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THE OPENING OF THE

THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING


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The Inaugural Exhibit In the Collins Gallery THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING

O P E N I N G

December 10, 2016 75 Greenmanville Avenue • Mystic, Connecticut 06355 • 860.572.0711 • www.mysticseaport.org


CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE

TM

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic SeaporT

SEASCAPES . ..................................… 6

President STEPHEN C. WHITE

ADVANCEMENT NEWS ................ 8-11

executive vice presidents SUSAN FUNK MARCY WITHINGTON

MUSEUM BRIEFS ....................... 12-16

Senior VICE PRESIDENT FOR Curatorial Affairs Nicholas Bell

THE OPENING OF THE THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING ............... 17-20

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT Elisabeth Saxe

NEW EXHIBIT: SEACHANGE ............ 21

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Editor Göran R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

INTERVIEW: NICHOLAS BELL .... 22-23 EDUCATION ................................ 24-25

PRODUCTION Susan HEATH

FOR THE HOLIDAYS . ....................... 26

Design Dayna Carignan, Mystic Seaport karen Ward, THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY

ON BOOKS .................................. 27-29

contributors Matt Barnes

Susan Funk

John Boudreau

Arlene Marcionette

Fred Calabretta

Dan McFadden

Melinda Carlisle

Paul O’Pecko

FROM THE COLLECTIONS . ............. 30 EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT . ....... 31

Elysa Engelman PHOTOGRAPHY Matt Barnes Göran R Buckhorn Ingrid Buckhorn Alina Bulazel Chris Freeman Bob Johnstone

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Werner Karrasch Andrew Marzano Joe Michael Andy Price Mystic Seaport Photography Archives

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ON THE COVER: THE FACADE OF THE MUSEUM’S NEW THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING SEEN

2016

FROM THE MYSTIC RIVER SIDE. PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY PRICE/MYSTIC SEAPORT

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315 • 888.973.2767 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 ADVANCEMENT: 860.572.5365 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 Please go to the Museum’s website for information on the Fall, Winter, and Spring schedules ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355-0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

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A New Era Begins

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n the very earliest days of this millennium, the leadership members of Mystic Seaport were deep in discussions, as were many other so-called “living history museums,” as to how to address what had been a rather steady decline of visitors over time. Despite engaging exhibitions and creative programming, the simple fact was that museums like Mystic Seaport were no longer attracting the same number of people that had sustained us for decades. In response, the Museum created a master plan for programming and for the campus, and began to envision a different future. In this planning process, it became clear that one of the greatest assets of Mystic Seaport—its stunning location on the river— was underutilized. The “outdoor museum” and collections of buildings and vessels that had made Mystic Seaport famous no longer generated enough revenue in the off-seasons to fully support the programs. It was determined that the Museum had to become more of an all-season, all-weather destination. Such a goal would require dramatic changes. Enter trustee Wade F. B. Thompson. At a point when the Museum Board was engaged

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Angela and Wade Thompson, in 2007.

in discussions about what these changes needed to be, Wade had heard enough. Planning and discussion were important ingredients for success, but what Mystic Seaport needed at that point was action, and Wade was the person to make that happen. Wade proposed a major fundraising challenge to the Board: he would match, up to a multi-million-dollar level, all trustee contributions made within a very short time frame. Inspired by his generosity, millions were raised, and in 2007, the Museum’s future began to take shape as defined by sketches of a new exhibition building that was the result of many years of planning. The recession, and then the Charles W. Morgan project, interfered with the plans, but here

we are in 2016 and the original vision in its final interpretation has been fully accomplished. Sadly, Wade passed away in 2009 and thus he never witnessed the final result of his leadership and his call to action. As his wife, Angela, and their daughter, Amanda, christened the Thompson Exhibition Building in September, we know that Wade was proudly at their side and quietly telling them and his former trustee colleagues: “Well done and thank you for fulfilling the vision in such a marvelous manner.” The Thompson Building stands as a tribute to Wade Thompson and as a testament for the confidence the Board of Trustees and donors have in the future of Mystic Seaport. The capital campaign for the building is called A Museum in Motion. Indeed we are. Enjoy the article about the building on pages 17-20 in this issue of the Magazine. Better yet, come and see the building now, and then be with us again for the first exhibition, SeaChange, in the Collins Gallery in the Thompson Building, which opens on December 10, 2016. STEPHEN C. WHITE, President


SUPPORT THE NATION’S PREMIER MARITIME MUSEUM PLEASE MAKE YOUR DONATION BY DECEMBER 31

YOU CAN HELP A NEW GENERATION SEA HISTORY ALIVE. You can strengthen our nation’s premier maritime museum with a gift to the Annual Fund. Your gift supports our exemplary programs in every area of the Museum and ensures the vitality of Mystic Seaport. By making a donation, you will inspire an enduring connection to our nation’s maritime heritage for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. To make your gift today, please call 860.572.5376 or visit www.mysticseaport.org/support

ANNUAL FUND AT MYSTIC SEAPORT 75 Greenmanville Ave. P.O. Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 860.572.5376 www.mysticseaport.org/support


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

OPERA HOUSE CUP

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his past August, the Museum’s schooner Brilliant sailed to Nantucket to participate in the Opera House Cup. The weekend racing event—which featured numerous other storied classic vessels, including Ticonderoga, Santana, and Dorade—was coupled with a teen sail training voyage. Thanks to a generous Mystic Seaport supporter, young people from the Nantucket Community Sailing Program sailed Brilliant from Mystic Seaport to Nantucket and, in turn, a second group sailed her home the following week. While Brilliant was on Nantucket, she hosted the Nantucket Community Sailing program’s dockside open-house and welcomed hundreds of admirers, as well as 150 guests who stepped aboard to tour the yacht. Throughout the weekend, Brilliant served as a sterling ambassador of Mystic Seaport, providing the young sailors the experience of open-water sailing on a great vessel while acquiring important seamanship, leadership, and teambuilding skills.

TICONDEROGA, BRILLIANT, WILD HORSE, ANDTREE OF LIFE CROSS THE LINE AT THE START OF THE OPERA HOUSE CUP ON NANTUCKET. PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB JOHNSTONE, ABOARD ZING.

HINCKLEY RENDEZVOUS

Center, viewing photographs from the Rosenfeld Collection and artifacts relating to the schooner America. In addition, a tour of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard was given as well as a special tour of the exhibit “Over Life’s Waters” featuring the art collector Charles Hamm. During an evening cocktail party, a celebratory toast was made in honor of the late Jim McManus, the former CEO of Hinckley, and it was announced that the company and friends of Jim contributed to make a $100,000 gift to Mystic Seaport, recognized with a permanent naming plaque on one of the ten support beams of the new Thompson Exhibition Building. The Hinckley Rendezvous was organized with the support of Mystic Seaport Trustee, Grant L. Cambridge and his wife Peggy, who attended on board their Talaria 40, Shenandoah. Also in attendance were Alex and Amanda Bu-

A BEAUTIFUL PARADE OF BOATS AS PARTICIPANTS IN THE HINCKLEY RENDEZVOUS, BOTH SAIL AND POWER, HEAD DOWNRIVER AND ON TO NEWPORT FOR THE SECOND LEG OF THE EVENT.

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ystic Seaport served as the first destination for this summer’s Hinckley Rendezvous with more than 20 of the iconic Hinckley picnic boats and 70 guests visiting the Museum in early August. During their stay, Hinckley owners toured the Museum’s Collections Research

lazel and their daughter Alina on board their Hinckley Picnic Boat, Skylark. This was a good example of an event hosted by members and friends of Mystic Seaport, the institution’s new Mystic Affinity Program (MAP), a fresh strategy Mystic Seaport is using to introduce new people to the Museum and to the region.


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

COMMODORE RIVES POTTS, FLEET CAPTAIN CHAFEE EMORY, AND CREW READY THEIR WHALEBOAT AS PART OF THE NEW YORK YACHT CLUB ANNUAL CRUISE LAY DAY WHALEBOAT RACES ON FISHERS ISLAND. MYSTIC SEAPORT DEMONSTRATION SQUAD MEMBER CHRIS GAULD IS STEERING THE BOAT.

MYSTIC SEAPORT-NEW YORK YACHT CLUB WHALEBOAT RACES

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ystic Seaport teamed up with the New York Yacht Club to introduce an authentic maritime experience during the club’s lay day activities of the 2016 NYYC Annual Cruise on August 10. Participating club members raced in four historically accurate 28-foot whaleboats that were brought to Fishers Island for the event. The races were presented in cooperation with Mystic Seaport using whaleboats that were built for the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage. Teams of five rowers worked a

short course and experienced the strength required to row these beautiful wooden boats that combine speed, agility, and purpose. Commodore Rives Potts and Fleet Captain Chafee Emory were among the participants. At the evening dinner, Commodore Potts and Mystic Seaport President Steve White congratulated all participants and White presented the Mystic Seaport Whaleboat Race Trophy to the crew of the El Oro, which came in first place, and the Broken Oar Trophy, which

honors the spirit of rowing, to the team from the Fishers Island Yacht Club, which came in just seconds behind the first-place boat. For all who participated in or viewed the whaleboat races, a special thank you goes to NYYC members/Mystic Seaport Trustees Sheila McCurdy and John Brim, and Fleet Captain Chafee Emory, as well as Lincoln White, General Manager of the Fishers Island Yacht Club, who made the event possible.

