Page 1

FALL | WINTER 2017

A NEW ERA

OF EXHIBITIONS: ARTIST JOHN GRADE’S MURMUR: ARCTIC REALITIES THE VIKINGS BEGIN THE VINLAND MAP DEATH IN THE ICE


SUPPORT THE NATION’S PREMIER MARITIME MUSEUM PLEASE MAKE YOUR DONATION BY DECEMBER 31

YOU CAN HELP A NEW GENERATION SEA HISTORY ALIVE. You can strengthen our nation’s premier maritime museum with a gift to the Annual Fund. Your gift supports our exemplary programs in every area of the Museum and ensures the vitality of Mystic Seaport. By making a donation, you will inspire an enduring connection to our nation’s maritime heritage for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. To make your gift today, please call 860.572.5376 or visit www.mysticseaport.org/support

ANNUAL FUND AT MYSTIC SEAPORT 75 Greenmanville Ave. P.O. Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 860.572.5376 www.mysticseaport.org/support


CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE TM

SEASCAPES . ..................................… 4

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic SeaporT

ADVANCEMENT NEWS .................. 5-7

President STEPHEN C. WHITE

MUSEUM BRIEFS ......................... 8-11

executive vice presidents SUSAN FUNK MARCY WITHINGTON

12

Senior VICE PRESIDENT FOR Curatorial Affairs Nicholas Bell

THE ERA OF EXHIBITIONS.......... 12-14

IMPORTED GLASS BOWL, 8TH CENTURY. © GUSTAVIANUM, UPPSALA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM.

Editor Göran R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

Q & A WITH CHRIS GASIOREK........................ 16-17

15

PRODUCTION Susan HEATH Design

FOR THE HOLIDAYS: GIFT IDEAS ...................................... 19

karen Ward, THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY contributors Elissa Bass Fred Calabretta Chris Freeman Susan Funk Dan McFadden

ASMA EXHIBITION . ......................... 15

Gillian Perry Millsom Carol Mowrey Paul O’Pecko Sherri Ramella John Urban

ON BOOKS .................................. 20-21 FROM THE COLLECTIONS . ............. 22

PHOTOGRAPHY Elissa Bass Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University Göran R Buckhorn Debby Carlton Caryn Davis Gustavianum, Uppsala University Museum

John Grade Studio Amanda Keenan Joe Michael Andy Price Susan Snowden Mystic Seaport Photography Archives

EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT . ....... 23 ELEVATION NO. 5 ALTITUDE SERIES, 36 X 36 IN., OIL, BY SARAH HULL.

FALL / WINTER

ON THE COVER: RENDERING OF A PINGO, A HILL OF ICE THAT GROWS OVER CENTURIES IN THE ARCTIC’S HIGHEST LATITUDES. ARTIST JOHN GRADE’S MURMUR EXACTLY

2017

REPLICATES A PINGO IN ALASKA’S NOATAK NATIONAL PRESERVE, MAPPED BY THE

16

ARTIST USING PHOTOGRAMMETRY. PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN GRADE STUDIO

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315 • 888.973.2767 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 ADVANCEMENT: 860.572.5365 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5331 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 Please go to the Museum’s website for information on Winter and Spring schedules ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355-0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

& FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

3


S

E

A

S

C A

P

E

S

Igniting Inspiration

M

useum Executive Vice President Susan Funk likes to begin our new staff orientation meetings with one of several introductory prompts to break the ice and to get us thinking about museums in the context of our work at Mystic Seaport. One of my favorites is “what was your first memorable cultural or museum experience?” It elicits interesting, genuine responses, often taking us back to our early years of childhood or young adulthood. For me, it was seeing Michelangelo’s Renaissance sculpture Pietà in 1964 at the New York World’s Fair. The family piled into the station wagon and off we went from Maine. It was not a short trip in those days. I really had no idea what to expect, as New York seemed like a long way, but something called the World’s Fair sounded mighty impressive. Far more so than our local Hope County Fair. As I recall, once we had arrived at the World’s Fair, we toured the grounds and eventually joined a long line, and I’m sure I wondered in typical preadolescent manner: “How could

4

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

a sculpture be this important to so many people?” When the line finally brought us front and center, I came to understand. Beautiful, subtle, and captivating, it silenced the large crowd, who peered at the white marble with deep reverence. At least for the 11-year-old me, it was a memorable moment, and I was moved. Clearly what I was seeing was important, and yes, it was worth the wait. Did it change my life or my perspective? I suspect it played a role, but I’m sure it helped me understand then that there are things in life that deserve our respect and are so important that they should be protected and preserved for all to see. The coming year at Mystic Seaport is an important one. For some 88 years, we have tried to create a deeper understanding of the maritime world through our exhibitions and engaging personal experiences with the hope of inspiring future stewards of that heritage. More recently, we have brought works of art and other creations to Mystic Seaport, such as the Harrison clocks (in the 2015-2016 Ships,

FALL / WINTER 2017

Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude exhibition), which we hope have had a memorable impact. I witnessed young boys and girls peering into the clock cases mesmerized by their movements and in awe of their beauty. As you will read about in this issue of the Magazine and see on our website, we have some stunning exhibitions coming to Mystic Seaport in 2018: artist John Grade’s Murmur: Arctic Realities; The Vikings Begin from Gustavianum, the Museum of Uppsala University in Sweden; the controversial Vinland Map, which goes on display in the United States for the first time in more than 50 years; and Death

in the Ice, the story of Sir John Franklin’s tragic Arctic expedition. These exhibitions, unusual for Mystic Seaport but dynamic in content, should spark those memorable experiences we strive to create. What will ignite the inspiration? The ship’s bell from Franklin’s HMS Erebus? A remarkable Viking helmet from the 7th century? Microsoft’s HoloLens mixed reality in Grade’s exhibition? Whatever it might be, we believe that the exhibition schedule ahead sets the stage well for experiences that visitors, members, and perhaps future Museum professionals will reflect upon as being memorable! See you in the exhibitions.

STEPHEN C. WHITE, President


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

EASTBAY RENDEZVOUS

O

n June 2-3, Mystic Seaport held the 2017 Mystic Seaport Eastbay Rendezvous, an event hosted by trustees Jay Benet and Chet Kitchings. The rendezvous is part of the Museum’s ongoing Mystic Seaport Affinity Program (MAP) outreach and was sponsored by Mystic Seaport corporate partner, Gowrie Group. The rendezvous participants tied-up at our docks and toured the Collections Research Center, spending time viewing the photographs of the Rosenfeld Collection with a special focus on vessels designed by Ray Hunt (Eastbay Yachts, a division of Grand Banks, were designed by C. Raymond Hunt Associates). Visitors also enjoyed a tour led by the Museum’s Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft Quentin Snediker that included boats on display and in storage, as well as a tour of the

Museum’s extensive restoration of Plimoth Plantation’s vessel, the Mayflower II. On Saturday morning, rendezvous attendees were treated to a breakfast with Nicholas Bell, senior vice president for Curatorial Affairs. During the breakfast, which was underwritten by Essex Yacht Sales, Bell outlined the exciting new Era of Exhibitions at Mystic Seaport that will include the exhibitions Murmur in

January-April 2018, The Vikings Begin and The Vinland Map in May-September 2018, and Death in the Ice about the Franklin Expedition in November 2018-April 2019. The Eastbay and MJM Rendezvous are sponsored by:

MJM RENDEZVOUS

O

n August 18-19, Mystic Seaport held its second Mystic Seaport Affinity Program (MAP) Rendezvous of the season, the MJM Rendezvous, which, like the Eastbay Rendezvous (see above), was sponsored by Gowrie Group. The rendezvous was scheduled to begin on the morning of Friday, August 18, just as a storm front was approaching from the west with rain settling-in, casting some doubt as to whether the event would be held. Then, as the 10:40 Mystic River drawbridge opened, an impressive string of MJM Yachts, ranging from 34 to 50 feet, began coming up the river, having journeyed from Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York, a testament to the confidence the owners have in their MJMs. In addition to participating boats from the region, the event drew MJM owners coming by land and by air from as far away as South Carolina, Texas, and California. MJM’s founder Bob Johnstone—who, with his brother Rod, received the Mystic Seaport

2016 America and the Sea Award—joined in hosting the rendezvous. In addition, the noted marine architect Doug Zurn, who designed the MJM line boats and whose other design credits include the Shelter Island Runabout, the Marlow 65, and the custom power yacht Vendetta, was in attendance. The MJM Rendezvous included tours of the Watercraft Hall, the Collections Research Center, and a shipboard tour of the Viking longship Draken Harald Hårfagre, as well as the special treat of a dockside presentation on the history of the Gerda III by Museum volunteer Howard Veisz. John Urban is Director of Major Gifts and Strategic Partnership.

