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LE FT C OA S T L I F E S TY L E MAG AZI NE

THE

G RE AT

AMERICAN

GREASER TWISTED IN A GOOD WAY TACO HEAVEN


CALI

FORNIA

CRUI S I N ’

Left Coast Car Culture

By: Daniel Foster

A A

t the end of the war, a legion of young men returned to America with a wad of demobilization cash in their pockets and a sense of freedom and excitement bred by their experiences in the war. With a period of peace and the steadily increasing prosperity of the country as a backdrop, these young men had a “can-do” attitude and a desire to express themselves in ways that their time in the military had stifled. And, all of a sudden, there were a lot of inexpensive used cars available. For five years Detroit had basically been in the business of supplying the military. Now all that production 54


capacity was turned to creating a stream of new cars to satisfy the pent-up demand of a civilian population that had scrimped and saved throughout the Great Depression of the 1930s and the sacrifices of the war years. Men who’d stayed behind to work A lot has been written about the origins of the hot rod and the development of the culture that gave rise to them and then grew up around them. The origin point for hot rods and hot rod culture was the end of World War II. A number of factors came together at one time -- the period between the end of the war in 1945 and the begining of the 1950s -- and mainly in one

place -- southern California -- to create a unique environment in which the hot rod and its culture were born. These factors dictated the core aesthetic of the classic American hot rod. It was the later Model Ts and the plentiful early-30s Fords and Chevys that became the raw material for the young men who created hot rodding and hot rod culture. Here’s a picture of a ‘32 Ford Roadster, a contemporary car, but one built on the style of those first hot rods. The basic performance and engineering elements of the hotrod came together in these cars: More power, less weight and a look derived from these things leading to chopped

These young men had a “can-do” attitude.

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tops, channeled bodies, pinched frames, dropped axles and, eventually wide tires. At the end of the war, a legion of young men returned to America with a wad of demobilization cash in their pockets and a sense of freedom and excitement bred by their experiences in the war. With a period of peace and the steadily increasing prosperity of the country as a backdrop, these young men had a “can-do” attitude and a desire to express themselves in ways that their time in the military had stifled. And, all of a sudden, there were a lot of inexpensive used cars available. For five years Detroit had basically been in the business of supplying the military. Now all that production capacity was turned to creating a stream of new cars to satisfy the pent-up demand of a civilian population that had scrimped and saved throughout the Great Depression of the 1930s and the sacrifices of the war years. Men who’d stayed behind to work

EVENTS California Hot Rod Reunion Bakersfield, Ca September 19,20 2009

Pomona Street Rod Swap Meet Pomona, Ca November 8,9 2009

16th Annual N HR A California Hot Rod Reunion Hemet, Ca October 3,4 2009

SoCal Cruiser Night Long Beach, Ca November 7, 2009

Hot Rod Swap Meet Sacramento, Ca November 1, 2009

7th Annual All California Musclecar Show Fullerton, Ca December 5, 2009

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A lot has been written about the origins of the hot rod and the development of the culture that gave rise to them and then grew up around them. The origin point for hot rods and hot rod culture was the end of World War II. A number of factors came together at one time -- the period between the end of the war in 1945 and the begining of the 1950s -- and mainly in one place -- southern California -- to create a unique environment in which the hot rod and its culture were born. These factors dictated the core aesthetic of the classic American hot rod. It was the later Model Ts and the plentiful early-30s Fords and Chevys that became the raw material for the young men who created hot rodding and hot rod culture. Here’s a picture of a ‘32 Ford Roadster, 57

a contemporary car, but one built on the style of those first hot rods. The basic performance and engineering elements of the hotrod came together in these cars: More power, less weight and a look derived from these things leading to chopped tops, channeled bodies, pinched frames, dropped axles and, eventually wide tires. At the end of the war, a legion of young men returned to America with a wad of demobilization cash in their pockets and a sense of freedom and excitement bred by their experiences in the war. With a period of peace and the steadily increasing prosperity of the country as a backdrop, these young men had a “can-do” attitude and a desire to express themselves in ways that their time in the military had stifled. And, all of a sudden, there were a


lot of inexpensive used cars available. For five years Detroit had basically been in the business of supplying the military. Now all that production capacity was turned to creating a stream of new cars to satisfy the pent-up demand of a civilian population that had scrimped and saved throughout the Great Depression of the 1930s and the sacrifices of the war years. Men who’d stayed behind to work A lot has been written about the origins of the hot rod and the development of the culture that gave rise to them and then grew up around them. The origin point for hot rods and hot rod culture was the end of World War II. A number of factors came together at one time -- the period between the end of the war in 1945 and the begining of the 1950s -- and mainly in one place -- southern