NEWPORT BERMUDA RACE

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he field of boats participating in the 50th Newport Bermuda Race included a number of Mystic Seaport friends and members, including Trustees Sheila McCurdy, Frank Bohlen, Bob Rodgers, Mike Hudner, and Joe Hoopes. Mystic Seaport covered this as the first of what will be Virtual MAPs (Mystic Seaport Affinity Programs) with the help of Capt. Brad Baker of the yacht Rena, who took numerous spectacular photos from the starting line that the Museum then shared on social media. Joe, a past winner of the Bermuda Race for the American Cruising Division, shared a mid-race series of three photos he took from the aft deck of America II depicting a stark historic moment as Comanche approached, overtook, and then shot past America II in a matter of seconds. The 100-foot Comanche continued on, averaging a speed of 16 knots, setting a race record with an elapsed time of 34 hours, 42 minutes, and 53 seconds, almost five hours ahead of the previous record set in 2012 by George David on Rambler. Congratulations to Skipper Ken Read and owners Jim and Kristy Hinze Clark, who distributed points and numbers to Mystic Seaport Magazine.

MYSTIC SEAPORT TRUSTEE JOE HOOPES, FROM ABOARD THE 139-FOOT SCHOONER AMERICA II IN THE NEWPORT BERMUDA RACE, GETS A PHOTO OF COMANCHE AS SHE PASSES AND REPORTS “IT HAPPENED IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE.”

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BUILDING A LEGACY

SUPPORTING THE CHARLES W. MORGAN By MELINDA CARLISLE

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have been a member and supporter of Mystic Seaport since 1988. In my profession as a Mystic realtor and business owner, I am keenly aware of the important role of Mystic Seaport in our community. I have always been a champion and advocate for the Museum and often introduce my clients to Mystic Seaport when they move to town. So it was no surprise to me when I was invited to a meeting at the Museum in early 2011 to participate in a conversation about the ongoing restoration of the Charles W. Morgan. What was news, however, was that Mystic Seaport had decided to take the Charles W. Morgan to sea at the conclusion of her restoration and that the Museum was looking to the local community for help. It came to pass that in the spring of 2011, I joined Mystic Seaport Trustee Searle Field as Co-Chair of the Sail the Morgan 2014 campaign. Who could ignore such a great opportunity or refuse such a unique invitation? Our goal was to lead a community-wide effort to raise awareness of the importance of the Morgan’s presence here, her history and the daring adventure in store for her when she returned to the open seas in 2014. In November 2011, we began with a celebration of the 70th anniversary of the arrival of the Morgan to Mystic. We established “Morgan Week” with fireworks and lantern lighting, restaurant week, historical lectures, and music in the park in downtown Mystic—all designed to bring the community together in shared activities to benefit all. Several of these activities have become annual events. We conducted private group tours of the Morgan, hosted dinner parties, and invited local companies to participate in our efforts. All with the goal in mind to raise funds so the Morgan could go on her 38th Voyage. As you all know by now, our efforts, combined with those of the shipwrights,

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FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: MELINDA CARLISLE, U.S. SENATOR RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, MYSTIC SEAPORT PRESIDENT STEVE WHITE, AND CO-CHAIR OF THE SAIL THE MORGAN 2014 COMMITTEE SEARLE FIELD AT THE CHARLES W. MORGAN’S 70 YEARS IN MYSTIC CELEBRATION ON NOVEMBER 5, 2011.

met with success and the Morgan let slip

Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard to sail forth to inspire a new generation. During this voyage, her cargo was neither baleen nor whale oil, but rather knowledge and inspiration. The job is never over, the work never done. The Charles W. Morgan requires continuous care and attention if she is to survive and inspire our grandchildren. It is with that knowledge in mind that I made the decision to further my support in perpetuity by including a bequest gift to support the Morgan as part of my estate plans. If you share my passion for the Morgan and my belief in the vital role of Mystic Seaport in our lives and our community, then please join me and name Mystic Seaport as a beneficiary in your estate plans. If you would like to learn more about creating your own legacy of support for Mystic Seaport and the Charles W. Morgan call the Mystic Seaport Advancement office at 860.572.5365.

her mooring lines from the Museum’s

Melinda Carlisle is a realtor in Mystic.

The job is never over, the work never done. The Charles W. Morgan requires continuous care and attention if she is to survive and inspire our grandchildren. It is with that knowledge in mind that I made the decision to further my support in perpetuity by including a bequest gift to support the Morgan as part of my estate plans. If you share my passion for the Morgan and my belief in the vital role of Mystic Seaport in our lives and our community, then please join me and name Mystic Seaport as a beneficiary in your estate plans. — Melinda Carlisle educators, advancement officers, staff, trustees, and volunteers of Mystic Seaport,


AMERICA AND THE SEA AWARD

B O B A N D R O D J O H N S T O N E – J / B O AT S : R E C I P I E N T S O F T H E 2 0 1 6

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: KEN READ, PRESIDENT OF NORTH SAILS; BOB JOHNSTONE, AWARD RECIPIENT; STEVE WHITE , PRESIDENT OF MYSTIC SEAPORT; ROD JOHNSTONE, AWARD RECIPIENT; AND BARCLAY COLLINS, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF MYSTIC SEAPORT.

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he year 2016 marked the 11th anniversary of the Museum’s America and the Sea Award Gala, an annual celebration during which Mystic Seaport confers its highest honor to a distinguished member of the maritime community. On October 22, Bob and Rod Johnstone – J/Boats joined the esteemed ranks of award recipients at the Museum’s largest single fundraiser, held this year in the Collins Gallery at the new Thompson Exhibition Building. The award, established by Mystic Seaport in 2006, recognizes individuals or organizations whose contributions to the history, arts, business, or sciences of the sea best exemplify the American spirit and character. The Johnstones and J/Boats are extremely well-suited recipients. The J/Boats story began in 1974 when Rod, then an ad salesman for Soundings Magazine, designed and started building the 24-foot sailboat Ragtime in his garage in Stonington, CT. Launched in the spring of 1976, it beat everything in sight. Bob, then vice president

of marketing at AMF Alcort, saw the potential in his brother’s design and a 50/50 partnership was formed in 1977 to build and market the J/24. Today, some 14,000 “J’s” in 40 different designs are sailing in more than 35 countries. J/Boats has remained a family business and continues to leave an indelible mark on the sailing world. The award gala was a great success, with an overall gross revenue of $480,000. Sotheby’s Vice President Geraldine Nager Griffin ran a lively auction, which included items such as a beautifully handcrafted wood “mystery box” made of wood from the Charles W. Morgan and containing items from the whaleship’s restoration and 38th Voyage; a day aboard the MJM 50z Zing in either Naples or Nantucket; Nelson H. White’s oil painting The Palm Tree; candlesticks crafted of wood also from the Charles W. Morgan; a Vidanta certificate for a week in Mexico; a commissioned marine oil painting by Julia O’Malley-Keyes; a Mystic getaway package including two nights at Spicer Mansion and a cruise aboard

Encore; a Watch Hill package including two nights at Ocean House and a Barton & Gray outing on a captained Hinckley Picnic Boat; and a day sail with honoree Rod Johnstone with dinner afterwards at Dog Watch Café in Stonington, CT. Custom glass awards for the honorees were created by Studio Jeffrey P’an in Mystic, with bases made from Charles W. Morgan wood. The evening’s entertainment was provided by Beantown Swing Orchestra. The paddle-raise generated funds for technology in exhibits. The opening of the Thompson Exhibition Building signals a new era of exhibitions at Mystic Seaport. Soaring architecture, advanced security, and state-of-the-art climate control combine to provide an ideal environment to celebrate our extraordinarily diverse collections and to host some of the most valuable and historically significant objects from museums around the world. Success in this new era will be measured by how well we connect these histories with our public, and how we achieve this connection will be most dramatically impacted by the ways we use technology. Thanks to the generosity of all who raised their paddles, we raised $73,000, which will allow Mystic Seaport to leverage the best of technology to build a diverse, national audience, one experience at a time. Arlene Marcionette is Advancement Administrative and Events Manager.

COLLINS GALLERY, OCTOBER 22, 2016.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS

NEW MUSEUM DIRECTOR

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rik Ingmundson has been promoted to Director of Interpretation. Ingmundson, who grew up on the coast of Maine, holds a B.A. in American Studies from Wheaton College and an M.A. in Public History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He managed interpretive programs for the Nantucket Historical Association and joined Mystic Seaport as Supervisor of Interpretation in 2013. “During his time at the Museum, Erik has gained the respect and admiration of his department members and colleagues as they worked together to develop missiondriven programs and events,” ERIK INGMUNDSON remarked Susan Funk, executive vice president. She continued: “As a participant in strategic planning, he demonstrated his commitment to making Mystic Seaport essential to the local community.” In a statement, Ingmundson said: “I feel privileged to have the opportunity to serve as the Interpretation Department’s next director. I believe that there is great value in the personalized learning experiences that our interpreters can provide, and I look forward to doing everything that I can to help our staff make the past relevant to people’s lives today.”

OYSTER FESTIVAL

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n October 1, the Museum invited visitors to a new event, Mystic River Oyster Festival at Mystic Seaport. Outside vendors offered oysters, oyster knives, and other good-to-have tools for oyster preparing and eating. And what would a food festival be without a competition? Some brave people lined up for the shuck an oyster contest, cheered on by family and friends. Get your knife ready for next year’s Mystic River Oyster Festival at the Museum.

MAYFLOWER II IN THE SHIPYARD

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limoth Plantation’s Mayflower II is back at the Museum’s Henry B. du-

Pont Preservation Shipyard, where the shipwrights will continue the restoration work from last winter and spring. Returning her to seaworthy condition for the celebration of the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims arrival in Massachusetts in 2020, the vessel is going through a multi-year preservation at the Shipyard. This time she will stay for 30 months at Mystic Seaport. Depending on what kind of work is being done aboard her, she will be open to Museum visitors whenever possible. The 106-foot vessel, a replica of the vessel that carried the Pilgrims to the New World in 1620, was built in the United Kingdom in 1957 and presented to Plimoth Plantation as a gesture of unity with the American people.