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

5


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

D AV I D R O C K E F E L L E R , J R . , A N D S A I L O R S F O R T H E S E A : RECIPIENTS OF THE 2017

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: J. BARCLAY COLLINS, II, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF MYSTIC SEAPORT; DAVID ROCKEFELLER, JR., AWARD RECIPIENT; R. MARK DAVIS, PRESIDENT OF SAILORS FOR THE SEA; AND STEPHEN C. WHITE, PRESIDENT OF MYSTIC SEAPORT.

T

he year 2017 marked the 12th anniversary of the Museum’s annual America and the Sea Award Gala. On October 11, David Rockefeller, Jr., and Sailors for the Sea joined the esteemed ranks of award recipients at the Museum’s largest single fundraiser, held this year at the Metropolitan Club in New York. The award, the institution’s highest honor, which was established by the Museum in 2006, recognizes individuals or organizations whose contributions to the history, arts, business, or sciences of the sea best exemplify the American spirit and character. Rockefeller, a member of the Pew Oceans Commission until 2003, co-founded Sailors for the Sea to educate the recreational boating community about significant challenges to ocean health and to unite boaters to protect the oceans. Sailors for the Sea is a movement and pragmatic voice for action that addresses current environmental challenges, including plastic pollution, ocean acidification, climate change, and toxic chemicals that threaten marine life, our health, and the health of our

6

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017

children for generations to come. Through the organization’s Clean Regattas and Ocean Watch programs, they inspire and motivate the sailing and boating community to heal the ocean. The gala was a record-breaking success, grossing more than $672,000, with proceeds from the event benefiting the mission of the Museum to inspire an enduring connection to America’s maritime heritage. Sotheby’s Senior Vice President Geraldine Nager Griffin once again ran the live auction, which included many unique items and opportunities such as a Lindblad Expeditions trip for two to the Galapagos Islands; an on-field experience with the New York Yankees; a two-night stay at the beautifully renovated Four Columns Inn in Vermont; a sail for up to 12 people aboard Intrepid, two-time winner of the America’s Cup; a stunning oil painting by maritime artist Julia O’Malley-Keyes; an original hand-blown glass vase by American artist Jeffrey P’an, who also created the two exquisite awards; a handcrafted ice chest set

made from Charles W. Morgan wood; a pair of storied Mystic Seaport burgees, one having traveled on the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage and the other through the Northwest Passage in summer 2017; a day aboard Zing, an MJM 50z, leaving from Newport Harbor; and a luncheon sail with the honoree off the coast of Maine. New this year was a silent auction, which was available online as well as at the event. The silent auction allowed for an expanded variety of offerings in a wider price range, opening the possibilities to many new bidders. The silent auction included several sailing opportunities, one of which was a charter for 12 people on the Museum’s schooner Brilliant. Also included were tickets to the Broadway smash hit Hamilton and dinner at the New York Yacht Club; Northern Trust-sponsored FedEx Cup golf tournament tickets; spectacular custom compass rose cufflinks by Maggie Lee Designs; a Long Island cruise aboard a lovely Rybovich, Corsair, along with dinner for two at Sag Harbor’s


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S The American Hotel; special VIP tours of the New York Botanical Gardens and the Bronx Zoo; and a majestic beach scene painted by contemporary realist Nelson H. White. Surprise entertainment was revealed near the end of the evening, as the Harvard Krokodiloes burst onto the scene with a spirited rendition of “House of Blue Lights.” As a former member of the Krokodiloes, Rockefeller was delighted by the show. The Weill Cornell Medical College Classical String Trio performed beautifully during the reception hour. It was also a record-breaking year for the paddle-raise, which speaks to the appreciation and importance of the Rosenfeld Collection. Mystic Seaport preserves the most comprehensive collections of maritime photography, documenting our history at

sea. Due to a photographic imaging process commonly used in the 1930s, a portion of the collection from that period is at risk of succumbing to Vinegar Syndrome whereby the plastic foundation for the photographic emulsion breaks down, emitting a strong “vinegar” odor and rendering the film unusable. Thanks to the generosity of those who raised their paddles, the Museum raised $120,000, which will allow Mystic Seaport to begin the process of rescuing the collections at risk in three stages: stabilization, evaluation, and recovery. We are truly grateful to the many friends who came together in this effort to support the important mission of Mystic Seaport. Sherri Ramella is Advancement Events Manager.

WE SINCERELY THANK THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS. Platinum: J. Barclay Collins, II Irene and Charles J. Hamm Gold: Peggy and Grant Cambridge Gowrie Group Susan and David Rockefeller Alexander Roepers Travelers Silver: KPMG LLP MJM Yachts The Northern Trust Company Rena and Jason Pilalas

American Cruise Lines is a Proud Supporter of Mystic Seaport’s Era of Exhibitions and the upcoming exhibit:

Murmur – Arctic Realities Opens January 20th, 2018

American Cruise Lines operates the newest fleet of small modern riverboats and authentic paddlewheelers in the U.S. With over 35 itineraries to 30 states, the Line cruises along the rivers and inland waterways of Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, the Mississippi River region and the East Coast. AmericanCruiseLines.com

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

7


MUSEUM BRIEFS

REMEMBERING RHODA HOPKINS ROOT

M

ystic Seaport was saddened to learn of the passing of Rhoda J. Hopkins Root on June 18. In 2000, Rhoda was hired as an interpreter at the Museum, and two years later, she took on the job as coordinator of Volunteer Services. With her vast knowledge of the campus and her natural ability to make those around her feel special, she was, without a doubt, the perfect choice for the position. In 2012, she was appointed associate director of Volunteer Services. Rhoda gathered people in a unique way. Her welcoming manner and interest in her volunteers made a visit to her office an enjoyable experience. I had the pleasure of RHODA HOPKINS ROOT volunteering in Rhoda’s office for several years. Working with her gave me a ringside seat as she interviewed and interacted with people who came by to sign up as volunteers. When the G. W. Blunt White Building was to house the National Rowing Hall of Fame and a rowing exhibit, Rhoda took pride in learning about the history of the sport and enthusiastically forming the group RAR (Ready All Row) that was responsible for staffing the exhibit. Upon her retirement in May 2014, she signed up as a volunteer herself and worked in the Collections Research Center. Rhoda’s endeavors on the water took place in a variety of boats. With her small Walker Bay dinghy, she rowed on the Mystic River. Replacement of the oars with a tiny engine meant expanded horizons. She was regularly spotted in Ram Island Bay or at Enders Island with a dinner guest aboard. After Rhoda had purchased an Eastern Boats (18-foot outboard), she enjoyed motoring to Fishers Island and up the Thames River. Never one to duck a challenge, Rhoda sailed onboard the Museum’s schooner Brilliant from Marblehead to Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and Cuttyhunk in rough seas before abandoning ship in Newport to visit the Tennis Hall of Fame—she was once ranked eighth among the U.S. ladies singles—where she called me for a ride home by car! Rhoda loved Mystic Seaport. She was a good friend and honorary member of my family for 40 years. Sadly, Rhoda’s husband Howard Root passed away a few weeks after his wife. Gillian Perry Millsom is a volunteer at Mystic Seaport.

