS Platinum: William I. Koch Betsy and Hunt Lawrence

Above: Museum president Steve White (left) and board chairman Barclay Collins (right), holding awards accepted by Dawn Riley (center) and Oakcliff Sailing. Below: Honoree Dawn Riley surrounded by family, friends, colleagues.

Gold: Peggy and Grant Cambridge J. Barclay Collins, II Gowrie Group Travelers Silver: Irene and Charles Hamm KPMG Joanne and Michael T. Masin Cayre and Alexis Michas The Northern Trust Company

T

…and our 12 Bronze sponsors he Museum’s 13th annual America

What a night it was! Guests delighted

It was also a record-breaking year for

and the Sea Award Gala honored

in an elegant reception and dinner and

the paddle raise, benefiting our Youth Sail-

American sailor Dawn Riley and

enthusiastically engaged in a spectacular

ing Programs. Thanks to the generosity

Oakcliff Sailing, the high performance train-

auction line-up. The evening was a re-

of so many, $179,000 was generated to

ing center that Dawn leads, on October 3

sounding success for the Museum, grossing

provide opportunities for economically

at the Metropolitan Club in New York. This

more than $730,000.

highest honor of Mystic Seaport Museum

Sotheby’s Executive Vice President

was established in 2006 to celebrate those

Hugh Hildesley ran the live auction, which

who embrace the scholarship, exploration,

included many unique items and oppor-

adventure, aesthetics, competition, and

tunities. At the top of the auction list were

freedom that the sea inspires.

two very special experiences: a once-in-

“Dawn has blazed the trail for women in

a-lifetime 15-day expedition for two on

sailing over the course of nearly three de-

Abercrombie & Kent’s Antarctic Discovery,

cades, and has had a tremendous impact

Palmer’s Bicentennial Expedition 2020;

on the sport, both as a competitor and as

and an extraordinary opportunity for eight

a teacher,” said Steve White, president of

people to sail in a match race between two

Mystic Seaport Museum. “She is in a class

America’s Cup sailors and America and the

by herself, serving as an inspirational role

Sea Award recipients, 2018 honoree Dawn

model for young women and all sailors,”

Riley and 2013 honoree Gary Jobson, each

throughout her remarkable career.

at the helm of a Swedish Match 40!

disadvantaged youth to reap the benefits of the invaluable life lessons learned on the water. Some of life’s greatest lessons are learned at sea! The evening was capped off by Broadway star Paul Alexander Nolan, who enchanted Dawn with his performance of Jimmy Buffett classics in tribute to her love for free-spirited island music. We are truly grateful to the many friends who came together in this effort to support the important mission of Mystic Seaport Museum, and to inspire an enduring connection to the American maritime experience. Sherri Ramella is Advancement events manager.

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

5


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

FARSIGHTED PHILANTHROPY In the spring of 2008, Mystic Seaport Museum lost a dear friend and ardent supporter when Dorothy Blair passed away. Dorothy and her husband John, who died in 1983, had been life members of the Mu-

It was the fervent hope of John and Dorothy that their example would inspire others to join them and include Mystic Seaport Museum in their own estate plans. Please consider following their lead.

seum and John served on the board for many years. They frequently visited the Museum with their boat and immensely enjoyed their interaction with staff members and other friends. Their deep belief in the mission of Mystic Seaport Museum was conveyed through their philanthropy. As loyal and generous patrons, they made regular contributions to the general operating fund, as well as significant contributions to capital projects and endowment. They funded the construction of the replica of the Brant Point Lighthouse and created an endowment to support it. Most recently, Dorothy made a significant leadership gift to the campaign to restore and sail the Charles W. Morgan. John and Dorothy were also participants in the Charles K. Stillman Legacy Society at Mystic Seaport Museum. They made

Dorothy and John Blair.

6

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

provisions through their estate plans to

monies where the impact would be the

establish the Blair Foundation and named

greatest. Over the past decade this has

the Museum as a primary beneficiary. Over

enabled us to invest in our people, exhibits,

the past decade, the foundation made annual gifts totaling $2.3 million. This spring, the Museum was once again the beneficiary of John and Dorothy’s philanthropy in a significant way. They had determined that their foundation would be dissolved after a decade and the remaining funds would be distributed to the various beneficiaries. Thus, in July, word reached us that we would receive a final gift from the Blair Foundation in the amount of $4.2 million. All of these gifts from the foundation

public programs, and collections—ensuring our ability to remain at the forefront of the museum field. It was the fervent hope of John and Dorothy that their example would inspire others to join them and include Mystic Seaport Museum in their own estate plans. Please consider following their lead. To learn more about bequest gifts and planned or deferred gifts and the Charles K. Stillman Legacy Society at Mystic Seaport Museum, please visit our website or call

were given without restrictions so that the

the advancement office directly.

Museum’s management team and board of

Chris Freeman is director of Development &

trustees have been able to deploy these

Legacy Giving.


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

Selected yachting trophies from the permanent collection of Mystic Seaport Museum. A $735,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation will fund new scholarship and curation of these artifacts, which will result in a new exhibition exploring how the sea inspired immigrant craftsmanship and the decorative arts.

THE MUSEUM RECEIVES GRANT FROM THE HENRY LUCE FOUNDATION Earlier this summer, Mystic Seaport

activities will encourage new scholar-

students immersive professional expe-

Museum received a $735,000 grant from

ship around the themes of “The Sea as

riences at a major museum, and three

the Henry Luce Foundation to support the

Muse,” a window into the world of immi-

teacher-fellows will adapt the exhibit

curation and development of three new

grant craftsmanship and decorative arts;

content into “resource sets” that will be

collections installations and related pro-

“The Sea as Studio” for folk art such as

archived and made available for Museum

gramming. These projects will provide new

scrimshaw; and “The Sea as Commons”

and classroom teachers beyond the ex-

perspectives on the art and ensure the

through a curatorial investigation by con-

hibit installations. Teachers will use the

continued preservation and refinement

temporary artist Mary Mattingly.

content to encourage their students to

of the collections while also promoting

“The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased

dig deeper into the stories of the objects

to support Mystic Seaport Museum in

and their creators and make connections

Mystic Seaport Museum preserves

this effort to expand the scholarship and

to their own lives.

the most significant public collections of

knowledge around parts of its collections

“This grant will enable the Museum to

marine art and artifacts in the western

that will benefit from a fresh perspec-

bring rarely-seen collections to light and

hemisphere. Through this initiative, the

tive,” Teresa A. Carbone, program direc-

augment our curatorial capacity. Our staff

Museum will reimagine the artistic merit

tor for American Art at the Henry Luce

has expertise largely in maritime history

and educational potential of its permanent

Foundation, said. “We are excited to offer

and the humanities. Introducing differ-

collections of decorative, folk, and self-

new audiences access to compelling art

ing disciplinary perspectives will invite

taught art. These objects—not always con-

objects and introduce new voices into

complementary yet distinct presenta-

sidered as works of art and substantially

the Museum’s continuing research and

tions and generate new narratives around

hidden from public view—will be placed

interpretation of its collections.”

selected objects,” Steve White, president

public access.

on display so they can be appreciated

The grant will support a guest artist-

and studied afresh through the eyes of

curator and two scholar-curators, emerg-

The three installations are scheduled

a new generation of scholars, artists,

ing career professionals who will gain

to open on the Museum’s McGraw Gallery

and curators.

from interaction with Museum staff. In

Quadrangle in 2019 and 2020.