California -- to create a unique environment in which the hot rod and its culture were born. These factors dictated the core aesthetic of the classic American hot rod. It was the later Model Ts and the plentiful early-30s Fords and Chevys that became the raw material for the young men who created hot rodding and hot rod culture. Here’s a picture of a ‘32 Ford Roadster, a contemporary car, but one built on the style of those first hot rods. The basic performance and engineering elements of the hotrod came together in these cars: More power, less weight and a look derived from these things leading to chopped tops, channeled bodies, pinched frames, dropped axles and, eventually wide tires.

“T h e ori gi n point for hot rods and hot rod culture was the end of World War II.”

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In t h e fa st lane WITH

PAUL

WALKER

in Diesel and Paul Walker lead a reunion of returning all-stars from every chapter of the explosive franchise built on speed in Fast Five. In this fifth installment, former cop Brian O’Conner (Paul Walker) partners with ex-con Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel) on the opposite side of the law.

Dwayne Johnson joins returning favorites Jordana Brewster, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, Tyrese Gibson, Sung Kang, Gal Gadot, Matt Schulze, Tego Calderon and Don Omar for this ultimate high-stakes race. Check out what Paul Walker had to say about the film below. ‘Fast Five’ is out in UK cinemas now, it’s set for release April 29th in the US.

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A:

Paul Walker: Basically we’re running for our lives, it’s the only way to make things work. The funny thing about the whole deal is that Brian’s been a cop for a while, he’s been this so called “good guy”, and now here he is running for his life, trying to keep out of jail and harms way. Even with this the guys happier than he’s ever been, he’s living more free and far more looser. He’s with the people he loves, he’s with the guy he see’s as a brother/maybe even father figure – because he never had that. He’s also with the girl of his dreams, he’s floating in the midst of all this crazy stuff going, he’s on cloud 9, he’s in a very happy place. With Brian and

Dom it’s not much unlike Vin and I, we get along and I think there’s this mutual respect and fascination with one another. The heist is pretty epic?

A:

Paul Walker: Yeah, you think about it being the fifth film, obviously there’s the pressure of doing something pretty ridiculous, something that people haven’t seen before. For the most part everything’s been seen, when you think of heist movies how many things have been boosted, jacked, robbed, hijacked, whatever you wanna call it. The sequence that I read, for the first time when I read the script, I thought it was pretty ambitious (Laughs). I’m a pretty visual guy, I can put stuff together,

I can read it and connect the dots and that, but nothing like what Justin Lin (director) put together. To actually see it edited together, blowing through banks, taking cars, it’s next level for sure. Justin wanted everything to be real, 200 or so cars were destroyed, what does that add to the film?

A:

Paul Walker: From my position that’s sick, that’s ridiculous. Justin is really really competitive, I think because of that competitive nature I think he wanted to shoot it practical, he wanted to do it real, not with CG. That is his personality, that is his make up. In pulling it off, it’s definitely a pop your collar moment, he can say “I’m the man”, (Laughs) there has to

BLOWING THROUGH BANKS, TAKING CARS, IT’S NEXT LEVEL FOR SURE... 61

Tell us a little about Brian, he’s on the same side as Dom now.


be some of that. He’s a humble guy, he doesn’t put that on, but from what I’ve seen and what I know of him I know that’s going on. I like to think that because of that people will appreciate it, we’ve seen CG this, CG that, I remember when the computer generated stuff first came around it was pretty wicked, we were all like WOW, but then I feel like for the longest time we saw so much of it that after a while people get slightly tired of it, you might as well be watching

an animated movie sometimes. Justin is just one of those guys, he just wanted to make it happen. How was Dwayne Johnson’s addition? He’s great in the film.

A:

Paul Walker: The thing with Dwayne is that I watch him and there’s times when I’m just going “man this guys larger than life, is he real, really!” (Laughs) You talk to him and you just think

this guy is too perfect, there’s something about this dude, I don’t know if it’s something that he has developed, or it’s something he had innately, it was an organic thing, he was just born with perfection (Laughs). Or maybe it’s just a culmination of him being born with some of it, then he’s worked on the other stuff. There’s no better match to fit for the Hobbs role than Dwayne. He OWNED that stuff, when he walked on set you were like “there’s Hobbs.”