GRAMP JOINS THE COLLECTION

O

ne of the latest additions to the Museum’s watercraft collection is the 25-foot motorboat Gramp, designed by noted naval architect William Hand and built in 1915 by L. West of Port Chester, N.Y. Gramp is an excellent example of the fast and seaworthy “Hand v-bottom” launches and runabouts that were plentiful in the decade before World War I. She is believed to be the only surviving example of this revolutionary design and has been kept largely original. The vessel’s construction is carvel cedar batten-seam planking, fastened with bronze screws to white oak sawn frames, backbone, keel, and floor timbers. Her cedar decking has been covered with epoxy and Dynel. She has a transom-hung rudder with drum steering. Her mahogany cockpit coaming, trim, and transom are finished with bright varnish. Gramp is powered by a 62 h.p. Westerbeke Model W-70 6-cylinder gas engine connected to a Scripps 1:1 transmission with mechanical engine controls. She has an 11”X 9” 3-blade bronze propeller on a 1-1/8" bronze shaft. She can cruise at 10-12 knots with a top speed of 20 knots. She has a 30-gallon stainless steel fuel tank. Gramp arrived at the Museum from Coecles Harbor Boat Yard, Shelter Island, N.Y., where she has been maintained for many years.

BUSTER AND TY HAD A DOG DAY AT THE MUSEUM

E

arlier this summer, Mystic Seaport was named the most pet-friendly attraction in Connecticut in 2017 by GoPetFriendly.com. On June 10, Amy and Rod Burkert, who are behind

the travel website, and their two dogs, Ty and Buster, came to visit the Museum. Being a pet-friendly museum has always been important to Mystic Seaport, so to celebrate the website’s designation and Ty, Buster, and the Burkerts’ arrival, Mystic Seaport invited dogs to bring their humans to visit that day. Every dog received free admission for one human in the morning. In the afternoon, the Burkerts and their dogs had a meet-and-greet and fundraiser for the CT Humane Society at Red 36 restaurant in downtown Mystic. AMY AND ROD BURKERT, TOGETHER WITH TY (LEFT) AND BUSTER.

8

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017


MUSEUM BRIEFS

DISCOVER ROSENFELD

D

uring the past five years, while engrossed in the research and stewardship of the Rosenfeld Collection, I have often thought of the idiom “best-kept secret.” The imagery of the beautiful yachts of the America’s Cup races and the excitement captured in the high-speed Gold Cup races, for example, are well-known through reproductions for publications and fine art prints. But in a collection with more than a million objects that span over 100 years of maritime activity, it is easy to understand how “secrets” have been unintentionally kept. Discover Rosenfeld is a page on the Museum’s website (www.mysticseaport.org/

rosenfeld) where the best-kept secrets are told by posting “a story of a picture.” Since its inception in January 2017, posts have covered a circumnavigation of the world, flying yachts, an experiment with airplane wing rigging decades before the recent America’s Cup yachts, stories of vessels with impressive careers, the 1925 total solar eclipse, PT boats, and more. So follow us through the evolution of maritime activity while we research, explore, and Discover Rosenfeld. Carol Mowrey is a Research Librarian at the G. W. Blunt White Library and a Rosenfeld Specialist. SPECTATORS, 1921. 1984.187.6424F.

O

LLEWELLYN HOWLAND RECEIVES THE WILLIAM P. STEPHENS AWARD

n a perfect summer evening in June, in the model room of the Corinthian Yacht Club in Marblehead, MA, a gathering of friends and family had assembled to honor Llewellyn Howland, III, with the Museum’s William P. Stephens Award. Howland was recognized for his remarkable career as a researcher, author, and editor of books and articles about yachting and sailing in America. His latest book is a biography about the yacht designer and aviation pioneer W. Starling Burgess, No Ordinary Being (2015). Roger Taylor, author of a two-volume biography on L. Francis Herreshoff (volume two will soon be published by Mystic Seaport), could not attend the event but sent the following sentiment: “Sailor, author, editor, bibliophile, Louie Howland does it all with great, good humor, but his unsung role is that of Godfather to a huge amount of marine writing. There is none better than W. P. Stephens now to sing Louie’s praises.” Among those who were at the Corinthian Yacht Club to celebrate Howland were yacht designers, builders, and brokers, along with maritime historians, scholars, and authors. Sprinkled around the room were also championship sailors representing every discipline from club racers to international one-design champions and single-handed ‘round-the-world voyagers. They had all come to pay their respects to their friend Louie and to join Mystic Seaport in recognizing his accomplishments. As the famous yachtsman, author, and historian John Rousmaniere, who received the Stephens Award in 2014, stated in his introductory remarks: “Among those of us today who write about boats and yachts and yachting history, there is one who the rest of us count on for encouragement and inspiration and pure high standards and best quality. He is Louie Howland, and I am pleased to honor him.” Llewellyn Howland is the 18th person to receive the Stephens Award since Mystic Seaport instituted the prize in 1988.

FROM LEFT, STEVE WHITE, LLEWELLYN HOWLAND, III, AND JOHN ROUSMANIERE.

Chris Freeman is Director of Development.

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

9


MUSEUM BRIEFS

RENA TO THE RESCUE

I

n the wake of Hurricane Irma, Mystic Seaport staff, volunteers, and trustees were invited to help with the relief ef-

FAMILY FOUNDATION GIFT SECURES MUSEUM INTERNSHIPS

T

forts for the victims of the devastating hurricane. In a few days, these groups had collected dozens of boxes and bags of donated clothing, linen, towels, and other necessary supplies for delivery to people who had been affected—mainly residents in the Florida Keys and St. Thomas. On September 26, the 145foot motor yacht Rena, owned by Mystic Seaport Trustee Jason Pilalas and his wife Rena and captained by Brad Baker, left the Museum’s Bartram Dock to head south to deliver the supplies.

Laura Asson: “Throughout this summer, I further developed my interest in a museum career so as to educate the public in engaging and memorable ways.”

For those who are considering sending monetary donations to the affected areas, YachtAid Global is an organization that has provided disaster relief aid and humanitarian support to remote coastal communities since 2006. More details at: yachtaidglobal.org/

Elizabeth DiPippo: “Through this internship, I have learned that museums are charged with the important task of making themselves relevant and how evaluators contribute to that effort.”

NEW SHIPYARD EXHIBIT

K

eeping History Afloat is a new exhibition in the Shipyard Gallery on the second floor of the main building in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. The exhibition shows how the Museum’s skillful craftspeople, including shipwrights, carpenters, riggers, metalworkers, painters, and others, preserve and restore historic vessels and keep the tradition of shipbuilding alive. With the help of photos, audiovisuals, collectibles, and models, visitors get behind-the-scenes tours of the work done in the Shipyard. Past and present projects are described, including the current restoration of Plimoth Plantation’s Mayflower II.

10 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017

Sarah Noel Rodriguez: “This internship has given me professional experience in event management and public programs as well as the chance to meet incredible museum professionals.”

his summer, Mystic Seaport expanded its intern program with new pre-professional opportunities for graduate-level students. This program was made possible by the generous support of The Scripps Family Fund for Education and the Arts. Designed to reflect ongoing changes in the Museum workplace, this internship provides training and preparation for entry into the field by grounding students in practical and marketable skills. We welcomed three highly qualified candidates to the Museum for a summer of full-time paid work: Laura Asson of University of Connecticut, Elizabeth DiPippo of St. John’s University, and Sarah Noel Rodriguez of Marist College. Hosted by exhibition and public program staff, this experience provided the interns with direct access to Museum leaders and an opportunity to engage in strategically important initiatives. One project included research on the Vikings, polar history, and the maritime environment, gathering stories and resources for exhibition development. Another project explored the logistics, coordination, and impact of public programs, such as the annual naturalization ceremony, the waterfront party Docktails and Dancing, and the summer concert series, Arts on the Quad. Elizabeth, Sarah, and Laura all used professional Museum evaluation tools to gauge success, revealing what visitors like to do when they are here and how their experiences translate into new opportunities within the Museum. The internship program was very valuable to the Museum in working towards strategic goals. The interns brought their own skill set and perspective, as well as enthusiasm and a vibrant appetite for learning new skills as they engaged in the work of the Museum. Susan Funk is Executive Vice President and COO at Mystic Seaport.