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THE VIKINGS ARE COMING, THE VIKINGS ARE COMING!

n a slightly gloomy day this past October 2, a remarkable vessel came up the Mystic River. After a 23-week voyage of nearly 7,000 nautical miles, the 115-foot, wooden, clinker-built Viking longship Draken Harald Hårfagre [“Dragon Harald the Fairhaired”] docked at the Bulazel Wharf at Mystic Seaport. Thereby, Draken’s “Expedition America 2016” had come to an end. The reconstructed Draken Harald Hårfagre—named after the king who unified Norway around 870 AD—started her voyage on April 26, 2016, from Haugesund in Norway with a 33-strong crew of women and men, led by Swedish Captain Björn Ahlander. The vessel had an international crew, coming from eleven different countries. Draken sailed across the North Atlantic Ocean, stopped at the Shetland Islands, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and on June 1, the longship reached the American continent in St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada. Her voyage then continued into the St. Lawrence waterway and the Great Lakes. When Draken came up the Mystic River, the vessel was greeted by thousands of well-wishers along the shoreline and at the Museum. Steve White, president of Mystic Seaport, was there to greet “the Vikings.” After Capt. Ahlander had thanked White for the warm welcome, his crew gave Mystic Seaport three cheers, which was returned by the Museum staff and visitors. Then followed a week with beautiful weather when Draken was open for visitors for a couple of hours daily—a popular initiative, as seen in the long lines that formed by the vessel each day. I have to confess, walking Draken Harald Hårfagre’s deck, I could feel my ancestors’ Viking blood run a little faster through my veins. Another popular event occured later in October, when Capt. Ahlander gave an acclaimed talk about the longship’s voyage and plans for the future at the Museum’s 2016-2017 Adventure Series, which was sponsored by StoneRidge, a senior living community in Mystic. Draken Harald Hårfagre is staying at the Museum over the winter, but will be covered and cannot be boarded. Göran R Buckhorn, a Swede, is the editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS Earlier this summer, Matt Barnes, shipwright in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at Mystic Seaport, was awarded one of the Museum’s grant programs, the Mallory International Exchange Fellowship Program. This exchange program enables full-time staff to travel to foreign institutions to work for a short time.

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ast winter, I met Søren Nielsen, head of the Maritime Reconstruc-

tion Department for the Vikingeskibsmuseet in Roskilde, Denmark, who was visiting our Shipyard with a friend of

mine. Flash forward six months and I was living in Søren’s basement and starting my fellowship at the Vikingeskibsmuseet, Denmark’s national museum for ships, seafaring, and boatbuilding in the ”Viking Age” and medieval era. I had applied for the Mallory Exchange Program and had the good fortune to be selected. The thesis of my fellowship was based on three things: document and study the effect the Westward expansion of the Norse people had on wooden boatbuilding; apprentice at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde and assist with

the building of a traditional reconstruction of a ship from the Viking Age, the Gislinge III; and bridge the gap between Mystic Seaport and other institutions throughout Scandinavia and Northern Europe. My ten-week trip, which started on July 1, took me 12,000 miles and included eight countries: the Netherlands, Denmark, England, Scotland, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and Færøerne (the Faroe Islands, an autonomous country within Denmark). It also brought me to 32 museums, giving me a firsthand view of the real significance and value

BUILDING BOATS, VIKING STYLE

TWO TYPICAL FISHING BOATS OF THE FAROE ISLANDS IN THE VILLAGE OF SANDAVAUR ON THE ISLAND OF VAGARY.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS

MATT BARNES CHECKING PLANKING MEASUREMENTS USING A TIC-STICK AT THE VIKING SHIP MUSEUM IN ROSKILDE, DENMARK.

of Mystic Seaport. It was hard to find someone in the museum field that was unaware of our Museum. I met people who came to Mystic 30 years ago and now have modeled their own museums after Mystic Seaport. During my seven weeks as an apprentice at the Viking Ship Museum, I worked alongside an incredibly group of skilled boatbuilders. We built the Gislinge III, a seven-meter long, reconstructed, clinkerbuilt fishing boat, which was found in 1993 near the village of Gislinge on the banks of the Lammerfjord. It is believed that the original Gislinge is from 1130, the end of the Viking Age—an era roughly between 793 and 1066. Gislinge III was built all by hand with traditional hand tools from the Viking Age, mainly with axes of different styles and shapes used for different jobs. The work started with the “cleaving” of a onemeter wide Danish Oak log. Cleaving is the method of splitting the log lengthwise using large wedges. This keeps all the grain in line with the plank, allowing the finished product to be very strong and flexible. The log is cleaved into 16 pieces, which make up the planks of the boat. These were hewed down with an axe to roughly 21 millimeters or 3/4” and installed on the boat in lapstrake style. The boat was fastened with more than 400 handmade iron rivets and roves and all holes were drilled with a bow drill.

I consider myself to be a bit of a primitive hand tool enthusiast. One of the main reasons I came to work at Mystic Seaport is the institution’s emphasis on keeping traditional skills alive. The Viking Ship Museum has the same mentality. There, I was taught to use axes and other hand tools reconstructed from the 10th century and earlier. Before this trip, I had been using mainly traditional early American ship building tools like the adz and the larger American broad axe. To train with tools from the Viking Age has given me a completely different understanding of early primitive tools and a whole new set of skills that I will use at the Museum’s Shipyard. Aside from working in Roskilde and spending my birthday and one-year wedding anniversary with my wife in Iceland, the top highlight of the trip was spending six days on the Faroe Islands. The Faroes are a chain of small islands that lie between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic. They were used as an outpost for the Norse explorers and were generally the last stop before Iceland. Wooden boats are a way of life for the people on these islands. With an incredibly beautiful but stark landscape and a very short growing period, fishing was, and still is, the main method

of survival. Today, the wooden boats of the Faroes are held in very high regard throughout Scandinavia. However, the tradition of building these boats is dying. The older builders never wrote down the methods, and with the trade going from father to son, only a few people now have the knowledge. The impact the Norse of the Viking Age had not only on wooden boats, but on every aspect of life in this region is immeasurable, from boat building to farming to founding the first Parliament in the world on Iceland, the Alþingi. These men, who are mainly known for their pillaging and thought to be primitive, expanded as far south as the Byzantine Empire, as far east as Russia, and as far west as North America, permanently leaving the mark on history that is still seen today. Being given this opportunity through the Mallory Exchange Program and Mystic Seaport has been an opportunity of a life time. The knowledge, skills, and connections I gathered from this trip will stay with me forever. Matt Barnes is a shipwright at the Museum’s Shipyard and also a photographer. The photos of the Faroes in this article were taken by him. The photographs of Barnes were taken by Werner Karrasch of the Vikingeskibsmuseet in Roskilde.

THE GÁSADALUR FALLS IN THE VILLAGE OF GÁSADALUR ON THE ISLAND OF VÁGAR.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS

THE JOHNSTONES AND THE JOHNSONS INDUCTED IN NSHOF

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n October 30, nine people were inducted into the National Sailing Hall of Fame (NSHOF) at a ceremony at St. Francis Yacht Club in San Francisco, CA. In the 2016 class of inductees were four people who have connections to Mystic Seaport: Robert and Rodney Johnstone and Electa and Irving Johnson. Just a week before the inductee celebrations, on October 22, the Johnstone brothers, founders of J/Boats, were the recipients of the Museum’s prestigious America and the Sea Award at a gala held in the newly opened Thompson Exhibition Building at Mystic Seaport (see page 11). The adventurers Electa “Exy” (19092004) and Irving Johnson (1905-1991), famous sail training pioneers and authors, were honored posthumously by the NSHOF. The Johnson couple completed seven round-the-world voyages between 1933 and 1958 aboard a couple of vessels named Yankee. Later in life, they traveled throughout the inland waterways, canals, and seas of Europe and Egypt. They often visited remote islands and documented each voyage extensively, frequently as

EXY AND IRVING JOHNSON.

contributors to National Geographic. Exy and Irving Johnson were able to capture traditions, ceremonies, and customs of people who lived a lifestyle that, in many cases, no longer exists today. Mystic Seaport is the repository for much of the Johnson legacy, and the manuscripts, archival footage, and most of the photographs of these voyages are housed in the Museum’s collections. In 2012, a documentary about the couple’s adventures, Unfurling the World: The Voyages of Irving and Electa Johnson, was created by Mystic Seaport and film producer and sailor Gary Jobson, who is president of the NSHOF and the recipient of the 2013 America and the Sea Award.

SABINO NEWS

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he Museum’s 1908 steamboat Sabino has been undergoing restoration in the Shipyard, and after nearly a year and a half of work she was launched in July. The shipwrights addressed many issues with her hull and superstructure—frame replacement, new keel bolts, new planks, and a new top deck covering are some of the larger tasks. Her hull is now in condition to continue her service for another 25-30 years. After a thorough inspection, it was determined that replacement of the steamboat’s 1940s-era boiler was warranted. This is a very involved process as the new unit needed to be custom-designed, fabricated, and meet stringent certification standards.

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The design is now complete and has passed initial certification. Fabrication will take place over the winter to enable Sabino to return to operation for the 2017 season. For those wondering what happened to her old Almy boiler, they can see it firsthand on display in the lobby of the Thompson Building.