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O C A T en

v a e H

by: Daniel Foster

I

t’s 7:10 on a breezy Echo Park evening, and Wilson Alvarez is tossing out the first pitch as the Dodgers host the Astros at Chavez Ravine. On the other side of the hill from the stadium, the daylight dances, its final golden beams for this summer day tapping atop sun-bleached adobes spiked with elegant palms that kiss the southern California sky. Cars once again free to park on the street after rush hour begin to dot the perimeter of Alvarado Street just north of Sunset Boulevard, but it’s a specific vehicle I seek. A taco truck outside the Vons grocery store parking lot is my destination, three of the tastiest carne asada

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tacos my prize. As I park my car in the grocery store lot, a Chevy Blazer pulls up behind Taquizas a Domicilio, the taco truck run by Isilda Rangel and her daughter Veronica Rodriguez. A jovial Hispanic man in a cowboy hat jumps out of the Blazer and runs up behind Veronica, who is taking advantage of the temporary lull by mopping up salsa spills just outside the window of the truck. The buckaroo embraces Veronica from behind for about eight seconds, then darts back to his Blazer and pulls away. When I order my tacos, I ask Veronica if the cowboy was her boyfriend. She blushes modestly, her eyes cast downward, and with a huge smile politely declines to answer. If the way to a man’s heart is indeed through his stomach, I can imagine Veronica and Isilda must have innumerable suitors. This taco truck is one of the most popular I’ve seen around Los Angeles, and although I credit the delicious tacos, velvety guacamole, fresh salsa, and tasty nuggets of carne asada first, it may be nocoincidence that these foxy taco truck mujeres arrive perfectly made up, looking fabulous every evening. Street eating is a common facet of life in Mexico, and has become a fixture in the Hispanic neighborhoods of Los Angeles. Mexican puestos, semi-permanent street

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stands, not only sell food, but also provide a sense of community and culture, a backdrop for celebrations, affairs, or drunken brawls. The taco trucks in Los Angeles have their own share of culture, provided by the figures that surround them, like the done-up ladies and their cowboys, or the scragglyhaired broke hipster rockers able to afford the low price of a buck per taco. Elderly Hispanic men with deep lines of character etched into their faces linger about, commenting in Spanish how the neighborhood has changed. When the taco trucks come out at night, they have the power to transform parking lots or sidewalks into bustling social scenes. Almost every Angeleno I ask has a favorite taco truck and a reason why it’s the best. Friends meet for tacos, or just to hang out and watch people. A softball team orders after a single mother and her three children, then some college students, and finally two vatos. The community, usually segregated by differing ways of life and separate interests, comes together for the common goal of eating tacos. While tacos have become about as popular as the sandwich in the U.S., their origin is authentically Mexican. The Aztec Empire was at its height around 1520, when Spanish


conquistador Hernan Cortes led a march on Mexico City and made Montezuma his bitch. Thus was born New Spain, along with a new kind of food that was a fusion between Spanish and Aztec palates. Much of the Aztec diet, native foods like maize (corn), tomatoes, pumpkins, green beans, and vanilla, was heretofore alien to Europeans. A corn tortilla smeared with bean paste was the most common Aztec staple, and they couldn’t have known intellectually at the time that the combination of corn and beans contains complementary amino acids. Together the corn and beans synthesize to produce a protein the body needs that can’t be produced by corn or beans alone, nor the combination of corn and any other food. Necessary amino acids are abundant in meat and dairy products, but until the Spaniards took over, the region was devoid of animals to

eat, with t he exception of fish and some wild game. As Spain colonized the region, the Spaniards introduced pork, beef, lamb, garlic, cheese, milk, wheat, vinegar, wine, and citrus fruits to the cuisine. The taco as we know it was born: cornmeal, meat, onions, tomatoes, and cilantro (the Mexican veggies), sometimes with lettuce, topped with lime or lemon. Cortes is credited with throwing the first ever taco bash, a banquet he hosted for his captains with fresh pigs brought over from Cuba. However, before he arrived, natives of the lake region of the Valley of Mexico had been eating taco-esque tortillas filled with fish. Where fish wasn’t an option, natives in Morelos and Guerrero creatively thought to stuff tortillas with ants and other small insects; in Puebla and Oaxaca, they opted for snails and locusts.