The proposed installations and as-

addition, two pre-professional inclusive

sociated research and public program

internships will offer promising young

of Mystic Seaport Museum, said.

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

7


Q&A Q&A

WITH NEW CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID PATTEN

David Patten joined the Museum in June 2018 as Chief Financial Officer. Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine sat down with him to see how he is settling into his new job.

What would you like to achieve as CFO? I would like to achieve three things as CFO. First, and the top priority for all of us, is to increase revenue to support the Museum’s operations. Everyone can help move the needle in this regard. Second, I want to engage all my

Tell us a little bit about about your background. I have more than 25 years of experience in developing resource strategies to support business objectives. This includes working for a national retail chain, a defense contractor, a pharmaceutical company, and two institutions of higher education. While I have worked in a number of industries, I have always been focused on resource management. One example is working at Pfizer Global Research & Development for 15 years. I contributed to the success of the company by developing budget, facility, and human resource plans to enable achievement of key performance indicators. Most recently, I have been the CFO and vice president of operations for colleges in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, where I managed annual budgets of more than $100 million.

What brought you to the Museum? Mystic Seaport Museum is a special place because it combines a deep history with an exciting future. I was working in Boston when I was contacted about the opportunity at the Museum. Although I am originally from New York City, I knew of the Museum from living in nearby Rhode Island. After one conversation with Steve White, I was hooked. The role as CFO is an interesting blend of typical financial responsibilities and operational duties. In a non-profit it is common that everyone has to wear a number of hats, and I really enjoy the diversity of activities.

colleagues in an inclusive budget process for 2019 to look for innovative ways to improve operations, grow revenue, and reduce costs. Third, I would like to look for ways to make the Museum a place where people “recommend and return.” We need people to recommend the Museum to their friends and family—#mysticseaport—and we need them to return often. There is so much to do and see, and things change frequently.

What has surprised you the most about the Museum? It is the variety of things going on at the Museum. Who knew about the more than 400 watercraft stored across the street‽ What an opportunity to create a display of a select number of these treasures. I also didn’t know that we effectively operate a marina. Finally, this is not a surprise, but a very reassuring confirmation of something I suspected. The people who work at the Museum, including an amazing board, all care deeply about the institution. This is a “people business” and the Museum is fortunate to have a fine group of members, volunteers, employees, and board members.

When you are not working, what do you like to do? I enjoy spending time with my father-in-law and my son tinkering around with old cars. We have two Model A’s (1930 and 1931) and a 1966 Ford LTD. I have an antique Buick that, up until about a year ago, I drove every day to work.

Do you have a message for members and visitors to the Museum? Come back often and tell your friends! Get into it!

8

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018


MUSEUM BRIEFS

SCHOLFIELD AND TINGLEY LOCAL PORTRAITS Most of us have hundreds of photos of ourselves, from school portraits to cellphone selfies. But until the late 1800s, only the wealthy could afford to hire an artist to capture their likeness.

MARGARET MILNES NEW DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP Margaret Milnes has been promoted

Originally from Toronto, Canada,

to the new director of Membership and

via New York City and Brooklyn, Milnes

Corporate Sales.

now lives in Chester, Connecticut, with

Milnes joined Mystic Seaport Museum in April 2017 in the Group Sales and Communications Department, where she launched new sales and marketing partnerships with AARP, Metro North, Aquarion Water, Mohegan Sun, and many other companies. Before joining the Museum, Milnes spent 10 years as the VP of Publishing and Licensing at Nickelodeon and eight years as a content marketing consultant in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors, as well as writing books for children under a pen name. She was the marketing director at Globe Pequot Publishing Company and the director of branding at Running Press, where she launched partnerships with HBO, BBC, and Sesame Street, among others.

her husband, where they are taming a 200-year-old garden. “I am excited to be taking on this new role at Mystic Seaport Museum and joining the membership team,” Milnes said. “The member community is passionate and deeply committed to the Museum’s mission. I am thrilled to be given the opportunity to help steward the growth of this engaged group.” “We have a dedicated and capable membership team and they are delighted to have a new director with Margaret’s customer service expertise, leadership, and marketing acumen. She is a strong addition to the Museum’s development leadership team, and I am so pleased to have her on board,”

That all changed with advances in photographic technology and techniques in the late 1800s. The coming exhibit When This You See, Remember Me, opening in late January 2019 in the R.J. Schaefer Building, will explore studio photography of that period from the perspective of both the sitter and the photographer. Drawing on thousands of portraits in the Museum collection by local photographers Edward Scholfield and George Tingley, the exhibit also features their original backdrops, cameras, coupons, and ads. Visitors will practice composing a scene viewed upside down through a camera, consider the importance of good light in the pre-electric age, and experiment with props and poses. The exhibit brings us face-to-face with images of those who walked the Mystic streets before us, including African Americans and Native Americans, woodcutters and musicians, babies, and

Laura Hopkins, senior vice president for

village elders.

Advancement, said.

Elysa Engelman is director of Exhibits.

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

9


MUSEUM BRIEFS

THE MUSEUM RECEIVES GRANTS TO RESTORE L.A. DUNTON AND PRESERVE ROSENFELD NEGATIVES

Thanks to a grant, the Museum will be able to save 3,500 negatives in the Rosenfeld Collection from “vinegar syndrome.”

In May, it was announced that Mystic Seaport Museum was the recipient of a National Maritime Heritage Grant of $103,703, an award that will fund the survey and documentation of the fish-

Two grants will allow the Museum to move forward on the restoration of the fishing schooner L.A. Dunton.

ing schooner L.A. Dunton in preparation for restoration at the Museum’s Henry B.

acquisition of rare shipbuilding timber

Diacetate negatives are subject to a

duPont Preservation Shipyard.

and other materials for the restoration.

natural process of degradation as the

The timing of the funding meets a critical

diacetate plastic mounts give off acetic

need of the project:

acid in the presence of humidity and/or

Built in 1921 in Essex, Massachusetts, the 123-foot Dunton is one of the last surviving examples of the Grand Banks

“It is very difficult to find the white

other environmental factors. The plastic

fishing schooners, once one of New Eng-

oak, longleaf pine, American larch, and

mount shrinks and partially separates

land’s most common fishing vessels in

live oak stock in the size and quality we

from the base. The resulting condition,

the beginning of the 20th century. The

need for large vessel restoration, and we

called “vinegar syndrome” due to the

Dunton was designated a National His-

also need a long lead time—as much as

odor that accompanies it, ultimately ren-

toric Landmark in November 1993 and

3 years—to enable the wood to ‘season’

ders the negatives unusable. Fortunately,

is the only remaining schooner of that

and dry correctly so it will be dimension-

there is a process to separate materials

era that is configured as she was when

ally stable when we are ready to use it,”

from the backing and preserve the im-

actively fishing.

said Quentin Snediker, Shipyard director

age. The grant of $244,417 will enable the

and Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft.