POLYNESIAN VOYAGING - CANOE HOKULE‘A VISITS THE MUSEUM

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ne of the highlights at the 25th Annual WoodenBoat Show at Mystic Seaport this past summer was the Polynesian voyaging canoe from Hawaii, Ho-ku-le‘a. This 62-foot double-hulled canoe is in the midst of a multiyear circumnavigation of the globe to raise awareness of Polynesian maritime culture and ocean conservation. The voyage is a project of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. When Ho-ku-le‘a arrived at the Museum on June 23, she was escorted up the Mystic River by several vessels, among them a canoe from the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. After tying up Ho-ku-le‘a, there was a traditional welcoming ceremony involving the vessel’s crew and members of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation on the Museum’s north lawn. Songs, prayers, speeches, chants, dances, and presentations made it a unique celebration seldom seen at Mystic Seaport. Remarks were made by representatives from Ho-ku-le‘a, the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, Steve White, president of Mystic Seaport, and Susan Funk, executive vice president of the Museum.


USHERING IN A NEW ERA

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By DAN McFADDEN

undreds of people gathered on the Cambridge Plaza in front of the Thompson Exhibition Building on Saturday, September 24 to help celebrate the opening of the newest addition to the Museum. This was the first opportunity for members and the public to view the new structure. In what is perhaps an omen for the future, moments before the ceremonial ribbon was cut, the clouds rolled back and the sun shone down on the assembled crowd, who had braved early morning cold and the threat of rain. FALL / WINTER 2016

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BY THE NUMBERS: THE THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING Thompson Building project in years: 13 Number of Museum Presidents during the project: 2 Number of Mystic Seaport Board Chairmen during the project: 3 Thompson Building in square feet: 14,000 Collins Gallery in square feet: 5,000 Height of ceilings in Collins Gallery in feet: 26 Length of each beam in feet: 105 Laminated Douglas fir on the main beams in miles: 22.5 Linear feet of cedar siding wrapping the building: 22,000 Number of linear feet of mahogany for the outside deck: 26,250 Number of screws holding the deck in place: 46,500 Linear feet of stainless steel wire for the exterior railing: 8,400 Gallons of fluid to transport heat to and from the grounds (the geothermal system): 850

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CUTTING THE CEREMONIAL RIBBON TO OPEN THE BUILDING. FROM LEFT, DAN YAEGER, PRESIDENT, NEMA; CHAD FLOYD, PARTNER IN CHARGE, CENTERBROOK ARCHITECTS AND PLANNERS; SUSAN FUNK, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND COO, MYSTIC SEAPORT; BARCLAY COLLINS, MYSTIC SEAPORT BOARD CHAIRMAN; AND STEVE WHITE, PRESIDENT OF MYSTIC SEAPORT.

“This stunning building is the manifestaThe cornerstone of the project is the tion of many years of planning, bold vision, 14,000-square-foot Thompson Building, a creative programming, and effective fundraisstructure whose main purpose is to provide ing,” said Steve White, president of Mystic exhibition facilities using the latest technoloSeaport, in his address to the crowd. gies and flexible space to engage with visitors “It is clear that this represents a new di- and serve their diverse interests. Named for mension for the Museum,” said Susan Funk, the late Wade Thompson, a Mystic Seaport executive vice president and COO of Mystic trustee for 27 years who believed passionately Seaport. “Along with the redesigned McGraw in the need for modern exhibition space and Gallery Quadrangle and its prized riverfront its importance for the future of the Museum, location, the Thompson Building creates a the Thompson Building is designed to usher unique sense of place while expanding our in an “Era of Exhibition” at Mystic Seaport. capacity to present a compelling array of exDesigned by the Connecticut firm Cenhibitions and programs.” terbrook Architects and Planners, the buildThis project is the result of a strategic planing seeks to evoke the “geometry of the sea,” ning process that began in the early 2000s. drawing design cues from the interior of a After a decade of careful analysis and consul- wooden ship, the undulating sea, and a spiraltation with leading professionals, it was clear ing nautilus shell. that future success required a substantial investment in the expansion and improvement of the Museum’s exhibition capacity. An additional need was to improve the all-season opportunity for our visitors and to embrace contemporary channels for them to explore our nation’s maritime history. The project evolved into the McGraw Gallery Quadrangle, a $15.3 million commitment to achieve those goals with the combination of new construcA HIGHLIGHT OF THE MASIN CONFERENCE ROOM IS A HUGE tion and significant upgrades to existENLARGEMENT OF AN 1874 PHOTOGRAPH OF WHAT IS NOW MYSTIC ing buildings and spaces. SEAPORT ON THE EAST WALL.


Their mandate was a tall order: to design a building that “would stand out, but also fit in.” It was important that the building reflect contemporary design to differentiate it from its historic surroundings. As new construction, the structure has to clearly articulate that newness and respect the authenticity of the historic building in other parts of the grounds. ”We found inspiration in the subtitle [of Mystic Seaport]: Museum of America and the Sea. We wanted to architecturally express that fine phrase in a way that might be intriguing in a poetic fashion,” said Chad Floyd, Partner in Charge at Centerbrook. “This magnificent, soaring, beautiful, daring building […] is a triumph for vision, courage, philanthropy, and execution,” remarked Barclay Collins, board chairman of Mystic Seaport, during the dedication ceremony. The primary feature of the building is the Collins Gallery, a 5,000-square-foot hall with soaring ceilings and a flexible layout that provides the caliber of conditions required to curate not only exhibits from the Mystic Seaport collections, but also permit the borrowing of outstanding art and artifacts from other museums around the world. Other elements include a visitor’s entrance, a sweeping reception lobby, a ticketing center, and a retail shop. A wraparound deck invites visitors to enjoy the riverside setting and serves as a covered overlook to the quadrangle’s common area. Unveiled at the opening was a mural commissioned specifically for the lobby. Titled “Away,” the 59-foot-long work of art was created by Nikki McClure, an artist from Olympia, WA. The image was cut from black paper using an X-ACTO knife, then enlarged and fabricated in vinyl to install on wall. “Away” depicts a figure in a boat dragging his or her hand in the water, reflecting the continuing human desire “to touch the water and feel the wake,” in the words of the artist. The mural was the brainchild of Nicholas Bell, the new senior vice president for curatorial affairs. “When I first entered the lobby and saw this enormous wall, it struck me as an opening to send a message about the Museum’s focus and its values just as you step through the door, before you’ve even purchased a ticket. We knew we needed something bold here expressing that we are moving forward,

ANGELA THOMPSON, WIFE OF THE LATE WADE THOMPSON, WITH THEIR DAUGHTER AMANDA THOMPSON-RIEGEL IN FRONT OF THE THOMPSON BUILDING.

always with an eye to our past,” Bell said. “Away” is not the only large installation in the building. The wall opposite the window in the Masin Conference Room features a 50-foot-long enlargement of a photograph from the collections. Taken by Everett Scholfield in 1874, the image depicts the site along Greenmanville Avenue that is now Mystic Seaport. The 2016 contemporary architecture of the room and the river view in the window is in wonderful contrast to the historic panorama in the photograph. While the striking design may capture the eye, there is a lot of interesting technology as well. The Thompson Building uses a geothermal system for its heating and cooling. The energy-efficient system circulates liquid

through a series of 20 closed-loop wells– each 465-feet deep–that extract needed heat or cooling from the ground depending on the season. The project employs a comprehensive stormwater collection and containment system for the McGraw Quad project. Runoff is collected in a drainage network that directs it to an underground retention system which will filter a portion of the water before it enters the water table and eventually makes its way into the Mystic River. In addition, much of the paving is permeable, enabling water to percolate into the underlying soil for natural treatment. Mystic Seaport partnered with local engineering and construction firm A/Z Corporation of North Stonington, CT, for the construction of the new exhibition building and the development of the McGraw Quad. A leader in building design, construction, and maintenance with projects across New England and the Mid-Atlantic states, A/Z was able to bring its top-level expertise to make Centerbrook’s vision a reality. “The opportunity to help Mystic Seaport realize the vision for its north end has been one of deep personal interest for A/Z – many of our 450 employees are residents of Southeastern Connecticut and the Mystic area,” said A/Z CEO Perry Lorenz. “We are proud to have served Mystic Seaport and the community during this landmark initiative.” Just as the Thompson Building reimagines the grounds of Mystic Seaport, so too

THE WIDE DECK OFFERS VISITORS THE OPPORTUNITY TO RELAX AND LOOK OUT OVER THE MCGRAW QUAD COMMON. FALL / WINTER 2016

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Q U A D U P D AT E

THE MCGRAW FAMILY AT THE DEDICATION OF THE DONALD C. MCGRAW GALLERY QUADRANGLE AT MYSTIC SEAPORT ON MAY 20, 2016.

McGRAW QUAD DEDICATION

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he Thompson Exhibition Building is the final element of the McGraw Gallery Quadrangle, which Mystic Seaport formally dedicated for the late Donald C. McGraw, Jr., in a ceremony on May 20. McGraw was a longtime supporter of the Museum and a charter member and first chairman of its National Council of Advisors. The dedication was attended by members of the McGraw family, the Board of Trustees, and other friends and supporters of the Museum. “Don McGraw… believed that our maritime heritage should be saved and shared, not stuck away in curiosity cabinets available only to scholars, but exhibited and used to tell stories that inform and inspire,” said Board Chairman Barclay Collins in his speech. An avid collector, McGraw brought his passion for the artifacts of America’s maritime heritage to his leadership and support of the Museum, and his philanthropy significantly increased the endowment and the enhancement of the Museum’s priceless collection of J.E. Buttersworth paintings. The McGraw family’s commitment to Mystic Seaport continues with his son Robin’s service on the Board of Trustees. The McGraw Quadrangle replaced what was Anchor Circle on the north end of the Museum’s grounds. In addition to the Thompson Building, it is comprised of the Stillman, Wendell, C. D. Mallory, P. R. Mallory, and R. J. Schaefer Buildings as well as the Greenmanville Church. In the center is a grassy open common.