MUSEUM BRIEFS

ROANN ON TOUR

T MYSTIC SEAPORT RECEIVES HERITAGE GRANT

L

ast spring, Mystic Seaport was awarded a $49,959 National Maritime Heritage Grant to support the development of From Clippers to Containers: The Benjamin F. Packard and the History of U.S. Deepwater Cargo Transport, a long-term exhibition that will deliver to a broad public audience important historic content about the changes in the maritime cargo trades from the mid-19th century to the present. The centerpiece of this exhibit will be the recently reinstalled ship’s cabin from the 244-foot Down Easter Benjamin F. Packard, which is located on the second floor of the Stillman Building. Mystic Seaport salvaged the cabin in 1939 before the full-rigged ship was scuttled. The cabin is a favorite with Museum visitors as they are allowed access into the dining area, parlor, and captain’s stateroom, an ornate Gilded Age setting complete with velvet settees and burled wood panels. This unique artifact is an ideal vehicle to frame the history of American merchant vessels. In addition to the compelling story of the Packard, the exhibition will focus on the evolution of American cargo-handling and deepwater trade using examples of various vessel types to illustrate the changes in society and technology that occurred over time. From Clippers to Containers will use interactive technology as well as ship models, period paintings, photos, and other artifacts to illustrate these stories. The Museum was one of 27 recipients in 13 states and the District of Columbia that collectively received $1,752,073 in grant awards. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD), the National Park Service awarded grants for projects that teach about and preserve sites and objects related to our nation’s maritime history.

TSUNAMI DEBRIS CARRIES SEA CREATURES TO PACIFIC COAST

A

new study, led by Williams-Mystic Professor Emeritus James T. Carlton (left in the picture), documents for the first time that plastic marine debris may be significantly increasing the transport of nonnative species across the world’s oceans. The study appeared in the September 29 issue of the prestigious magazine Science. The analysis of the samples that formed the basis of the study was conducted at the Marine Science Center located at Mystic Seaport. Carlton and his eight colleagues demonstrate that, since 2012, nearly 300 species of marine life have landed alive on the coasts of North America and the Hawaiian Islands after rafting across the Pacific Ocean on debris swept out to sea by the March 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

he Museum’s 60-foot eastern-rig dragger, Roann, was on three tours this summer. In July, she took part in the 63rd annual Blessing of the Fleet in Stonington Borough, CT, which entailed a Fishermen’s Mass commemorating Stonington fleet members who have died at sea and prayers for the safety and success of fishermen today. In the beginning of August, Roann attended the 3rd annual Meet the Fleet event on Martha’s Vineyard, which was sponsored by the Martha’s Vineyard Fishermen’s Preservation Trust. Her first owner, Roy Campbell of Vineyard Haven, MA, fished Roann from Martha’s Vineyard, dragging local waters for flounder, cod, and haddock. In mid-August, Roann attended the maritime festival Woods Hole Science Stroll on Cape Cod.

“This study of a remarkable ocean rafting event of unprecedented magnitude and duration reveals for the first time the profound role that plastic marine debris can now play in transporting entire communities of species in the world’s oceans—for far longer lengths of time than historic dispersal on natural substrates (such as wood) would have been possible,” Carlton said. More than 10 million tons of plastic

Because the organisms traveled on pri-

waste from nearly 200 countries enter the

marily non-biodegradable objects, such as

ocean every year. The authors argue that

fiberglass vessels and plastic buoys, they

vastly expanded coastal urbanization has

survived far longer than marine scientists

increased the amount of such plastic avail-

have earlier predicted. Coastal species were

able to be washed into the sea. Hurricanes

believed to be unable to live for more than two

and typhoons then sweep the debris into

years on the open ocean. However, the Japa-

the oceans, as happened when hurricanes

nese species were still arriving on American

struck the Caribbean and Florida Keys in

shores in 2017, six years after the tsunami.

fall 2017. FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 11


THE ERA OF EXHIBITIONS

THE ERA OF EXHIBITIONS:

THE MUSEUM IS A PLACE TO EXPERIENCE HISTORY FIRST HAND

I

By ELISSA BASS n September of 2016, Mystic Seaport opened the Thompson Exhibition Building, the keystone to its reconfigura-

tion of the north end of its campus. The goal of the project, which spanned 10 years in all, was to greatly enhance the quality of Museum exhibition space

12 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

and offer a more robust yearround experience for visitors. As the one-year anniversary of the Thompson opening has come and gone, the Museum has now unveiled the next phase in its Era of Exhibitions initiative. Four major exciting, innovative, and intriguing exhibitions are slated for Mystic Seaport in 2018, beginning with Murmur:

FALL / WINTER 2017

TOP: A RENDERING OF THE INTERIOR OF THE SCULPTURE MURMUR. PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN GRADE STUDIO. ABOVE: A DETAIL OF THE SURFACE OF THE SCULPTURE MURMUR. PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN GRADE STUDIO.

Arctic Realities, which opens on January 20. The Vikings Begin: Treasures from Uppsala University, Sweden follows in May, the same month an exhibition on the world-renowned and controversial Vinland Map opens. The year closes out with the November opening of Death in the Ice – The Mystery of the Franklin Expedition.


THE ERA OF EXHIBITIONS “There is often a misperception that this Museum is unchanging,” said Nicholas Bell, senior vice president for Curatorial Affairs at the Museum. “For many of our visitors, there is a great nostalgia for a visit that took place earlier in their life, and that can lead to a lack of urgency to return, because of this sense of timelessness. So in the earliest discussions of what the Era of Exhibitions would be, we talked about the need to dramatically effect change in the public’s perception of the Museum. Mystic Seaport could become a more diverse platform by increasing its exhibiting capacity—meaning staging exhibitions not just now and then and not just for prolonged periods. By mimicking the schedule of a major exhibiting museum, we could reach more people and share our passion with a broader audience. Creating a robust exhibition calendar gives us the opportunity to evolve from a museum perceived as a summer destination to one that offers compelling programming throughout the year.” For Bell, guiding the Era of Exhibitions to fruition is part of the Museum’s mission and a major part of the reason he came to Mystic Seaport from his previous position as The Fleur and Charles Bresler Curator-in-Charge at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery.

“Mystic Seaport could become a more diverse platform by increasing its exhibiting capacity— meaning staging exhibitions not just now and then and not just for prolonged periods. By mimicking the schedule of a major exhibiting museum, we could reach more people and share our passion with a broader audience. ” — Nicholas Bell

TWO HELMETS FROM THE 7TH CENTURY. © GUSTAVIANUM, UPPSALA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM.

THE VINLAND MAP. PHOTO COURTESY BEINECKE RARE BOOK AND MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY, YALE UNIVERSITY.

“We can preserve all of the qualities that create that strong emotional bond with our visitors,” he said. “We can also be a museum that offers programming that is timely, that addresses contemporary issues, that brings to Mystic Seaport a quality of an artifact and a rarity of experience that is on par with the greatest museums in this country.” Such an exhibition is Murmur: Arctic Realities, which opens January 20, 2018, in the Collins Gallery in the Thompson Building. “We are the international debut of a major new contemporary art initiative entitled Murmur: Arctic Realities,” Bell noted, “in which one of the leading contemporary artists in the United States, John Grade (pronounced Graw-Day), has created the most unexpected of artworks, intricately carved from Alaskan yellow cedar. This artwork will win the hearts of the people who care about craftsmanship, about the care of wooden vessels. But Murmur is so vastly different from the kind of work that we perform on our campus that it allows you to find those same passions in an entirely different area: in this case, experiencing an incredibly remote part of northwestern Alaska, where few of us will ever venture in person.”