Museum’s curators to preserve 3,500

This planning grant will fund steps re-

10

quired in advance of the restoration, in-

The Save America’s Treasures program

cluding upgrades to the Museum’s shiplift;

will also fund the restoration, digitization,

The Save America’s Treasures grants

a complete structural survey of the vessel

and rehousing of selected negatives from

are administered by the National Park

to determine materials needed, work flow,

the Museum’s Rosenfeld Collection of

Service, in partnership with the Institute

and staffing; and documentation of the

Maritime Photography, which have been

of Museum and Library Services, the Na-

Dunton’s current condition using modern

affected by a form of acetate film base

tional Endowment for the Humanities,

laser-scanning technology.

deterioration. The Rosenfeld Collection,

and the National Endowment for the Arts.

But that was just part of the good news

acquired by the Museum in 1984, is built

In 2018, it awarded $4.8 million to help

for the Dunton. In September, the National

on the inventory of the Morris Rosenfeld

fund 16 projects in 12 states. The funds

Park Service announced the vessel was

& Sons photographic business and is the

will support the preservation of nationally

the recipient of a Save America’s Trea-

largest archive of maritime photographs

significant historic properties and collec-

sures grant of $491,750 to support the

in the United States.

tions throughout the country.

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

affected negatives.


MUSEUM BRIEFS

VIKING DAYS EXCEEDED ALL EXPECTATIONS Viking Days in June attracted more than 6,000 visitors and transformed the Museum as it celebrated Viking culture and lore. The exhibitions The Vikings Begin and Science, Myth, and Mystery: The Vinland Map Saga as well as the entire grounds were abuzz with activity, from mead demonstrations and performances to Norwegian Fjord horses and tours of the Viking longship Draken Harald Hårfagre. Museum staff met regularly for several months prior to the event to plan for the weekend. At the top of the list was to dispel Viking stereotypes, create an immersive, authentic experience, and attract new audiences. This was achieved through a wide range of fun and educational activities, giving visitors a better understanding of what daily life was like for the Vikings and how they accomplished basic activities such as gathering food, cooking, sailing, and voyaging.

At the top of the list was to dispel Viking stereotypes, create an immersive, authentic experience, and attract new audiences.

Social media engagement indicated there was a great deal of interest for the event. For the weekend itself, Mother Nature cooperated beautifully, and attendance exceeded expectations. People arrived in costume, adding even more energy and excitement to the event. Museum visitors enjoyed entertainment on the performance stage, including storytelling

by Lynn Noel, Icelandic folk music by FUNI, and a Viking fact vs. fiction theatrical piece by Flock Theatre. Lectures by Viking scholars were held in the Masin Room throughout the festival, and star gazers could catch a Planetarium show on Viking navigation. For those interested in the maritime aspects of Viking culture, Nordic boat building demonstrations took place in the Shipyard, and a fleet of Norse small boats provided sailing demonstrations off Middle Wharf. The Museum partnered with Draugar Vinlands, a New Englandbased Viking historical reenactment group, who talked with visitors and demonstrated traditional crafts, weapons, and cooking on the Village Green. Viking craftsmanship shows a fine command of materials, design, and execution, so it was important to feature contemporary artisans, who added to the lively atmosphere and gave visitors the opportunity to bring home a unique memento from the weekend. Food and beverage were of course a key component. Coastal Gourmet provided a food tent with Scandinavian fare, and multiple meaderies provided their products for tastings and purchase. Little Vikings played Scandinavian games, created flower crowns, built Viking boats, painted runes, and made yarn beards and braids. A Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center educator brought several birds of prey for an onstage talk and meet-and-greet with the audience. For the young-at-heart, a Viking beard contest provided the winners with prizes such as a beard comb and wax. Bjorn Mroz, Viking reenactor, summed it up: “Thank you to Mystic Seaport Museum for having Draugar Vinlands as a centerpiece of the event and for allowing us to fully demonstrate what we love so passionately. We had an incredible time; hands down it was our favorite festival.” Viking Days next year will be on June 1-2. Arlene Marcionette is the Museum’s public programs project manager.

Top: Harald (Paul Pakenham) of Draugar Vinlands. Above: Ivar (Greg Caminsky) of Draugar Vinlands.

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 11


NEW EXHIBITION: DEATH IN THE ICE

‘HISTORY IS HAPPENING

RIGHT NOW’

I

G R E E N L A N D

B Y E L IS S A B A S S

n 1845, Sir John Franklin led two Royal Navy ships on a mission into the Arctic to discover a Northwest Passage.

Both ships and the 129 men aboard disappeared. Since then, dozens of expeditions were launched to determine their fates, and over the ensuing 173 years, their story has been

C A N A D A

told in bits and pieces, through the recovery of artifacts strewn across the frozen landscape. “In its day, [the disappearance of the Franklin Expedition] was already a multi-media disaster, covered in the illustrated papers, depicted in paintings and lantern slides, and serving as the inspiration for novels by Jules Verne and Joseph Conrad,” noted Russell A. Potter, Ph.D. FRCGS, a professor of English and director of media studies at Rhode Island College. Potter teaches about the history of Arctic

12

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

The route of the lost Franklin Expedition. The HMS Erebus was discovered in 2014 and HMS Terror two years later, both close to King William Island in northern Canada. The wrecks are designated a National Historic Site of Canada.


NEW EXHIBITION: DEATH IN THE ICE exploration, maintains a website about the Franklin expedition, is the author of Finding Franklin: The Untold Story of a 165-year

“Now, in our even more connected age,

off the ship’s attack on August 9-12, 1814.

a global gaggle of armchair historians—

Additionally, a New London whaling captain,

Search (McGill-Queen’s University Press,

many of them extraordinarily well-versed

2016), and moderates several Facebook

in the evidence—wait with the keenest

groups devoted to the mystery surrounding the lost expedition.

of them extraordinarily well-versed in the evidence—wait with the keenest anticipation for each new development,” he said. This is good news for Mystic Seaport Museum, which opens Death in the Ice: The Mystery of the Franklin Expedition on December 1. The exhibition, which runs through April 28, 2019, was developed by the Canadian Museum of History (Gatineau, Canada), in partnership with Parks Canada Agency and with the National Maritime Museum (London, United Kingdom), and in collaboration with the Government of Nunavut and the Inuit Heritage Trust. Its residence in Mystic is its third incarnation, as it was shown previously at the Canadian Museum of History, Ottawa, Canada, and debuted at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England. “There’s a great deal of what they call ‘Franklin fever,’” said Elysa Engelman, director of exhibits at Mystic Seaport Museum. “I think it’s in part due to the lostand-found parts of the story that are so remarkable. Usually, with maritime mysteries, you either never know what happened or we already know what happened. With Franklin, we are literally learning new information all the time.” The exhibition was already in the planning stages before the first of Franklin’s two ships was found four years ago. HMS Erebus was discovered in relatively shallow

the history books when he discovered an abandoned ship while on a whaling trip in

anticipation for each new development.”