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does it help redefine the entrance to the town of Mystic. “The dynamic Thompson Exhibition Building represents another bold and positive step taken by Mystic Seaport to delight their guests, provides an additional reason to visit Mystic year-round, and serves as an iconic gateway to the downtown area,” said Bill Smith, the interim president of the Greater Mystic Chamber of Commerce. The Monday after the opening festivities, the Thompsons informed the Museum that they would make one more contribution to the project: the Thompson Family Foundation was going to give a further $1 million. The gift caps the amount required to fund the exhibition building and the McGraw Quad project. Funds have come from a combination of private and public sources, including generous support from individual philanthropists and foundations and a $2 million grant from the State of “We are deeply appreciative Connecticut. to all donors who made “We are deeply appreciative to all extraordinary gifts to comdonors who made extraordinary gifts to complete this ambitious project plete this ambitious project so so vital to the Museum’s future susvital to the Museum’s future tainability and institutional growth, sustainability and institutional many of whom were inspired by Wade Thompson and his family’s example growth, many of whom were of philanthropy,” said Elisabeth Saxe, inspired by Wade Thompson vice president for Advancement. and his family’s example of “My father’s entire life’s work was the pursuit of excellence and he philanthropy.” always felt this beautiful building’s — Elisabeth Saxe, presence was what Mystic needed as vice president for Advancement part of a long range plan to ensure its excellent future,” remarked Amanda Thompson-Riegel, daughter of Angela and Wade Thompson. From the moment the ribbon was cut, the Thompson Building began fulfilling its role to redefine how people use and experience Mystic Seaport. The Pilalas Family Reception Lobby is open as a permanent, year-round entrance to the Museum adjacent to Latitude 41° Restaurant and the north parking lot. The America and the Sea Award gala was held in the Collins Gallery on October 22. This year, the award was presented to Rod and Bob Johnstone and their company J/Boats. Given annually by the Museum, the prestigious award recognizes individuals or organizations whose contribution to the history, arts, business, or sciences of the sea best exemplify the American character. The first exhibit to be installed in the Collins Gallery will be SeaChange, a dramatic presentation of a range of beautiful and unique objects drawn from the collections of the Museum. Several of these intriguing artifacts will be on display for the first time, and all will be presented in a new setting which reveals surprising stories of transformation that continue to impact a contemporary audience and its experience with the sea. The exhibit opens Dan McFadden is Director of Communications. December 10.


NEW EXHIBIT

DESIGN CONCEPT FOR THE SEACHANGE EXHIBIT. DESIGN BY CHARLIE McMILLAN OF THE McMILLAN GROUP.

The First Exhibit in the Collins Gallery

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eaChange, the inaugural exhibit in the Collins Gallery in the new Thompson Exhibition Building, will open on December 10. The exhibit presents a range of beautiful and unique objects drawn from the rich collections of Mystic Seaport. Each is a survivor of the past that speaks to a notable transformation—in material, technology, the sea itself, or the broader American culture over the past 200 years. A handful of these intriguing artifacts are on display for the first time, alongside other Museum visitors’ favorites, all presented in a new setting with surprising stories revealed. Together, they give glimpses into people’s lives in different places and times, from sci-

entific surveyors charting the Atlantic coast on the eve of the American Revolution to western merchants trading for silk and tea in 1850s China, from Arctic explorers to laborers harvesting bird guano off Peru for American farmers. The stories of transformation they relate continue to impact our lives and our experiences with the sea. In keeping with the bold design, clean lines, and natural materials of the Thompson Building, the exhibit design uses large, freestanding abstract structures evocative of sails or icebergs to frame each central artifact, taking advantage of the soaring heights in the Collins Gallery. The overall effect is visually stunning, an inviting space that change that

entices visitors to contemplate, discover, discuss—and return to the exhibit. SeaChange extends the sensory approach beyond the visual. The custom-created interactives give people the chance to peer inside a 1740s English shipmodel, test the principles behind dazzling World War I ship designs, and zoom-in to see the tiny carved cuts on modern miniature figureheads. A range of public programs will complement the gallery experience and further explore the sea-change that links stories from around the world to our own. Elysa Engelman is Director of Exhibits at Mystic Seaport.

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INTERVIEW

NICHOLAS R. BELL

Assumes Role as Senior Vice President for Curatorial Affairs In June, Nicholas R. Bell was named Senior Vice President for Curatorial Affairs at Mystic Seaport. Mystic Seaport Magazine had a chat with Bell to ask him what this new position means for Mystic Seaport and what Museum members and visitors can expect to see as a direct consequence of his appointment and role as a new member of the leadership team of Mystic Seaport.

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By GÖRAN R BUCKHORN

efore taking on the position as Senior Vice President for Curatorial Affairs at Mystic Seaport, Nicholas R. Bell worked for eight years at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., the last part as The Fleur and Charles Bresler Curator-in-Charge. As curator, Bell worked, among other things, with the gallery’s relaunch following a $30 million, two-year renovation. The reopening exhibition in 2015, entitled “WONDER”, brought success and acclaim to the Renwick—museum attendance increased 1,000 percent since its reopening. What was the secret behind this success? “I went through several rounds of concepts with my director, Betsy Broun, searching for a topic that would demonstrate that the renovated Renwick would be a forward-looking museum. Each time she said: ‘That’s a great idea for the second or third exhibition after we open. But you will only have one opportunity to relaunch this museum. Be sure you reach beyond your specialized audience to the general public.’ She knew from experience that, no matter what its focus or mission, everyone pays attention to a museum at the moment it opens or reopens. That fleeting window of attention is invaluable,” Bell remarked. The Renwick’s building—the original Corcoran Gallery— was the first in the United States built specifically to be an art museum. “What was it trying to accomplish for the American public in the 19th century?” Bell said. “What do we hope to gain from a museum visit today? The answer I settled on was: wonder. We visit museums to open ourselves to the possibility that we will be carried away by things or experiences that are wondrous in nature.” Bell continued: “I invited nine contemporary artists to transform the interior of the museum into a veritable cabinet of wonders. The public response was overwhelming. The takeaway for them was that the museum was now a part of the fabric of their life. But I hope beyond that, that it reaffirmed for them the intrinsic value of every museum.”

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Meeting Bell, 37, who is never seen without a fancy bowtie, it is soon clear that he is a person with high energy. During the last six years at the Renwick, he published seven books, including six peer-reviewed exhibition catalogues and one edited anthology. When asked how Bell managed to write that many books in such a short time, he replied: “I was working in a professional culture that deeply values scholarship and publishing. The people at the Smithsonian are passionate about establishing a record of the institution’s work. As I was the one overseeing the Renwick’s curatorial program, I was given regular opportunities to write about our projects, and when given the opportunity, I have the troublesome habit of saying yes. “I was able to table my other responsibilities for periods of time so that my full energy could be turned to writing. When you’re on deadline, you just go home and write. I also got married and had three kids in that time, so it was quite a whirlwind,” he said with a smile. What kind of maritime background does Bell have? “The short answer is there isn’t much of one!” Bell said. He grew up in Vancouver, BC, near the water and always felt an emotional link to the sea. “When we lived in Washington, my wife, Allison, and I felt that connection was missing. We spent the last six years living in Annapolis so that we could be closer to the water in spirit. But my education in maritime history and culture really began in earnest when we arrived in Mystic this summer.” Senior Vice President for Curatorial Affairs is a new position at Mystic Seaport. What does this work entail?, I asked. “This position pulls together the related elements of exhibitions, collections, and research under a single umbrella. It’s partly the role of chief curator, but also of how to consider the place of our more traditional museum departments in service to a unique institutional structure and mission. Mystic Seaport is unlike any other museum, which counts as a real strength. However, the redevelopment of our north campus and the opening of the Thompson Exhibition Building will demonstrate we are also building a future with a robust exhibitions program, similar to what you will find at this country’s best history

and art museums. I believe this position can help plot the course for that future, and I’m humbled to be in it,” Bell said. So what are the biggest differences between working at a museum in Washington, D.C., and at at Mystic Seaport?, I asked. “The commute! But seriously, the challenges are very different. In Washington there is an assumption that resources will be available, but that you will have to wade through a highly complex political and bureaucratic culture to succeed in implementing them,” he said and added: “In Mystic the challenge has always been resources. But that in turn has led to what I hear affectionately called ‘the Mystic way’ of developing solutions. The Mystic way wouldn’t be possible unless everyone at the Museum—staff, volunteers, trustees—was rowing in the same direction. There is a real sense of camaraderie here that gives this Museum an edge in building success.” When asked what he sees as the largest challenge at Mystic Seaport, Bell answered with a laugh: “Name all the parts of a boat.” With Bell as the “head curator” what new exhibitions can we expect to see at Mystic Seaport in 2017?, I asked. “In February, we will open a small exhibition on the work of papercut artist Nikki McClure, who designed our mural for the entrance of the Thompson Building. We are thrilled to be able to show more of her exquisite work,” Bell said. “Then in March, we will open a show based on Margaret Anderson Rosenfeld’s book, On Land and On Sea: A Century of Women in the Rosenfeld Collection. This is an opportunity to illustrate the depth and breadth of this extraordinary body of photography and to show the public the Rosenfeld collection extends far beyond its reputation for sailing.” Any new exhibits next fall?, I asked. “Yes,” Bell disclosed, “we will host the American Society of Marine Artists exhibition, and as for the Thompson Building, well, you’ll just have to wait and see. It’s going to be a real treat to share news of our upcoming projects as we confirm them in the coming months.” I cannot help asking Bell how many bowties he has in his collection? Bell adjusts his bowtie before answering: “Not enough!”