Murmur will also feature the use of Microsoft’s HoloLens Mixed Reality technology. “We have a two-fer,” Bell said. “We have the opportunity to explore an exciting new artwork that I believe is compelling in and of itself and stands alone. But we also have the opportunity to experience a technology that very few people have yet had the chance to engage with on a personal level.” The three following exhibitions are more traditional in terms of content for a history museum, Bell said, but he looks at all of them—and those planned for 2019, 2020, and beyond—“as what we understand to be the breadth of our mission. As the Museum tacks between collections, to a contemporary art initiative and then back to a major exhibition of visiting collections, Viking material for example, we are demonstrating the outline of what we see as the full potential of our exhibiting capacity.” No one single project will define the Era of Exhibitions, Bell said. Rather, taken together as a “family of projects, they start to flesh out a vision of how Mystic Seaport can serve as an increasingly important hub for people to gain experience and understand-

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 13


THE ERA OF EXHIBITIONS ing of everything from where we have come from and how we define ourselves to where we are going. “As people watch the Era of Exhibitions unfold, and engage and participate in it, I hope they will understand that each project that comes after the last is helping to map a constellation of how our mission remains essential and relevant to a broad audience.” Each planned exhibition can and will stand on its own, Bell noted, so that, for example, visitors fascinated by Vikings but uninterested in failed Arctic expeditions will arrive and leave happy with what they have experienced and learned. But, he added, “if you experience this arc, if you come back, if you continue to participate and join us on a regular basis to be part of these projects, I hope that people will see the connections among them. I like to think of them as interrelated in the sense that experiencing one helps you to have richer experience of another.” The Vikings Begin, which opens on May 19, 2018, will be the first time many of these Viking artifacts—some dating back to the 7th century—have traveled outside Sweden. “An opportunity to come to Mystic Seaport and have a first-person experience, standing face-toface with a Viking helmet from the 7th century, just consider that for a moment. I believe that when you enter a museum and encounter artifacts with that kind of history, you open your-

14 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017

“We cannot overstate the importance of Mystic Seaport as a place to experience history first hand. As the Era of Exhibitions evolves, Mystic Seaport will increasingly be a platform to bring together experts from around the world with an audience that otherwise doesn’t have access to that level of knowledge. We can be the center point of that dialog, to help people engage and learn.” — Nicholas Bell

self up to a primal connection, to people who came before you. If we, as a museum, can help ourselves connect at a human level with other cultures or past cultures, it can only be a good thing.” At the same time The Vikings Begin opens, on May 19, so will an exhibition exploring the controversy of the Vinland Map. When it was first unveiled by Yale University in 1965, the Vinland Map immediately became one of the most valuable and controversial documents in the world. This parchment map was dated by Yale to about 1440—an incendiary claim as the map depicts at its far western edge Vinland (what we now know to be Newfoundland), the mysterious land discovered by explorer Leif Ericsson around the year 1000. The map suggests that Norse knowledge of the New World existed within mainland Europe before Columbus sailed. This riveted the public and roiled the scholarly world—there were marches, the map was burned in effigy, and the debates over its legitimacy were fierce. “The map created a whole debate in American culture about who came here first and what that stood for and what that meant,” Bell said. After decades of scientific analysis of the map, we now know it to be a forgery. However, that conclusion continues to be debated. It is our goal to tell the story of where this map came from and what it can tell us, why it had the cultural impact it did, and how it fomented a cross-cultural discussion of what the relationship

might be between Norse culture and North America. The exhibition will also explore why we know the map to be a forgery today, what the evidence is, and the deep irony of this history, which is that even though we know the map is not authentic, it still represented Norse contact with the New World that we now have archeological evidence to support. “The map allows us to tell a story about how we are connected to Norse culture and to serve as a bridge between that deep remote history and the artifacts that will be shown in The Vikings Begin,” Bell said. “On top of all that, this is the first opportunity since the 1960s for Americans to see the map itself. Most of the people involved in this debate have never seen it in person. To see the parchment, the ink, allows us to better understand. There is so much more you can gain with your own eyes.” Bell said that the Era of Exhibitions will—over the next several years—provide that opportunity again and again. And that, after all, is the point. “We cannot overstate the importance of Mystic Seaport as a place to experience history first hand,” Bell said. “As the Era of Exhibitions evolves, Mystic Seaport will increasingly be a platform to bring together experts from around the world with an audience that otherwise doesn’t have access to that level of knowledge. We can be the center point of that dialog, to help people engage and learn.” Elissa Bass is the Museum’s Social Media and Digital Manager. THE PINGO IN THE NOATAK NATIONAL PRESERVE THAT IS THE SUBJECT OF JOHN GRADE’S MURMUR. THE SMALL FIGURE ON TOP IS JOHN GRADE. PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN GRADE STUDIO.


NEW EXHIBITION

HAWAIIAN COWBOY, 24 X 30 IN., OIL, BY DEBRA HUSE.

DOCKING THE “WESTERDAM,” 11 X 14 IN., ACRYLIC, BY ANNE BRODIE HILL.

ASMA EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE

O

AT MYSTIC SEAPORT

n October 14, Mystic Seaport opened Contemporary American Marine Art: The 17th National Exhibition of the American Society of Marine Artists. The Museum is the final venue for this traveling exhibition, which debuted in September 2016 at the Muscarelle Museum of Art. The show, which includes 120 artworks, will be on display in the R. J. Schaefer Building through January 21, 2018. This exhibit is the latest joint project between Mystic Seaport and the American Society of Marine Artists (ASMA) to promote the genre of marine art and encourage new generations in the field. From October 19 to 22, ASMA held its second National Marine Art Conference (NMAC) in Mystic. At the conference, the 2017 ASMA Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Russell Jinishian. Earlier this summer, the 2017 Young Marine Artist Search (YMAS) Program Awards were given to Hyacinth Weng (Johns Creek High School, Johns Creek, GA) for “Shrimp,” which won in the categories Best in Show and Paintings and Drawings, and Darby Bowen (Goffstown High School, Goffstown, N.H.) for “Bloom” in the category Ceramics and Mixed Media. The exhibit in the Schaefer Building includes

these award-winning artworks, along with an acrylic painting by Su Min “Erin” Lee (Johns Creek High School, Johns Creek, GA), titled “Fresh”, which received Second Place in Paintings and Drawings. The YMAS program was launched in 2008 “to nurture and support young artists interested in maritime subjects and to encourage museums, art centers, and schools to hold competitions for these young people.” “The young artist competition creates an interesting new angle to the show. I think our visitors, especially those who know and love maritime art, will enjoy seeing works by renowned masters in the field alongside that of a new generation of artists,” commented Elysa Engelman, director of Exhibits at Mystic Seaport. ASMA, which was founded in 1978 by a group of leading maritime artists, has a longtime relationship with The Maritime Gallery at Mystic Seaport, which was established in 1979. Six years later, in April 1985, the gallery moved into a 3,300-square-foot new building, adjacent to the Museum’s gift store. The $475,000 gallery building—at the time the largest marine art gallery in the country—was donated by Rudolph “Rudie” J. Schaefer, III, then President of the Mystic

Seaport Board of Trustees, in memory of his father, Rudolph J. Schaefer, who had also been on the Board of Trustees. “Rudie had a vision for Mystic Seaport to be an incubator for the best of the next generation of marine artists. By providing a dedicated venue for them to display their work, he helped launch many artists’ careers,” Mystic Seaport President Steve White wrote in an obituary on Schaefer after his death in June 2011. “The American Society of Marine Artists’ relationship with Mystic Seaport has been a longstanding partnership. We support and complement each other’s missions, and ASMA is honored to have such a strong working relationship with the Museum,” remarked Kim Shaklee, who is President and Fellow of ASMA. Monique Foster, director of the Maritime Gallery, added: “In many ways, the Maritime Gallery and ASMA are both stewards in fostering the maintenance and continuation of marine art into the future. We look forward to continuing this close connection and supporting future talent and exhibitions of marine art.”an R Göran R Buckhorn is editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine. FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 15


Q&A with New Vice President of Watercraft Preservation and Programs Chris Gasiorek