1856 in the Arctic. Commissioned by Sir

­—Russell A. Potter, Ph.D. FRCGS

his lost expedition, the HMS Resolute had

“Now, in our even more connected age, a global gaggle of armchair historians—many

James M. Buddington, made his way into

other ship, was found, also off the south coast of King William Island. This summer, Parks Canada sent another underwater archeology team out to dive on the wreck. And while dozens of artifacts from the expedition have been collected over the decades from land, Engelman noted, “This is suddenly a much more contemporary story. And it has raised even more questions, like, how did the ships get there? They were found far south of where it is believed they were abandoned. While our exhibition is open, we may learn even more answers.” The message for visitors, Engelman said, is “History isn’t dead. In fact, it’s literally happening right now. There is still more to explore and discover. And that’s really exciting.” Potter agrees. “I compare the Franklin story to an onion, with layer after layer of fresh uncertainty,” he said. “The finding of the Terror didn’t mean anything was solved—only that the onion just became much larger. There are hundreds, if not thousands of artifacts yet to be recovered from each ship, and archaeological work on the ground continues every season, with two major search expeditions just this

Edward Belcher to locate Sir Franklin and become icebound and was abandoned. Buddington towed her back to New London, where Resolute was refurbished and sent back to England. The President of the United States later received a desk made from the Resolute’s timbers, which remains in use in the Oval Office to this day. “It’s a special treat to have this exhibition here in the very heart of where American whaling ships were based,” Potter said. “The whalers are a huge part of the Franklin story; they participated in the early search, transported later searchers such as Charles Francis Hall in 1860 and Frederick Schwatka in 1878, and their close connection with Inuit communities gave them unique insights that UK and U.S. naval explorers lacked.” The exhibition will explore both the European and Inuit perspectives, Engelman said, including the importance of the Inuit to those out looking for the remains of the expedition and the ideas of imperialism and populism that prompted such explorations to begin with. “The Franklin story, in the end, is many things to many people,” Potter said, “an

past summer. So I don’t think we’ll have

historical puzzle, a psychological thriller,

to worry for quite some time that there’ll

a tale (take your pick) of heroic persever-

be any significant lessening of the aura of

ance under grim conditions or the imperial-

mystery that’s surrounded the Franklin ex-

istic hubris of a society that placed too little

pedition since it was first reported missing.”

value on indigenous people’s knowledge.

The exhibition is special for eastern

The debate over these kinds of issues, as

Connecticut in another, far more local way,

well as the persistent uncertainty about

ern Canada in 2014. That certainly gave a

Engelman said. Descendants of early 19th-

the final fate of Franklin’s men, is likely to

boost to the excitement surrounding the

century-era farmers in Stonington will rec-

keep this fascination going for decades

plans, and artifacts from Erebus, including

ognize the name Terror, as it was the ship

to come.”

its ship’s bell, are included in the exhibition.

that bombed Stonington Village during the

Then two years ago, HMS Terror, the

War of 1812. Farmers successfully fended

Elissa Bass is the Museum’s social media and

water south of King William Island in north-

digital manager.

Mystic Seaport Museum Gratefully

Leadership Circle:

Patron Circle:

Acknowledges the Support of our

Alexander and Amanda Bulazel

Grant and Peggy Cambridge

Generous Patrons

Charles and Irene Hamm

Cape Branch Foundation

Ken and Dina Siegel Chubb, the global insurance company FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 13


NEW EXHIBITION: THE VIKINGS BEGIN Kevin Blythe Sampson June 26

Kevin Blythe Sampson June 28

I love the Mystic Seaport Museum at any time of day. But at night, when its quiet it really comes alive for me. As a retired dumpster diver.I Can get in but can’t get out. I feel honored and excited to have the lay of the land at all hours. You know the night is my friend.

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: KEVIN SAMPSON’S FACEBOOK DIARY

I am having blast at the Mystic Seaport Museum. It was a very busy but fun day. Their is so much to see at this Museum that some times i find myself just spinning. It always takes me a few days to get my bearings. Mystic and the Ironbound section are two very different Beast. Its simply stunningly beautiful here. Fresh air, nice people and good food what else can one need... How about some art their are so many kind and helpful staff and people here. I cant wait to start collecting objects to begin building some thing, Working with Nicholas R. Bell and the amazing staff, has been a treat, I cant wait to wake up tomorrow and begin again for now i am going to sit on the dock ad count the stars. I have a beautiful ring side seat to enjoy peace and quiet. If all of those damn fish would just stop jumping..lol

Those were the days.......... before we got over run. I find the dark here with all of its ancient wood and factories strangely comforting.

And while it’s true that during his stay

Bell added: “Because at the end of

ystic Seaport Museum inaugurated

Sampson created an incredible sculpture

the day, this is not as much about works

an artist residency this summer with

made from objects he brought with him,

of art as it is about people. This is about

sculptor Kevin Sampson. By the time the

pieces he was given while here, and items

developing relationships that allow the

three-week program was over, both Samp-

that he found (Kye Kye Kule, currently part

Museum to reach a broader and more

son and the Museum came away with more

of the Monument Man exhibition in the C.D.

inclusive audience.

than was bargained for.

Mallory Building), “I think Kevin’s largest

M

14

Mystic at night reminds me of Newark in the 90;s, when i used to get my shopping cart and two kids then I would Attach my two Pitts to the front of the shopping cart and prowl around Newark looking for goodies, Newark used to be like K mart in those days. All of the night creatures (myself included) were out and about (looking out for each other, Junk hunters, aresol artist, fine artist and others reveled in the safety of the dark.

BY ELIS S A B A S S

“Kevin has left a permanent fingerprint

Sampson chronicled his experience day-

impact is not the artwork he made here,”

by-day (sometimes hour-by-hour) on his

said Nicholas Bell, senior vice president for

Monument Man: Kevin Sampson in

personal Facebook page. The end result

Curatorial Affairs at the Museum. “The larg-

Residence is on exhibit in the C.D. Mallory

was a love letter of sorts to Mystic, the Mu-

est impact is the effect that he had on our

Building through spring 2019.

seum, its staff, and its visitors. A sampling

staff and the friendships that were devel-

of his posts and photos taken by Sampson

oped and the impact that the Museum as

information.

and his assistant Cesar Melgar are displayed

a place had on him and on what he carried

on these pages.

with him back to his community.”

Elissa Bass is the Museum’s social media and

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

on the Museum’s collections.”

Visit mysticseaport.org for more

digital manager.


Kevin Blythe Sampson July 1

I am enjoying this beautiful morning dream drinking coffee by the mystic river. It is such an honor to be able to walk around this place at will and see so many things that the public never will. we spent the last week, setting up this first time residency. I was very surprised that their weren’t any problems and that things are going so smoothly, that’s because of the level of professionalism here. I always take a few days just to survey the land, get to know the people, before I even pretend to understand new places, that’s a matter of respect and one that allows me to bond, bwith people places and things. I have the materials that I need to start, tommorow is D day

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 1 I am having a blast working on stuff in Mystic. I have A GOOD routine going now....stay up late, get up early run around collecting and making until late evening. Fish for no more than 2 hours and go back to work. It just appears to look easy...this is quite a culture shock, nature shock, body shock and brain shock. All of the things that i need to make My day. Ok i can do with out the body shock but that’s what they make aspirins for..