BELL’S WONDER “WONDER”, Nicholas Bell’s exhibit at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery, was stunningly beautiful. The work of nine contemporary artists delighted visitors of all ages as they engaged with the artistic expression of “wonder” and explored distinctive ways in which museums present objects and stories that expand their view of the world. Everyone who saw the show recognized that they were part of a remarkable and inspiring event. The exhibit is no longer on view, but the book Wonder sustains the excitement and perspective, capturing both the visual richness and intellectual depth of this installation. Gorgeous photographs invite the reader to savor the beauty and majesty of the artwork and the thoughtprovoking essay by Bell explores the enduring concepts and foundations of museums’ role as a powerful source of wonder. This book is to return to again and again, each time engaging the eye, the mind, and the heart. Susan Funk is Executive Vice President at Mystic Seaport.

Göran R Buckhorn is editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine.

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E D U C AT I O N

A GROUP OF STUDENTS FROM HAMDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL’S NAVIGATOR PROGRAM SPENT TWO DAYS THIS SUMMER ABOARD BRILLIANT AS PART OF AN ONGOING PARTNERSHIP WITH THE MUSEUM’S EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.

The Navigator Program:

Middle School Students Learn Life Lessons

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By JOHN BOUDREAU

n the beginning, Andrew Marzano just wanted to build a boat. As a teacher at Hamden Middle School in Hamden, CT, he realized boatbuilding was an ideal way to get his summer school students to learn the math and science concepts they didn’t absorb during the school year. So, during the summer of 2011, Marzano, his colleague Frank Kachmar, and a few students built a 12-foot Bevin skiff. The project went so well that they built another boat the next summer, and another the summer after that. Around the same time, Marzano and coworker Rob Mandel began to discuss an alternative education program for underserved eighth graders—students who

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had consistently low grades or high rates

give students the tools to steer themselves

of absenteeism. They wanted to create

through life’s sometimes stormy waters,

an environment for these students that

Marzano and Mandel dubbed it The Navi-

would harness the rambunctious energy of

gator Program.

13-year-olds and give them a way to succeed

While Mandel assembled a team of

outside of a traditional classroom setting.

teachers to help implement the program,

As Marzano and Mandel began to dis-

Marzano began looking for local resources

cuss a central theme for the program, boat-

to help augment the in-class curriculum.

building again seemed to be the right fit. It

He immediately thought of Mystic Seaport.

was already an effective way to teach math

Sarah Cahill, director of Education at

and science, and given Connecticut’s his-

Mystic Seaport, and Shannon McKenzie,

toric connection to the sea, it was easy to

director of Watercraft Programs, both recog-

integrate boatbuilding alongside a study

nized the value of the Navigators’ approach

of maritime history and literature. As the

to learning. “The program’s philosophy

students worked on building three boats

was what most attracted me,” Cahill said.

(two Bevin Skiffs and a Glen-L sloop), they

“Using the power of experiential education

would learn both character education and

to change the outcomes of underserved

the eighth grade curriculum. Hoping to

populations draws heavily on my own


E D U C AT I O N background, so Andrew pitched it to the right people.” Cahill and McKenzie worked with Marzano to plan a comprehensive range of activities for the Navigators, including an overnight aboard the full-rigged ship Joseph Conrad and culminating in two separate trips aboard the schooner Brilliant. One of the most intensive activities, though, was a five-month “apprenticeship” program. Each month, groups of three or four students paired off with the Museum’s master tradesmen to learn traditional skills: blacksmithing, carving, coopering, ropework, or navigation. Each group focused on applying their new knowledge to the construction of the program’s boats. It was challenging work in the beginning for both the students and the master tradesmen. For the instructors, the challenges were obvious—supervising teenagers working with white-hot metal or sharp chisels demands constant attention. As for the students, their time in the Museum’s workshops demanded an equally tricky task: learning to fail correctly. Instead of viewing a misshapen barrel stave or a lumpy line splice as a failure, students were taught to frame their mistakes as learning opportunities. “Many of our students came in thinking that everyone else was the problem,” Marzano said. “That’s partly a defense mechanism, but it doesn’t leave the door open to healthy self-critique.” It was during quiet moments of focus and self-assessment in the Cooperage or at the forge that the door to self-critique

and feelings into a spontaneous poetic meditation. “The boat is as beautiful as can be/… the moon is bright/and the sun is set/I love it.” That poem, and the moment in which it was created, couldn’t have happened in a classroom. For Marzano and his colleagues, those moments of introspection are far more rewarding than any test scores. Success is measured in other ways, too: one Navigator missed only four days of school this year, THOUGH MANY OF THE STUDENTS IN THE NAVIGATOR PROGRAM HAD NEVER BEEN ON A SAILBOAT BEFORE, THEY SOON ADAPTED TO LIFE ABOARD.

compared to 100 last year.

gradually opened. By the third or fourth apprenticeship session, many of the students were beginning to think about themselves in new ways. Rather than focus on their weaknesses or failures, they instead began to focus on their strengths. More importantly, they began to think about how to use their new-found strengths to benefit their fellow Navigators. The students found an opportunity to refine this mindset during two short trips aboard Brilliant. Getting the students offshore was a priority for Marzano. “Being on the water draws something from inside of you,” he said. “It allows you to escape the world and return with perspective and focus.” As Navigator Skylet Lee sat on Brilliant’s deck during her anchor watch, she found herself with no shortage of fresh perspective. It was her first time on a boat like Brilliant, and she channeled the new sights, sounds,

meantime, the challenge shifts to helping last

A new class of Navigators has begun their journey at the Museum this fall. In the year’s students transition out of the Navigator Program and into high school. Marzano and his team know some students will still need the support the program provides, and they’re working on ways to make sure students will have access to the resources they need. To help with that transition, the Museum has already awarded guest passes and a week of Conrad Overnight Sailing Camp to two deserving students. Marzano, though, is thinking even more long-term and hopes to establish a scholarship for Navigator alumni, to be used for whatever higher education the students choose to pursue. As for the boats, the school is amassing quite a flotilla. The students successfully completed all three craft and hope to get them out on the water soon. And while the boats are nice, they were never the program’s true focus. “I am not the same Jayvon as the first day of school,” Jayvon Chapman wrote in an assignment for English class. “I feel if I [wasn’t in the Navigator program] my grades would not be as good and I would not get the extra push the Navigator teachers gave me.” Or as Hamden Middle School Principal Dan Levy put it, “They built themselves as well as the boats.”

John Boudreau is the Education Programs Marketing Coordinator at Mystic Seaport. INTERPRETER TIM REILLY WALKS TWO STUDENTS THROUGH THE FINER POINTS OF LINE SPLICING. FALL / WINTER 2016

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F O R T H E H O L I D AY S

Gift Ideas

2017 MYSTIC SEAPORT CALENDAR This stunning 2017 wall calendar features beautiful images captured by the staff photographers of Mystic Seaport. Throughout the year, our photographers take images of our grounds, highlighting the buildings, collections, and historic vessels. These photographs represent some of the hidden treasures at the Museum. Retails for $12.99

DECK PRISMS In the days before electricity, light below a vessel’s deck was provided by candles and oil and kerosene lamps, which are all dangerous aboard a wooden ship. A clever solution for the lighting problem was the deck prism. Laid flush into the deck, small conical prisms drew light below decks without weakening the deck planks. The deck prism is an exact reproduction of Mystic Seaport’s remaining original Charles W. Morgan, deck prism. Available in two sizes: small (shown in picture) are available in nine colors and retail for $16.95, while the large prisms are available in two colors. Retail for $29.95.

SCRIMSHAW ORNAMENTS Highly detailed 4-inch scrimshaw-like ornaments. Scenes of Charles W. Morgan, schooner Brilliant, and a whaler at sea. Each boxed for gift giving and retail for $18.95/each. CAT’S MEOW VILLAGE Mystic Seaport Christmas Collection. The Cat’s Meow Village features handcrafted exact replicas of Mystic Seaport buildings from 3/4” thick wood with lightly falling snow on the fronts and history of each building on the backs. Retails for $12-$18.50/piece. Special price on entire collection $98.50.

2017 CLASSIC SAILING CALENDAR The beauty and the thrill of sailing are captured in this gorgeous wall calendar that includes vintage photographs from the Museum’s Rosenfeld Collection, taken between 1881 and 1992. Each vessel is identified by date, location, and builder, along with information about the specific event recorded in the image, and quotations that every seafarer will appreciate. Retails for $14.99.

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VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG AND SHOP ONLINE; ENTER “SAVE 10” DURING CHECKOUT TO SAVE 10% ON YOUR NEXT ORDER! OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2017, AND IS AVAILABLE ONLINE ONLY.