C

hris Gasiorek joined Mystic Seaport in June 2017 as the Museum’s Vice President of Watercraft Preservation and Programs. Chris is a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point and is a professional mariner with an unlimited tonnage master’s license from the U.S. Coast Guard. He has served on tugs, bulk carriers, research ships, training ships, and racing yachts and has circumnavigated the world twice. Mystic Seaport Magazine sat down with him to see how he is settling in to his new job. Tell us a little about your background. I grew up in Michigan with an interest in boating and sailing from an early age. At about age 4, I told my parents that I wanted to work on a ship and never looked back. I attended the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and then went to work

16

| Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017


at sea. After 10 years at sea, I returned to the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy as Sailing Master and Director of Waterfront Operations and Training. In 2014, I returned to sea as captain of large supply vessels working with the oil and gas industry in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In addition to a love of being on the sea, I have always been interested in maritime history. I remember being young and wanting to re-visit the Dossin Great Lakes Museum in Detroit–I guess I was destined to find a place that combined active ships and history. What made you want to apply for the job as Vice President of Watercraft Preservation and Programs at the Museum? While working at sea as the captain of a ship is certainly challenging and fulfilling, I missed the sense of working toward a greater good that I had while working with the midshipmen at Kings Point. The idea of preserving and sharing the great history of the collected vessels at Mystic Seaport sounded like a perfect challenge to fill that gap. Did you have any previous experience with Mystic Seaport? I first visited the Museum while working on the Schooner Lettie G. Howard and was amazed by the Museum and location–walking through the grounds felt like the closest thing to time travel. While working at Kings Point, I brought many training trips here because of how important I feel it is to include history with practical maritime training. How do you see your professional mariner background contributing to your job here? The things that I love about working at sea are the things I see in the community here at Mystic Seaport: a strong sense of purpose, the awareness that it is more than just a job, and the broad capabilities to be able to handle anything that comes one’s way. I think the team here would make a great ship’s crew. So in answer to the question, I think working at the Museum is very similar to working as a mariner. What surprised you the most about the Museum once your started work? I think the biggest surprise was how many amazing people it takes to make the Museum work.

What are your goals and ambitions for the watercraft department? My goals for the watercraft department are to build on the existing safety culture to make a safe environment for our visitors and employees, work to get more people to experience the Museum on the water, and provide greater access to our watercraft collection. What is it like to operate a preservation shipyard? What makes it special or different? I think the greatest part is that our goal is not only to preserve history, but to share the work that we do with our visitors. Having them see logs turned into frames and then the frames ultimately turned into a ship lends a whole different perspective than walking aboard or even sailing on a historic vessel. The ability to connect with the artisans at the Shipyard is really something unique and at a scale that cannot be found anywhere else. How is managing a fleet with historic ships and boats different for you compared to your past experience, for example Kings Point? I think the biggest difference is that at Kings Point some bumps and bruises to the boats were expected in the training program, and while we would keep the boats for a long time, we never thought in terms of a maintenance plan that would preserve a vessel forever. At Mystic Seaport, we are dealing with priceless artifacts of our national history, and everything we do has to be in terms of preserving the vessels for eternity. Do you have a favorite historic vessel? How about I narrow it down to three? Lettie G. Howard has a strong place in my heart from the times I spent sailing her; the John Brown and Jeremiah O’Brien–having commanded cargo ships at sea, I cannot begin to fathom the challenges my maritime forefathers faced on the WWII Liberty Ships; and the L.A. Dunton. I have a thing for Gloucester schooners and I can’t wait to begin work on her restoration. I guess that is four, oh well… Do you have a message for members and visitors to the Museum? It is an honor to join the team at Mystic Seaport and I look forward to meeting more of our members. Please stop by the Shipyard to say “Hi.”

QUENTIN SNEDIKER NAMED CLARK SENIOR CURATOR Quentin Snediker has been named the Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft at Mystic Seaport. His role is to direct and lead the preservation and development of the Museum’s watercraft collection, which presently numbers 521 vessels of all sizes, ranging from small rowboats and kayaks to four National Historic Landmarks, including the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan. Snediker is tasked with evaluating the collection contents and managing the preservation work and curation plan to maximize the collection’s contents for historical importance and cultural relevance. The appointment as curator for the watercraft collection is in addition to his role as Director of the Museum’s Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. “This title is in recognition of Quentin Snediker’s extraordinary knowledge and experience in maritime history and preservation techniques,” said Mystic Seaport President Steve White. “He is a leader in the field with a worldwide reputation, and the Museum is fortunate to have someone of his caliber on staff to lead our collection.” Snediker is only the second person to hold this title at the Museum. He succeeds Dana Hewson, who retired after 39 years at Mystic Seaport earlier this year.

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 17


MYSTIC SEAPORT IN WINTER? YES! Explore exhibits H Visit the Morgan H Play outside H Learn about the stars Have fun with children’s activities H Attend a program H Enjoy games and crafts Sip hot cocoa in the Members’ Lounge H Have lunch in the cozy Tavern Warm up by the fire in a historic kitchen H Shop the Museum stores 860.572.0711

• WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG


F O R T H E H O L I D AY S

Gift Ideas EMBOSSED DIARIES AND LOG BOOKS Our popular Christmas Memories Book, A Boater’s Diary, and the new and revised Yacht Log make wonderful and unique holiday gifts when personalized with embossing. Christmas Memories Book is $38.95, A Boater’s Diary is $39.95, Yacht Log is $44.95.

WHALESHIP HANGER Our Whaleship Hanger is reminiscent of vessels long ago. It can be used in a window or as a great Christmas ornament! This hanger of copper, tin, and brass is made exclusively for Mystic Seaport. Retails for $24.95.

CODE FLAG SCARF Our signal code flag scarf (featured under the books) is custom-designed for Mystic Seaport. 100% Rayon 20” x 68” Retails for $39.95.

DECK PRISMS Our deck prisms are replicas of the ones used in the last remaining whaleship in the world, Charles W. Morgan, and make the perfect holiday gift! Deck prisms were “skylights” installed point-down in decks of 19th-century sailing vessels to provide light, evenly distributed by the six facets, to the cabins below. Our replica deck prisms are hand-cast in the United States. Two sizes: small is available in nine colors and retails for $19.95, while the large prism is available in two colors and retails for $29.95.

2018 WALL CALENDARS Mystic Seaport Calendar Featuring stunning images from the grounds of Mystic Seaport, taken throughout the year by our talented staff photographers. These images represent some of the hidden treasures at Mystic Seaport. Retails for $12.99. Classic Sailing Featuring images from The Rosenfeld Collection of historic photographs. This year’s calendar highlights the image of Flying Spinnakers, taken in 1938 and published as a full-page Life magazine illustration. Retails for $14.99.

VISIT MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG AND SHOP ONLINE: ENTER SAVETEN DURING CHECKOUT TO SAVE 10% ON YOUR NEXT ORDER! OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2018, AND IS AVAILABLE ONLINE ONLY. FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 19