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 2

crazy busy day today..The folks here are simply amazing. It is so cool to hang with so many skilled craftsman and ship Captains. their are so many men here my age, with the salty mouths and attitude that I love. i cant tell you how.much i am learning here, everything from boat building to life aboard a ship,

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 3

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 5 I used to think that I didn’t like the morning, I guess it depends on where you are at, I love getting up early here. Living on this beautiful boat is a trip. I can’t remember sleeping this good the sea air does it. They might have to pry my hands off this boat when its time to leave. I sat having coffee with one of the guys here who was a set designer on Broadway for years, what stories he told. On my way out to meet with a new friend who is taking me to the woods and other places to find more stuff.

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 7 What a difference a day makes, last night the wind was blowing beautifully crazy here in Mystic. The river was rocking. I stayed up late sitting outside on the boat loving it, I love the wind, I found myself making up songs about the sea. Its going to be hard to leave this place and return to city life.

Kevin Blythe Sampson July 9

This residency is something else… There is a real beauty to this place. Mystic reminds me a bit of the Kohler in Sheboygan, in that it’s really its own city. That is how I have come to see it as another form of community. The incredible thing about being here is that you are surrounded by people who love what they are doing. Every one here seems to want to be here, seems to be honored by being here…. Me included. The best things about residencies has always been people, meeting new people, hearing new stories and then (the light Goes off), you realize the sameness of us all.

My Families visit, restored me, they made me sit down and rest. Now i have my second wind. I am surprised at the number of people that i talk to each day now. They stop by the tent and share their stories, esp. the seniors. They go and see the show and then come ask me questions about my work, then share their stories. I should have taped some of these marvalous details of these folks lives, its truly a learning exp for me. The show and the installation is a big hit with the people who come to the seaport, some thing new to look at, some one knew to observe...I am having a blast. I got up and i had to go on the deck and stare at the stars, i will have to force myself to sleep tonight because my battery is fully charged. what a beautiful sky...

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 15


MUNSON INSTITUTE

MUNSON INSTITUTE AWARDED LARGE GRANT FROM NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

The Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies Class of 1966. Standing at the right rear is Professor Robert G. Albion with Professor Benjamin Labaree to the left of him: the institute’s first two directors. Although the dress was much more formal than today, the atmosphere has always been both challenging and warm.

high school teachers, museum professionals, and interested others. The University of Connecticut accredits the BY ERI C PAUL R O O R DA A ND

K

GLENN GO R DINIE R nowledge tops the list of things that Mystic Seaport Museum values the most.

Knowledge—­producing it, preserving it,

spreading it around—has been the specialty of The Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies, the flagship

16

Mystic Seaport Museum offers many learning options at all levels: day camps for young children; a variety of experiences for elementary and secondary students; the Conrad and Brilliant residential sailing camps for tweens and teens; and the semester-long Williams College-Mystic

courses, which Mystic Seaport Museum members often audit for a reduced rate. These engaging classes regularly attract the attendance of independent scholars, naval officers, merchant mariners, sailing school ship captains, and others from across the country and abroad. Every other summer for the last dozen

Seaport Maritime Studies Program for un-

years, The Munson Institute has con-

dergraduate studies.

vened for college faculty, supported

of the fleet of educational offerings at

At the highest level of education, the

by the National Endowment for the Hu-

Mystic Seaport Museum, since its found-

venerable Munson Institute offers sum-

manities (NEH). This past July, it hosted

ing in 1955.

mertime classes for graduate students,

its sixth Summer Institute for College

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018


MUNSON INSTITUTE

Typical of Munson Institute classes over the decades, these student come from schools all over the country and abroad and include aspiring graduate students, museum professionals, and educators.

and University Educators, which the NEH funded with a grant of $155,000, bringing the total amount that The Munson Institute has garnered from this prestigious award to nearly $1,000,000. This success is owed to the 100-plus anonymous reviews submitted by NEH Fellows who studied at Munson. Typical of their comments are the following from just this past July: “The Munson Institute and Mystic Seaport Museum were a wonderful venue. Learning history in a top-notch outdoor museum is a great way to learn...this was a fantastic and productive experience.” “The directors, visiting faculty, colleagues, discussions, and especially the experiential learning (sailing a whaleboat for example) were all fantastic.” “My four weeks in Mystic were transformative. This program is a gem, and its setting at the Museum is invaluable.” The 2018 NEH Summer Institute brought together 20 professors, library professionals, and public historians from around the country for four weeks of seminars on the topic of “The American Maritime Commons,” with a focus on the history of the environmental crisis in the ocean. The speakers included James T. Carlton,

“My four weeks in Mystic were transformative. This program is a gem, and its setting at the Museum is invaluable.” 2007) and The Amistad Revolt (Penguin,

the Sea (Mystic Seaport, 2005), Twain At Sea

2012); and seven other experts, who to-

(University Press of New England, 2018), and

gether form The Munson Institute faculty.

The Ocean Reader: History, Politics, Culture

For its first half century or so, The Mun-

(Duke, 2019), among other volumes.

son Institute had only three directors, each

You do not have to be a graduate stu-

of them a towering figure in maritime his-

dent or professor to get the benefit of The

tory: Robert G. Albion, Benjamin Labaree

Munson Institute. If you are interested in

(who spun off the Williams College Program

taking Munson Institute classes, with or

from The Munson Institute in 1976), and

without college credit, with the option of

John B. Hattendorf, emeritus professor

living in Mystic Seaport Museum hous-

of history at the U.S. Naval War College. Since 2003, Munson Mystic has had two co-directors, who endeavor together to fill the shoes of their eminent predecessors. Glenn S. Gordinier is recently retired from the Williams College faculty for the aforementioned Maritime Studies Program. He remains the Robert G. Albion Historian of Mystic Seaport Museum. Known to many for channeling “Captain Josiah Gardener” in front of large audiences around the world, he has a number of books to his credit, including Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Power in Maritime America (Mystic Seaport, 2006)

director emeritus of the Williams-Mystic

and The Rockets’ Red Glare: The War of

Program and the world’s leading authority

1812 and Connecticut (New London County

on invasive species, whose research on

Historical Society, 2012). Another veteran at

Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris was the

Mystic Seaport Museum, Eric Paul Roorda,

cover story of Science magazine on Sep-

taught on the Williams-Mystic faculty for

tember 29, 2017; W. Jeffrey Bolster, author

three years from 1992 through 1995 and

of the prize-winning The Mortal Sea (Har-

is now a Professor of History at Bellarmine

vard, 2014); Marcus Rediker, whose many

University in Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Roorda

books include The Slave Ship (Penguin,

is the author/editor of Cuba, America and

ing during June and July, 2019, you are invited to apply. Next summer’s program will feature field seminars to New Bedford, among other port towns, and presentations from pioneering scholars: Christine Keiner, author of The Oyster Question, about Chesapeake Bay; Matthew McKenzie, author of Clearing the Coast, about Cape Cod; Christopher Pastore, author of Between Land and Sea, about Narragansett Bay; and Roderick Mather, a member of the University of Rhode Island nautical archaeology team that recently located Captain Cook’s HMS Endeavor. To learn more, visit www.mysticseaport.org/munson/ or contact munson@ mysticseaport.org, or call 860.572.0711. Eric Roorda is professor in the History Department, Bellarmine University, and co-director of the Munson Institute. Glenn Gordinier is Robert G. Albion Historian and co-director of the Munson Institute. FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 17