TheDummies ide:

Gu Tacos

Fortunately, bugs and snails are not presently available at taco trucks—at least, none to order from the menu. The health department visits often and judges strictly. The trucks’ menus usually consist simply of a list of taco fillings, and you will find these fairly universal …

* Carne Asada: steak, usually marinated in a limebased marinade, salted and then grilled well done. It seems to be the most popular order, and it’s definitely my favorite. * Al Pastor: barbecued pork in a spicy marinade. Pastor comes from pastoral, or country-style, cooking. Often the pork is placed on a vertical rotating spit with a pineapple and an onion on top. * Carnitas: fatty pork, simmered for a few hours to make it tender and then braised in the oven to make it crispy. * Pollo: chicken, sometimes grilled, but usually stewed.

* Cabeza: literally, “head,” this meat is the tender flesh of the cow’s cheek. * Sesos: beef brains. * Lengua: beef tongue. * Cueritas: pig skin. * Tripas: oft-mistakenly translated by gringos as tripe, which comes from the cow’s stomach lining. Tripas is the lower intestine of a cow, usually deepfried in chunks.

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F o o d t r av e l s

FiveGuys

DISCOVER: APRIL 2011

BURGERS

Prices are very moderate, burgers range from $3.39 for a “little” hamburger to $5.89 for the bacon cheeseburger. Fries will set you back an additional $2.69 or $3.59 depending on the size. Considering what you get at the typical chain fast food places, Five Guys is a hands-down winner. While you wait for your order’s number to be shouted out, you can enjoy the complimentary peanuts, available in the cardboard boxes located throughout the restaurant. My “little” cheeseburger had mayo, pickles, lettuce, ketchup and mustard, and it was very filling. My lunch companion, a Five Guys virgin, was a little surprised by the size of his double-patty cheeseburger, but dove right into the messy, multi-level meat and cheese monstrosity. One thing my lunch companion complained about was that his bun was a little doughy and he would have preferred it toasted. My only issue was that the fries, while very tasty, were a little limpy. Granted, the restaurant hasn’t been open very long, so these might just be kinks they are working through.

Having lived in Washington, DC, for several years, I was already familiar with Five Guys and their delicious burgers and yummy fries. But when a friend mentioned the opening of Five Guys in Beaverton, I thought I heard her wrong. A Five Guys in Beaverton? How could that be? When I moved back to Oregon several years ago, I thought I would never experience a delicious Five Guys lunch again. Sure enough, it was my beloved Five Guys! (They have been franchising the stores for a number of years now and there are more than 1000 stores across the U.S.) So we hopped in the car and headed to the brand new suburban strip mall location. The line was pretty long and the wait for our order was about 10 minutes, but once we had our scrumptious burgers and a regularsized order of Cajun fries we were in hamburger heaven. One thing to note about Five Guys is the portion size—everything is huge. A “standard” burger has TWO hefty patties, so if you aren’t looking for a gut-busting lunch, go with the “little” version. Same goes with the fries, the two of us split the regular size and ended up too full to eat them all. I’m guessing a large size could easily fill a family of four. There are four versions of the burger to start with: plain hamburger, cheeseburger, bacon burger and bacon cheeseburger. After you pick your “base” burger, you get to select your own toppings: mayo, relish, onions, lettuce, pickles, tomatoes, grilled onions, grilled mushrooms, ketchup, mustard, jalapenos, green peppers, A-1 Sauce, barbeque sauce and hot sauce are all available.

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The restaurant itself is bright, airy and clean. The walls are covered with Five Guys framed press clippings and the while restaurant is decorated in a festive red and white design. And, while the line to order was a little long, we had no trouble finding a table. Not to be overly critical, but this is Oregon after all, and some of the practices of the restaurant are not all that environmentally friendly. All Five Guys restaurants follow the same procedures.