ON BOOKS

I

ce Ghosts. This intriguing title Of particular interest is the story of serves as an excellent hook, drawInuit historian Louie Kamookak, who ing readers into an epic adventure conducted exhaustive studies of Inuit story. Or more accurately, two epic traditions and oral histories relating to adventure stories: the first, Sir John the Franklin Expedition. His personal Franklin’s search for the Northwest story and the accompanying details Passage, which generates a second, about the challenges facing the Inuit in the 170-year search for Sir John and his lifetime are revealing and at times his ships. heartbreaking. They also serve as a On May 19, 1845, two British exreminder that the Arctic world visited ploring ships, the Erebus and Terby outside explorers was not unoccuror, departed from England under pied; it was the home of a people who the command of veteran explorer were—and are—masters at surviving Sir John Franklin. Their mission was in an unforgiving environment. to discover the Arctic’s long-sought As the 21st century unfolded, the Northwest Passage, a northern sea fate of Franklin attracted renewed route that would hopefully expedite interest. Then, two dramatic events trade and travel westward from Euin recent years shed much light on rope. The Franklin Expedition failed the mysteries of the Franklin Expein its quest, disappearing into an icy dition. Using a unique combination and largely unknown realm. In doing of cutting-edge technology and Inuit so, it gave birth to one of history’s knowledge, Erebus was found in 2014 great mysteries. In Ice Ghosts, Pulitzer and Terror in 2016, both in excellent Prize-winning author Paul Watson condition. With their discovery, one provides a fascinating telling of this major question—what became of remarkable tale. Franklin’s ships?—has been answered. Watson begins with a solid body Underwater archaeology and ongoing of background information, creating study will likely reveal much more a foundation of valuable information about a story that continues to capture on Arctic exploration, Franklin, his popular imagination. contemporaries, and his wife Jane, The author delivers an excellent By PAUL WATSON who plays a very prominent role in account, with all its twists, turns, and (Published by W. W. Norton & Company, the quest for information about her personalities. There is little to criti2017, 384 pages) husband’s fate. Once the Franklin cize about this fine book and a few Expedition sails from port, the actual minor points suffice. Although genREVIEWED BY FRED CALABRETTA travels of the two ships receive limited eral source information is provided, description, partly because specific specific citations are lacking: a disdetails of their movements and activiadvantage for the serious researcher. ties once they reached the Arctic remain largely uncertain. Also, the book would benefit from more frequent use of dates, As the subtitle suggests, the author places his emphasis on which would be helpful in grounding the reader at the appropriate the at-times obsessive search for Franklin. The search, involving place in time. However, these issues do not seriously detract from British and American ships, persisted for several decades. Various a well-researched and well-written book and a highly readable searchers found relics, skeletons, and most importantly, brief notes presentation of a remarkable story that continues to evolve today. which confirmed that Franklin had died in 1847 and his ships had Fred Calabretta is Curator of Collections at Mystic Seaport. been trapped in the ice in 1848. Still the quest continued for details about events and movements of the Expedition. And the search Between November 2018 and April 2019, the exhibition for Franklin’s body and the two ships persisted. Death in the Ice: The Mystery of the Franklin Expedition The story takes interesting turns in the 20th century, when will be featured in the Collins Gallery. new technology and renewed research bring new developments.

Ice Ghosts: The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition

20 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017


EDITOR’S PICKS The Sphinx of the Charles: A Year at Harvard with Harry Parker By Toby Ayer

H

arry Parker (1935-2013) might not have been a famous name outside the rowing world but within it, he was a legend. Before representing the U.S. in the single sculls at the 1960 Olympic Games, Parker had both rowed and sculled at the prestigous Henley Royal Regatta in England: winning the Grand Challenge Cup for eights (1955) and being the runner-up in the Diamond Challenge Sculls in the single (1959). In 1961, he was appointed freshman coach at Harvard, and when the varsity heavyweight coach suddenly died in 1963, Parker was promoted to coach that crew, surprisingly taking the young men to victory in the 1964 race against archrival Yale. Thereafter, it wasn’t until the 1981 Harvard-Yale Race that Yale managed to beat Harvard. Parker would coach Harvard until his death in June 2013. Parker also coached several U.S. national teams to medals at the World Championships and Olympics, including the first women’s national team, the “Red Rose Crew,” that took a silver medal in the eights at the 1975 World Championships and the women’s eight that took an Olympic bronze the following year. Parker was known as a man of few words, hence the title of Toby Ayer’s book, The Sphinx of the Charles. The author knows his subjects—Coach Parker and rowing—well, as Ayer rowed at MIT and Oxford—in the Oxford crew versus Cambridge in 1999 and 2000—and then acted as Parker’s assistant coach during Harvard’s 2007/2008 rowing season. It is from the later period that the author bases his writing about Parker. He points out that this is not a biography about the great coach, nor is it a “Parker-how-to-row book.” It is light on rowing technical details, which will be appreciated by readers who are non-rowers but nevertheless interested in modern rowing history. Ayer makes it clear that the Harvard coach was adored by his oarsmen, even seen as a god by many; as the author puts it about Parker, “He could walk on water” and “He could control the weather.” The author has scattered his book with short and long statements or reminiscences from former Harvard rowers and coxes. Many of them attest that their coach not only made them better oarsmen but also better people—and there are life lessons to be learned from hard rowing. A few of the rowers demonstrate that Parker was a competitive man off the water as well and sometimes difficult to deal with. Ayer, who is a rowing coach and teacher at the Salisbury School in Connecticut, has composed a well-written and entertaining portrait of Harry Parker, the most successful rowing coach in the USA during the last half-century.

Shiver Hitch By Linda Greenlaw

C

ommercial lobster boat captain Linda Greenlaw, who has many books under her belt, including the bestsellers The Hungry Ocean (1999), The Lobster Chronicles (2002), and All Fishermen Are Liars (2002), has now become a mystery writer with her Jane Bunker series. Bunker has quit her job as a Miami detective to move back to Green Haven, Maine, to work as an insurance investigator and part-time deputy sheriff. In Shiver Hitch, she is investigating the case of a house fire, where the burned body of a woman is found. The victim, the wealthy, detested Midge Kohl, was murdered. Did the killing have anything to do with Kohl’s lobster-processing factory, which the locals on remote Acadia Island were opposed to, or the ex-cons who staff the place? Can it have anything to do with drugs? While trying to solve the murder, Bunker also has to deal with her crazy landlords, the Vickersons, a not-so-easy task.

To order these or other books, please call 860.572.5386 or email msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com Don’t forget your 10% members’ discount! Remember we ship anywhere.

A Man for All Oceans: Captain Joshua Slocum and the first solo voyage around the world By Stan Grayson

“W

hat a tale it is,” Stan Grayson writes in his latest book, A Man for All Oceans. This is a biography of Captain Joshua Slocum, the Canadian farm boy who became an American seaman, then rose to captain (and what a superb navigator and sailor he was), and later turned into a celebrated world-renowned maritime author. Luckily for Slocum, his father, a shoemaker who transformed into a farmer, decided to sell his farm in Mount Hanley to move his family to Brier Island, Nova Scotia, to open a boot shop. There young Slocum worked, but with seafaring in his blood, he dreamt about the sea. In 1860, after giving birth to her 11th child, Slocum’s mother died. Slocum left the home soon thereafter–exactly when and under what circumstances are obscure, Grayson writes. Much information about Slocum is sparse or contradicting, as he omitted details in his own writing or neglected to mention certain episodes when he was interviewed by newspapers after reaching fame. He sailed around the world and in 1871 he met a young American woman, Victoria, in Sydney. They fell in love and married soon after a short courtship. Victoria accompanied her husband on his voyages and they would have seven children, four of whom would survive to adulthood. Grayson writes, that Slocum “almost certainly believed that the ocean was not just a good place but the best place to raise a family.” In July 1884, when the Slocums were by Rio de la Plata aboard the 1865 Mystic-built bark Aquidneck, Victoria suddenly took ill and died, age 35. Capt. Slocum never recovered from his wife’s death. Two years later, at age 42, he married his 18-year-younger cousin, “Hettie.” She proved not to have sea-legs and the marriage was not a happy one. He continued to captain vessels around the world, leaving his younger children with his new wife. After Capt. Slocum had finished rebuilding his 36-foot 9-inch sloop Spray, he set sail from East Boston on April 24, 1895, to singlehandedly voyage around the world. It never crossed his mind that this could not be done. With Slocum’s tremendous skills in seamanship, he was the right man to succeed. Grayson writes admirably about the captain: “It would have been an education in seamanship to go sailing with Joshua Slocum, watching his moves while he handled the Spray as if she were an extension of his own body.” On June 27, 1898, three years, two months later, and after 46,000 miles, the Spray arrived in Newport, Rhode Island. In 1900, Capt. Slocum published his account of his circumnavigation of the world, Sailing Alone Around the World, which has never been out of print. The book gave him world fame and his sailing endeavor and book opened doors to prominent people in America, including President Teddy Roosevelt. Although he tried, Slocum could not settle down to a life ashore. He continued to sail the Spray, in winters to the Caribbean. In November 1908, he again set sail from Martha’s Vineyard to sail to the Caribbean. He was never heard from or seen again. There are many mysteries surrounding Capt. Slocum and his life. With this well-written and marvelously illustrated book, Stan Grayson has straightened out many of the question marks. The author is to be congratulated for a fascinating biography about a true American legend—indeed, what a tale it is.