J . M . W. T U R N E R ’ S WAT E R C O L O R S

FORGET THAT TRIP TO LONDON J.M.W. TURNER IS COMING TO MYSTIC

W

hen Mystic Seaport Museum embarked on planning for the Thompson Exhibition Build-

ing earlier this decade, there developed a shorthand among those involved to describe the level of excellence the build-

J.M.W. Turner, Venice: San Giorgio Maggiore – Early Morning, 1819, watercolor on paper. Tate: Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856 © Tate, London 2018.

ing aspired to: “It had to be good enough for Turner.” That ambition will be met in October 2019

J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851) is widely recog-

when the building’s Collins Gallery will host

nized as the greatest marine painter of all

a major monographic exhibition of Turner’s

time. This exhibition is a broad survey of

watercolors on loan from Tate, London. J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851) is widely rec-

Turner’s watercolors with approximately

ognized as the greatest marine painter of

90 works from the very beginning of his

all time. This exhibition is a broad survey

career all the way to his death.

of Turner’s watercolors with approximately 90 works from the very beginning of his

The scale and presence of these wa-

career all the way to his death. They have

tercolors may surprise many. “There is a

been selected from the vast legacy that

whole history of what are called ‘presen-

comprises more than 30,000 works on

tation watercolors’ that developed in this

paper, 300 oil paintings, and 280 sketch-

time,” said Nicholas Bell, senior vice presi-

books, known as the “Turner Bequest,”

dent for Curatorial Affairs. “Very quickly,

accepted on behalf of the nation after the

Turner and others developed a method of

artist’s death in 1851 and mostly conserved

creating quite large watercolors for public

at Tate, London. The bequest includes the

display. They are dramatic and have just

entire body of work housed in the artist’s

as much presence as the oil paintings for

personal studio and produced over the

which Turner is better known.”

rapid sketches that he was doing outdoors to try to work through what he saw and create a visual archive to understand and recreate what he had experienced. “I would argue that his watercolors are far more accessible to the individual than many of his oils,” said Bell. “Standing in front of a watercolor, where you can see his brush strokes and see the creativity layered over the surface, has an immediacy and a humanity to it: there is something of the private life of Turner in these watercolors.” The exhibition is currently on display in Bueno Aires, Argentina, after opening in Rome earlier this year. After a stop in Santiago, Chile, it will close its tour at Mystic Seaport Museum, the only North American venue. “This will be a rare opportunity to experience the true breadth and majesty of

years for his own use. For context and to

There are also many intimate works

provide some insight into Turner’s creative

in this exhibition. Many of the watercol-

process, the exhibition also will include a

ors that Turner became famous for long

handful of significant oil paintings and one

after his death were never meant to be

right here in Mystic.”

of his sketchbooks.

seen. There is a whole range of what are

Dan McFadden is director of Communications.

Mystic Seaport Museum Gratefully

Leadership Circle:

Patron Circle:

Acknowledges the Support of our

Alexander and Amanda Bulazel

Grant and Peggy Cambridge

Generous Patrons

Charles and Irene Hamm

Cape Branch Foundation

Ken and Dina Siegel Chubb, the global insurance company

18

known as “color beginnings,” which are

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018

the Turner Bequest without having to go to London,” says Bell. “You can experience it


BUCKINGHAM-HALL HOUSE

Jacci Greenlee in the Buckingham-Hall House’s kitchen.

TALK AND TASTE IN THE BUCK

T

lecture, and then a tasting. It’s a miniseries of what I call ‘talk and taste.’” This coming January, the Museum will

hroughout the year, it is sizzling in

answered. “The interesting thing is that

offer a bread-baking class for the first time.

the Buckingham-Hall House. This

when it’s humid, lighting a small fire helps

In February, there will be a Valentine’s Din-

coastal farmhouse was built by

to draw out the humidity from the kitchen.”

ner and in March a St. Patrick’s Day Dinner,

Samuel Buckingham in 1768 in Saybrook

Jacci started out as a junior volunteer,

the latter a traditional New England boiled

(now Old Saybrook), Connecticut. William

worked in the Bake Shop during the sum-

Hall, Jr., bought the house in 1833.

mers when she was in college, and then

In all the cooking classes in the Buck,

When a new highway bridge was going

became an interpreter. “I did hands-on

the interpreters are using “pre-stove” reci-

to be built across the Connecticut River and

activities with children, worked in the Print

pes to be able to portray the period of the

the house was up for demolition, Mystic

Shop, and ended up in the Buck,” Jacci

Buckingham family. “I love the flavor in the

Seaport Museum agreed to preserve it. The

said. That was eight years ago and she has

Buck,” Jacci said. “Everything just tastes

house was transported on a barge upriver

been the lead interpreter since 2015, “This

much better. I love making cooking ac-

to the Museum in 1951. For a long time, the

despite not having a culinary background,”

cessible to other people.”

Museum has held open-hearth cooking

Jacci said. “Working in the Buck, I had some

“Jacci is working hard to expand our

demonstrations and classes in the “Buck,”

great teachers, who taught me the basics

programmatic offerings related to hearth-

as the house is called by the Museum staff.

in cooking.”

side cooking and foodways. Her efforts

dinner, “with an Irish twist,” Jacci said.

The 2018 summer was unusually hot in

For decades, the Museum offered a

reflect the Museum’s strategic emphasis

Mystic with the heat index hitting 90 degrees

couple of classes a year of cooking three-

on exploring different areas of history and

several days in July and August. Is it not

course meals, which were fairly labor-in-

engaging new audiences,” Erik Ingmund-

unbearable to cook over an open fire with

tensive. With Jacci designing the menus,

son, director of Interpretation, said. “She

temperatures that high?

the classes have changed. “For the last

certainly has added some exciting new flavors to our menu of classes in the Buck.”

“If it is too hot, we might not light the fire,

two years, we have held one class a month

or make something that cooks very fast, or

between September and May,” she said.

Check out the Museum’s website for

make something that requires a small fire,

“Some of the new cooking classes include a

more information about the cooking classes

like stew,” Jacqueline “Jacci” Greenlee, lead

lecture for 45 minutes, then a brief cooking

offered in the Buck.

interpreter in the Buck, said. There is no

demonstration, when we show how to do

cooling system? “Only the windows,” Jacci

one of the foods we talked about during the

Göran R Buckhorn is editor of Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine. He is a lousy cook. FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 19


ON BOOKS

By Stephen B. Sulavik, with revisions and

he died before he could fin-

additions by Edward Comstock, Jr., and

ish the book, but his friend

Christopher H. Woodward

Robert Worth, former chairman of the Adirondack Mu-

(Published by Adirondack Experience and Bauhan Publishing LLC, 2018, 384 pages)

seum (now the Adirondack

RE V IEW ED BY DAN McFA DDE N

project and enlisted help of

T

Experience), took over the Comstock, an historian and

he Adirondack guide-

curator, and Woodward, a

boat has to be one of

guideboat builder and restor-

the most beautiful small

er, to bring it to completion.

watercraft ever built. With its double-ended canoe profile and low sheer dramatically sweeping up to a high bow and stern, the boats have a distinct and graceful presence that never fail to draws eyes at any small