Tech Wor ld

IPAD2 The iPad 2 has arrived, and with it, the tablet computer that has redefined the genre is getting a very interesting update. Thinner design, dual-cameras, updated OS, new accessories… with the same pricing structure. For some, it is the update they’ve been waiting for: the iPad platform won’t change for the next year (is it really so?). For others, the thinner design and the video chat capabilities make it a must-have device. Some firstgen iPad might even want to upgrade, eBay showed signs of iPad flooding last week. The question is: is iPad 2 as good as it seems? Is it really for you? And if you already own one, should you upgrade? We go over all these points – and much more- in this iPad 2 review. iPad 2 makes everything that was good

DISCOVER: APRIL 2011

in iPad, great. It starts with the thinness: iPad 2 is a lot thinner than the first iPad. Granted, there was some empty space in the original iPad shell, but still, iPad 2 is unbelievably thin when compared to its competition: the most recent Android and WebOS tablets. Apple has done a very good job at optimizing the internal space to create this uber-thin device. The addition of the cameras and the new speaker design are among the visible signs of change. Other than that, iPad 2 feels very much like the first iPad. That was probably the #1 request from users. The cameras (front and back) are there, but I’m disappointed by them because the image quality is poor. Even in a well-lit room, images shot with the back camera are noisy. The front cam-

era is even worse. There are two reasons for that: First, Apple’s goal is to use the cameras for FaceTime, its video-call application. Still photo quality seems to be unimportant (or too expensive) at the moment. That’s too bad because in such a relatively large body, there was probably a way to use much better optics. Thanks to its new A5 chip, the iPad 2 is faster. This is particularly noticeable when manipulating the web browser. I expect the iPad 2 to be faster for both single-threaded application and multi-threaded ones. It’s a dual-core processor, but each of the cores should be more efficient than the previous circuitry used in the original iPad. That’s perceptible performance.

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Mus ic: New Release

TINIE TEMPAH DISCOVER: APRIL 2011

Tinie released his debut single “Pass Out” with Parlophone on 28 February 2010, with it entering the UK Singles Chart at number 1. Selling just over 92,000 copies, making this his first number 1 which it remained for two consecutive weeks. Tinie would later perform “Pass Out” on 25 June 2010 at Glastonbury on the Pyramid stage with Snoop Dogg. Tinie then announced his second single, “Frisky”, which was released on 6 June 2010 entering the UK Singles Chart at number 2. Tinie supported Rihanna for four dates (London on 11 May, Nottingham on 14 May, and Glasgow on 19 and 20 May.) on her 10-date UK tour with Tinchy Stryder and Pixie Lott.[7] Tinie performed at many summer balls at various universities around the United Kingdom. Tinie performed at Radio 1 Big Weekend in Bangor on 22 May 2010 on the In New Music We Trust stage. He also toured with Mr Hudson in May 2010. Tinie Tempah played the Summertime Ball at Wembley Stadium on 6 June 2010, at Wakestock in Abersoch on 3 July 2010, both T4 On The Beach and the Wireless Festival in London’s Hyde Park on 4 July, and both days of the V Festival on 21 and 22 August 2010. Tinie released his third single “Written in the Stars” on 19 September 2010. This again charted at number 1 in the UK Singles Chart selling over 115,000 copies in its first week, making it his biggest-selling single to date. The song also went on to chart in a number of other countries. Tinie went on to team up with Swedish House Mafia for his fourth single “Miami 2 Ibiza” which was released on 1 October 2010. This went on to reach a peak of number 4 in the UK Singles Chart and his first number 1 in the Netherlands Mega Single Top 100 chart. He released his long-awaited debut album, Disc-Overy on 4 October 2010 which featured all his previous charted singles. On 11 October 2010 he kicked off his first UK tour which was supported by Chiddy Bang. He went on to win his first 2

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MOBO Awards in October. Tinie went on to feature on the Tinchy Stryder single “Game Over” which was released on 15 November 2010. This reached number 22 on the UK Singles Chart. On 25 December, Tinie released his fifth single “Invincible” featuring Kelly Rowland, which peaked at number 11 on the UK Singles Chart. “Wonderman”, featuring Ellie Goulding, was released was the fifth officially single. Tinie joined Usher on the European leg of his OMG Tour in January 2011. Tinie was also nominated for 4 Brit Awards making him the most nominated artist for at the awards. Tinie’s single “Written in the Stars” was used for a WrestleMania XXVII countdown promo during the WWE PPV Royal Rumble on 30 January 2011. It was later confirmed by WWE that it will be the official theme for Wrestlemania XXVII. On 15 February 2011, he won his first ever Brit Award, for Best British Breakthrough Act. He also won a Brit for Best British Single.[8] On 7 March 2011, Tempah expressed his desire for his next album to go triple platinum. “I reckon in 2011, towards the end of it, I’m going to do an arena tour - and sell it out - then I reckon I’m going to release another album.


Coast Magazine: Left Coast Lifestyle