ON BOOKS

The Mathews Men:

Seven Brothers and the War against Hitler’s U-Boats By William Geroux (Published by Viking, 2016, 390 pages)

Reviewed by GÖRAN R BUCKHORN

D

Photo: Kema Geroux

uring Christmas week 1941, a couple of weeks after Nazi Germany declared war on the United States, five U-boat captains were called into the office of Admiral Karl Dönitz, head of the German submarine fleet. Dönitz, who had served in the German Imperial Navy since 1910 and in its U-boat fleet since October 1916, revealed his plans to attack American merchant marine vessels on U.S. waters along the country’s east coast. Dönitz called the operation Paukenschlag [“Drumbeat”]. For more than 250 years, the men of Mathews County, Virginia, had crewed the U.S. Merchant Marine. Young boys in WILLIAM GEROUX Mathews were left with few choices of professions: either they farmed, fished, or went to sea. Many of them chose the latter. And “they came up through the hawsepipe” (a hawsepipe is the opening in the bow section of a vessel where the anchor chain passes through), a metaphor for climbing up the ranks the hard way. A young man started as a cabin boy or ordinary seaman, then became an able seaman, boatswain, and then joined the officers’ ranks, as third mate, second mate, first mate, and finally, captain. A few families in Mathews regarded that it was their sons’ birthright to become captains and several of them made it to command the bridge. One of these men was Ernest Thompson, captain of the 253-foot freighter Norvana, which left Cuba on January 14, 1942 with a cargo of raw sugar bound for Philadelphia. After some time, when no one had heard from Norvana, the freighter was listed as “overdue,” then “missing,” and then the vessel was declared “lost.” After the war, the Allies found U-boat logbooks. One stated that Norvana was torpedoed and sunk on January 22, 1942. Thompson was the first seaman from Mathews to lose his life in the U-boat war of World War II. Many more merchant marine vessels would become easy targets for Dönitz’s “wolfpacks.” While both Britain and Germany blacked out their coastal cities, the cities along the American coast were lit up like Christmas trees, so it was simple for a U-boat captain to see the silhouette of a vessel hugging the shoreline. “At times the U.S. coastal defense resembled a deadly comedy of errors,” Geroux remarks in his well-written and splendid debut book, The Mathews Men.

However, in April 1942, the USS Roper, a vintage destroyer from World War I, managed to sink the U-85 outside North Carolina, giving the USA its first victory on home waters in the U-boat war (though, the U.S. Navy had claimed for weeks that several German Uboats had been sunk, which was a lie). This was not the turning point in the Navy’s war against the U-boats on what was called the Eastern Sea Frontier, but “The waters off the U.S. coast were changing from a killing ground into a battleground,” Geroux writes. Although, at this time, at least one U.S. merchant vessel a day was lost to a U-boat attack. Nevertheless, late in April, the country’s production of merchant ships had increased to one new vessel a day, and the production multiplied rapidly. In 1943, the USA launched 1,896 new Liberty ships, which transported troops and supplies all around the world, to Africa, the Mediterranean, and Murmansk, the latter undoubtedly the toughest convoy run in the war. It is as William Geroux writes: “The sun never sets on Mathews men.” Among the remarkable families in Mathews County was the Hodges family, whose members play a central part in The Mathews Men. The head of the Hodges, Jesse, went to sea in 1884, at the age of ten. He became a captain of a tugboat and was home three or four times a year and only for a few days each time. When at home, Jesse was pampered by his wife, Henrietta, “Henny,” who took care of their 60-acre farm on Gales Neck. Between 1895 and 1920, Henny bore Jesse 14 children, nine boys and five girls. Six of their sons became captains—a seventh son had to leave the sea after an accident—and three of their daughters married Mathews mariners. And the Hodges made sacrifices: among the 23 Mathews men who died at sea in the war, two were Jesse and Henny’s sons Leslie, who died on July 13, 1942, and Dewey, who died on another vessel ten days later. Officially 5,665 American mariners died in the war, but the true number is probably closer to 9,300, Geroux states. Geroux has written a gripping story about courage, heroism, and bravery among the “unsung heroes” of the U.S. Merchant Marine, who never received any praise during or after the war. They did, however, have two highly-positioned supporters in President Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor, who credited them with “supreme courage.” Finally, with Geroux’s The Mathews Men, the U.S. Merchant mariners have received their long overdue tribute. Göran R Buckhorn is the editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine. His paternal grandfather served in the Swedish Merchant Marine during World War I. FALL / WINTER 2016

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 27


BOOK NOTES

Q&A M

with Author James L. Nelson

ystic Seaport Magazine caught up with renowned author James L. Nelson, who has done several book signings at Mystic Seaport Bookstore, to ask him some questions.

In your novel The French Prize, the readers meet Jack Biddlecomb, son of Isaac Biddlecomb, your earliest fictional hero in the Revolution at Sea series. Is Jack Biddlecomb coming back, maybe even getting a series of his own? I had hoped Jack might be the start of a new series, but for now it looks as if The French Prize will be a standalone. But we’ll see. In another series of yours, Norsemen Saga, you write about Ireland during the Viking age. What made you skip over the pond to write about another era? As someone of Scandinavian heritage, I’ve always had an interest in Vikings, though I think anyone with an interest in maritime history would find the subject fascinating. I could see a lot of potential for a series of novels about the interaction of the Vikings and the Irish. It’s a great subject and I only hope I can do it justice.

JAMES L. NELSON

Some months ago, you published the fifth novel in the Norsemen Saga, Night Wolf. Have you decided how many more books there will be in this series? I’m not sure how many there will be. Right now, I keep getting e-mails from readers asking for the next one, so I suppose as long as those e-mails keep coming, I’ll keep writing. You have also written some acclaimed maritime non-fiction books, including George Washington’s Secret Navy and Benedict Arnold’s Navy. Do you approach the task of writing these books differently than when you write the fiction books? Writing non-fiction is entirely different from writing fiction. With fiction, I start at the beginning and write straight through. With non-fiction, I skip around, pause to do research, write the book in bits and pieces. It’s a lot harder when you can’t make things up! Please tell us what your next book is going to be about. The next book is a departure for me, my first contemporary novel. It’s set on the coast of Maine, where I live, and the main character is a lobsterman and former security specialist who gets caught up in a lot of intrigue surrounding a proposed liquid natural gas terminal. Fun stuff! It’s called Full Fathom Five and should be out this fall. Then after that, book six of the Viking series.

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FALL / WINTER 2016

Nathaniel Bowditch and the Power of Numbers. How a Nineteenth-Century Man of Business, Science, and the Sea Changed American Life. By Tamara Plakins Thornton Nathaniel Bowditch. The name conjures up a host of images for one who has dealt with the many editions of the New American Practical Navigator for many years. The Library at Mystic Seaport is named for G.W. Blunt White, a direct descendant of Edmund March Blunt, the first publisher of the seaman’s bible known simply as Bowditch. So it came as a shock to see that the Navigator, one of the most practical of best-sellers of the 19th century, was only a small measure of Bowditch’s genius. For while there is no doubt that Bowditch was indeed a genius, the author rightly states that in this compendium there was much calculation, but little original thought, as the Navigator was primarily a re-working of Englishman John Hamilton Moore’s New Practical Navigator. Indeed, she notes that Bowditch’s skills lay in computation, rather than in cutting-edge conceptualism. And it was in numbers that Bowditch surpassed all other Americans of the time. Finding that he could use calculations to predict the stability of the universe from his study of Pierre-Simon Laplace’s Mecanique Celeste (“Celestial Mechanics”), Bowditch found a “physical model of order and regularity he would transfer to human interactions.” By the time Nathaniel Bowditch died in 1838, he had revolutionized the business world, as well as other establishments such as universities, by introducing order through organization rather than by relying on relationships among the class of patricians. Yet he understood his place in the world order when in his last days he confided to his son Henry that “he was no Archimedes. He was….more on par with Euclid, ‘a second-rate mathematician.’” Bowditch may have been a little too harsh in critiquing his own worth, having proved himself capable from the beginning. He traveled the world as a clerk and then supercargo on merchant ships, dived headlong into astronomy, and became the leader of corporations. Not a shabby resume, by any means. Dr. Thornton’s treatment of Bowditch is both thoroughly researched and fair in its treatment of the subject. Although a biography of Bowditch, this book could stand on its observance of societal growth in 19th-century America.

Paul O’Pecko is Vice President of Research Collections and Director of the G.W. Blunt White Library.


BOOK NOTES

Sailing Around the World: The Illustrated Edition By Joshua Slocum, Introduction by Geoffrey Wolff It is safe to say that few books about sea voyages have been as widely read—and reread—as Captain Joshua Slocum’s Sailing Around the World. First published in 1900, it was an instant hit and has remained in print ever since. For those not familiar with his story, Slocum was the first person to circumnavigate the globe solo. Beginning in 1895, he sailed a converted oyster sloop, Spray, from Massachusetts on a voyage that had him cross the Atlantic Ocean three times, the Pacific and Indian Oceans once, venture around Cape Horn and the Cape of Good Hope, to return home three years later. Along the way, he visited some of the most exotic and remote places JOSHUA SLOCUM on Earth. So how does one improve on one of travel writing’s all-time classics? Pictures! Geoffrey Wolff and the team at Zenith Press have done an admirable job collecting a wide range of color photographs of the locations Slocum visited, historic photos and paintings, and artifacts from museums around the world. Slocum’s text is reproduced in its entirety and the captain’s eye for detail and talent for narrative are wonderfully complemented by the illustrations. This coffee-table edition only enhances the original work and will be enjoyed equally by first-time readers and those who have read it many times before.

Dan McFadden is Director of Communication.

Draken Harald Hårfagre When the Viking longship Draken Harald Hårfagre docked at Mystic Seaport on October 2, she received a warm welcome from the Museum, Mystic residents, and tourists, who had travelled to Mystic to take a closer look at this remarkable vessel (see page 13). The 115-foot Draken is the world’s largest longship sailing in modern times. To celebrate Draken’s “Expedition America 2016”, which took her from her homeport in Norway to North America—and many ports in between, with Mystic as her end-stop—“the Vikings” have released a 58-page book on her 23-week voyage, Draken Harald Hårfagre. The book, with many beautiful photographs in black & white and in color, gives the reader a glimpse of how it is to sail a longship 1,000 years after the Vikings took their “Great Ships” to explore the world.