THE ADIRONDACK GUIDEBOAT: ITS ORIGINS, ITS BUILDERS, AND THEIR BOATS

boat gathering. Like all good boats, the guideboat is the product of its

tains became a destination for the wealthy leisure class in the middle of the 19th century, the hoteliers and guides needed a boat to transport people and goods throughout the remote, mostly roadless region. The need to carry the boat over-

Like all good boats, the guideboat is the product of its

and its origins, a list of the known builders and their boats, and an identification guide. What was first known as a Saranac or Adirondack boat in the 1860s, the boat was built of readily available ern white cedar, and eastern red spruce. Initially, the

environment and purpose. As New York’s Adirondack

guideboats were built both

Mountains became a destination for the wealthy leisure class

ended, but by the late 1880s

in the middle of the 19th century, the hoteliers and guides

with transoms and doublethe double-ender had all but replaced the transom

needed a boat to transport people and goods throughout

because the guides pre-

the remote, mostly roadless region.

were designed to be rowed,

land between different bodies of water made light weight a priority. The guide leading his

ferred the lower weight. They not paddled. Sulavik traces the boat’s

trapper, hunter, or angler client would have to hoist the boat

development and the distinctive regional styles adopted by the

over his head and shoulders and bear it through the woods

builders: the Saranac, Long Lake, and Brown’s Tract styles. He

to the next launch site. It is that quest for lightness that re-

goes to great lengths to describe and illustrate each variant

sulted in much of the artistry of the type: the true Adirondack

and the construction details of the individual builders. This is

guideboat is finely crafted, much like an aircraft, with delicate

an encyclopedia of guideboat knowledge.

frames and thin planks.

20 |

tory of the guideboat type

northern white pine, north-

environment and purpose. As New York’s Adirondack Moun-

The book is organized into three sections: a his-

Beautifully illustrated with the author’s photos, historic

How this came to be is the subject of the new book The

images, and diagrams, The Adirondack Guideboat is a lovely

Adirondack Guideboat: Its Origins, Its Builders, and Their Boats

book that will engage anyone with an interest in this iconic

by Stephen B. Sulavik, with revisions and additions by Edward

watercraft, but it will be an invaluable resource for those who

Comstock, Jr., and Christopher H. Woodward. Sulavik, a retired

are researching the characteristics and details of individual

pulmonary surgeon from Connecticut who had a passion for the

boats. This book makes significant contribution to the historic

guideboats, spent many years researching and photograph-

record of a cultural icon of the Adirondacks.

ing the boats to compile an exhaustive record. Unfortunately,

Dan McFadden is director of Communications.

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018


ON BOOKS

Second Wind BY NATHANIEL PHILBRICK

Mystic Seaport Museum: Official Guidebook

In 1999, Nathaniel Philbrick, not yet the acclaimed and bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Sea of Glory, Mayflower, Why Read Moby-Dick, and Valiant Ambition, published Second Wind on a small New England press. This witty, entertaining, and charming autobiography has now been republished in a beautiful trade paper edition by Penguin. About the book, Philbrick himself has written, “While many of the books I’ve written explore America’s relationship with the sea, Second Wind explores my own relationship to the water.” The year is 1992 and Philbrick, a 36-year-old stay-at-home dad, lives on Nantucket and decides to take up sailing his old and forgotten Sunfish boat again. At age 22, Philbrick had won a national championship in the boat class and suddenly he felt the urge to repeat his glory days on the water.

With all of the changes that have taken place on Greenmanville Avenue in recent years, it was time to publish a new guidebook that reflects everything that is the Mystic Seaport Museum of today. That book, Mystic Seaport Museum: Official Guidebook (Beckon Books, 145 pages), is now complete and available on the shelves of the Museum Bookstore. The book can function as a guide to a visit, but it will probably appeal most as a souvenir or gift as the depth of content goes beyond the basics of a day at the Museum. More than 30 pages have been added to the Guidebook, many of which are dedicated to expanded chapters on the history of the institution, its buildings, and its historic vessels. There are also chapters on the exhibits, the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, the many education programs, the daily activities and demonstrations,

At first, Philbrick’s wife and two young children are skeptical of this midlife crisis activity but go along and show their support while he is “pond sailing” around the island. His goal is to race in the July 1993 Sunfish North Americans on a lake in Springfield, Illinois, via competitions on a river in Connecticut and a bay in Florida. The readers follow Philbrick’s practices and competitions in good and bad weather, his ups and downs, and his frustration but also pure joy when spray flies all around as he and the Sunfish push through the waves. Thankfully, the author does not overload the short chapters with technical sailing terms. As readers, we are grateful that the author took us along on this enjoyable voyage.

Unsinkable: The History of Boston Whaler

and the “back-of-house” functions of the Museum, including the G.W. Blunt White Library and the curatorial activities in the Collections Research Center. The highlight of the book is the photography. Completely re-illustrated with historic images from the collections and stunning contemporary photographs by staff photographers Andy Price and Joe Michael, the book shows the Mystic Seaport Museum grounds at their best.

BY MATTHEW D. PLUNKETT FOREWORD BY CLINT FISHER CROWELL

SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT THE FRANKLIN EXPEDITION Martyn Beardsley, Deadly Winter: The Life of Sir John Franklin (2002) Owen Beattie and John Geiger, Frozen in Time: The Fate of the Franklin Expedition (2017) Scott Cookman, Ice Blink: The Tragic Fate of Sir John Franklin’s Lost Polar Expedition (2001) John Geiger and Alanna Mitchell, Franklin’s Lost Ship: The Historic Discovery of HMS Erebus (2015) Gillian Hutchinson, Sir John Franklin’s Erebus and Terror Expedition: Lost and Found (2017) Anders Knudsen, Sir John Franklin: The Search for the Northwest Passage (In the Footsteps of Explorers) (2007) Dan Simmons, The Terror: A Novel (2007) Garth Walpole and Russell Potter, Relics of the Franklin Expedition: Discovering Artifacts from the Doomed Arctic Voyage of 1845 (2017)

The first Boston Whaler was launched in 1958. Three years later, in 1961, Richard “Dick” Fisher, the founder of the boat company, sawed a boat in half out on a pond without it sinking. Fisher then piloted the back half of the hull around the water, and the “Unsinkable Legend” was born. Last year, Unsinkable: The History of Boston Whaler by Matthew D. Plunkett was published to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the company that created these iconic boats. Plunkett’s book covers the Boston Whaler’s whole story from the original 13’ hull, unfavorably known as the “blue bathtub,” to the current 420 Outrage. The author has interviewed longtime employees working at the building sites and dealerships. The book is filled with previously untold stories and many never-before published images, including interesting photographs from the families of Dick Fisher and “Mr. Unsinkable,” designer Bob Dougherty. Plunkett’s fine book gives the readers an intimate look into the creation, culture, and ongoing legacy of these American motorboats and tells the tale of how influential this company has been, both within the boating industry and for the boats’ fans around the world.

To order these or other books, please call 860.572.5386 or email msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com Don’t forget your 10% members’ discount! (20% between Nov. 23 and Dec. 2)! Remember, we ship anywhere. Go to www.mysticseaport.org for upcoming book signings.