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 21


FROM THE COLLECTIONS

RESEARCH FELLOWS AT THE G.W. BLUNT WHITE LIBRARY

By PAUL O’PECKO

Funding for the fellowships comes from annual art of the tagline for dues by each institution the G.W. Blunt White and is also supported in Library at Mystic Seagreat part by a grant from port has always been that the Mellon Foundation. it is the best place in the A few of the interesting United States to begin any fellows (with their affiliawork in maritime studies. tion at the time) who visThe Library, located in the ited Mystic Seaport over Collections Research Center the years, along with their DETAIL FROM LOG OF WHALING BARK CLARA BELL. LOG 164, MANUSCRIPTS COLLECTION, at the Museum, is a major topics, include: Joshua M. G.W. BLUNT WHITE LIBRARY. maritime research facility Smith (Ph.D. candidate, and home to the most comprehensive maritime collection in Department of History, The University of Maine) “The Rogues of America. The collection is used by Museum staff, resident students, ‘Quoddy: Smuggling in the Maine-New Brunswick Borderlands, maritime history scholars, genealogists, artists, authors, and more. 1783-1820” The Library’s collection consists of 75,000 books, 1,000,000 pieces David Montejano (Associate Professor, History and Sociology, of manuscript material, 2,000 logbooks, 200,000 sheets of ships University of Texas at Austin) “A Red Badge of Cotton? On the plans, 10,000 charts and maps, periodicals, oral histories, and other Circulation of Southern Cotton during the American Civil War” relevant collections. The professional staff at the Library collects, Brian Payne (Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, Canadiancatalogs, digitizes, and responds to more than 2,500 visits and American Center, University of Maine) “Fishing the Borderlands: inquiries per year. Subjects of the collection include, but are not Labor and Capital Migration in the North Atlantic Fisheries” limited to, ships (passenger ships, merchant marine, ocean liners, Stephen R. Berry (Ph.D. Candidate, Graduate Program in ReliCoast Guard, naval, and pleasure), immigration, yachting, voyages, gion, Duke University) “Seaborne Conversions, 1700-1800” women at sea, crew lists, whaling, exploration, and discovery. In James Revell Carr, III, (UNC Greensboro, School of Music) other words, we have plenty of material for anyone interested in “Hawaiian Music and Dance in New England, 1802-1862” the maritime world. Hari Vishwanadha (Santa Monica College) “Passages to India” Since 2001, the Library has been part of the New England ReDan Du (Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georgia) “This World gional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC), which has grown from in a Teacup: Sino-American Tea Trade in the Nineteenth Century” about ten institutions in 2001 to 25 as of this year. Members include Currently, NERFC is our only library fellowship program and all of the state historical societies in New England, the Boston it has paid great dividends in bringing our collections to the atPublic Library, the Boston Athenaeum, and a number of university tention of rising young scholars in the field. See more about the libraries including Harvard, Brown, Dartmouth, Smith, and Boston Consortium at www.masshist.org/fellowships/nerfc/ College. Along with Mystic Seaport, Historic Deerfield represents Paul O’Pecko is Vice President of Research Collections and Director of the the Museum community. The purpose of NERFC is to encourage G.W. Blunt White Library. scholarly research at all of these New England research institutions by awarding fellowships to qualified individuals in the amount of To get more information about the $5,000. This year, the Consortium received approximately 100 apCollections Research Center of Mystic Seaport and online resources, plications for funds and handed out 20 fellowships. Recipients of a please visit research.mysticseaport.org fellowship are required to spend eight weeks during a calendar year doing research at no less than three of the participating institutions.

P

22 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2017


EVENTS at MYSTIC SEAPORT New Exhibition! CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN MARINE ART: THE 17TH NATIONAL EXHIBITION OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MARINE ARTISTS October 14 – January 21, 2018 R. J. Schaefer Building

COASTAL WATERS: WHERE LAND MEETS THE SEA April 28 – June 10, 2018 The Maritime Gallery

MARITIME MINIATURES BY MARITIME MASTERS November 18 – January 31, 2018 The Maritime Gallery

SALUTE TO SUMMER May 26 – 27, 2018

LANTERN LIGHT TOURS Weekends, November 24 – December 23 COMMUNITY CAROL SING December 17 HOLIDAY MAGIC December 26 – January 1, 2018 CHANTEY BLAST AND PUB SING January 13, 2018 1 – 5 p.m. Frohsinn Hall (located at 54 Greenmanville Ave. across from the Museum’s South Entrance) New Exhibition! MURMUR: ARCTIC REALITIES January 20 – April, 2018 Collins Gallery PIRATE DAYS April 17 – 18, 2018

Save The Date! Mystic Seaport Members’ Annual Meeting & Recognition Day Saturday, May 19, 2018 (doors open 9:30) 10-11:30 a.m. The River Room, Latitude 41° FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG OR CALL 860.572.5339

PILOTS WEEKEND May 7 – 8, 2018

2017-2018 ADVENTURE SERIES 1:30 p.m and 6:30 p.m. THE RIVER ROOM, LATITUDE 41° RESTAURANT & TAVERN OR STONERIDGE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY StoneRidge is the exclusive sponsor of the 2017 – 2018 Adventure Series

DECORATION DAY May 28, 2018

CHRIS CRYDER PRESERVING PLUM ISLAND Thursday, December 14 (Afternoon program at StoneRidge)

New Exhibition! THE VIKINGS BEGIN: TREASURES FROM UPPSALA UNIVERSITY, SWEDEN May 19 – September, 2018 Collins Gallery

THE CREW OF THE OLIVER HAZARD PERRY LIFE ON THE HIGH SEAS Thursday, January 18, 2018 (Evening program at StoneRidge)

New Exhibition! THE VINLAND MAP May 19 – September, 2018 R. J. Schaefer Building

NELSON SIMON THE ACCIDENTAL SAILOR Thursday, February 15, 2018 (Evening program at StoneRidge)

SEA MUSIC FESTIVAL June 7 – 10, 2018 VIKING DAYS June 16 – 17, 2018 WOODENBOAT SHOW June 22 – 24, 2018 SMALL CRAFT WORKSHOP June 22 – 24, 2018

SYMA EBBIN RESEARCHING NATIVE FISHERIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Thursday, March 15, 2018 ELIZABETH COTTRELL EXPEDITION TO ARCTIC VOLCANOES Thursday, April 19, 2018 JAMES L. NELSON FROM TALL SHIPS TO VIKING LONGSHIPS Thursday, May 17, 2018

For additional programs, classes, and courses, but also for changes or cancellations, please visit the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org For hours of operation, open and closed exhibits, shopping, and dining, please check the Museum’s website www.mysticseaport.org

Follow us on

FALL / WINTER 2017

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 23


FALL | WINTER 2017

FALL | WINTER 2011

75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Do not hold

Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID

mailed from zip code 14206 Permit #982

THE PERFECT GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR Connect your friends and family to America’s premiere maritime museum. Give them the gift of Membership and we’ll include a 2018 Mystic Seaport calendar. Members enjoy year-round FREE admission, discounts at the Museum stores and restaurants, and much more! To purchase a gift Membership, call 860.572.5339, or visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org/join. Offer good through January 31, 2018. Allow five business days for processing plus additional time for shipping.

Profile for Daniel McFadden

Mystic Seaport Magazine Fall/Winter 2017  

This is the magazine of Mystic Seaport for Fall/Winter 2017.

Mystic Seaport Magazine Fall/Winter 2017  

This is the magazine of Mystic Seaport for Fall/Winter 2017.

Advertisement