Valiant Ambition By Nathaniel Philbrick Acclaimed author Nathaniel Philbrick’s latest book, Valiant Ambition, is an enthralling story of the American Revolution, in particular the relationship between Benedict Arnold and George Washington. In the summer of 1776, Washington’s army was forced to evacuate Manhattan Island after a series of defeats. However, three weeks later, close to the Canadian border, Arnold managed to stall British forces in a naval battle on Lake Champlain, which probably saved the young nation. Three years later, Arnold, Washington’s most talented general, defected over to the British side, becoming one of military history’s most renowned traitors. Philbrick proclaims that it was Arnold’s treason that saved America. He writes: “it was as a traitor that he [Arnold] succeeded in galvanizing a nation. Just as the American people appeared to be sliding into apathy and despair, Arnold’s treason awakened them to the realization that the War of Independence was theirs to lose.” In showing the first American president in a never-before-seen new light, Philbrick stands out as one of the country’s leading historians and storytellers.

So Close To Home By Michael J. Tougias and Alison O’Leary There are few books written about the German submarine attacks close to the American coast during World War II (see also page 27). Michael J. Tougias and Alison O’Leary’s So Close to Home is the true story of the Downs family, Ray, Sr., Ina, and their two young children, Lucille, 11, and Sonny, 8, after the freighter they were travelling on, S.S. Heredia, was torpedoed in the Gulf of Mexico in May 1942. It was mostly merchant seamen aboard the vessel, but there were also a handful of civilians, including the Downs, who had to fight for their lives to survive—more than half the 62 crew and passengers aboard the Heredia perished. Methodically researched, using primary sources, including the war diary of 29-year-old Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, commander of the German U-boat which sank Heredia, Tougias and O’Leary have crafted an inspiring and gripping story of endurance.

TO ORDER THESE OR OTHER BOOKS, PLEASE CALL 860.572.5386 OR EMAIL MSMBOOKSTORE@EVENTNETWORK.COM DON’T FORGET YOUR 10% MEMBERS’ DISCOUNT! REMEMBER WE SHIP ANYWHERE! WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG/BOOKSTORE

. FALL / WINTER 2016

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 29


FROM THE COLLECTIONS

The “Beautiful Gems” of

Alexander Law

A

By FRED CALABRETTA lthough small in size, a unique group

of ship models hold a position among the treasures in Mystic Seaport’s collections. Crafted by Alexander Law (1897-1970), a former commercial artist who began building ship models in 1933, this group of 22 miniature models—only 5” to 7” in length— came to the Museum in 1966. Frequently on display individually

by Law in which he describes his model-making. In his own

or in small groups over the years, they remain very popular with

words—some underlined by him for emphasis—Alexander Law

visitors. One of them, the whaleship Essex, is currently included

gives us wonderful insight into his work:

in the “Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers” exhibit in the Stillman Building.

These little ships have been a labor of pure love. Many long, happy hours have gone into their making. There were some

Several characteristics of the Law models make them

moments of sweat, blood and near-tears, and there was a generous

distinctive and add to their appeal. Each is in a handcrafted

sprinkling of under-the-breath profanity when problems of the

case, with the model resting on an original watercolor map

moment seemed hopeless or impossible to solve.

representing a place on the globe central to the ship’s history. In

I have avoided referring to my miniature maritime subjects

addition, when the models arrived at the Museum, a drawer built

as “ship models.” While it is true that the ships are the central

into the base of each of the attractive wooden cases contained a

theme, they supply only the drama and minitura. The hand-drawn

book or other printed material which also related to the ship’s

period maps incorporate the art of cartography, the books adds

career. For example, the drawer in the case housing a river

bibliography, and the miniature human figures, sculpture. The

steamboat model contained a first-edition printing of Mark

accuracy of detail and period representation require exhaustive

Twain’s Life on the Mississippi.

research which leads to a true history of man’s effort to master the

Law worked up to 1,000 hours on each model, giving careful attention to every detail. In building the case for the famous derelict ship Mary Celeste, Law chose American walnut with Italian burl walnut for the drawer front. The choices represented New York and Genoa, the ship’s hailing port and destination. In another extraordinary touch, Law accommodated his need for very thin rigging material for certain models by using human hair. He selected blond hair for running rigging and black hair for standing rigging. The artifacts in the Museum’s collections become more

sea. Design and the art of the cabinet maker tie the whole together into beautiful gems of maritime fine arts. I spent those years striving to attain a full measure of artistic beauty capturing the drama and lore of the sea, preserving as much historical accuracy as was physically possible in miniature packages of maritime fine art. Those were good years, which I consider well spent. I couldn’t agree more; those were years well spent. Fred Calabretta is the Museum’s Curator of Collections.

meaningful—and potentially more valuable for exhibits and other programs—when we know something about the people associated with them. In this regard, a 2014 windfall of documentation associated with the Law models enhanced our appreciation of them. The papers included a lengthy essay

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FALL / WINTER 2016

To get more information about Mystic Seaport’s Collections Research Center and online resources, please visit http://library.mysticseaport.org


EVENTS at MYSTIC SEAPORT 37TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MARINE ART EXHIBITION AND SALE October 2 – December 31 The Maritime Gallery

New Exhibition! “ON LAND AND ON SEA: A CENTURY OF WOMEN IN THE ROSENFELD COLLECTION” Opens March 4, 2017 R.J. Schaefer Building

MARITIME MINIATURES BY MARITIME MASTERS November 20 – January 31, 2017 The Maritime Gallery LANTERN LIGHT TOURS: THE NUT-CRACKER SWEETS November 25, 26, December 2, 3, 9, 10, 16 – 18, 23 Snow-Date: December 20 TALK AND BOOK SIGNING WITH PETER NEILL: WHY THE OCEAN MATTERS: THE ONCE AND FUTURE OCEAN December 7 Masin Room, Thompson Exhibition Building 6 – 8 p.m. NEWPORT MANSIONS HOLIDAY TOUR December 8 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

ART EDUCATION SERIES BEHIND THE CANVAS All programs 3-4:30 p.m. The Maritime Gallery

EDUCATORS’ WEEKEND April 22 – 23, 2017

FLUID ACRYLIC PAINTING WITH ROBERT NOREIKA February 4, 2017

MODERN MARITIME MASTERS: AMERICA AND THE SEA April 29-June 18, 2017 The Maritime Gallery

WORKING FROM OBSERVATION: OIL PAINTINGS FROM SIGHT ON SITE WITH SUSAN STEPHENSON February 25, 2017

PILOTS WEEKEND May 6 – 7, 2017

LECTURE ON NOSTALGIC NAUTICAL DESIGNS BY ELIZABETH MUMFORD March 11, 2017

Save The Date! Mystic Seaport Members’ Annual Meeting & Recognition Day

PAINTING THE OCEAN IN OILS WITH HARLEY BARTLETT April 8, 2017

Saturday, May 20, 2017 9:30-11:30 a.m. The River Room, Latitude 41° FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG OR CALL 860.572.5339

New Exhibition! SEACHANGE Opens December 10 Collins Gallery, Thompson Exhibition Building Special Members Morning Preview 8:30 – 10 a.m.

2016-2017 ADVENTURE SERIES Exploration and Opportunity 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

SALUTE TO SUMMER May 27 – 28, 2017

The River Room, Latitude 41° Restaurant & Tavern or StoneRidge Senior Living Community

DECORATION DAY May 29, 2017

StoneRidge is the exclusive sponsor of the 2016-2017 Adventure Series

COMMUNITY CAROL SING December 18

SEA MUSIC FESTIVAL June 8 – 11, 2017

HOLIDAY MAGIC December 26 – January 1, 2017

AMERICA’S CUP REGATTA NEWPORT, R.I. June 24, 2017

BRAD BARR Lost Whaling Fleets of the Western Arctic 2015 Exploration Thursday, December 15

CHANTEY BLAST AND PUB SING January 14, 2017 1 – 5 p.m. Frohsinn Hall (located at 54 Greenmanville Ave. across from the Museum’s South Entrance) New Exhibition! THE ART OF NIKKI McCLURE Opens February 18, 2017 C.D. Mallory Building

THE PLEIN AIR PAINTERS OF THE MARITIME GALLERY June 24 – September 24, 2017 The Maritime Gallery WOODENBOAT SHOW June 30 – July 2, 2017 SMALL CRAFT WORKSHOP June 30 – July 2, 2017

R For additional programs, classes, and courses, but also for changes or cancellations, please visit the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org

MELISSA RYAN Exploring the Deep Ocean Thursday, January 19, 2017

COMMANDER AARON WATERS Hurricane Katrina from Above – Coast Guard Aviation Thursday, February 16, 2017 Evening program will be at StoneRidge. ELMA BURNHAM After All…A Fisherman Thursday, March 16, 2017 RALPH AND LENORE NARANJO Across Three Oceans: A Family Cruising Adventure Thursday, April 13, 2017 Evening program will be at StoneRidge

For hours of operation, open and closed exhibits, shopping and dining during fall, winter, and spring, please check the Museum’s website www.mysticseaport.org

FALL / WINTER 2016

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 31


SPRING |SUMMER 2015

FALL | WINTER 2011

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PAID

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mailed from zip code 14206 Permit #982

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connect your friends and family to america’s maritime heritage. Give them the gift of Membership and we’ll include a 2017 Mystic seaport calendar. Members enjoy year-round Free admission, discounts at the Museum stores and restaurants, and much more! to purchase a gift Membership, call 860.572.5339, or visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org/join. offer good through January 30, 2017.

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Mystic Seaport Magazine Fall/Winter 2016  

Highlights in this issue: "A New Era: The Opening of the Thompson Exhibition Building," New Exhibit: SeaChange, an interview with Nicholas B...

Mystic Seaport Magazine Fall/Winter 2016  

Highlights in this issue: "A New Era: The Opening of the Thompson Exhibition Building," New Exhibit: SeaChange, an interview with Nicholas B...

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