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 21


FROM THE COLLECTIONS

A

BY PAUL O’ PECK O arcane to today’s readers but

n advertisement in the

would have been very common in

Liverpool Mercury for

the early to mid-19th century. For

August 7, 1835, states,

example, in an 1820 book entitled

in part, “To sail on the 10th instant.

The House Surgeon and Physician,

FOR NEW YORK. The fine Ameri-

which was carried on many ships,

can Ship Splendid, Augustus Proal,

the treatment for cholera included

Commander...Coppered and cop-

opium in large doses as well as

per-fastened, is a fast sailer and

hartshorn. Both of these appear

well known in the trade, and a very

on this list with opium coming in

desirable conveyance for goods…

the form of laudanum, or opium

having elegant accommodations

diluted in alcohol. Hartshorn was

in the cabin.” The Splendid was a

a concoction made from red deer

packet, meaning she sailed on a

horns that was used to treat diar-

schedule, full or not full. She was

rhea. Other obscure potions in-

owned in New York by Abraham

clude sugar of lead, mercurial pills,

Bell, who also owned and managed

sweet nitre, and balsam of co-

several vessels in the Liverpool and

paiva. Friars’ Balsam and Opening

Southern trade. The typical route

Powders seem to come straight

for the Splendid was to sail from

from the pharmacy at Hogwarts.

New York to Mobile, Alabama, with

All obviously served a purpose:

a cargo of finished goods, barrel

reducing fevers, inducing vomit-

staves, liquor, etc. There she would

ing, ridding one of worms, or treat-

have her hold filled with cotton for

ing St. Vitus’ dance (also called

a trip to Liverpool and then return

Sydenham’s chorea), a disorder

to New York with woolens, cot-

characterized by rapid, uncoordi-

ton cloth, manufactured goods, other items­—and passengers. On one trip from Mobile to Liverpool a couple years earlier, the Splendid came across a ship whose captain and a few of the crew had died from cholera. One of the Splendid’s mates braved going aboard and took command, taking her back to New York while the Splendid sailed on for Liverpool. The document seen here, dated October of 1834, comes from the Splendid. It is an invoice for replen-

nated jerking movements. Luckily,

DRUG THERAPY AT SEA,

1834 STYLE

ishing the ship’s medicine chest, a

our medicine chest carried just the things to treat it. Give the patient a little calumel, some jalap, and a bit of powdered rhubarb and the “dance” will be done in no time. While there were occasionally doctors aboard ships to treat the crew and passengers, treating the sick more often fell to the ship’s captain. Knowing how to interpret symptoms and then following guidance from written sources carried aboard put the power of

necessity that every ship was required by law to carry. A very

life and death in the hands of the ship’s master. His duty was to

good article about a medicine chest from this year (1834) can

medicate as well as navigate.

be seen on the Mystic Seaport Museum for Educators website.

Paul O’Pecko is vice president of Research Collections and director of

This invoice contains medicines and ingredients that seem very

the G.W. Blunt White Library.

To get more information about the Collections Research Center of Mystic Seaport Museum and online resources, please visit research.mysticseaport.org

22 |

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2018


EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM THE 39TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MARINE ART EXHIBITION AND SALE The Maritime Gallery September 29 – December 31 MINIATURES BY MARITIME MASTERS Maritime Gallery November 17 – January 31, 2019 FIELD DAYS November 23 – 24 MEMBERS’ DOUBLE DISCOUNT DAYS November 23 - December 2 LANTERN LIGHT TOURS Weekends November 24 – December 23

WOUNDED WARRIOR & GOLD STAR FAMILIES DAY Spring 2019 (date TBD) PIRATE DAYS April 16-17, 2019 BOATS, BEACHES, AND BEACONS The Maritime Galley April 27 – September 22, 2019 PILOTS WEEKEND May 11 – 12, 2019 DECORATION DAY May 27, 2019 VIKING DAYS June 1 - 2, 2019

NEW EXHIBITION DEATH IN THE ICE: THE MYSTERY OF THE FRANKLIN EXPEDITION December 1 – April 28, 2019 Collins Gallery, Thompson Exhibition Building

SEA MUSIC FESTIVAL June 6 – 9, 2019

SEAPORT AFTER SEVEN: ARCTIC NIGHTS December 7

WOODENBOAT SHOW June 28 – 30, 2019

COMMUNITY CAROL SING December 16

SMALL CRAFT WORKSHOP June 28 – 30, 2019

HOLIDAY MAGIC December 26 – 31 CHANTEY BLAST AND PUB SING January 12, 2019 NEW EXHIBITION WHEN THIS YOU SEE, REMEMBER ME R.J. Schaefer Building Opens late January 2019 ICE FESTIVAL February 16 – 18, 2019

PLEIN AIR The Maritime Gallery June 22 – September 22, 2019

SAVE THE DATE!

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MEMBERS’ ANNUAL MEETING & RECOGNITION DAY SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2019 10-11:30 a.m. (doors open 9:30)

The River Room, Latitude 41° FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

2018-2019 ADVENTURE SERIES 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m*

RIVER ROOM, LATITUDE 41° RESTAURANT or STONERIDGE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY

StoneRidge is the exclusive sponsor of the 2018-2019 Adventure Series.

USCG LTJG MARY E. LEON BREAKING THROUGH TO VICTORY Thursday, December 13 (Evening Program at StoneRidge)

CHARLES BUFFUM & CRAIG HARGER DIVING FOR THE USS REVENGE Thursday, January 17 (Evening Program at StoneRidge)

WILLIAM FITZHUGH JOURNEYS THROUGH THE ARCTIC Thursday, February 21

JOHN KERR & CAROL SIMONS DREAMERS BEFORE THE MAST Thursday, March 14 (Evening Program at StoneRidge)

PAUL KRANTZ RIDING THE WILD OCEAN Thursday, April 11

*Please note the new evening time.

For additional programs, classes, and courses, but also for changes or cancellations, please visit the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org For hours of operation, open and closed exhibits, shopping, and dining, please check the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org

OR CALL 860.572.5339

Follow us on

FALL / WINTER 2018

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine | 23


Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID

mailed from zip code 14206 Permit #982

75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Do not hold

GIVE THE GIFT OF MEMBERSHIP THE GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR LONG!

BUY A GIFT MEMBERSHIP BEFORE DECEMBER 10 AND WE’LL INCLUDE A 2019 MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM CALENDAR FOR FREE! Ask about our new two-part Adventure Series Gift bundle – Only $30! 75 Greenmanville Ave. Mystic, CT 06355

To purchase, call 860.572.5339, or visit us in person at the Membership Office.

DON’T MISS MEMBERS’ DOUBLE DISCOUNT DAYS! FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 - SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2

Everything* in the store and Maritime Bookstore is 20% off for Members. Our Main Store, located at the south entrance, will be open until 8:30 p.m. on Lantern Light Tour evenings! *excluding sale items, promotional items, and original art.

Profile for Daniel McFadden

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine --Fall/Winter 2018  

This is the fall/winter 2018 issue of Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine.

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine --Fall/Winter 2018  

This is the fall/winter 2018 issue of Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine.

Advertisement